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Pilgrim passport, number of stamps

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Cookiedave

Member
Camino(s) past & future
French way 2019
I’m just a bit confused, can someone help?
How many stamps do I need from Sarria onwards which is where I am now, if I started in sjpdp?
Two per day or just the one ?

Regards
 

Cookiedave

Member
Camino(s) past & future
French way 2019
Oh, several pilgrims said you needed to per day if you started from Sierra but only one per day if you start from Saint Jean Pied de port so that’s why I’m confused
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Oh, several pilgrims said you needed to per day if you started from Sierra but only one per day if you start from Saint Jean Pied de port
Well, several pilgrims are wrong. 🙂
All pilgrims are required to have two stamps per day for the last 100 km, including the day they reach Santiago. It should say so on your credential. I have one from American Pilgrims on the Camino, which states this in English, but in past years I used a Spanish credential which states the same rule in Spanish. 20190613_185611-756x538.jpg
I understand that the volunteers in the Pilgrims Office can use their discretion and grant a Compostela to those who don't have the requisite two stamps per day, but make it easier on them and follow the rule if you want a Compostela.
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
It reads like on mine thus the confusion last 100km...
I just had a friend walk the Camino from St Jean Pied de Port. She got only one stamp a day. When she got to the Compostela Office they refused her the Compostela cause she didn't have two stamps starting at Sarria
Because her other companions did in her group, they made an exception. However, they did not after to do so.
Two stamps after Sarria is the rule

Are you walking now? Did you not get the stamps?
If you haven't walked yet, it is not a problem. It is easy to get stamps at churches, restaurants, bars, Albergues, hotels,
 

Cookiedave

Member
Camino(s) past & future
French way 2019
I just had a friend walk the Camino from St Jean Pied de Port. She got only one stamp a day. When she got to the Compostela Office they refused her the Compostela cause she didn't have two stamps starting at Sarria
Because her other companions did in her group, they made an exception. However, they did not after to do so.
Two stamps after Sarria is the rule

Are you walking now? Did you not get the stamps?
If you haven't walked yet, it is not a problem. It is easy to get stamps at churches, restaurants, bars, Albergues, hotels,
Having a rest day whilst wife flys in
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I'm less ambitious than that: it's the Invierno. ;)
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Oh, several pilgrims said you needed to per day if you started from Sierra but only one per day if you start from Saint Jean Pied de port so that’s why I’m confused
The rule is two per day for the last 100 km (or 200 km if you are riding a bike or horse), no matter where you start your camino. As with all rules enforced by humans, enforcement of the rule is not consistent. So plenty of people have brought in credencials that don't necessarily meet the rules and the volunteers at the counter may look at them and how far they walked and perhaps the line up behind them and not checked the credencials meticulously against the rules. Whether you want to count on that happening for you is, of course, up to you.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
Given that there is probably someone who will stamp your Credencial at roughly 500 mtr intervals along most of the final 100k two stamps per day isn't that much of a challenge. I remember one year trying hard to collect stamps that didn't mention the Camino - Correos, Ferreterias, Guardia Civil Barracks and Banks are quite good for connoisseurs of the arcane, but everyone else seems to have "camino" somewhere in the print.

Have sympathy for our good sister @VNwalking out there in the badlands of the Invierno. Getting two cafe-con-leches per day is a challenge never mind two sellos.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Awww, thanks for the thought, Tinca!
Getting two cafe-con-leches per day is a challenge never mind two sellos
Depending on when you leave, getting one café con leche can be a challenge (Not drinking them too late; liking my sleep...)
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
Buen Camino amiga. I've asked the old guys if they can help you find your strayed credencial and also that they help the PO will look with sympathy on a peregrina who can evidence her path with many beautiful photos and many postings on this esteemed forum even if she is unable to produce that ink-smudged folded paper.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Ha! Thank you, amigo.
It crossed my mind today that maybe the old ones are joking with me, amused as can be.

And thank you all for your supportive replies.
I've done what I can...now who knows?
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
The rule is two per day for the last 100 km (or 200 km if you are riding a bike or horse), no matter where you start your camino.
To clarify, the 100 km distance applies to walkers and horse riders. Bicycle riders need to do 200 km. The 'rules' are here.
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
Given that there is probably someone who will stamp your Credencial at roughly 500 mtr intervals along most of the final 100k two stamps per day isn't that much of a challenge. I remember one year trying hard to collect stamps that didn't mention the Camino - Correos, Ferreterias, Guardia Civil Barracks and Banks are quite good for connoisseurs of the arcane, but everyone else seems to have "camino" somewhere in the print.

Have sympathy for our good sister @VNwalking out there in the badlands of the Invierno. Getting two cafe-con-leches per day is a challenge never mind two sellos.
[/Quote
VNwalking , is an inspiration!!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
Oh, several pilgrims said you needed to per day if you started from Sierra but only one per day if you start from Saint Jean Pied de port so that’s why I’m confused
Rereading what you wrote, you are correct up to a point. Between SJPdP and Sarria it is true that you only need one sello a day, this would count for a distance certificate. Between Sarria and SdC you must have two sellos a day to qualify for the Compostela. In other words, walk SJPdP to Sarria getting at least one sello a day, but when you reach Sarria you must get 2 a day from there on.
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Awww, thanks for the thought, Tinca!

Depending on when you leave, getting one café con leche can be a challenge (Not drinking them too late; liking my sleep...)
Doing the Invierno in 2018 reinforced the knowledge that ANY business in Spain will have at least a rubber address stamp for its business name and address. It might not be esthetic, but it does work to meet the requirement. I think they have these to produce manual receipts if the computer goes out. The tax man will have his pound of flesh... But, even gasoline stations and beauty parlours have them. I know...

Just ask. I resorted to popping into bodegas (wineries) in the Ribeira Sacra region, and other places of business wherever I could find them along this developing route. Only once you hit the larger towns and cities, are you likely to find commonly seen types of albergue or Camino-themed sellos.

Remember, this old route (the Winter Route) was only formally accepted as an ancient Camino route in 2015 - 2016. So everything is in development. However, the route markings are very good.

The two-sello daily rule is the rule. IMHO it is not unreasonable.

The only exceptions I have seen made casually are for clear and obvious "long walkers" who document that they started at St. Jean Pied de Port or beyond; Irun, Sevilla, Madrid, Lisbon, etc. Pilgrims who walk 800 - 1000 km or more to arrive at Santiago look, act, and sometimes smell different than folks who strolled (relatively) in from Tui or Sarria. Trust me on this...

When someone comes to the counter and the staff look at the credential, they can tell just by their senses that this pilgrim 'went the full distance.' They will generally excuse the odd missing second stamp in the final 100 km. This has happened to me on several occasions when I walked both trom SJPdP and from Lisbon. Although I am a repeat pilgrim as well as a regular volunteer at the office, they do not make any allowances for me. Nor, do I request special treatment.

In fact, on two of my six annual Caminos, I had to quit early due to injuries or pain. As I had to 'pull the plug early," I arrived at Santiago maybe a week early. When I went into the office to greet my colleagues and friends there, they naturally offered to do my Compostela. I explained that I did not finish properly, having to stop early. That was that. I only received the Cathedral stamp to close out my credencial.

The rule exists to try to ensure that all pilgrims diligently DO WALK the final 100 km on any recognized route. The continued success and growth of the Camino de Santiago into perpetuity relies on integrity, and compliance with the reasonable rules, from all.

