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Pilgrim Menus - what are your favourite items?

geraldkelly

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés, Vía de la Plata / Camino Sanabrés, Camino del Baztán, Camino Aragonés, Chemin du Puy
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
 
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amancio

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Good question... As a Spaniard, I avoid pilgrim menus as such, because they mostly offer food to international taste and I find it repetitive and bland after a while. It is worth it to venture into Spanish food, do not be shy, go to places with Menú del día instead of Menú del peregrino where Spaniards eat chickpeas, bean stews, lentils, different types of fish, artichokes, asparagus, roast peppers, potato casseroles, paprika based dishes, all different types of jamon, chorizo, lacón, an amazing variety of local specialities in every region, different wines in each region, go on, be brave and take a step into the unknown!

It is a pity most pilgrims stick to the pilgrim menu and do not dive into real Spanish cuisine, just stick to salada, pork loin, fried eggs, overcooked pasta (yes, we ARE terrible for that in Spain) and industrial custards/cream caramel/cheese cakes.

And wines are worth a try too: Navarra, Rioja, Ribera del Duero, Mencía (in Bierzo and Galicia) reds, and whites from Navarra, Rueda, Godello in Bierzo and Albariño or Ribeiro in Galicia.

Not to mention cheeses...
 

Wmonk2071

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (Sarria to SdC)
Camino Portugues
The one i recall the most which i was fond of was the heavy breakfast of eggs, bacon and some fries with coffee and orange juice to start the long day....that lasted me until lunchtime.
 
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OZAJ

Member
Past OR future Camino
Mozarabe/VdlP/Sanabres (2008) Norte (2009) Vezelay/Frances/Salvador/Primitivo (2010) etc.
Good question... As a Spaniard, I avoid pilgrim menus as such, because they mostly offer food to international taste and I find it repetitive and bland after a while. It is worth it to venture into Spanish food, do not be shy, go to places with Menú del día instead of Menú del peregrino where Spaniards eat chickpeas, bean stews, lentils, different types of fish, artichokes, asparagus, roast peppers, potato casseroles, paprika based dishes, all different types of jamon, chorizo, lacón, an amazing variety of local specialities in every region, different wines in each region, go on, be brave and take a step into the unknown!

It is a pity most pilgrims stick to the pilgrim menu and do not dive into real Spanish cuisine, just stick to salada, pork loin, fried eggs, overcooked pasta (yes, we ARE terrible for that in Spain) and industrial custards/cream caramel/cheese cakes.

And wines are worth a try too: Navarra, Rioja, Ribera del Duero, Mencía (in Bierzo and Galicia) reds, and whites from Navarra, Rueda, Godello in Bierzo and Albariño or Ribeiro in Galicia.

Not to mention cheeses...
Agreed.

I ask if there is a menu del dia. It is more expensive, but MUCH better.

Whisky on your ice cream? Yes please!
 
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OZAJ

Member
Past OR future Camino
Mozarabe/VdlP/Sanabres (2008) Norte (2009) Vezelay/Frances/Salvador/Primitivo (2010) etc.
But to answer the question,

First course: melon con jamon or caldo;
Main: conejo or cordero
Dessert: cuajarda (spelling?) or ice cream

I usually drink tinto.
 

SioCamino

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2015, CPo 2016, VDLP[Sev-Các] 2017, VDLP[Các-Sal] 2018
I'd agree with @amancio on the menú del día v del peregrino. I usually try to get a salad for primero (to get an injection of vegetables) but get led astray by the delicious sopas (ajo, garbanzos, judias, garlic, chickpeas, green beans). For segundo, if there's anything like carrilleras or costillas (pork cheeks or ribs) I'd order that... But tbh it depends on the area, on the VDLP i had some amazing pork and even some venison. I usually ask what's good.
For dessert i get whatever is homemade and if not then i get fruit. The yogurt for the next day is a really good idea though.
 
Past OR future Camino
06,CF;13,CP;17,SSal;19,Ingles
Good question... As a Spaniard, I avoid pilgrim menus as such, because they mostly offer food to international taste and I find it repetitive and bland after a while. It is worth it to venture into Spanish food, do not be shy, go to places with Menú del día instead of Menú del peregrino where Spaniards eat chickpeas, bean stews, lentils, different types of fish, artichokes, asparagus, roast peppers, potato casseroles, paprika based dishes, all different types of jamon, chorizo, lacón, an amazing variety of local specialities in every region, different wines in each region, go on, be brave and take a step into the unknown!

It is a pity most pilgrims stick to the pilgrim menu and do not dive into real Spanish cuisine, just stick to salada, pork loin, fried eggs, overcooked pasta (yes, we ARE terrible for that in Spain) and industrial custards/cream caramel/cheese cakes.

And wines are worth a try too: Navarra, Rioja, Ribera del Duero, Mencía (in Bierzo and Galicia) reds, and whites from Navarra, Rueda, Godello in Bierzo and Albariño or Ribeiro in Galicia.

