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Pilgrim Office volunteer experience/update

2020 Camino Guides

elleley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (16); Leon-Sarria, Ourense-SdC (17), Burgos-Leon (17), Porto-SdC (18), SalvadorPrimitivo(19)
I completed my first volunteer experience in the Oficina de Peregrinos a couple of weeks ago and wanted to give an update. We were told that we were the last group to have accommodations at the Convento de Santa Clara on Rua San Roque. They have identified new digs somewhere in San Lorenzo about 4 KMs from the Oficina. We were told that it would be a big improvement with "new everything..." Frankly, it makes me a bit sad. We were a group of 6, two Americanas (my sister and me), an Irishman, a Spaniard, Portuguesa, and a Francesa. We called it our albergue and even though our work schedules varied, made a point of eating together (sharing the shopping, cooking and cleaning duties) every evening. Each night was filled with laughter, story telling and pilgrim love. I think that being in that beautiful, ancient building, sharing it with the cloistered nuns and taking in some incredible spiritual energy made the volunteer experience even better. I am not judging the new accommodations, for I don't even know where it is or how it is organized, but, for me, I feel grateful to have had the experience living in Convento Santa Clara. So, please, don't be discouraged to apply for this experience. BTW, we all were assigned to completing Compostelas but made a decision that we would take the time we needed to TALK with each peregrino and not just STAMP STAMP, WHAM BAM THANK YOU M'AM...the paid staff are under a bit more pressure to keep the line moving, but I would urge any of you who may be future volunteers there to take the time to ask and LISTEN. ❤ Ultreia, elle
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
I am very curious about the reasons for the shift out to San Lorenzo. While it is not inconvenient to live out there, it is OUT THERE. To meet with anyone or do anything in the old town, you need to take the #6 bus...

The last information I had was that work on the 20 "dormitorios con banos" being developed upstairs in the large building a the rear of the campus, upstairs from the new Pilgrim Waiting Room, had to be mothballed as the funds needed to be shifted to the Cathedral renovation project. These rooms are apparently designed following the model of the pilgrim rooms on the upper floor at Hospederia San Martin Pinario. "New" has a special quality all its own.

It might well be that, as the convento had NO HEAT, the shift out to San Lazaro is a seasonal adaptation. Then again, there may be another reason altogether. If anyone knows more, please chime in here, or PM me.

I too, enjoyed the camaraderie that group living with friends brought at the convent flat. However, to be truthful, I do NOT miss the stairs, or the near one km hike from the Cathedral. But, as a pilgrim, I just sucked it up...

Again, for those of you interested in volunteering at the Pilgrim Office, click on the BLUE link in my signature, below...

Hope this helps.
 

elleley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (16); Leon-Sarria, Ourense-SdC (17), Burgos-Leon (17), Porto-SdC (18), SalvadorPrimitivo(19)
I am very curious about the reasons for the shift out to San Lorenzo. While it is not inconvenient to live out there, it is OUT THERE. To meet with anyone or do anything in the old town, you need to take the #6 bus...

The last information I had was that work on the 20 "dormitorios con banos" being developed upstairs in the large building a the rear of the campus, upstairs from the new Pilgrim Waiting Room, had to be mothballed as the funds needed to be shifted to the Cathedral renovation project. These rooms are apparently designed following the model of the pilgrim rooms on the upper floor at Hospederia San Martin Pinario. "New" has a special quality all its own.

It might well be that, as the convento had NO HEAT, the shift out to San Lazaro is a seasonal adaptation. Then again, there may be another reason altogether. If anyone knows more, please chime in here, or PM me.

I too, enjoyed the camaraderie that group living with friends brought at the convent flat. However, to be truthful, I do NOT miss the stairs, or the near one km hike from the Cathedral. But, as a pilgrim, I just sucked it up...

Again, for those of you interested in volunteering at the Pilgrim Office, click on the BLUE link in my signature, below...

