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Plan B and Beyond.

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
Well at this point every reopening situation is speculative and we are all at the mercy of the virus but seeing as I'm supposed to restart my pilgrimage from Martingny about Sept 1st, I need options. If I can't restart this year, I'll finish it when I can but I'll be going somewhere so I need ideas and opinions on other possible routes. It will depend on what each country is doing and how they have been affected by the virus.
Lycian Way in Turkey?
Trans Canada Trail?
Any thoughts or ideas I can put on my evaluation list? Places that potentially will be open for pilgrims in Sept?
Cheers!
John
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
Any thoughts or ideas I can put on my evaluation list?
Perhaps focusing on a route you can reach without an airplane would improve the likelihood of being able to execute your plan B. Also factor in the possibility of quarantine requirements either going in or coming out, or both. Otherwise, you'd need to develop Plan C in addition. (Of course, Plan C may be necessary anyhow.)
 

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
Perhaps focusing on a route you can reach without an airplane would improve the likelihood of being able to execute your plan B. Also factor in the possibility of quarantine requirements either going in or coming out, or both. Otherwise, you'd need to develop Plan C in addition. (Of course, Plan C may be necessary anyhow.)
Absolutely. That's why I need the options to evaluate. I already have a flight to Geneva but air travel may not be possible at that time. If I can't fly then obviously an option closer to home would go up the list. Right now it's about building the list, ranking the options and then having the necessary information so that I can quickly and seamlessly switch gears as information/restrictions are revealed.
 

evanscl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2016
Well at this point every reopening situation is speculative and we are all at the mercy of the virus but seeing as I'm supposed to restart my pilgrimage from Martingny about Sept 1st, I need options. If I can't restart this year, I'll finish it when I can but I'll be going somewhere so I need ideas and opinions on other possible routes. It will depend on what each country is doing and how they have been affected by the virus.
Lycian Way in Turkey?
Trans Canada Trail?
Any thoughts or ideas I can put on my evaluation list? Places that potentially will be open for pilgrims in Sept?
Cheers!
John
If the uk is open for business the pembrokeshire coastal path, 186 miles, is truly beautiful.
If you do re-start from Martigny which route will you take? I was put off the narrow valley route which sounded too dodgy for me so we took the nigh-on vertical alternative route (lightfoot guide) on the left hand side of the valley. It crossed the railway line where a train took me by suprise as i flattened myself between it and our blocked exit route off the train lines - should have looked more carefully before crossing - so much for the safer route! I realised they had blocked the route to prevent incidents such as my close call as it was on a bend in the track, but they had only blocked access coming down off the hill not going up it in our direction. Anyway, a story to tell the kids as a cautionary tale, but not fun for the poor train driver. You could still take that rroute but access it further along the road out of Martigny then turn back on yourself a bit. It was a very steep walk up but i dont regret it as the villaGe at the top was straight out of Heidi with a big hotel and bar there, where the lovely guy opened up early when he saw us waiting hopefully outside as he arrived on his bike, and made us a pot of tea. we stopped at the crevasse cafe on our way down the other side - sadly shut on a sunday but we took a rest on their terrace and enjoyed the views. There was a roadside restaurant on the valley floor for refreshments later. It was one of my favourite days on the vf, fantastic scenery, have a great walk when you get back to it.😀
 

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
If the uk is open for business the pembrokeshire coastal path, 186 miles, is truly beautiful.
If you do re-start from Martigny which route will you take? I was put off the narrow valley route which sounded too dodgy for me so we took the nigh-on vertical alternative route (lightfoot guide) on the left hand side of the valley. It crossed the railway line where a train took me by suprise as i flattened myself between it and our blocked exit route off the train lines - should have looked more carefully before crossing - so much for the safer route! I realised they had blocked the route to prevent incidents such as my close call as it was on a bend in the track, but they had only blocked access coming down off the hill not going up it in our direction. Anyway, a story to tell the kids as a cautionary tale, but not fun for the poor train driver. You could still take that rroute but access it further along the road out of Martigny then turn back on yourself a bit. It was a very steep walk up but i dont regret it as the villaGe at the top was straight out of Heidi with a big hotel and bar there, where the lovely guy opened up early when he saw us waiting hopefully outside as he arrived on his bike, and made us a pot of tea. we stopped at the crevasse cafe on our way down the other side - sadly shut on a sunday but we took a rest on their terrace and enjoyed the views. There was a roadside restaurant on the valley floor for refreshments later. It was one of my favourite days on the vf, fantastic scenery, have a great walk when you get back to it.😀
Thank you for the info. I see the UK is opening the Coastal Route as well. I started my pilgrimage on the Isle of Iona, 1 year ago today and took routes across Scotland and England to link up to the Via Francigena. It was incredible but also very expensive. I had to use my tent a bit more than I would have liked. I also walked some of the South Coastal Trail near Torquay during a visit from my wife. I absolutely love the UK but because of this, it will be farther down my list of options. Again thank you for your information.
Cheers!
John
 