Not to mention cheeses...
Such a refreshing reply! Often, I react against comments about the lack of vegetables in the menus. I am fortunate in having a native from Pamplona as my guide in many things, so it has never been my experience to be lacking in vegetables. Amancio, your post is superb.
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
But to answer the question,

First course: melon con jamon or caldo;
Main: conejo or cordero
Dessert: cuajarda (spelling?) or ice cream

I usually drink tinto.
good approach, indeed! Cuajada can be stunning, the one I tried in Samos was the best ever, beautiful dessert
 
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amancio

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Generally the Menu de Dia in places where workers eat privided my daily hot meal.
See more on this topic in this earlier thread
that is it, pretty much; the Menú del Peregrino has a strong influence of what is mostly ordered by international pilgrims, and most of them go for a safe choice: pasta, salad, potato chips, chicken burgers and the like. That is what the average pilgrim demands, so that is what is normally included in the Pilgrim menu.
 
Past OR future Camino
06,CF;13,CP;17,SSal;19,Ingles
Best cuajada? Venta de Ultzama, near Larraintzar, not too far off the Baztan route approaching Pamplona...
As with many stories, this place tells of a long struggle for making a living that has resulted in a wonderful restaurant, favoured by people from Pamplona, who think it worthwhile to travel the distance by car. Highly recommended.
 

Stroller

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Norte (2015), Frances (2016)
Fabada at Cuatro Cantones after a long hot day. It was so good I had two helpings and missed the rest. There was a bottle of wine of course.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Two weeks ago we finished our CF. We did not order off the Peregrino menu at all. We normally had at least 8oz of OJ, 16 + ozs of water and half a power bar around 5am. Started walking by 6am. Other-half of power bar by 7am. Second breakfast stop around 8-9am. Either egg based meal or Croissant with cafe or Tea. Downed another 16 ozs of water by then. Refill water supply. 10am and 11am half a cut (quartered) Tomato followed by (an hour later)half a quartered orange or half a banana. If we are still walking by noon time then it is usually half a small chocolate bar with nuts.
For us, the main meal is eaten after we arrive at our destination.Often we will order from the Menu del Dia…or we order one menu del Dia and one a a la carte salad….or two a la carte meals. One of us picks those huge large salads with walnuts, pears, arugala , olives, red peppers, apples. etc.. or how about those lushes green tomatoes with Burrata cheese…we share it and then the menu del dia or a a particular dish.

For supper we shop for it to eat in out room and supplies for the next day. Usually, we eat fresh bread, cheese, tomatoes, Jamon, or fresh veggies mixed with rice. Then dessert.
 

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nidarosa

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
I walked from Burgos this September and I'm not sure why my normal routine changed - could have been shorter stages so arriving earlier, or more stops along the way being closed? - but suddenly I managed to get to my destination while the kitchens were open for Spanish lunch. That meant having a delicious menu del dia instead of the menu del peregrino, which was wonderful! Not just the food either but being able to eat straight away and not wait for hours as well. I often ask staff to recommend something and have not been disappointed. I am also getting better at asking for what I would like - ie just the lomo a la plancha y tomate, sin pan, from the bocadillo menu - or sometimes half a menu for lunch, if I don't want bread, dessert or lots of wine.
So to answer the original question:
If there is ensalada and grilled chicken on the menu, which there almost always is, I ask if I can have them at the same time. Ensalada y pollo, sin patatas - lovely, just what a tired pilgrim needs. Or sometimes I fancy the fried eggs with chorizo or something, as long as there is decent protein on the plate. If there is a choice of pork ribs or cheeks, I jump at the chance, and if there are meatballs, ditto. I'm not really a soup person, but if there are lentejas for starters, I ditch the ensalada and just ask to have some salad or a tomato with the chicken. I avoid the pasta and rice overload, and the breaded fish, though fresh trucha is a welcome sight. A lemon yogurt beats any cake, my walking legs must be craving calcium or something. Pilgrim menus are cheap and cheerful and can be great, but I agree wholeheartedly - go and try the menu del dia and some regional dishes along the way too!
 
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Marbe2

Active member
Past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Pilgrim menus remind me a bit of NYC marathon menu concept… 40 years ago (minus the wine). Fill up on Carbs…energy boost for the 26 miles the next day. However…it doesn’t work for me walking shorter distances for so many days!
 
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Next up 2022?
It is a pity most pilgrims stick to the pilgrim menu and do not dive into real Spanish cuisine, just stick to salada, pork loin, fried eggs, overcooked pasta (yes, we ARE terrible for that in Spain) and industrial custards/cream caramel/cheese cakes.
Agree completely.
The menu peregrino is cheap, monotonous, and bland. Yes - like school cafeteria fare. Dreadful.
On the other hand, stopping between 2 and 4, in order to be able to enjoy a menu del dia as a midday meal is a habit really worth cultivating.
 