Hope this helps.
Oh yeah, those stairs! I often wondered how those nuns in past years made their way up and down that HUGE stone staircase over and over. It makes sense regarding the heat issue. Sorry, I have no idea if it's a temporary or permanent move, but Santi made it sound like it was a move to a newer, more modern environment and that volunteers want that....oh well...
ultreia! elle
 

mmmmartin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santander-SdC bici '14
Plata bici '17
1/2 Plata bici '18
Frances a pie '18
(Porto a pie '19)
The new accommodation is in a building attached to the San lazaro albergue, you walk through the albergue to get to it. Each volunteer has their own room, there are eight rooms with space for more. This used to be used as offices. There is a good, powerful heating system, it was turned off at times because it was almost too hot. There is masses of hot water. Volunteers were told at first they could not use the kitchen in the albergue, because they were not pilgrims, but later told they could use it. There is a room used as a kitchen in the new accommodation but it is an office with a large table, big fridge, microwave, kettle, but no sink or cooker. The place is a minute's walk from the bus stop. It cost €0.60 per journey with the tarjeta verde: you pay €3.01 for the card, then put ten journeys on it for €6, and tap it in the machine as you get on the bus. It's ten minutes to san roque, near the old flat, which is about eight minutes from the pilgrim office. The buses are every 20 minutes, clean, efficient. When you don't want the card any more you hand it back to the bus driver and she hands you back the three euros. There are a few good places to eat out there, used by locals. It's a good system and will be warm in the winter. At the end of the stay there, a volunteer leaving the building to go to the airport can leave their keys with the man in the albergue to be picked up later by friends and delivered to the pilgrim office. The system works well and to get it up and running from a standing start in one day was a great achievement: a fortnight ago on the first night volunteers were in San Martin and waited half a day for the keys to be found and copies to be made before they could get in. Recommended.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
If the eight dormitorios were formerly offices, I presume the rooms do not have ensuite bathrooms / shower? Assuming not, do the volunteers share the bathroom facilities with the albergue?

Do you know where the nearest supermercado is, closest to his accommodation?

I do know that the C6 bus turns down a street in the 'center' of San Lazaro to head over to the Decathlon and other big box stores, including a Mercadona supermercado ar Costa Vella. The ride is maybe 10 minutes from San Lazaro. The buses run every hour (60 minutes) both ways.

Located there, you are also in walking distance to the large shopping mall at As Cancelas. This centro commercial also has a Hyper-Carrefour as a magnet store.

Thanks, and hope this helps.
 

mmmmartin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santander-SdC bici '14
Plata bici '17
1/2 Plata bici '18
Frances a pie '18
(Porto a pie '19)
They use the washrooms and showers attached to the offices: these are similar in design to, but entirely separate from, those for the albergue.
There is the massive shopping centre within walking distance, you just get off a stop or so early, it's about ten minutes to talk from there to the accommodation.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Camino Frances SJPP / 2014 Camino Portugues / 2015 Camino Ingles / 2015 Hospitalero Training
2016 (fall) Camino Sanabre / Hospitalero?
I completed my first volunteer experience in the Oficina de Peregrinos a couple of weeks ago and wanted to give an update. We were told that we were the last group to have accommodations at the Convento de Santa Clara on Rua San Roque. They have identified new digs somewhere in San Lorenzo about 4 KMs from the Oficina. We were told that it would be a big improvement with "new everything..." Frankly, it makes me a bit sad. We were a group of 6, two Americanas (my sister and me), an Irishman, a Spaniard, Portuguesa, and a Francesa. We called it our albergue and even though our work schedules varied, made a point of eating together (sharing the shopping, cooking and cleaning duties) every evening. Each night was filled with laughter, story telling and pilgrim love. I think that being in that beautiful, ancient building, sharing it with the cloistered nuns and taking in some incredible spiritual energy made the volunteer experience even better. I am not judging the new accommodations, for I don't even know where it is or how it is organized, but, for me, I feel grateful to have had the experience living in Convento Santa Clara. So, please, don't be discouraged to apply for this experience. BTW, we all were assigned to completing Compostelas but made a decision that we would take the time we needed to TALK with each peregrino and not just STAMP STAMP, WHAM BAM THANK YOU M'AM...the paid staff are under a bit more pressure to keep the line moving, but I would urge any of you who may be future volunteers there to take the time to ask and LISTEN. ❤ Ultreia, elle
I am so glad for your very positive experience. Isn't that the Convent known for its fantastic cookies?
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Cookies!?!?! I never got any cookies!