marylynn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011-2019 CF, Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 HærvejenDK
Well at this point every reopening situation is speculative and we are all at the mercy of the virus but seeing as I'm supposed to restart my pilgrimage from Martingny about Sept 1st, I need options. If I can't restart this year, I'll finish it when I can but I'll be going somewhere so I need ideas and opinions on other possible routes. It will depend on what each country is doing and how they have been affected by the virus.
Lycian Way in Turkey?
Trans Canada Trail?
Any thoughts or ideas I can put on my evaluation list? Places that potentially will be open for pilgrims in Sept?
Cheers!
John
Since you live in Ontario, you might be interested in the Sentier Norte-Dame Kapatakan in Quebec, a 215km trail that begins in Rivière-Eternite in the east and pretty much follows the Saguenay River on good trails with a variety of accommodations, including B&B’s, a convent, school, sport hotel, etc. It helps to speak French to call ahead to make reservations. It is a beautiful walk with a variety of terrains and small towns along the way. Sentiernotredamekapatakan.org

Or...you might be interested in Le Traversee de Charlevois, also a beautiful trail with accommodations in cabins that sleep 12-15. You take your own food and leave it at the office, then they deliver it to each cottage each day so you don’t have to carry it or worry about refrigeration. Traversee@traverseedecharlevoix.qc.ca

I don’t see any indication on their websites that either of these trails are closed.
Good luck with your planning. Mary Lynn, Waterloo ON
 
Last edited:

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
Since you live in Ontario, you might be interested in the Sentier Norte-Dame Kapatakan in Qubec, a 215km trail that begins in Rivière-Eternite in the east and pretty much follows the Saguenay River on good trails with a variety of accommodations, including B&B’s, a convent, school, sport hotel, etc. It helps to speak French to call ahead to make reservations. It is a beautiful walk with a variety of terrains and small towns along the way. Sentiernotredamekapatakan.org

Or...you might be interested in Le Traversee de Charlevois, also a beautiful trail with accommodations in cabins that sleep 12-15. You take your own food and leave it at the office, then they deliver it to each cottage each day so you don’t have to carry it or worry about refrigeration. Traversee@traverseedecharlevoix.qc.ca

I don’t see any indication on their websites that either of these trails are closed.
Good luck with your planning. Mary Lynn, Waterloo ON
Oh those are very intriguing options. I knew nothing about these routes but I'll be checking them out today. Excellent! Thank you.
Cheers!
John
 

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
Since you live in Ontario, you might be interested in the Sentier Norte-Dame Kapatakan in Qubec, a 215km trail that begins in Rivière-Eternite in the east and pretty much follows the Saguenay River on good trails with a variety of accommodations, including B&B’s, a convent, school, sport hotel, etc. It helps to speak French to call ahead to make reservations. It is a beautiful walk with a variety of terrains and small towns along the way. Sentiernotredamekapatakan.org

Or...you might be interested in Le Traversee de Charlevois, also a beautiful trail with accommodations in cabins that sleep 12-15. You take your own food and leave it at the office, then they deliver it to each cottage each day so you don’t have to carry it or worry about refrigeration. Traversee@traverseedecharlevoix.qc.ca

I don’t see any indication on their websites that either of these trails are closed.
Good luck with your planning. Mary Lynn, Waterloo ON
Just ordered their Pilgrim Guide book! Looks like a great option or even to do this summer before my planned return to the Via Francigena.
Cheers!
John
 

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
How about The Island Walk on Prince Edward Island?

I'll check it out. Thank you.
Cheers!
John
 

marylynn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011-2019 CF, Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 HærvejenDK
Just ordered their Pilgrim Guide book! Looks like a great option or even to do this summer before my planned return to the Via Francigena.
Cheers!
John
Let me know if you have any questions — I have walked both of these trails and they are both well-signed interesting walks.
 

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
Let me know if you have any questions — I have walked both of these trails and they are both well-signed interesting walks.
Thank you so much!
 
Hello John,
I am also from Canada, looking at possibly the East Coast trail or the Bruce Trail in Ontario as domestic alternatives. Have you done either, and any preference?
 