Harland2019

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances April/May "2019"
What a surprise reading the above, perhaps because I am English (!), I loved all the food eating Menú del Peregrino most if not all nights. The wine perhaps helped as I don't normally drink. My mid-morning treat was Tortilla de Patatas - my wife loves me as I always love whatever she makes and clear the plate (sometimes with my tongue - sorry)!
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Breaded pork, fish or chicken something, soggy fries and cup of ice cream is all I can remember about a pilgrim menu, it is the menu del dia for me every time and I have developed a long list, in my mind, of my favorite places to go shortly after I secure a bed, take a shower and head out for my big meal of the day around 2 or 3pm.
 
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Aguapura

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Sarria to Santiago 2010
Roncesvalles to Logrono 2015
Hospitalera 2016
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
This post makes me nostalgic for Spain, the food has always been a highlight of my trips there! Menu del Dia is definitely the best, and I often choose two first courses instead of a first and second as the first course is often more interesting than the second. I always choose salt cod, padron peppers, torta santiago, ensalada mixta when available because they do such a great job on these items, also whatever foods wines and are typical of the area. Hold the french fries and pork chops, please....I can get those anywhere.
 

MCathleen

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2017
Fabada - a rich bean stew - without a doubt. And a tinto verano on a hot day....
YES!!! I discovered fabada by trial and error at the end of a couple difficult days. The only cafe in the tiny town of Serdio (Camino del Norte) did not offer pilgrim's menu...just "del dia." No one spoke English and I had NO IDEA what the primero dish called fabada was. I asked in my broken Spanish and the proprietor just kissed his fingertips. How could I resist? It was so memorable, I wrote a whole blog post about it: https://cathleensodyssey.com/fabada/
1635689174062.png
 
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El Gordo

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
Hey Gerald,

I would agree that the soups were wonderful. Specifically, the lentil soups were very good and hearty & the Galician Soups were good hot and simple.

Legrono tapas lane must be mentioned. The best tapas restaurant was definitely Angel’s that served mushrooms. They were delightful and it was the busiest bar on the strip.
 

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Kalimera

New Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Oct/Nov 2021
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
I am in Lavacolla having lunch. Took a break from Galician Broth and having this instead😂. It has been a rainy, windy, muddy walk. So I opted for a fish & seafood soup, clams and noodles and this dessert I can’t wait to eat😂
 

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Past OR future Camino
2019: León to Santiago; 2021: St. Jean to León.
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
I am a huge fan of the Galician soups made with turnip greens. This is the perfect thing to eat during a break on a cold rainy day.
Susan
 

frbobs

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances-(2014)
Camino Portugues-(2017)
Camino Madrid (August 2019)
As was mentioned: the menu de Peregrino is rustic food, geared toward walking and international recipients; which can be somewhat repetitious. That being said: I first encountered croquettes and Caldo Gallego on Pilgrim menus, and will love them both for ever. SURPRISINGLY, had a pretty decent Paella once on one of them too. As one member pointed out, my joy really came from delving in deeper to actual Spanish products and cuisine. Thanks for the trip down culinary-memory lane
 

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Robi Diaz De Vivar

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2016), Norte (2017), Portuges (2018), Mozarabe (2019), Primitivo (2019), Via de La Plata (2
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
This is a serious imponderable. My experience is that my body is different every day. Sometimes at lunch I need to eat a lot at other times the thought of eating a big meal is nauseating. My ideal menu peregrino es en Santiago. Jamon and melon to start, chuleton de ternera next and then flan with coffee and a chupito - and red wine featured largely. This bounty came in at 9 euros. Difficult to beat. For sheer bulk Bar Castro on the Portugues in Caldos do Rei cannot be beaten - the quantity and quality of the food defies description - and all for 9 euros.
 
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SabineP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
H

Legrono tapas lane must be mentioned. The best tapas restaurant was definitely Angel’s that served mushrooms. They were delightful and it was the busiest bar on the strip.

You are of course referring to the famous Calle Laurel and adjacent streets in Logroño.
If bar Angel is too crowded then Bar Soriano for champis is a good alternative.

 
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andylm65

Member
Past OR future Camino
2018
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
Sopa de ajo 🧄
 

andylm65

Member
Past OR future Camino
2018
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
Sopa de ajo 🧄
 
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domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
My favourite food on the Camino? A bowl of Caldo gallego in O Cebreiro when it’s very cold and rainy (like it was last June! 😳).
If have to have a pilgrim menu, I only eat the starter… Not my idea of Spanish food 😉
 

Sharonih

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF (SJPdP to Santiago) March 15, 2018
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
I love white asparagus and salads a tuin as well as the flan. I miss got very sick of the fries though.
 

brian560

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF, VdlP 2016, Port. Central, Norte , Port. Coastal (2018).San Salvador and Primitivo (2019)
Agree completely.
The menu peregrino is cheap, monotonous, and bland. Yes - like school cafeteria fare. Dreadful.
On the other hand, stopping between 2 and 4, in order to be able to enjoy a menu del dia as a midday meal is a habit really worth cultivating.
Good question... As a Spaniard, I avoid pilgrim menus as such, because they mostly offer food to international taste and I find it repetitive and bland after a while. It is worth it to venture into Spanish food, do not be shy, go to places with Menú del día instead of Menú del peregrino where Spaniards eat chickpeas, bean stews, lentils, different types of fish, artichokes, asparagus, roast peppers, potato casseroles, paprika based dishes, all different types of jamon, chorizo, lacón, an amazing variety of local specialities in every region, different wines in each region, go on, be brave and take a step into the unknown!