That's it, I am moving...out to San Lazaro!
They use the washrooms and showers attached to the offices: these are similar in design to, but entirely separate from, those for the albergue.
There is the massive shopping centre within walking distance, you just get off a stop or so early, it's about ten minutes to talk from there to the accommodation.
Thanks. That helps.

I still wonder if this had to do with having heat in the winter for year-round volunteers, or is more permanent? As I will be there next year in May and again in July - August it is nice to know what to anticipate.

FYI, they DO need volunteers all year. As the convent did not have central heating, only space heaters, with sketchy electrical mains, a move makes sense.

If anyone is there now, could you ask Monste or Santi, or even Cesar - he would know what was going on?

Thanks.
 

elleley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (16); Leon-Sarria, Ourense-SdC (17), Burgos-Leon (17), Porto-SdC (18), SalvadorPrimitivo(19)
I am so glad for your very positive experience. Isn't that the Convent known for its fantastic cookies?
Not sure about the cookies, but the attached iglesia has one of the most famous pipe organs in Galicia. It is featured regularly in special concerts. The mass is beautiful because the nuns (seated behind and above you) have gorgeous voices and do all of the readings. Worth a visit!! Ultreia, elle
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sep/Oct 2015
C Primitivo Sep / Oct 2016
Portugese Sep/Oct 2017
VdlP, Muxia 2018
I completed my first volunteer experience in the Oficina de Peregrinos a couple of weeks ago and wanted to give an update. We were told that we were the last group to have accommodations at the Convento de Santa Clara on Rua San Roque. They have identified new digs somewhere in San Lorenzo about 4 KMs from the Oficina. We were told that it would be a big improvement with "new everything..." Frankly, it makes me a bit sad. We were a group of 6, two Americanas (my sister and me), an Irishman, a Spaniard, Portuguesa, and a Francesa. We called it our albergue and even though our work schedules varied, made a point of eating together (sharing the shopping, cooking and cleaning duties) every evening. Each night was filled with laughter, story telling and pilgrim love. I think that being in that beautiful, ancient building, sharing it with the cloistered nuns and taking in some incredible spiritual energy made the volunteer experience even better. I am not judging the new accommodations, for I don't even know where it is or how it is organized, but, for me, I feel grateful to have had the experience living in Convento Santa Clara. So, please, don't be discouraged to apply for this experience. BTW, we all were assigned to completing Compostelas but made a decision that we would take the time we needed to TALK with each peregrino and not just STAMP STAMP, WHAM BAM THANK YOU M'AM...the paid staff are under a bit more pressure to keep the line moving, but I would urge any of you who may be future volunteers there to take the time to ask and LISTEN. ❤ Ultreia, elle
Thanks for this Elleley. I am curious about volunteering to give time at the Pilgrim Office and wonder if you can enlighten me please. Is it a requirement to speak Spanish or languages other than English? Also how to go about it. Minimum time requirements etc.
Congratulations on your volunteering and information
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago 2014
Pamplona to Santiago 2017
Norte. 2018
I am very curious about the reasons for the shift out to San Lorenzo. While it is not inconvenient to live out there, it is OUT THERE. To meet with anyone or do anything in the old town, you need to take the #6 bus...

The last information I had was that work on the 20 "dormitorios con banos" being developed upstairs in the large building a the rear of the campus, upstairs from the new Pilgrim Waiting Room, had to be mothballed as the funds needed to be shifted to the Cathedral renovation project. These rooms are apparently designed following the model of the pilgrim rooms on the upper floor at Hospederia San Martin Pinario. "New" has a special quality all its own.

It might well be that, as the convento had NO HEAT, the shift out to San Lazaro is a seasonal adaptation. Then again, there may be another reason altogether. If anyone knows more, please chime in here, or PM me.

I too, enjoyed the camaraderie that group living with friends brought at the convent flat. However, to be truthful, I do NOT miss the stairs, or the near one km hike from the Cathedral. But, as a pilgrim, I just sucked it up...

Again, for those of you interested in volunteering at the Pilgrim Office, click on the BLUE link in my signature, below...