You would be surprised, or perhaps not, by the ever increasing number of people who try to shave even this nominal distance. This 'corner cutting' is particularly rampant during the summer months. I have seen small groups pile out of taxis, retrieve their mochilas from the boot / trunk then get in line with the others to claim their Compostelas.

Others, very reliable forum members, have seen bus loads offload from their coach near Monte de Gozo to hike en masse down the hill in to Santiago. Advance scouts or 'rabbits' as we call them, actually walked from Sarria and obtained sellos in some four dozen credencials. This specific example occurred in 2016, and likely continues in some form to this day.

The properly completed and stamped credentials were distributed to the group by the scouts / rabbits at the final cafe at the top of the hill, across from the TV Galicia building. This could not be stopped at the time, because there was no formal system in place to police this sort of rampant cheating. We are working on it. That's all I will say about it...

Of course, these folks, who willingly ignore the rules are only making it worse for all the others, the 99.99 percenters who did what was asked of them and followed the rules.

As regards this specific threat, simply try your best to get as many sellos as you can during the final 100 km. One other tactic that sometimes helps is to use your smartphone with location services turned ON to record photos along your line of march.

These photos will be electronically stamped with the date, time, and physical place you took the photo. You can sort and view your photos using this capability.

I have seen this feature used at the counter both to support or refute claims to a Compostela.

Hope this helps.
 

dfox

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (4/2017)
CP (5/2019)
As I understand, the Pilgrim Office issues two "papers" if pilgrims request (apply). One is "Compostela" and the other one is "certificate of distance".

To qualify for the Compostela, a pilgrim must have walked the last 100 km, either starting from Sarnia or Tui, or somewhere else. To "testify" the pilgrim has walked the last 100 km, he/she must have two stamps (sellos) a day. This paper (Compostela) is free of charge.

A pilgrim can also request a "certificate of distance" walked. I believe the Pilgrim Office takes note on the starting point. If one starts at Porto and takes the Central route, the distance would be 240 km. One needs to pay for a fee, 3 euros (5/2019).
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
The Compostela has been available to eligible pilgrims for more than 1,000 years. It is free. This involves walking at least the minimal 100 km distance on any recognized route in to Santiago.

Evidence of having done this is gathered in the form of two sellos daily during the final 100 km walked, or 200 km ridden on a bike, and contained contained in an approved version of the pilgrim passport or credencial.

The Certificate of Distance was created in 2014, at the request of a lot of long-distance pilgrims who wanted evidence of their longer pilgrimage, by foot or bicycle. Because this is an OPTIONAL certificate, there is a €3,00 donativo / cost involved.

Once you qualify for a Compostela, you can request a Certificate of Distance. Both are usually generated at the same time.

Hope this is clear and helps...
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Rereading what you wrote, you are correct up to a point. Between SJPdP and Sarria it is true that you only need one sello a day, this would count for a distance certificate. Between Sarria and SdC you must have two sellos a day to qualify for the Compostela. In other words, walk SJPdP to Sarria getting at least one sello a day, but when you reach Sarria you must get 2 a day from there on.
Can you tell me where you've seen it stated that between SJPP and Sarria you only need one stamp per day? All of my credentials state - on each page - "at least two per day" (italics are mine, bold font is theirs).

twice a day.JPG
 

Lambs

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Cadiz - Santiago
I’m just a bit confused, can someone help?
How many stamps do I need from Sarria onwards which is where I am now, if I started in sjpdp?
Two per day or just the one ?

Regards
Myself and my partner completed the VDLP and Via Augusta totalling over 1200kms. The queue was two hours long to get the Compostela ( no matter what time of day!) We both decided that queuing two hours was a waste of time and that we didn’t need a piece of paper to tell us that we had walked this distance !!!
 

skeyes0715

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
Myself and my partner completed the VDLP and Via Augusta totalling over 1200kms. The queue was two hours long to get the Compostela ( no matter what time of day!) We both decided that queuing two hours was a waste of time and that we didn’t need a piece of paper to tell us that we had walked this distance !!!
Agree!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
Can you tell me where you've seen it stated that between SJPP and Sarria you only need one stamp per day? All of my credentials state - on each page - "at least two per day" (italics are mine, bold font is theirs).

View attachment 59279
Jeff, you have an excellent point and to address that I would defer to our member expert @t2andreo. My reply was intended to address the concerns and confusion of the OP who wondered if he needed 2 sellos a day after Sarria even though he had 1 a day since starting in SJPdP. I see that the Credencialles that I have are like your's.

The sellos before Sarria serve to "admit" one to pilgrim accommodations, after Sarria the sellos not only admit one to pilgrim accommodations but document one's eligibility for a Compostela.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Jeff, you have an excellent point and to address that I would defer to our member expert @t2andreo. My reply was intended to address the concerns and confusion of the OP who wondered if he needed 2 sellos a day after Sarria even though he had 1 a day since starting in SJPdP. I see that the Credencialles that I have are like your's.

The sellos before Sarria serve to "admit" one to pilgrim accommodations, after Sarria the sellos not only admit one to pilgrim accommodations but document one's eligibility for a Compostela.
Why not just cut out the confusion and, like the credential says, get at least two stamps a day? Granted that on some of the caminos this might be hard but on the CF, which is what we're discussing, it's a piece of cake 🍰
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
Jeff, your point about original sources of information is well taken. Without doing some research I would have to say that right now I take the one-a-day-before-Sarria as a custon passed along, again for the purpose of admittance to a pilgrim albergue. From what I read on the Pilgrim Office site, one a day before Sarria is not specifically stated.

Have you always gotten two sellos a day anywhere along any of the caminos? You must have a wonderful collection of Credenciales!

It is getting hot here in Texas, I shall serve you some ice cream to go with your cake.🍦
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Can you tell me where you've seen it stated that between SJPP and Sarria you only need one stamp per day? All of my credentials state - on each page - "at least two per day" (italics are mine, bold font is theirs).

View attachment 59279
Does it say anything about the final 100 km before Santiago above what you have shown us?
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Okay folks, take this to the bank... It is categorical...accurate....and FINAL!

It is similarly, NOT DEBATABLE.

All pilgrims seeking to quality for a Compostela MUST have at least two sello (rubber stamps) per day once they reach the FINAL 100 km stretch before arriving at Santiago. The purpose of each of these stamps, including the fecha or date, is to establish a chronological and logical "line of march" from your starting point to the Cathedral at Santiago.

Failing to obtain at least two such rubber stamps daily during the final 100 km of your pilgrimage jeopardizes your eligibility for a Compostela... PERIOD! DO NOT SAY YOU WERE NOT WARNED!

I do not care what you think you read, or where you think you read it.... IT IS WRONG!

Exceptions are only, infrequently made, and on a case-by-case basis. You ought never to plan to obtain an exception. GET THE DARN SELLOS!

Okay, blame me for being a hard a$$. But, this is correct. It gets tiring to have people whining on about cutting corners and distances, to do the least effort to get a Compostela. It cheapens it for the rest of us who stick to the program.

For reference, the final 100 km stretch is commonly considered to start at (for example):
  • Sarria on the Frances, and points to the east on the Frances
  • The town before (to the north east of ) Lugo on the Primitivo
  • Monforte de Lemos on the Invierno
  • Ferrol on the Ingles
  • Tui on the Portuguese
  • Ourense on the de la Plata
If you attempt to armchair lawyer the minimum distances inside these geographic points, expect to be challenged at the counter. There, YOU WERE WARNED!

