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Pilgrim mass script

biloute

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (summer 2014), Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (possible summer 2019)
#1
Is there a particular script for a pilgrim mass? I’m thinking of including one or two in my Nanowrimo book this year, but I’m not sure if the priests have a standard script that they all use or if it’s just whatever they want to say.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Aragones/Frances/Finisterre (2018), Operation Sabre (2018), Marin Ramble (2017)
#2
The Catholic mass follows a standard format, though it changes a bit season to season and parish to parish. However, that format includes bible readings which change daily as well as the homily which varies priest to priest. You could include the basic mass format but not sure it would be if much use unless you included an English/Spanish translation, too.
 

Morgan Holmes

Every day is a path to walk.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Santiago from SJPDP (2014); Fromistá to Santiago (2018).
#3
What you need is a missal. I no longer have mine but they used to be in every household so that all Catholics could know the daily readings for the church.
Kim uncertain what purpose it can serve you to include this in your creative non-fiction if you did not have an awareness of the basic liturgical traditions of the church at the time you arrived in SdC. why not write that you had no idea that each day brings a specific and known reading to every practicing Catholic and that the psalms are specific to each day but common across every parish? It seems more honest than writing backward significance onto a tradition that was outside your frame of reference.
 

biloute

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (summer 2014), Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (possible summer 2019)
#4
What you need is a missal. I no longer have mine but they used to be in every household so that all Catholics could know the daily readings for the church.
Kim uncertain what purpose it can serve you to include this in your creative non-fiction if you did not have an awareness of the basic liturgical traditions of the church at the time you arrived in SdC. why not write that you had no idea that each day brings a specific and known reading to every practicing Catholic and that the psalms are specific to each day but common across every parish? It seems more honest than writing backward significance onto a tradition that was outside your frame of reference.
Who said I’m writing nonfiction? I’m not Catholic, but that has no bearing on what I might write, or even who might walk the Camino. It’s called research.
 

Morgan Holmes

Every day is a path to walk.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Santiago from SJPDP (2014); Fromistá to Santiago (2018).
#5
Who said I’m writing nonfiction? I’m not Catholic, but that has no bearing on what I might write, or even who might walk the Camino. It’s called research.
Fine. It’s creative something, but to write about a Catholic mass without this fundamental understanding is going to go over like a lead balloon.
 

JRO

Member
Camino(s) past & future
santiago to muxia
#6
Is there a particular script for a pilgrim mass? I’m thinking of including one or two in my Nanowrimo book this year, but I’m not sure if the priests have a standard script that they all use or if it’s just whatever they want to say.
THe basic answer is that yes, there is a standard Roman Catholic Mass format, including music, prayers, readings, a Eucharist rite, etc. Each day of the year has specific readings from the Old Testament, Psalms and New Testament (Gospel Reading). There is a three year cycle,so that if one went to Mass every single day, one would hear the entire Bible in 3 years (years A, B, and C). Of course, there is also what we call the "homily" analogous to "sermon" in other faiths, which is what the presiding priest wishes to preach on that day. You can easily google something like "catholic daily liturgical readings 2018" if you want to see a specific day's reading. The basic format for a Mass is the same the world over, and you can also find the various "parts" of the Mass and explanations about each online as well. It's a pretty big topic ....and I've been a liturgical musician for 30 years, and still have to look lots of stuff up!
 

rick1977

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
At some point, perhaps 2018.
#7
Yeah, there's a particular "script," called the Roman Missal. There are various editions and translations, which often vary by country. I tried looking for one on an official Catholic Spanish website, but struck out. However, did come across this website, which should be helpful to you: misas.org. They do have a bilingual translation, but the English version is not the latest we use here in the USA. See:

https://www.misas.org/sta.tic/descarga/missa_es_en.pdf

This one is pretty basic, and there are different options that aren't listed here which could be used instead. (eg. Eucharistic Prayer I instead of II). The readings from the bible for Sundays are on a cycle and could be figured out for any date. No clue about readings for weekday Masses, but I assume they are on a set schedule as well. Hope this helps!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis September/October 2015
#8
There are two apps that I have downloaded which give the mass schedule and daily readings to my phone. They are both free and also have many useful tools including the CCC and prayers.

Ibreviary
laudate

You can follow the mass with your phone or tablet in your own language. Ibreaviary is good because you can download the readings for a week if you will not have internet. I use Laudate for my Bible Study.