It is a pity most pilgrims stick to the pilgrim menu and do not dive into real Spanish cuisine, just stick to salada, pork loin, fried eggs, overcooked pasta (yes, we ARE terrible for that in Spain) and industrial custards/cream caramel/cheese cakes.

And wines are worth a try too: Navarra, Rioja, Ribera del Duero, Mencía (in Bierzo and Galicia) reds, and whites from Navarra, Rueda, Godello in Bierzo and Albariño or Ribeiro in Galicia.

Not to mention cheeses...
and if you can't get a good wine...most useful phrase in Spain is ?hay gaseosa?
 

Grousedoctor

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Although I’ve enjoyed many good menus del dia, I have to admit, the pilgrim meals at albergues are extra special because of the people. I travel around the world looking for good food, but more importantly, I find having people around me to share the meal with far more important than the actual food itself. The real nourishment comes from those that I break bread with. The people are why I walk!
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Although I’ve enjoyed many good menus del dia, I have to admit, the pilgrim meals at albergues are extra special because of the people. I travel around the world looking for good food, but more importantly, I find having people around me to share the meal with far more important than the actual food itself. The real nourishment comes from those that I break bread with. The people are why I walk!
Indeed shared meals in an albergue are a different story where variety and taste are not so relevant, beautiful moments'
 
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Sirage

Member
Past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago (2005), Porto to Santiago (2007), Vezelay for 200 kms (2009), From Seville, May (2015), Le Puy to Sangüesa (2016), Norte-Primitivo (Sep-Oct 2016)
On my first Camino whilst walking in the fois gras region on the Le Puy route, duck meat is a cheap byproduct so we had it quite often in the gite d'etapes. People elsewhere have it as a luxury meat.

One evening meal as the trays of food appeared on the serving table, a women spoke loudly across all 20 or so pilgrims:

" No more f****** duck". It had ceased to be her favourite meal.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald

Like many others I try to avoid them, as they tend to lack flavour and become very much the same after a while.

So if I see a Pilgrim menu with something different, I'll often go for that, just for a change.

But generally, I like the soups.
Maybe a salad if there is one!

Main courses can be a bit hit and miss.
Maybe a beef thing like a stew if they have it, as the chicken and pork can often be cooked till it's bone dry.

Desserts, usually the creamed rice.

But sometimes, maybe 2 or 3 on a Camino, I've come across a real Gem of a Pilgrim menu.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
YES!!! I discovered fabada by trial and error at the end of a couple difficult days. The only cafe in the tiny town of Serdio (Camino del Norte) did not offer pilgrim's menu...just "del dia." No one spoke English and I had NO IDEA what the primero dish called fabada was. I asked in my broken Spanish and the proprietor just kissed his fingertips. How could I resist? It was so memorable, I wrote a whole blog post about it: https://cathleensodyssey.com/fabada/
View attachment 112314

Looks great! :)
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Past OR future Camino
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
I love white asparagus and salads a tuin as well as the flan. I miss got very sick of the fries though.
I really like the white asparagus too, Sharon. This, with the Spanish mayo, makes a delicious light starter.

For the main I go for the fish if it’s on offer and for dessert it’s always flan - too much flan is never enough!

Cheers from Oz -
Jenny
 
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Past OR future Camino
Next up 2022?
One of us picks those huge large salads with walnuts, pears, arugala , olives, red peppers, apples. etc.. or how about those lushes green tomatoes with Burrata cheese…we share it and then the menu del dia or a a particular dish
Wow. Wonderful. ( ;) Where's the iceberg lettuce?)
I love white asparagus
really like the white asparagus too, Sharon.
I definitely do not, and would love to hear where along the camino anyone's managed to order fresh green asparagus (when it's in season, obviously).
 

SabineP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
Wow. Wonderful. ( ;) Where's the iceberg lettuce?)


I definitely do not, and would love to hear where along the camino anyone's managed to order fresh green asparagus (when it's in season, obviously).

I was able to order fresh green and white ones.
One time green asparagus were served as a media racion and one time I had them grilled together with mushrooms, red pepper and other veggies.

White fresh ones I has on the Camino del Ebro , in THE town famous for the white ones : Tudela.
Maybe I was just lucky?
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
Omg, where? I'm walking that camino
We will get you on the VDLP yet!

Four km before Zafra, after several tedious hours in the rain, I walked into a bar for some fuel for the last stretch, boots sloshing with each step. Two pilgrim friends were there looking as self-satisfied as possible, clothes spread out to dry by a heater, eating asparagus omelettes and drinking the local tinto. “We are thinking of taking a taxi into the city. Would you like to share?” They did not have to ask twice.