You can check here in the forum for the other 100 km threshold points for other routes. These were just off the top of my head, and are based in my experience or direct knowledge. Double check where your minimum distance threshold is for YOUR CAMINO.

Hope this helps...
 

Cookiedave

Member
Camino(s) past & future
French way 2019
I have just spoken to the man running hostel and person running church in portomarin and they both say if u start in Sarria u need 2 per day... if u start from st Jean pied de Port only one per day...
On the back on my passport 2 per last 100km ...
thus my question
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
I have just spoken to the man running hostel and person running church in portomarin and they both say if u start in Sarria u need 2 per day... if u start from st Jean pied de Port only one per day...
On the back on my passport 2 per last 100km ...
thus my question
@Cookiedave , you were just given good information. The most important thing to remember is 2 per day last 100 K. Best to not ask too many questions or some of us, me included, will wear out our welcome with @t2andreo. With that, we leave you to digest the information..
 
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Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Does it say anything about the final 100 km before Santiago above what you have shown us?
Sure thing, opposite the page where you put your name etc. it says:

La "Compostela" se concede solo a quien hace la peregrinacion con sentido cristiano: devotionis affectu, voti vel pietais causo, y solo a los que llegan hasta la Tumba del Apostel, habiendo recorrido al menos los 100 ultimos kilometros a pie o a caballo, o 200 kilometros en bicicleta.

The "Compostela" is granted only to those who make the pilgrimage with a Christian meaning: devotionis affectu, voti vel pietais causo, and only those who arrive at the Tomb of the Apostel, having traveled at least the last 100 kilometers on foot or on horseback, or 200 km by bicycle.

(From the credentials Ivar sells)

I'm not disputing that I was just querying the statement at #27 that said you only need one stamp a day between SJPP and Sarria.

If you get at least two a day a pedantic clerk at the PO (me?) can check on the often stated "yes, I walked the whole way . . . "

I'll bow out of this discussion now ;)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Jeff, your point about original sources of information is well taken. Without doing some research I would have to say that right now I take the one-a-day-before-Sarria as a custon passed along, again for the purpose of admittance to a pilgrim albergue. From what I read on the Pilgrim Office site, one a day before Sarria is not specifically stated.

Have you always gotten two sellos a day anywhere along any of the caminos? You must have a wonderful collection of Credenciales!

It is getting hot here in Texas, I shall serve you some ice cream to go with your cake.🍦
My favourite is from 2016: 3m/10ft long between Pamplona and SdC. I was walking with a friend, we had a competition, she won ;)
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
I have just spoken to the man running hostel and person running church in portomarin and they both say if u start in Sarria u need 2 per day... if u start from st Jean pied de Port only one per day...
@Jeff Crawley and @t2andreo are volunteers from the pilgrims office in Santiago. When they say it’s two stamps for everyone from Sarria onwards then it‘s two stamps from Sarria onwards for EVERYONE who wants a Compostela.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
What I always do is get 1 stamp a day at the Albergue.
Sometimes I will get more if I am somewhere that I had a nice experience. I have actually met bar owners who were proud of their stamps and of course I added it to my book. In Sarria and beyond 2 A DAY!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Generally, these places are 'chosen' because they are the last places with good transport connections (train and bus) to the rest of Spain, before Santiago. It is based on infrastructure, not mere distance.
 
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VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
So you have to get two stamps per day after 130 or so (or 110 fr Sarria)? Sorry, I know you don't make the rules, @t2andreo, but that doesn't make any sense.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
@Cookiedave , you were just given good information. The most important thing to remember is 2 per day last 100 K. Best to not ask too many questions or some of us, me included, will wear out our welcome with @t2andreo. With that, we leave you to digest the information..
No one ever wears out my welcome. I just get frustrated and tired 'herding cats.' This is one of the eternal issues that always comes up, every years, like dandelion flowers...weeds.

It is one sello daily UNTIL you reach the 100 km marking point on a given recognized route. After that, TWO ARE REQUIRED PER DAY...

PERIOD!
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
So you have to get two stamps per day after 130 or so (or 110 fr Sarria)? Sorry, I know you don't make the rules, @t2andreo, but that doesn't make any sense.
I NEVER said the rules made sense. On the Invierno, I am aware that is where you are at present, I know it is very difficult to obtain the standard required two daily sellos. Been there, done that... 'er sort of...

Also, I do not make the rules. If I did, they would likely be tougher... But I digress...

My recommendation is to do the best you can, take geolocated photos using a smartphone, and include pictures of road signs when you enter a town and then leave the town.

You know, these rectangular white signs with black lettering an usually a red border that inform you you entered the town, then on the back end, inform you with a diagonal line through the town name, that you just left the town. Of course, this works best when road walking. But, taken with the date and time stamp your photo can provide automatically, establishes a clear line of march.

The other alternative on a sello-stingy route like the Invierno, is to photograph every small local chapel and church you come to, including whatever name sign might be attached. After you get the Compostela, if that was your goal, you can always delete these photos.

Churches do not move. Once they are built, they generally remain in place. I make allowance for the Iglexa de San Xoan de Portomarin. That church WAS moved from the valley to the hilltop when the reservoir was built.

Hope this helps...
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
My favourite is from 2016: 3m/10ft long between Pamplona and SdC. I was walking with a friend, we had a competition, she won ;)
ooh! That makes my 2016 credencial look puny - only 1.8m.

And to answer an earlier question from @Sparrow in Texas, that credencial was started in SJPP, skipped Burgos to Leon (my wife found she was extremely allergic to wheat pollen, and walking the Meseta in May would have been agony for her) and continued to Santiago. I didn't consistently collect two stamps a day before Sarria, but on average collected about three a day across the whole distance that I walked. I didn't find that difficult - it was more a matter of remembering to take my credencial to the counter when ordering a coffee or lunch during the day than anything else.

That said, some stamps were a little more difficult to collect. At Irache, I walked a little way off the marked route to collect a stamp at the panaderia, Pan de Irache, and then again at Bodegas Irache to collect that stamp at the office. Why? I thought it worth the very little extra effort to have those two stamps together!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
No one ever wears out my welcome. I just get frustrated and tried 'herding cats.' This is one of the eternal issues that always comes up, every years, like dandelion flowers...weeds.

It is one sello daily UNTIL you reach the 100 km marking point on a given recognized route. After that, TWO ARE REQUIRED PER DAY...

PERIOD!
I sense your frustration and understand that. I previously posted a link to the Pilgrim Office page ( it can be found here) which is the source so far as I am concerned. I always prefer to note that this Pilgrim Office page is silent on how many stamps are needed before the final 'qualifying' leg.

It is also silent on what towns will be recognised, without further inquiry from the Pilgrim Office staff, as starting points for that final 100 km for walking pilgrims. Thank you for providing that information in your earlier post.