The full versions of both contain a wealth of uses including the liturgy of the hours which the religious do on a daily basis. I helped my retired priest to learn how to use tablet and also what an app was and he uses them regularly.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
#9
You could download Universalis that will give you all the daily readings, gospel and prayers. There is a cost but it will last you forever, I have found it very useful on the Camino.
 

biloute

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (summer 2014), Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (possible summer 2019)
#10
Okay, what I’m understanding is that every single mass follows the same script that doesn’t really deviate, and what is said only depends on the date? I had thought that mass for a gathering of pilgrims might be a little different in wording at some point, where the priest might say something about the journey. Otherwise why specify that a mass is a pilgrim mass, as I heard along the Camino?
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#11
Is there a particular script for a pilgrim mass? I’m thinking of including one or two in my Nanowrimo book this year, but I’m not sure if the priests have a standard script that they all use or if it’s just whatever they want to say.
What you probably want is contained somewhere in here:

https://catholicapps.com/laudate/

I have it on my iPhone. It provides EVERYTHING a Catholic could need, by way of information.

AND, by way of something in Spanish, especially how to locate Catholic churches and Mass times across Spain, I found this app to be invaluable:

https://www.misas.org/

Under \documents\... You can find the Order of the Mass in Spanish. I am attaching the Order of the Mass in Spanish / English. On the website you can find it in just about any bilingual combination you can imagine.

Hope this helps...
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
2035 km of the way to Saint James in Galicia done.
#12
I had thought that mass for a gathering of pilgrims might be a little different in wording at some point, where the priest might say something about the journey. Otherwise why specify that a mass is a pilgrim mass, as I heard along the Camino?
I think that part is called sermon or homily. See the recent thread on Sermon at the pilgrim mass in Santiago. Seems a lot of people don't understand a word as it's in Spanish but sort of know what it's about :). As you have poetic licence you can include something along the lines of we are all pilgrims on earth or your camino begins at home (after your return).

PS: I'm a bit puzzled, I thought your Nanowrimo story is about a druid in ancient times?

PPS: The custom of shaking hands and wishing peace to those around you at the end of service - mentioned in the linked thread - is something that you can encounter in many Christian churches these days, not only in Catholic ones.
 
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biloute

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (summer 2014), Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (possible summer 2019)
#13
I think that part is called sermon or homily. See the recent thread on Sermon at the pilgrim mass in Santiago. Seems a lot of people don't understand a word as it's in Spanish but sort of know what it's about :). As you have poetic licence you can include something along the lines of we are all pilgrims on earth or your camino begins at home (after your return).

PS: I'm a bit puzzled, I thought your Nanowrimo story is about a druid in ancient times?

PPS: The custom of shaking hands and wishing peace to those around you at the end of service - mentioned in the linked thread - is something that you can encounter in many Christian churches these days, not only in Catholic ones.
Not about a druid in ancient times, just one of the main characters (not the protagonist). There are druids now, and I’ve been doing research on that. There was a druid revival in the 18th century, and the neo-pagan community in general is growing with everything from Wicca to druidry to people praying to Odin. I thought it would be interesting to have a character of a totally different background who is also on a spiritual journey, but to Finisterre. And I think what I’m looking for would be a pilgrim-specific homily, though I’d only use a line or two. Trying to work in an entire mass would be a bit boring/tedious in a novel, especially since the focus is the character’s inner journey.
 

oursonpolaire

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
#14
1977
Okay, what I’m understanding is that every single mass follows the same script that doesn’t really deviate, and what is said only depends on the date? I had thought that mass for a gathering of pilgrims might be a little different in wording at some point, where the priest might say something about the journey. Otherwise why specify that a mass is a pilgrim mass, as I heard along the Camino?
What others, especially JRO and Rick1977 and 2tandreo have said. With one particular exception in Leon and another in Pamplona, masses in Spain will follow what is called the Novus Ordo, the standard mass for Latin Catholics (there are a number of different liturgies from eastern Catholic churches, but that's not relevant to this discussion). The Spanish church, like all national churches, will have some variations on saints' commemorations. The propers -- that is, the readings and one or two prayers-- will vary but are normally the ones used for Latin Catholic churches around the world (and here Latin does not mean language, but rather those churches using the Roman rite, as opposed to eastern liturgies)-- what most people think of as Catholic.

People usually refer to pilgrims' masses as they are principally held for the benefit of pilgrims along the Camino, but sometimes the term is used quite loosely. At the Cathedral in Santiago, certain masses (the 12 noon and the 7.30) are held for them in particular. Priests will sometimes make references in the sermon or homily, and sometimes they will hold a blessing for pilgrims at the end--- these can be quite moving. But sometimes they will just ignore the pilgrims and there will be no difference between a pilgrims' mass and a non-pilgrims' mass, aside from the presence of pilgrims.