Moments later, someone walked in and plunked a new load of fresh asparagus on the counter, so I had an omelette too. It might have been my best pilgrim meal ever.

 
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We will get you on the VDLP yet!
😂 Haha, good luck duckie.
There are way too many other caminos higher up on my list and I'm not getting any younger. So probably not even for asparagus. 🙃
But wow, that is an impressive bunch. I probably need to cook them myself to get an adequate fix - it's easy to imagine steaming a good part of that bunch and eating nothing else.
 

EL LECHERO

Friends no Strangers
Past OR future Camino
2008
I walked from Burgos this September and I'm not sure why my normal routine changed - could have been shorter stages so arriving earlier, or more stops along the way being closed? - but suddenly I managed to get to my destination while the kitchens were open for Spanish lunch. That meant having a delicious menu del dia instead of the menu del peregrino, which was wonderful! Not just the food either but being able to eat straight away and not wait for hours as well. I often ask staff to recommend something and have not been disappointed. I am also getting better at asking for what I would like - ie just the lomo a la plancha y tomate, sin pan, from the bocadillo menu - or sometimes half a menu for lunch, if I don't want bread, dessert or lots of wine.
So to answer the original question:
If there is ensalada and grilled chicken on the menu, which there almost always is, I ask if I can have them at the same time. Ensalada y pollo, sin patatas - lovely, just what a tired pilgrim needs. Or sometimes I fancy the fried eggs with chorizo or something, as long as there is decent protein on the plate. If there is a choice of pork ribs or cheeks, I jump at the chance, and if there are meatballs, ditto. I'm not really a soup person, but if there are lentejas for starters, I ditch the ensalada and just ask to have some salad or a tomato with the chicken. I avoid the pasta and rice overload, and the breaded fish, though fresh trucha is a welcome sight. A lemon yogurt beats any cake, my walking legs must be craving calcium or something. Pilgrim menus are cheap and cheerful and can be great, but I agree wholeheartedly - go and try the menu del dia and some regional dishes along the way too!
what is the price difference between the two menus?
 
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brian560

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF, VdlP 2016, Port. Central, Norte , Port. Coastal (2018).San Salvador and Primitivo (2019)
Often only a few euros, the pilgrim menu normally came to around €10 and the menu del dia ca €15, but allow for covid inflation. Still incredibly good value!
Generally, the smaller the town the better the menu del dia. In Madrid you'll be paying 15-6 E and get a small jug of tinto. In the back blocks, I've found you get a heartier meal and a full bottle of tinto, though usually needing a dash of gaseosa to make it drinkable. Then you usually need a siesta to sleep it off.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
On the coastal routes, or in Galicia, the fresh seafood - razor clams, percebes, and probably my favourite - boquerones. And, of course, pulpo.
On the interior routes, any stew that includes beef cheeks and local vegetables; tomatoes and capsicums in the south, beans and potatoes in the north.
Gosh, just thinking about this is making my mouth water!
 

Anhalter

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019 CF
In the plentitude of pilgrims meals i usually went with stuff i considered either "good for me".

Anything that appeared home cooked. With fibres. Vitamins. The vegan or vegetarian option.
They usually been far superior to the usual meatball-pasta or steak and fries.

Unfortunately such options were not that common. But they been there and i can recommend going for those.

And of course, if there is a local speciality thats always to be preferred.
 
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EL LECHERO

Friends no Strangers
Past OR future Camino
2008
Generally, the smaller the town the better the menu del dia. In Madrid you'll be paying 15-6 E and get a small jug of tinto. In the back blocks, I've found you get a heartier meal and a full bottle of tinto, though usually needing a dash of ‎soda‎ to make it drinkable. Then you usually need a siesta to sleep it off.
Ever drink kalamancha?
 
Past OR future Camino
Many and many more.
Honestly, the best ‘pilgrim menu’ is a bit of a tallest-dwarf competition. I realise that’s potentially offensive to those of reduced stature, and to whom I apologise sincerely.

If I need fuel, I’ll eat what’s put in front of me; but given the choice I’ll avoid ‘traditional peasant’ food which is usually offal or carbohydrate based and seek out what the people in charge of the peasants would have eaten. There are some amazing lunchtime meals which are very affordable at good restaurants and paradores throughout Spain. If you can convincingly wipe the top layer of dust from your boots you’re welcomed in the most unlikely places.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Honestly, the best ‘pilgrim menu’ is a bit of a tallest-dwarf competition. I realise that’s potentially offensive to those of reduced stature, and to whom I apologise sincerely.