I'll bow out of this discussion now ;)
That wasn't a very long bow!! About eight minutes by my reckoning!!
 

bbates225

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2020) Camino Frances (will try again)
To clarify, the 100 km distance applies to walkers and horse riders. Bicycle riders need to do 200 km. The 'rules' are here.
I am so glad this has finally been cleared for me because I have been confused by this as well. I didn't get to finish my first time around so this is helpful news for when I go back next year.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
As one who has started both my caminos far to the east of Sarria this "two stamps per day for the last 100km" looks more like a way to keep the passport printers in business than an effort to track any fraud pilgrims. On both pilgrimages I did some "cutting and pasting" to ensure I had enough room to gather all those stamps. So may I suggest that the "official passport printers" start producing credencials with room for at least 45 or 50 stamps. I think the ones provided by the CSJ UK are of this ilk but all the others I have come across barely have room for 30 stamps.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Please just adapt to the reality and go with the flow. While I respect honest debate and differences in opinion. This is really settled 'law.' It is not going to change anything soon, at least insofar as I know.

Having contrary opinions on this particular issue is not helpful to the newbies who rely on us for guidance and advice. I prefer to opt on the side of telling people to bring two credentials if they plan to collect a lot of sellos.

Personally, I always start my Caminos with an APOC issued (USA), laser-printed credencial. These are among the most stingy in terms of space for sellos. They are in fact designed for one stamp daily and then two after Sarria. Don't believe me, count the spaces. There are just enough for a 40 day Camino including two daily from Sarria.

To overcome this, I developed a document that I converted to .pdf that prints to a 'form' that can be trimmed and pasted, or taped into a credential to extend the number of pages. I usually bring one or two of these extra pages with me on Camino.

I am attaching it here for your use.

Hope this helps.
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
Since the original question of the OP has been answered multiple times in multiple ways and there have been a few mis interpretations of posters, would a moderator please close this thread. The topic has been sufficiently beaten!
 
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017,2018, (2019)
Since the original question of the OP has been answered multiple times in multiple ways and there have been a few mis interpretations of posters, would a moderator please close this thread. The topic has been sufficiently beaten!
Well said. May I just check that the Pilgrim Office should not really be interested in the number and frequency of sellos before the 100/200km mark unless a distance certificate is requested. Albergues, yes: Pilgrim Office, no?
Warm Regards, A (possibly mistaken) Pedant.😗
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
Well said. May I just check that the Pilgrim Office should not really be interested in the number and frequency of sellos before the 100/200km mark unless a distance certificate is requested. Albergues, yes: Pilgrim Office, no?
Warm Regards, A (possibly mistaken) Pedant.😗
I believe that you are correct, though I am not the authority, just a logical thinking person.
 

Lindsay53

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April / May 19
I have just spoken to the man running hostel and person running church in portomarin and they both say if u start in Sarria u need 2 per day... if u start from st Jean pied de Port only one per day...
On the back on my passport 2 per last 100km ...
thus my question
As the others have said, two per day from Sarria, even if it does seem pretty pointless. As a peregrina said as we were discussing this over a few beers one night "If I have walked all the way from St Jean am I suddenly going to get a taxi for the last 100ks?".... but the rules is the rules, even if they make little sense.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Well said. May I just check that the Pilgrim Office should not really be interested in the number and frequency of sellos before the 100/200km mark unless a distance certificate is requested. Albergues, yes: Pilgrim Office, no?
Warm Regards, A (possibly mistaken) Pedant.😗
James, you are correct.

Sellos BEFORE the 100 km thresholds do not qualify you for a Compostela. One only need do the final 100km and prove it with two or more sellos daily to obtain this document.

However, sellos from the starting point, let's say one daily, ARE REQUIRED to obtain a proper Certificate of Distance. If staff are to write down that you walked 799 Km (or whatever it is today) from SJPdP to Santiago, they are going to have to be able to establish that you did in fact cover that distance, along a reasonable rate and line of march. So, at least one sello daily is the standard here.

That said, if you only want a Compostela and do not care about the distance certificate, don't stress before the final 100 km. Enjoy your Camino and do not fret about sellos. However, I have found that getting into the habit of collecting them early and often contributes to making it easier in the final few days of a long Camino.

So, in my view, just get one sello at your place of accommodation starting at the beginning. Then, when you reach Sarria, Tui, Monforte de Lemos, Ourense, Ferrol, etc. Consciously start making the effort to obtain two or more daily.

Supplementing these sellos with whatever geolocated photos you may take along this ,one of march should ensure eligibility for a Compostela.

Hope this helps.

Your 'Ditch Pig' Partner...
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
Please just adapt to the reality and go with the flow. While I respect honest debate and differences in opinion. This is really settled 'law.' It is not going to change anything soon, at least insofar as I know.

Having contrary opinions on this particular issue is not helpful to the newbies who rely on us for guidance and advice. I prefer to opt on the side of telling people to bring two credentials if they plan to collect a lot of sellos.

Personally, I always start my Caminos with an APOC issued (USA), laser-printed credencial. These are among the most stingy in terms of space for sellos. They are in fact designed for one stamp daily and then two after Sarria. Don't believe me, count the spaces. There are just enough for a 40 day Camino including two daily from Sarria.

To overcome this, I developed a document that I converted to .pdf that prints to a 'form' that can be trimmed and pasted, or taped into a credential to extend the number of pages. I usually bring one or two of these extra pages with me on Camino.

I am attaching it here for your use.

Hope this helps.
Thanks for the form @t2andreo
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
As I understand, the Pilgrim Office issues two "papers" if pilgrims request (apply). One is "Compostela" and the other one is "certificate of distance".

To qualify for the Compostela, a pilgrim must have walked the last 100 km, either starting from Sarnia or Tui, or somewhere else. To "testify" the pilgrim has walked the last 100 km, he/she must have two stamps (sellos) a day. This paper (Compostela) is free of charge.

A pilgrim can also request a "certificate of distance" walked. I believe the Pilgrim Office takes note on the starting point. If one starts at Porto and takes the Central route, the distance would be 240 km. One needs to pay for a fee, 3 euros (5/2019).
I believe there is a third, a document of welcome. For this document there are no particular requirements except having made your way (however you want to) to Santiago de Compostela.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
Who decided that's the place? Because the 100km mojon is actually near Diamondi...many kms past Monforte.
Who cares where it is!!!!!!! People will tell you Sarria so you don’t screw up and start getting 2 stamps later on. Just get them starting there 2tAndreo is right. We hear this all the time. I don’t get why this is so difficult a concept to grasp and what the big deal is.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
Please just adapt to the reality and go with the flow. While I respect honest debate and differences in opinion. This is really settled 'law.' It is not going to change anything soon, at least insofar as I know.

Having contrary opinions on this particular issue is not helpful to the newbies who rely on us for guidance and advice. I prefer to opt on the side of telling people to bring two credentials if they plan to collect a lot of sellos.

Personally, I always start my Caminos with an APOC issued (USA), laser-printed credencial. These are among the most stingy in terms of space for sellos. They are in fact designed for one stamp daily and then two after Sarria. Don't believe me, count the spaces. There are just enough for a 40 day Camino including two daily from Sarria.

To overcome this, I developed a document that I converted to .pdf that prints to a 'form' that can be trimmed and pasted, or taped into a credential to extend the number of pages. I usually bring one or two of these extra pages with me on Camino.

I am attaching it here for your use.

Hope this helps.
I agree, I always buy two passports. It just makes things easier. There are so many ways to get them it is so easy
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Who cares where it is!!!!!!! People will tell you Sarria so you don’t screw up and start getting 2 stamps later on. Just get them starting there 2tAndreo is right. We hear this all the time. I don’t get why this is so difficult a concept to grasp and what the big deal is.
Welcome to my way of understanding... waiting ones turn, and following rules seems to be and increasingly arcane concept.