Hope this helps.
I don’t see a blue link. I have looked at the Pilgrim Office site about volunteering and it says to email with your CV and languages spoken. What’s a CV? Thanks
 

elleley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (16); Leon-Sarria, Ourense-SdC (17), Burgos-Leon (17), Porto-SdC (18), SalvadorPrimitivo(19)
Thanks for this Elleley. I am curious about volunteering to give time at the Pilgrim Office and wonder if you can enlighten me please. Is it a requirement to speak Spanish or languages other than English? Also how to go about it. Minimum time requirements etc.
Congratulations on your volunteering and information
Hola James! I have heard various things about the "requirements" but in my experience, ability to speak Spanish is preferred but not required. I served with an Irish volunteer who did not speak Spanish, but was a very experienced pilgrim, so they might have taken that into consideration.The rest of us spoke Spanish in varying degrees. Please see the above post by t2andreo, who shares a link to more specifics regarding the application process. Most are scheduled for a 2 week (15 day) period and you are given a work schedule for 5 hour shifts every day (for us it was 10-3 or 3-8 pm). You are supposed to be given two days off during that time, but we had to ask for it, as we were scheduled every day for the two weeks. I know volunteers have done a variety of things, but we were all assigned behind the "desk" checking credentials, stamping final sellos and writing out the Compostelas...at the time we were working (9/23-10/7), approximaely 1400 pilgrims were given Compostelas PER DAY. Like any volunteer job, there are positives and negatives, but for me, the positives far outweighed any negatives. Ultreia! elle ❤
 

elleley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (16); Leon-Sarria, Ourense-SdC (17), Burgos-Leon (17), Porto-SdC (18), SalvadorPrimitivo(19)
I don’t see a blue link. I have looked at the Pilgrim Office site about volunteering and it says to email with your CV and languages spoken. What’s a CV? Thanks
They want a resumé.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sep/Oct 2015
C Primitivo Sep / Oct 2016
Portugese Sep/Oct 2017
VdlP, Muxia 2018
Hola James! I have heard various things about the "requirements" but in my experience, ability to speak Spanish is preferred but not required. I served with an Irish volunteer who did not speak Spanish, but was a very experienced pilgrim, so they might have taken that into consideration.The rest of us spoke Spanish in varying degrees. Please see the above post by t2andreo, who shares a link to more specifics regarding the application process. Most are scheduled for a 2 week (15 day) period and you are given a work schedule for 5 hour shifts every day (for us it was 10-3 or 3-8 pm). You are supposed to be given two days off during that time, but we had to ask for it, as we were scheduled every day for the two weeks. I know volunteers have done a variety of things, but we were all assigned behind the "desk" checking credentials, stamping final sellos and writing out the Compostelas...at the time we were working (9/23-10/7), approximaely 1400 pilgrims were given Compostelas PER DAY. Like any volunteer job, there are positives and negatives, but for me, the positives far outweighed any negatives. Ultreia! elle ❤
Thanks Elle. I will follow up on this. James
 

intrepidtraveler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Madrid, Frances and Finisterre (2015)
Camino Norte-2017; Camino Ingles from A Coruna - 2017
I don’t see a blue link. I have looked at the Pilgrim Office site about volunteering and it says to email with your CV and languages spoken. What’s a CV? Thanks
In the literal sense, a CV is your Curriculum Vitae (life curriculum). Basically, a fancy name for your resume.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
I don’t see a blue link. I have looked at the Pilgrim Office site about volunteering and it says to email with your CV and languages spoken. What’s a CV? Thanks
Look at the bottom of post #9 above. It reads "Pilgrim Office Volunteering"
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
In the literal sense, a CV is your Curriculum Vitae (life curriculum). Basically, a fancy name for your resume.
Mainly, they want to know what you bring to the role of volunteer. You should lead with your Camino experiences, and other volunteer work related to the Camino, if any.

Then I would mention your language skills or lack of same. Lastly, I would list the major career or life experiences that you think qualify you to help pilgrims on arrival at Santiago.

This is not quite the same as applying for a professional position. So, you do not lead with academic and most professional accomplishments. It's a Camino CV. Just keep it in that context, and you will be fine.