If I need fuel, I’ll eat what’s put in front of me; but given the choice I’ll avoid ‘traditional peasant’ food which is usually offal or carbohydrate based and seek out what the people in charge of the peasants would have eaten. There are some amazing lunchtime meals which are very affordable at good restaurants and paradores throughout Spain. If you can convincingly wipe the top layer of dust from your boots you’re welcomed in the most unlikely places.
Spanish food is wonderful but I am sorry to say it is not what you eat on a Camino francés as a pilgrim, if you choose the pilgrim’s menu. It is unrecognisable except for a few places.🙂
 
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EL LECHERO

Friends no Strangers
Past OR future Camino
2008
No, what is it?
When we were in Leon it was May 1st and a festival was going on. A bunch of guys and one guy dressed with a wig bough me Kalamancha(sp)? It's a wine mixed with coca cola over ice. It was damn good! Someone told me the younger crowd drinks it. kind of like a punch.....
 

Paladina

old woman of the roads
Past OR future Camino
CF, primitivo & del norte (2017); VdlP/Sanabres, ingles etc (2018), Mozarabe etc (2019), tbc (2020)
When we were in Leon it was May 1st and a festival was going on. A bunch of guys and one guy dressed with a wig bough me Kalamancha(sp)? It's a wine mixed with coca cola over ice. It was damn good! Someone told me the younger crowd drinks it. kind of like a punch.....

Yuk! I came across this disgusting practice a few years ago while taking part in VSI work camps in central Europe. My younger work mates were diluting cheap supermarket wine with generic cola. However bad the vino tinto, it won’t be improved by further contamination.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Yuk! I came across this disgusting practice a few years ago while taking part in VSI work camps in central Europe. My younger work mates were diluting cheap supermarket wine with generic cola. However bad the vino tinto, it won’t be improved by further contamination.
I've never had a kalimotxo, but I love a nice cold tinto de verano (red wine and lemon soda) on a hot day.
 
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EL LECHERO

Friends no Strangers
Past OR future Camino
2008
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
Is it possible to buy Paxachan at the Airport?
 

darealdeal77

Member Since 2018
Past OR future Camino
2014 Camino Frances
Good question... As a Spaniard, I avoid pilgrim menus as such, because they mostly offer food to international taste and I find it repetitive and bland after a while. It is worth it to venture into Spanish food, do not be shy, go to places with Menú del día instead of Menú del peregrino where Spaniards eat chickpeas, bean stews, lentils, different types of fish, artichokes, asparagus, roast peppers, potato casseroles, paprika based dishes, all different types of jamon, chorizo, lacón, an amazing variety of local specialities in every region, different wines in each region, go on, be brave and take a step into the unknown!

It is a pity most pilgrims stick to the pilgrim menu and do not dive into real Spanish cuisine, just stick to salada, pork loin, fried eggs, overcooked pasta (yes, we ARE terrible for that in Spain) and industrial custards/cream caramel/cheese cakes.

And wines are worth a try too: Navarra, Rioja, Ribera del Duero, Mencía (in Bierzo and Galicia) reds, and whites from Navarra, Rueda, Godello in Bierzo and Albariño or Ribeiro in Galicia.

Not to mention cheeses...
I totally agree!! Being Cuban and living in the states when I did my Camino I longed for Red beans with chorizo, rustico bread and café con leche, paella, all that my ancestors food would provide. I know the Peregrino menu is cheaper, but cheat once in a while and try true Spanish food….my favorite on peregrino menu was fettuccine with ham! Buen Camino
 

Jacobus

Pilgrim since 2008
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés(2008,09 14)
Del Norte (2011)
Portuguese(2015,2017)
Inglés 2015
Fisterre (2015 17)
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
In Navarra. The white asparagus with the delicious cream sauce.

My favourite meal was a sea bass with potatoes and veggies at Casa Ramon in Molinaseca.
 

Zordmot

First timer Spring 2019
Past OR future Camino
April-May 2019
Along the CF, most cafes and restaurants offer a diverse pilgrim meal of the day:

Monday- Tortilla de Patatas
Tuesday- Tortilla de Patatas
Wednesday- Tortilla de Patatas
Thursday- Tortilla de Patatas
Friday- Tortilla de Patatas

haha
 
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KariC

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2016
Hi

I'd like to ask people's opinions. What are your favourtie items from a Pilgrim Menus?

Personally I usually go for sopa or ensalada verde for starter and then lomo or pollo for main course.

For dessert I usually go for yogurt which I keep for breakfast.

Gerald
Being surprised. Tried (and liked!) stuff I wasn't familiar with. Nice to release control and just take what they give you!
 

Canche

Volcano Climber
Past OR future Camino
2016
Good question... As a Spaniard, I avoid pilgrim menus as such, because they mostly offer food to international taste and I find it repetitive and bland after a while. It is worth it to venture into Spanish food, do not be shy, go to places with Menú del día instead of Menú del peregrino where Spaniards eat chickpeas, bean stews, lentils, different types of fish, artichokes, asparagus, roast peppers, potato casseroles, paprika based dishes, all different types of jamon, chorizo, lacón, an amazing variety of local specialities in every region, different wines in each region, go on, be brave and take a step into the unknown!

It is a pity most pilgrims stick to the pilgrim menu and do not dive into real Spanish cuisine, just stick to salada, pork loin, fried eggs, overcooked pasta (yes, we ARE terrible for that in Spain) and industrial custards/cream caramel/cheese cakes.