We are entitled to NOTHING! We earn eligibility through our honest labors and efforts...
 

JLWV

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Levante (2014-2016); Levante to Toledo (2017-2018), to be continued; Fisterra & Muxia (2018);
Please just adapt to the reality and go with the flow. While I respect honest debate and differences in opinion. This is really settled 'law.' It is not going to change anything soon, at least insofar as I know.
I agree with that, but I have to confirm that there is a confusing divergence between documents, which needs to be clarified by the competent authority.

If I am not wrong, I think t2andreo collaborates at the Pilgrim Office. I am at the other end, giving credenciales in AACS-Valencia.

The credencial from the "Federación de AACS" (we extend only in Valencia more than 7.500 by year) clearly says (in Spanish): "If you only walk the last 100 km you must stamp twice a day". As I know the problem I inform pilgrims they must do it if they start in Sarria, or equivalent, and strongly recommend to do it for longer trips.

The credencial from the catedral clearly says "two by day", without specifying that it is only at the end.

Can I suggest that people in contact with the authority promotes one single information in all documents?

I join a photo of a Federeación's credencial and one from the Catedral's credencial.
 

Attachments

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
I agree with that, but I have to confirm that there is a confusing divergence between documents, which needs to be clarified by the competent authority.

If I am not wrong, I think t2andreo collaborates at the Pilgrim Office. I am at the other end, giving credenciales in AACS-Valencia.

The credencial from the "Federación de AACS" (we extend only in Valencia more than 7.500 by year) clearly says (in Spanish): "If you only walk the last 100 km you must stamp twice a day". As I know the problem I inform pilgrims they must do it if they start in Sarria, or equivalent, and strongly recommend to do it for longer trips.

The credencial from the catedral clearly says "two by day", without specifying that it is only at the end.

Can I suggest that people in contact with the authority promotes one single information in all documents?

I join a foto of a Federeación's credencial and one from the Catedral's credencial.
Once again it is not rocket science. Get 2 a day starting in Sarria. Or you know what? Just look for the 100k Marker and walk back until you get to the first location that can give you a stamp!! PLEASE MODERATOR CLOSE THIS THREAD. THE ANSWER HAS BEEN REPEATED AS NAUSEAM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
I agree with that, but I have to confirm that there is a confusing divergence between documents, which needs to be clarified by the competent authority.

If I am not wrong, I think t2andreo collaborates at the Pilgrim Office. I am at the other end, giving credenciales in AACS-Valencia.

The credencial from the "Federación de AACS" (we extend only in Valencia more than 7.500 by year) clearly says (in Spanish): "If you only walk the last 100 km you must stamp twice a day". As I know the problem I inform pilgrims they must do it if they start in Sarria, or equivalent, and strongly recommend to do it for longer trips.

The credencial from the catedral clearly says "two by day", without specifying that it is only at the end.

Can I suggest that people in contact with the authority promotes one single information in all documents?

I join a foto of a Federeación's credencial and one from the Catedral's credencial.

The language in the Federation de AACS is technically incorrect, or at least misleading. I would recommend replacing the words... "If you only walk the last 100 km, you must..." With "...Beginning with the final 100 km before Santiago, you must..." IMHO, that is clearer. But I do not know how it works in Spanish.

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014; 2019)
Camino Primitivo (2016)
Camino del Norte (2016-2018)
San Salvador (2018)
I’m just a bit confused, can someone help?
How many stamps do I need from Sarria onwards which is where I am now, if I started in sjpdp?
Two per day or just the one ?

Regards
By the time I hit Sarria I was onto a new (2nd) credencial for the journey, so I thought what the hell, why not get multiple stamps per day to fill up the space? But as someone who now has four Compostelae, and all long distance, no, you really don't need two per day if you've been on the road for many hundreds of kilometres already. The extension to Finisterre and Muxia needs two per day.
 

Bala

Veteran member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: SJPdP-Burgos, (2015); Burgos-Sarria (2018); Sarria-Santiago (2018).
Frances (2020)
Why doesn't it ever occur to people to actually look on the Cathedral website to find out what's needed?

After all, it's the Cathedral, through the Pilgrim Office, that issues the Compostela, not the guy giving advice from the bunk next to you.

Personally, I can't imagine walking 500 miles expecting to receive something at the end, but never bothering to find out what was required. But clearly thousands of people do every year. After all, they read all they needed on Facebook.

A while back I got in a bit of a dustup on the APOC (American Pilgrims on the Camino) Facebook page over the two stamps requirement. One guy got highly offended that he'd been walking for several weeks --"all the way from SJPP!"-- and this was the first he'd heard of this. Why, the nerve! If this was really the case, he pointed out, then APOC ought to print that right on the credential!!

I posted a picture of where it was printed right on my credential.

Well, he said, he got his credential in SJPP and it was in French and he'd never bothered to try to translate it.

🤔🤨🤷‍♀️🤪

God bless everyone in the Pilgrim Office.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
The language in the Federation de AACS is technically incorrect, or at least misleading. I would recommend replacing the words... "If you only walk the last 100 km, you must..." With "...Beginning with the final 100 km before Santiago, you must..." IMHO, that is clearer. But I do not know how it works in Spanish.

Hope this helps.
Living in Mexico and seeing how translations are done you have to give very, very wide latitude to them. To say the least.
 

CharlieWart

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2018)
I'm not worried about this (I enjoyed doing my Camino as a challenge anyway), but the "two per day" doesn't make sense as a rule to me. Unusual I know, but I ran the last 100km in one day as an ultramarathon, so in principle I could have got one stamp at my starting point (Ourense) and the other one in SdC, and I would have met the rule. (Actually I got about 14 stamps -- but was still refused the certificate of distance, as it wasn't considered a proper 'peregrination' to do it in one day!)

Someone else may do a very modest distance each day, say 10 km. Do they really need 20 stamps in the last 100 km because that would be _2 per day_? When someone else doing the last 100km in 3 days would need only 6 stamps? I think it would make more sense to specify the distance interval, not define it in terms of days, because people can vary a lot in their speed. E.g. require 6 stamps in the last 100km, regardless of how long it took to cover that distance.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
(Actually I got about 14 stamps -- but was still refused the certificate of distance, as it wasn't considered a proper 'peregrination' to do it in one day!)
Why have a rule if it's applied capriciously?
You flowed the rules, and here's nothing in there about pace, proper or not.
Not fair.
😡
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Hey, whoever said that rules had to make sense? You must consider that this is the Catholic Church we are talking about. They have thousands of rules. Not all of them make sense to everyone.

I've lived under this system of "rules" for 66 years now. After a few decades, you just roll with it. Take it from me, it is easier to accept and go with the flow than it is to argue minutiae.

Then, you need to consider that this is Spain. The Camino is their cultural patrimony, history and long standing tradition. The routes are mostly in their country. In any event, most Camino routes culminate in Spain. This is simply because the object, the goal of the original Camino de Santiago, is there.

Thus, the Catholic officials in Spain get to set their rules, for their Camino, on their territory. What is so difficult with this simple and logical concept?

One might as well argue about the sun rising in the east and setting in the west.

I suggest that we all return to the instant concern of enjoying the journey as we saunter along our life's camino.

Hope this helps the dialog.
 