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago 2014
Pamplona to Santiago 2017
Norte. 2018

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019

Mycroft

Member
In the literal sense, a CV is your Curriculum Vitae (life curriculum). Basically, a fancy name for your resume.
Technically, a CV is supposed to contain details of every job and volunteer position one has held and pertinent information of what you've been doing with your life, while the resume is a shortened version. Both should describe educational background, etc.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago 2014
Pamplona to Santiago 2017
Norte. 2018
Technically, a CV is supposed to contain details of every job and volunteer position one has held and pertinent information of what you've been doing with your life, while the resume is a shortened version. Both should describe educational background, etc.
Since I worked the same thing for the last 30 years and have never had a resume mine would be short and sweet.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago 2014
Pamplona to Santiago 2017
Norte. 2018
Then just click on THIS LINK.


I shortened it to “Pilgrim Office Volunteering” and added it to my signature. But you only see my signature on a laptop or desktop. Everyone sees just the avatar photo and user name if you are using a smartphone browser.

Hope this helps.
Well surprise, surprise on my computer much different than a phone. My rule is I can only read Camino stuff on my morning visit to Starbucks, on my phone otherwise my whole day flies by if on the computer. Thanks for the info.
 

Mycroft

Member
Since I worked the same thing for the last 30 years and have never had a resume mine would be short and sweet.
Excellent! And a rare occurrence nowadays!
Some folks who have had many occupations write different CVs and resumes geared to the job for which they are applying.
 

Mycroft

Member
I completed my first volunteer experience in the Oficina de Peregrinos a couple of weeks ago and wanted to give an update. We were told that we were the last group to have accommodations at the Convento de Santa Clara on Rua San Roque. They have identified new digs somewhere in San Lorenzo about 4 KMs from the Oficina. We were told that it would be a big improvement with "new everything..." Frankly, it makes me a bit sad. We were a group of 6, two Americanas (my sister and me), an Irishman, a Spaniard, Portuguesa, and a Francesa. We called it our albergue and even though our work schedules varied, made a point of eating together (sharing the shopping, cooking and cleaning duties) every evening. Each night was filled with laughter, story telling and pilgrim love. I think that being in that beautiful, ancient building, sharing it with the cloistered nuns and taking in some incredible spiritual energy made the volunteer experience even better. I am not judging the new accommodations, for I don't even know where it is or how it is organized, but, for me, I feel grateful to have had the experience living in Convento Santa Clara. So, please, don't be discouraged to apply for this experience. BTW, we all were assigned to completing Compostelas but made a decision that we would take the time we needed to TALK with each peregrino and not just STAMP STAMP, WHAM BAM THANK YOU M'AM...the paid staff are under a bit more pressure to keep the line moving, but I would urge any of you who may be future volunteers there to take the time to ask and LISTEN. ❤ Ultreia, elle
Elle, I was told a few weeks ago when I was at the Office that the accommodations available were for females only. With the new digs, has that changed?
And does anyone know what the old convent space will be used for?
And so glad you took the time to speak to pilgrims coming into the office!!
 

elleley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (16); Leon-Sarria, Ourense-SdC (17), Burgos-Leon (17), Porto-SdC (18), SalvadorPrimitivo(19)
Elle, I was told a few weeks ago when I was at the Office that the accommodations available were for females only. With the new digs, has that changed?
And does anyone know what the old convent space will be used for?
And so glad you took the time to speak to pilgrims coming into the office!!
Hola! So sorry but I don't know anything about the accommodations being for only females. That sounds strange to me, but what do I know??! And no idea about future plans for that space. Next time I am in Santiago, I will definitely plan to attend mass at the church there, though, as it is a beautiful sacred space and the nuns sing like angels!
Ultreia! elle ❤
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Elle, I was told a few weeks ago when I was at the Office that the accommodations available were for females only. With the new digs, has that changed?
And does anyone know what the old convent space will be used for?
And so glad you took the time to speak to pilgrims coming into the office!!
The females only thing sounds odd. The volunteer housing has always been co-ed in my experience.

Each person typically has a private room. We always shared bathrooms.

This is the first I am hearing about segregation. In my view, that detracts from the group living experience. But, whatever...
 

Pamb

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011 & 2014). Camino Ignaciano (just to be different) (Sept 2016). Portuguese 2018
So is that the Albergue Acuario or the Residencia De Peregrinos? When I volunteered in 2017 we had an apartment about 1.3 km from the Cathedral. For me even that was a bit isolated, however that was partly because I had a broken toe and couldn't walk much. I would prefer to be more central so I can wander around in my off time and still be able to go back to my room for a break/rest. Was just about to put an application in for next year, now reconsidering
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
I would urge any of you who may be future volunteers there to take the time to ask and LISTEN
Having covered nearly 1,600 km from Le Puy I was given a very brief interrogation (or so it felt) focussed solely on the last 100 km.