And wines are worth a try too: Navarra, Rioja, Ribera del Duero, Mencía (in Bierzo and Galicia) reds, and whites from Navarra, Rueda, Godello in Bierzo and Albariño or Ribeiro in Galicia.

Not to mention cheeses...
And God awful mushy vegetables. Got tired of french fries and longed for rice,
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
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CF SJPdP to SdC
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I accidentally came into Logrono during their annual Wine Festival. The streets were full of people drinking wine in coca cola.
Urgggg! Heathens. And in a wine producing country!
But given the cost differential in Spain between wine and cola.

Maybe they were diluting their cola with wine ? :rolleyes:
 

Canuck

Veteran wanderer
Past OR future Camino
?
Urgggg! Heathens. And in a wine producing country!
But given the cost differential in Spain between wine and cola.

Maybe they were diluting their cola with wine ? :rolleyes:
Enjoy!
 
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alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
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(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Padrón peppers, so much so that I know where to buy them in Dublin. Every now and again I get a handful. Tonight, quite a few of the handful were what I had heard they could turn out to be... eyes running, burning mouth - even my very toes are feeling the 'benefit'.
Yes, I have learnt to really appreciate them!
Vino tinto.
Igualmente!
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
When eating paella do note that the government of Valencia, the region where paella originated, recently declared the authentic dish to be an item of cultural significance. Read more in this current article by Sam Jones in The Guardian.

 
Last edited:

truenorthpilgrim

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Norte post-pandemic
Has anyone yet mentioned empanadas of Galicia? Apparently they are a specialty of the region. I enjoyed some for an early lunch in Palas do Rei and found it perfect pilgrim food!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Past OR future Camino
2018
Urgggg! Heathens. And in a wine producing country!
But given the cost differential in Spain between wine and cola.

Maybe they were diluting their cola with wine ? :rolleyes:
These were mostly 20 - 30-something Spaniards. They were vomiting and otherwise evacuating themselves everywhere on the street, too. Not my idea of a good time.
 
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When eating paella do note that the government of Valencia, the region where paella originated, recently declared the authentic dish to be an item of cultural significance. Read more in this current article by Sam Jones in The Guardian.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...the-mediterranean-diet-given-protected-status
Thank you for this. I know from my exposure to regional pride that paella is truly part of Valencian culture and gastronomy.
While reading, I confess to a stab of awareness of how proud we can become of things that are exclusive, that exclude.
This is a train of thought for another place, so once more, thanks for the article, and if I eat paella anywhere other than in Valencia, on my own head be it!
 

Stroller

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Norte (2015), Frances (2016)
These were mostly 20 - 30-something Spaniards. They were vomiting and otherwise evacuating themselves everywhere on the street, too. Not my idea of a good time.
I'm not surprised drinking that!
 
Past OR future Camino
06,CF;13,CP;17,SSal;19,Ingles
If the following is out of order, let it be deleted. I have copied it from the Saturday edition of a paper I read. Lisbon pilgrims, for you...

The food lover’s guide to: Lisbon​

Clockwise from main: Prado focuses on local ingredients; Pastéis de nata from Manteigaria; Ramiro is a shellfish institution

1636808168336.png


CLOCKWISE FROM MAIN: PRADO FOCUSES ON LOCAL INGREDIENTS; PASTÉIS DE NATA FROM MANTEIGARIA; RAMIRO IS A SHELLFISH INSTITUTION

Food Month: The Portuguese capital’s culinary offering can rival that of London, Copenhagen or Paris, write Patrick Hanlon and Russell Alford
Patrick Hanlon, Russell Alford
1636808168589.png