CharlieWart

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2018)
Why have a rule if it's applied capriciously?
You flowed the rules, and here's nothing in there about pace, proper or not.
Not fair.
😡
I actually asked if it would have been OK if I'd spent 5 days over it -- yes, was the answer! To be fair, the system was set up for pilgrims, not those attempting sporting stunts like me. Having queued for about an hour to get to the desk, I didn'really fancy trying to argue anyway...
 

Turga

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
Take it from me, it is easier to accept and go with the flow than it is to argue minutiae.
Thank God not everybody chooses the easy way to go with the flow and accept what may be wrong and illogical, but dare to question and debate.

Thus, the Catholic officials in Spain get to set their rules, for their Camino, on their territory. What is so difficult with this simple and logical concept?
Luckily, history shows that humanity in general is not so naïve and narrow-minded as to blindly accept rules set by some authority, be it worldly or clerical, if these rules do not stand the test of time.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Thank God not everybody chooses the easy way to go with the flow and accept what may be wrong and illogical, but dare to question and debate.
Luckily, history shows that humanity in general is not so naïve and narrow-minded as to blindly accept rules set by some authority, be it worldly or clerical, if these rules do not stand the test of time.
@Turga, I can assure you from personal experience that these rules, set by this authority, are of minuscule importance to humanity at large and of no importance whatsoever for any pilgrim who is not keen on a Compostela. They concern only those who want something from the authority, namely a pretty looking piece of paper in Latin. They want to please you, not rule you, and I see nothing wrong with setting some seemingly arbitrary rules, the main purpose of which is to make the whole process still manageable and personal in view of the ever increasing number of Compostela recipients. You have a lot more personal freedom than you may think 😀, and for the absolute majority of Compostela holders, following these rules (two stamps per day during a roughly 100 km stretch until Santiago) is no trouble.
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Hey, whoever said that rules had to make sense? You must consider that this is the Catholic Church we are talking about. They have thousands of rules. Not all of them make sense to everyone.

I've lived under this system of "rules" for 66 years now. After a few decades, you just roll with it. Take it from me, it is easier to accept and go with the flow than it is to argue minutiae.

Then, you need to consider that this is Spain. The Camino is their cultural patrimony, history and long standing tradition. The routes are mostly in their country. In any event, most Camino routes culminate in Spain. This is simply because the object, the goal of the original Camino de Santiago, is there.

Thus, the Catholic officials in Spain get to set their rules, for their Camino, on their territory. What is so difficult with this simple and logical concept?

One might as well argue about the sun rising in the east and setting in the west.

I suggest that we all return to the instant concern of enjoying the journey as we saunter along our life's camino.

Hope this helps the dialog.
Ultimately, the Catholic Church in Spain isn't setting any rules for the Camino. One can still complete the Camino however one wants. What they are setting rules for is the giving out of the Compostela. They can do that because they are the ones giving it. In theory, if someone doesn't like the Church rules for this they are free to set up shop in Santiago (or partner with someone already there) and give out their own certificates based on whatever rules make more sense to them. Who knows, if their rules make so much more sense, maybe pilgrims will stop seeking the Church's certificate and pursue the new one instead. But for now, with regards to the Compostela, it is the Church gifting us with the paper and they get to choose to whom they will offer the gift.
 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
The volunteers at the Pilgrims Office - some of whom are employees of the Cathedral, while others are volunteers from Spain or elsewhere in the world on a 2 weeks stint - decide whether your credentials (sic!) qualify you for a Compostela or not. I'm sure that you could appeal to a supervisor and even a higher rang in the hierarchy ... so I have this fantasy: that all those who question the current rules and their implementation and find them unfair or illogical will appeal and then get the treatment that pilgrims such as @Bradypus received in times so far in the past (barely a couple of decades) that they are nearly forgotten: an interview with a priest on the cathedral staff who asks you about your reasons for walking, your religious practice along the way, your personal understanding of what "pilgrimage" meant and the significance of Santiago for you - a very friendly but searching inquisition.

I wonder how that would work out for those who, in their own words, have to shave off a day or 1 km 789 m from their short pilgrimage for apparently compelling reasons or apparently meditate and enjoy the landscape while running 2 consecutive marathons within one day ... ah, a fantasy, as I said. 🙃
 

Turga

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
@Turga, I can assure you from personal experience that these rules, set by this authority, are of minuscule importance to humanity at large and of no importance whatsoever for any pilgrim who is not keen on a Compostela. They concern only those who want something from the authority, namely a pretty looking piece of paper in Latin. They want to please you, not rule you, and I see nothing wrong with setting some seemingly arbitrary rules, the main purpose of which is to make the whole process still manageable and personal in view of the ever increasing number of Compostela recipients. You have a lot more personal freedom than you may think 😀, and for the absolute majority of Compostela holders, following these rules (two stamps per day during a roughly 100 km stretch until Santiago) is no trouble.
Kathar1na, I think you missed my point, which is of a more general nature. This of course is my fault, because I didn’t express myself clearly.

I have no problem with the specific rules, to which I have gladly abided myself in order to claim my own Compostelas.

That doesn’t change the reality that arguing and questioning matters are one of the main pillars of democracy and institutions and societies where you cannot do that are generally not nice places to be; so I have a problem with statements expressing the point of view that you should just accept matters and hold your tongue. Many rules have been changed over time including “rules” of religious matters, so why rule out the possibility that the rules of claiming Compostelas could be changed into something “better”/more operational? But that may only happen if these rules are questioned and debated.

In my book, you shouldn’t just accept things that you think are wrong or that you think could be improved, you should question and debate them. You may have to tolerate them, but that’s another matter.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
In my book, you shouldn’t just accept things that you think are wrong or that you think could be improved, you should question and debate them. You may have to tolerate them, but that’s another matter.
In all fairness, @t2andreo resorted to his categorical statement because one poster insisted on saying that some pilgrims told him something else, and a man running a church in Portomarin said the same thing, and also a hospitalero. It put me in a forgiving mood.

As to the pillars of democracy and institutions and societies: I increasingly feel that citizens have a duty to inform themselves carefully and check the reliability of their information sources, and they have the means to do so. It's millimetres away from their fingertips. It would also lift the level of debate and cut out a lot of chaff. But that's a topic that would lead us astray.
 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
(From the credentials Ivar sells)
Ivar sells the credential designed and issued on behalf of the Cabildo of the Santiago Cathedral themselves. However ...

@Jeff Crawley: Will you be doing another stint as a volunteer at the pilgrims office? If yes, may I suggest that you do a comprehensive study of what it says and doesn't say about the number of stamps on the many other credentials that are recognised by the Cabildo and are not issued by them but by one of the many pilgrims associations? You may be a little surprised. And these differences between Cabildo approved post-2016 (or so) credentials is of course partly the reason for this whole palaver. 🤓
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
I can tell you that each time there is a change in the format, style, or text of the 'official' Cathedral-issued credencial, they first use all present supplies. This makes sense both from business and environmental perspectives. To obtain the best unit price, they have a hundred thousand or more printed annually. Inventories are rotated so older stock and versions are used first.

Also, the PIlgrim Office provides case quantities, about 1,700 per case, to churches, tourism offices, church and civic organizations all over Europe. So, any version of the credencial will remain in the credencial distribution network for more than a year, at least in my experience and observation. Put another way, if you changed the credencial at the end of this season, you could not expect to see it in complete distribution and use for maybe two future seasons (years). Thus, it is normal for there to be several credencial versions floating around and acceptable for use.