Yes, I know that is the focus for the award of the Compostella.

Having being awarded that I went away a bit desolate. And had ro return to request a certificate of distance.

So any efficiency (or whatever) the first worker was attempting was totally lost.

@elleley , thank you for your observation.
 

mmmmartin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santander-SdC bici '14
Plata bici '17
1/2 Plata bici '18
Frances a pie '18
(Porto a pie '19)
There were male and female volunteers in the accommodation, each with their own rooms. The showers etc were separate, and separate from the albergue arrangements.
 

Mycroft

Member
The females only thing sounds odd. The volunteer housing has always been co-ed in my experience.

Each person typically has a private room. We always shared bathrooms.

This is the first I am hearing about segregation. In my view, that detracts from the group living experience. But, whatever...
Now that I am thinking more about it, I believe I am confusing the ground floor volunteers who check the pilgrim passports with the offices upstairs where there are volunteers who meet with pilgrims to speak in their home-language. The woman in the English-speaking office was the one who told me that their volunteers have space only for women.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Just do it! Put in your volunteer application. They will accept them now, but will not make notifications until after the New Year. I am already locked and loaded for next summer.

If they accept you, work will be found for you to do. Every little bit you do is something that the more experienced, paid staff does not have to take time to do.

Even though this will be my seventh year working as a volunteer, they have not yet asked me to do Compostelas. As I study Spanish for one-hour every day, one day this will change.

But each year, when I show up and ask them what they would have me do, they always tell me to do 'las mismas... the same... todas otras cosas ... everything else..." It means that I literally do anything and everything other than write Compostelas. It seems I am good at getting stuff done, and finding things to do that need doing.

If it is missing, I find it. If it is broke, I fix it. If they need something, I fetch, find, or run to buy it. Sick pilgrim, i take them to the Centro de Salud. Pilgrim with question, i'm your guy.

Over the years' I learned a LOT of stuff about Santiago, what to do, where to go, and where to find open shops, even on Sundays. So, I guess someone concluded I am more valuable to the operation in front of the counter than in the back.

I do not care. I love being there. These folks are like my second family.

In fact, I already told them that, if they ever tire of me, I will have a big yellow "spinner sign" made in the shape of a Camino arrow, and will stand at the bottom of the ramp coming from Plaza Obradoiro to direct pilgrims to the office. THEY thought I was being funny, but I have already lined up a firm to make a sign that will fit in my checked luggage. I always have a Plan B...;)

Hope this helps.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Not sure about the cookies, but the attached iglesia has one of the most famous pipe organs in Galicia. It is featured regularly in special concerts. The mass is beautiful because the nuns (seated behind and above you) have gorgeous voices and do all of the readings. Worth a visit!! Ultreia, elle
Better the organ pipes than those ~'!@{}; bells!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
At the convent, NO ONE slept past 06:30, when the nuns started with the bells... EVERY MORNING.

I got used to it, but would not miss it.
 

mmmmartin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santander-SdC bici '14
Plata bici '17
1/2 Plata bici '18
Frances a pie '18
(Porto a pie '19)
The new accommodation was clean and very quiet, no traffic noise, nothing. Really very relaxing.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
At the convent, NO ONE slept past 06:30, when the nuns started with the bells... EVERY MORNING.

I got used to it, but would not miss it.
I thought Sunday afternoon's 4 minutes of unrythmic clanging was the worst - "You want to be a good Catholic? Then suffer for your faith!"
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Not quite certain how to read this.

One reading is that you wake up no later than 06.29 so you do not miss the glorious sound of bells from 06.30.

Kia kaha
I meant that, were I to stay someone else, I would not miss the early wake up call. MY body prefers to sleep another hour or so, left to its own devices.

Funny thing though, after the first several days, my brain DID condition itself to wake up about five minutes BEFORE the first bell tolled. Sort of a Pavlovian pain avoidance unconscious conditioning thing I think.

It was weird. But it all contrived to wake me some one hour before I would have preferred.
 

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