The two exceptions I mentioned in my first paragraph are at the Basilica of San Isidro in Leon, where the ancient Mozarabic mass is celebrated a few times a week, and in Pamplona (at the cathedral??? I'm not sure) where the Usus Antiquor (the old pre-Vatican II mass) is used.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, Primitivo, Plata, Salvador Torres
#16
If I remember correctly there are always several priests of various countries “officiating”(?) together in the pilgrims’ mass in Santiago and they individually address pilgrims of their country in their language which is quite moving as oursonpolaire said. Don’t they also give a pilgrims’ blessing at the end of mass in Santiago? I cannot remember. You certainly get that frequently along the various caminos.
 

biloute

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (summer 2014), Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (possible summer 2019)
#17
At the Burgos Cathedral, I picked up a little booklet called Mass for Pilgrim. It was in 8 different languages I believe. If that is something you would like, I can make a PDF of it for you.
That would be great! Thanks!
 

biloute

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (summer 2014), Chemin du Puy & Camino Francés (possible summer 2019)
#18
If I remember correctly there are always several priests of various countries “officiating”(?) together in the pilgrims’ mass in Santiago and they individually address pilgrims of their country in their language which is quite moving as oursonpolaire said. Don’t they also give a pilgrims’ blessing at the end of mass in Santiago? I cannot remember. You certainly get that frequently along the various caminos.
I think the blessing would be closest to what I was thinking of. I didn’t go to the early morning mass in Le Puy, but I remember others who did saying that the priest asked where they were all from and gave them a blessing or prayer or something. I stumbled across a blessing this morning while googling, and I may use part of that. It seemed to be kind of like a poem.

I did go to a pilgrims’ mass at the cathedral in Santiago. It was all in Spanish and/or Latin, so I didn’t get everything. The only thing I remember specifically was the head priest welcoming pilgrims and listing all the different starting points. I probably only remember that because I thought he might be having a bad day. He said something about “and those who started in Sarria, for whom the paper means so much.” Seemed a bit bitter for a priest to say at mass, even if it’s partially true. I’m sure those people exist, but they’re not the majority.
 

oursonpolaire

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
#19
*snip* I probably only remember that because I thought he might be having a bad day. He said something about “and those who started in Sarria, for whom the paper means so much.” Seemed a bit bitter for a priest to say at mass, even if it’s partially true. I’m sure those people exist, but they’re not the majority.
They exist in astonishing numbers-- almost a quarter of all pilgrims this year began at Sarria, as it is the best point to accumulate the 100km necessary for a compostela. Most of these are young Spaniards and I have had occasion to speak with many of them (as you can see, I'm a repeat offender on the Camino); many of them were astonished at the numbers of the foreign pilgrims and even more so at the long-distance types (easily distinguished by their tired clothes and their pilgrim tans, leaving a shocking white patch at the ankles). Some of them were really intrigued and, I think, were resolving to do one of the longer Caminos.

It took me a few Caminos not to look down on them-- while their 100km may seem like a social event to many of us, it is still a Camino. Perhaps the priest was having a bay day, or perhaps he was trying to put them into a wider context; or both!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis September/October 2015
#20
To clarify the order of the mass and what is being said, in 2011 there was a universal amendment to make sure that the same wording was being used around the world the Conference of Bishops approved Rubrics which is the wording which is to be used during the mass so that there is conformity with what is being preached and professed. The difference comes with the homily which is given after the Gospel reading. The homily is an interpretation of what was read from the two(or sometimes one) readings and the Gosple reading. This can vary by priests. The Mysteries of Faith differ my Liturgical seasons and in Ordinary Time we add Blessed Be God Forever to the mass.

Ibreviary & Laudate apps are the ones used by many priests to use when they are doing their daily Office of the Hours(prayers that are said four times a day) so this is the best way to follow the daily mass, both of which are free. Ibreviary can be downloaded for a week if you may not have access to internet.

There are minor times such as prayer intentions that will vary, but the liturgical portion is always the same universally. The Vatican must approve any change to the mass.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Hice el camino francés hace 20 años (1999). Ahora quiero cruzar el del norte. (2019)
#22
Is there a particular script for a pilgrim mass? I’m thinking of including one or two in my Nanowrimo book this year, but I’m not sure if the priests have a standard script that they all use or if it’s just whatever they want to say.
You need an Ordinario de la Misa available in most churches of larger cities.
 

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