The last time I am aware this changeover happened was post-summer 2016, when I got them to change the quality of the paper stock to make it more absorbent and not streaky. You may recall having to use a bar napkin to blot up the ink from sellos so they would not smear on the shiny paper. I am also aware that they used the late post-2016 / 2017 printing to modify some of the text as well. But, I don't recall exactly what changed.

As regards the exact language on the current credencial, here is the translation and notes on the May 2019 credencial I have. With my 2019 Camino canceled for medical reasons, I went instead to volunteer for a couple of weeks. I picked up this credencial then.

(NOTE: I used Microsoft Translate though my iPhone camera to translate this from the actual May credencial I have at home. I made a very few edits to the text to enhance understanding, and only when it was obvious to me that I needed to change the initial, scanned translation.

Text of Instructions, May 2019 Credencial

“IMPORTANT BEFORE YOU START
THE CAMINO DE SANTIAGO


This credencial is only for pilgrims of foot, bicycle, horse, or sailing who wish to make the pilgrimage with a meaningful Christian, if only in a searching attitude. The credencial aims to identify the pilgrim. The credencial does not generate rights to the pilgrim but has two practical purposes:
  • Access to the hostels offered by Christian hospitality on the Way.
  • To apply for the “Compostela” at the (Pilgrim Office) belonging to S.A.M.I Cathedral of Santiago, which is the certification of having completed the pilgrimage.
The “Compostela” is granted only to those who make the pilgrimage in a Christian sense: “devotionis affectu, voti vel pietatis causa,” and only those who reach the Apostle’s Tomb having traveled at least the last 100 kilometers on foot or 200 kilometers by bicycle, and 100 nautical miles, walking the rest of the Camino from the port of landing.

(NOTE: This last bit about boats (nautical), is where the Irish Camino has been formally accepted. You walk about 30 km in Ireland, documenting same in your credencial using sellos / stamps, then travel by boat to the coast of Spain. From there, you walk direct to Santiago. If the total distance walked in Ireland plus Spain, adds to 100 km or more, plus the boat trip from Ireland to Spain, you qualify for a Compostela.

The last 100 kilometers must be made by any of the routes recognized as official by the S.A.M.I Cathedral of Santiago. (This is notwithstanding the special Irish Camino boat bit…)

The pilgrim’s credencial, therefore, can only be issued by the Church, through its own institutions (Bishopric, Parishes, Brotherhood, etc.), Federation of Associations, Association of Friends of the Camino de Santiago, etc. Only so may be awarded the “Compostela” at the S.A.M.I. Cathedral of Santiago. (NOTE: They also sell case quantities to commercial enterprises)

Bearer of this credencial accepts these conditions.” (END OF TRANSLATION)

Regarding the Number of Sellos required Daily...

Also, atop each credencial page provided to gather stamps or sellos, is this statement. It is printed in Spanish, then in English, atop alternating pages…

“PASSPORT STAMP REQUIREMENT
You must have at least TWO STAMPS PER DAY
DATED
to validate your journey”​

NOTE: Curiously, and this comes as news to me, nowhere in the above is there a clear statement that says when one sello / stamp daily is enough and when two sellos / stamps daily are required. The literal language above SUGGESTS that two stamps per day are required EVERYDAY.

But, PLEASE, this is only my interpretation of what I just tried to translate.

I plan to clarify this when I return in 25 or so days to work for a month. If anyone knows someone who is now serving at the Pilgrim Office, perhaps send them a PM and ask them to make the inquiries.

Hope this helps settle this issue...for now at least...;)
 
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JimGeier

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Spring 2016
CF Autumn 2017
VDLP Spring 2020
This discussion seems to surface frequently. And I smile. I love the stamps, and have no difficulty getting far more than the required minimum, as do many others.

Camino Frances 1 from SJPdP, 83 sellos in 33 days (average 2.5 per day)
Camino Frances 2 from SJPdP, 146 sellos in 32 days (average 4.6 per day).

On the second Camino, I averaged 8 per day after Sarria. I love the stamps - my credentials are more important to me than the Compostela and Cerificate of Distance. They are a great memory of where I stayed, where I ate, museums I visited (like Museo de Chocolate in Astorga), and the churches in which I prayed and reflected. And they are more interesting to share with friends. The Compestela and the Distance Certificates get a quick look, but people love looking at all the stamps.

Oh, I like best the credentials from the Confraternity of Saint James, they have space for 56 sellos, while the other credentials from the Cathedral de Santiago have spaces for only 48. I start with three credentials, and if needed, I know I can get another along the way.

Get the stamps, it is easy, fun, and makes for great memories.
Buen Camino,
--jim--
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
@t2andreo, thanks for your continued efforts at getting the message across :). This isn’t terribly important in the greater scheme of things, I just wanted to point out earlier that there are Cathedral approved and up to date editions of credencials in various languages, for example in French and German, and they are not a translation of the Spanish text of the Cathedral credencials.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
As to the pillars of democracy and institutions and societies: I increasingly feel that citizens have a duty to inform themselves carefully and check the reliability of their information sources, and they have the means to do so.
I also have a feeling - - based on the frailties of human nature - - that whether it is the rules for obtaining a Compostela, or the Rights of an individual in everyday life, people may sooner or later not appreciate the Tyranny of the Majority of a true democratic decision-making process.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
having traveled at least the last 100 kilometers on foot or 200 kilometers by bicycle, and 100 nautical miles, walking the rest of the Camino from the port of landing. (NOTE: This last bit about boats (nautical), is where the Irish Camino has been formally accepted. You walk about 30 km in Ireland, documenting same in your credencial using sellos / stamps, then travel by boat to the coast of Spain. From there, you walk direct to Santiago. If the total distance walked in Ireland plus Spain, adds to 100 km or more, plus the boat trip from Ireland to Spain, you qualify for a Compostela.
I discovered to my horror today that some say 100 nautical miles while others say (and write) that 90 nautical miles are required plus the last very short bit on foot. A potential new issue for debate! In any case, it has nothing to do with Ireland. Which is perhaps obvious because first of all, the majority of those who walk some 25 km in Ireland and then the Camino Ingles to Santiago in Spain travel by plane and not by boat, and secondly, the distance from the shores of Ireland to the shores of Galicia is more than 100 nautical miles. I'm sure someone can tell us how much it is. :)

It's for pilgrims who travel by sailing boat along the North Spanish coast. One of the most traditional ways for pilgrims of yore. High season is July and August: last year, the Pilgrims Office awarded 126 Compostelas during these two months.

One sello for each port.
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
I appreciate the irony. However, the usual / traditional place of disembarkation and finishing the Celtic (Irish) Camino is from a Coruña.

The rule change was simply to acknowledge this historic route and allow someone to start the Camino in Ireland, and finish it walking the approximate 75 km distance once in Spain. In either event, the cumulative distance, Ireland plus Spain, must total at least 100 km. Credencials and appropriate stamps / sellos must be used to document both segments. Those are the rules.

In fact, here is the official discussion of the Celtic Camino from the Camino Society of Ireland website:


This Celtic Camino is based on long tradition for the Irish pilgrims. Hundreds of years ago, they actually traveled from ireland to a Coruña using small wood and canvas rowed boats. The route followed the coastline of the UK, France and Spain.

Here is an article, appearing in an Irish news outlet today, that discusses this sort of boat.