For decades Portugal has been one of the most popular destinations for Irish tourists, however, in the last five years the masses have landed in Lisbon specifically seeking out its food and drink. “New Iberian” could well take up the mantle from “new Nordic”, and the Portuguese capital can compete with London, Dublin, Copenhagen or Paris with its culinary offering, particularly around the fine casual sphere, led by young chefs championing Portuguese produce and cuisine in contemporary ways.
Destination tables Lisbon’s Bairro Alto and Cais do Sodré areas seem pretty sleepy until dusk and then come into their own throughout the night, while the central Baixa/Chiado districts represent the tourist and shopping hotbed. However, we suggest looking everywhere to the east of Praça do Comerçio. The neighbourhoods of Alfama, Graça, Mouraria and Martim Moniz represent the more exciting, locally-oriented areas for dining and drinking.
António Galapito’s Prado (Travessa das Pedras Negras 2, pradorestaurante.com) – in a former fish factory – is modern Scandinavian in design and serves sharing plates, focusing on seasonal Portuguese ingredients. The wine list is almost entirely organic and biodynamic. Behind the restaurant find Prado Mercearia, Galapito’s more casual “grocery” deli-cafe-bottle shop open from 10am weekdays. In historic Alfama, SEM (Rua das Escolas Gerais 120, restaurantsem.com) is a zero-waste restaurant serving a modern tasting menu which celebrates seasonality in thrifty and delicious ways, while the adjoining wine bar serves small plates and snacks alongside impeccably chosen natural and biodynamic wines.
In Mouraria, former architect-turned-chef Leopoldo Calhau transported the entire interior of a closing-down tavern in Beja two hours away to his Lisbon restaurant Taberna do Calhau (Largo das Olarias 23, instagram.com/taberna_do_calhau), where he serves small sharing dishes (none more than €10) from the Alentejo region (the food-producing heartland of Portugal). Next door, his funky wine bar Bla Bla Glu Glu centres on low-intervention bottles from small producers. Other destination tables to the east of the city centre include Boi Cavalo (Rua do Vigário 70B, boi-cavalo.pt) and Sála de João Sá (Rua dos Bacalhoeiros 103, restaurantesala.pt) both of which serve tasting menus, and shellfish institution Ramiro (Avenida Almirante Reis 1, cervejariaramiro.com).
An exception to this neighbourhood rule is the well-heeled precinct of Príncipe Real, perched on a hill north of the city centre which boasts many exciting restaurants: star chef Henrique Sá Pessoa’s Tapisco (a portmanteau of tapas and the Portuguese equivalent petisco; Rua Dom Pedro V 8, tapisco.pt), Peruvian ceviche spot A Cevicheria (Rua Dom Pedro V 129, acevicheria.pt) Faz Frio (Rua Dom Pedro V 96, fazfrio.pt) the contemporary temple to bacalhau (salted cod), classic, regional French with a Portuguese accent, JNcQUOI (Avenida da Liberdade 182, jncquoi.com) and Lebanese spot Sumaya (Rua da Escola Politéc-nica 40, instagram.com/sumayarestaurante).
Fine dining The coastal Belém district is worth a trip alone for the Jerónimos monastery, Belém Tower and Padrão dos Descobrimentos monument, but while there try to nab a table at O Frade (Calçada da Ajuda 14, instagram.com/restauranteofrade). Run by chef cousins Carlos Afonso and Sérgio Frade, it was recently awarded a Bib Gourmand and the setting (around a U-shaped central bar) is cool and contemporary while the menu dances between traditional “home style” dishes and tweezer-tweaked small plates. In the city centre, try the single-menu restaurant Epur (Largo da Academia Nacional de Belas Artes 14, epur.pt), 100 Maneiras (Rua do Teixeira 39 100maneiras.com) run by Bosnian chef Ljubomir Stanisic and Alexandre Silva’s 16-course tasting menu at Loco (Rua dos Navegantes 53, loco.pt) – all three with one Michelin star a piece.
Must-visit bars Peter O’Connor made his name with Diageo in the United States and launched Roe & Co in Ireland, but as of late 2019 has called Lisbon home after seeking a change and taking a chance opening Onda Cocktail Room (Rua Damasceno Monteiro 45, insta-gram.com/ondacocktailroom). A talented mixologist and bartender with decades of experience, his sitting room speakeasy has a short, well-appointed cocktail and wine list – but if you’re indecisive ask O’Connor for his seven-question experience to sip a cocktail specifically created to your taste.
For wine lovers, marvel at the bottle-adorned arched ceilings of ByTheWine (Rua das Flores 41, bythewine.pt) in Chiado or drop by traditional tasca Garrafeira Alfaia (R do Diário de Notícias 125, garrafeiraalfaia.com) in Bairro Alto. Sip shots of the local ginjinha (cherry liqueur) at Ginjinha Sem Rival (Rua das Portas de Santo Antão 7).
Coffee and custard tarts Lisbon runs on espresso, and at every cafe, bar and pastelaria (pastry shop) you’ll find espresso constantly being pulled (never pay beyond a euro or so for one), so the microfoam flat whites, nitro and cold brew haven’t landed here in the same way as other European capitals.
However, notable exceptions include The Mill (R do Poço dos Negros 1, themill.pt), Heim (Rua Santos-O-Velho 2 e 4, insta-gram.com/heimcafe.lisbon) Copenhagen Coffee Lab (various locations, copenhagencof-feelab.com), Hello Kristof (Rua do Poço dos Negros 103, hellokristof.com) and Fábrica Coffee Roasters (various locations, fabricacoffeeroasters.com).
Pastéis de nata (Portuguese custard tarts) abound in Lisbon and it’s in the capital that these flaky, buttery warm tarts with their deep burnished tops were first created. You can’t miss pastéis in bakeries or pastelaria on pretty much every street. Though Pastéis de Belém (Rua de Belém 84 92, pasteisdebelem.pt) is believed to hold the original recipe and has the perma-queue down the street to prove it; it’s at Manteigaria (literally butter shop; various locations, instagram.com/manteigaria.oficial) that these are freshest and best. Sprinkled with ground cinnamon and enjoyed with espresso, this is the mid-morning (and mid-afternoon) pick-me-up you’ll soon convince yourself is a daily act of delicious self-care.
 

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