All said, I do not envision others coming out of the proverbial woodwork and lobbying for their special Camino, UNLESS and UNTIL a long historic route is identified, researched and documented. This is what happened in the case of the Celtic Camino.

This did not happen overnight. It took years to do the research and produce the documentation and archaeological evidence needed to prove the case for creating this newest formally recognized Camino.

Hope this helps the dialog.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Ivar sells the credential designed and issued on behalf of the Cabildo of the Santiago Cathedral themselves. However ...

@Jeff Crawley: Will you be doing another stint as a volunteer at the pilgrims office? If yes, may I suggest that you do a comprehensive study of what it says and doesn't say about the number of stamps on the many other credentials that are recognised by the Cabildo and are not issued by them but by one of the many pilgrims associations? You may be a little surprised. And these differences between Cabildo approved post-2016 (or so) credentials is of course partly the reason for this whole palaver. 🤓
Not in the immediate future - with my current state of health/fitness I'd never make it to the Santa Clara convent at the end of the day!
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
I appreciate the irony. However, the usual / traditional place of disembarkation and finishing the Celtic (Irish) Camino is from a Coruña.
There was no irony. Are you not aware of it? You can do the pilgrimage a pie (on foot), en bicicleta (bicycle), a caballo (horseback), a vela (sailing) - see the first page of the current credential as sold in the forum shop and two links to more information, including references that all this has been agreed with the Cathedral. Disembarkation ports are for example Portosin/Noia, Cabo da Cruz and Muros. There are several sailing routes, starting in a coastal port either to the south or to the east of Santiago. "A vela" is a category in the monthly statistics of the Santiago pilgrims office with entries of the number of pilgrims registered since 2016. Debes sellar tu Credencial del Peregrino en todos los puertos de la ruta escogida - you must get stamps for your Pilgrim Credential in all the ports of the chosen route.

https://www.mrcyb.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Folleto-Travesía-Náutica-Xacobea.pdf

A vela.png
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
I AM aware of the newly added boat symbol on the inside cover of the newer Credencial. I confess to not being fully conversant with the historical routes behind it.

Thank you for clarifying, and for the assist.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
the historical routes behind it
I very much doubt that there is anything much historical behind these modern sailing routes that have been recognised by the Cabildo of the Cathedral as valid for obtaining a Compostela or other certificates. It's just an agreement they made and it responds to the contemporary environment.

As to history, many pilgrims sailed not only from Ireland, but also from the UK, France, the Low Countries, northern parts of Germany, and Scandinavia to visit Saint James in Galicia. Bernadette Cunningham wrote an interesting book about medieval Irish pilgrims to Santiago which contains an overview of the usual sailing routes which were of course nothing else than the routes developed and used by traders. I'm aware of the recent journey made in a small traditional Irish rowing boat and the movie about it but that was not the traditional way to make such a journey to Galicia. Irish pilgrims were paying passengers on merchant ships. Coruña and Vigo were major ports then, as it is still the case now.

Ireland .png
 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
All said, I do not envision others coming out of the proverbial woodwork and lobbying for their special Camino, UNLESS and UNTIL a long historic route is identified, researched and documented. This is what happened in the case of the Celtic Camino.
Getting a Compostela for 25 km walked and somehow certified in one's home country plus 75 km from Coruña to Santiago is available for anyone from any country as far as I understand it. Today's pilgrims are, after all, not reenactors of medieval pilgrims but walk a contemporary foot pilgrimage. I guess the Irish pilgrims association is just better than others at marketing this fairly new option. :)
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
I have no basis to reply to this statement, so I choose to accept it as fact. It will go on my list of questions to pose when I arrive in mid-July for a month's volunteer service.

I suspect the key element of the 'correct' answer is that the distance walked and documented by sellos in a credencial must have been on an 'approved' route. The Celtic Camino is specifically approved for Compostela issuance.

This begs the logical question, "...are there other start-stop-start routes, similar to the Celtic Camino, starting at other places that are valid for Compostela eligibility?" Or, does the interruption by the Atlantic Ocean create the unique scenario.

The premise that one can walk, say 25 km in their home country, then fly or sail over the ocean, to pick it up again a a Spanish Atlantic port, or any other place, some 75 km or more from Santiago, is interesting. Logically, it means I can walk 25 km or more from my front door to my nearest airport (West Palm Beach, FL- PBI) using surface streets, obtain a rubber stamp from someone, somewhere to establish my passage, fly over the ocean, then pick it up in a Coruña or Ferrol, etc.

I dunno about this... That is why it requires more investigation and research.

I shall be interested in the official answer. If I get one, I will try to remember to report back here...or in another thread I would post.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
I dunno about this... That is why it requires more investigation and research.
I shall be interested in the official answer. If I get one, I will try to remember to report back here...or in another thread I would post.
That is very kind of you and much appreciated. However, I think this thread shows that there is room for improvement of the direct information flow from the Cabildo to the global pilgrims community, both through their website and through pilgrim associations. Although: the associations seem to guard their information and share it mainly with their members when asked.

The following is from the Camino Inglés Guidebook - 2017/2018 Kindle Edition, published by the British Cofraternity of Saint James CSJ and written by Johnnie Walker: For the purposes of gaining the Compostela the Cathedral has for some years taken the route as being 75 kms in length from A Coruña and during 2017 reaffirmed that those pilgrims who walk at least 25 kms in their home country then walk from A Coruña may gain the Compostela, providing they have stamps on an official credential as evidence of this. To learn more about this please consult your local Pilgrim Association.

It is my understanding that any 25 km will do. Outside of Galicia or Spain for that matter, the concept of historical routes makes less sense as people started walking from their home villages and home towns, either to Galicia on land or to a nearby sea port or even river port ... and also because there is not the same need or urge to promote any such revived routes for economic/touristic purposes.
 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Not in the immediate future - with my current state of health/fitness I'd never make it to the Santa Clara convent at the end of the day!
I am sorry to hear this. I hope your health status improves and as to the fitness status: keep working on it. 🙂
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Bernadette Cunningham wrote an interesting book
Just noticed in the chapter about the contemporary revival of the pilgrimage to Santiago that, in 1965, one could get a passage by boat from Liverpool or Southhampton (both ports in the UK) to Coruña or Vigo, and that was the cheapest way to get to Santiago or back from Santiago in those days. Today such regular ship lines for passengers don't exist anymore. It is actually quite difficult to find any ship or boat that will take a passenger who wants to travel from/to Galicia and the UK or Ireland or other countries to the north of Galicia.

A credential with the stamp of a ship in it ... 🤭
 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
This Celtic Camino is based on long tradition for the Irish pilgrims.
I read up a bit on the website provided by the link. So, in fact, there is no such thing as a "Celtic Camino" in the historical sense as there is a "Camino Frances" or a "Camino Ingles" or a "voie de Tours".

The Camino Society Ireland say themselves on their website that they have named the 25 km walked in Ireland with the 75 km walked from A Coruna the “Celtic Camino”. The 25 km can be anything and anywhere in Ireland, although they suggest that it should be preferably a pilgrimage path. They offer a list of identified and marked pilgrimage routes in Ireland to choose from. None of the 7 routes offered strike me as routes with a primary historical connection to the pilgrimage to Saint James in Galicia. I think this is all fine but it's also yet another example where we tend to believe that something quite contemporary, be it a tradition or a way, has been around in this form since the year 1200 or so. :)
 
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