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
Hello John,
I am also from Canada, looking at possibly the East Coast trail or the Bruce Trail in Ontario as domestic alternatives. Have you done either, and any preference?
Hello
I have done quite a bit of the Bruce Trail but I have not done the East Coast so I can't offer a comparison opinion. The Bruce Trail itself is very nice with great escarpment views, woodland and very little road sections. To through hike, I feel would be expensive as there is no real infrastructure for it. Stealth camping is an option if your budget doesn't allow for nightly b+b, Inns, hotel options. It's well marked and the guide book maps are good too. I mainly do sections at a time due to these concerns.
Cheers!
John
 

Rainey

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
de Madrid May 2018
del Salvador May 2018
Hello John,
I am also from Canada, looking at possibly the East Coast trail or the Bruce Trail in Ontario as domestic alternatives. Have you done either, and any preference?
I am from Nova Scotia, Canada and if there is a Canadian Company of Pilgrims chapter in your area/province they may have had a camino planned for your area. In NS they have planned and executed caminos in 2019 and 2020. Now whether they can execute this year? but good to check it out. https://www.santiago.ca/
 

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
I am from Nova Scotia, Canada and if there is a Canadian Company of Pilgrims chapter in your area/province they may have had a camino planned for your area. In NS they have planned and executed caminos in 2019 and 2020. Now whether they can execute this year? but good to check it out. https://www.santiago.ca/
Thank you. Yes I am a member but I have not heard yet of anything planned here.
I'll keep my ears open.
Cheers!
John
 

lindam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
Hello John,
I am also from Canada, looking at possibly the East Coast trail or the Bruce Trail in Ontario as domestic alternatives. Have you done either, and any preference?
I have done considerable walking on the Bruce Trail (as I lived in Toronto before moving to Barcelona about 6 years ago). I agree with the information given by John R McLean as the trail does not provide the same type of infrastructure you would typically find on a Spanish or Portuguese Camino route. You will rarely find shops, cafes, or accommodations along the way. There are many lovely stretches of the trail (e.g., in the northern part of the trail along the Bruce Peninsula, a personal favourite) where it is possible to stay in a B & B and walk in either direction (or drive further for a remote start) but it would otherwise involve having to organize complicated/limited transportation to and from the trail not to mention securing food along the way. Likewise, camping along the trail is not permitted and there are very few provincial or private campgrounds with easy access to the trail.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (14), Portuguese (15), Le Puy (17), Ingles (17), VDLP (18), Lana (18), Madrid (19) + more
I live in Ontario and the Bruce Trail will be the first trail I walk when restrictions ease.

Even though I can stealth camp without leaving a trace, I do not wish to break any regulations - and put the trail's relationship with private landowners in jeopardy.

I will obtain permission in advance through friends, the Bruce Trail angel network, and local section clubs for places where I can put my tent (set up at dusk, gone at dawn).

Ideally, later this summer I would love to be able to walk two months on the Great Divide Trail on the continental divide between Alberta and British Columbia. :) All depends on the pandemic restrictions!
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
While the Chemin de Navigateurs (http://chemindesnavigateurs.org/) from along the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River from just east of Rimouski to the old pilgrimage site at Sainte Anne de Beaupré (east of Québec City on the north shore) will not be having any organized walk this year, it is sufficiently well-served with commercial accommodation-- although you will need to check that they are open. Hoteliers are likely accustomed to anglophone travellers enough that you can manage without French, but you'll enjoy it much more if you try.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
I live in Ontario and the Bruce Trail will be the first trail I walk when restrictions ease.

Even though I can stealth camp without leaving a trace, I do not wish to break any regulations - and put the trail's relationship with private landowners in jeopardy.

I will obtain permission in advance through friends, the Bruce Trail angel network, and local section clubs for places where I can put my tent (set up at dusk, gone at dawn).

Ideally, later this summer I would love to be able to walk two months on the Great Divide Trail on the continental divide between Alberta and British Columbia. :) All depends on the pandemic restrictions!
You might be interested to know that part of the 1982 film, Quest for Fire, was shot along the northern part of the Bruce Trail. A friend of mine, now a respectable librarian, was at the time a Grade XIII student who took part as an extra, as one of the Ivaka (the mud people), and has agreable recollections of the experience.
 

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
While the Chemin de Navigateurs (http://chemindesnavigateurs.org/) from along the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River from just east of Rimouski to the old pilgrimage site at Sainte Anne de Beaupré (east of Québec City on the north shore) will not be having any organized walk this year, it is sufficiently well-served with commercial accommodation-- although you will need to check that they are open. Hoteliers are likely accustomed to anglophone travellers enough that you can manage without French, but you'll enjoy it much more if you try.
Oh yes. I just checked out their website. It looks awesome.
Thank you
John R McLean
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
This is an interesting thread. I have always been of a mind that I do not do a Camino de Santiago as a walk or hike, I do it as a Pilgrimage for a spiritual/religious purpose. If all I wanted to do was to hike or walk or backpack, then I would not spend the money and time going to Europe to do so; I have a gazillion choices to do that sort of activity much closer to home :)

But, if I end up cancelling my Fall Aragone and Portuguese pilgrimages, what will I do instead, since that chunk of time is already cleared on the calendar?

Right now, one possibility is to do a backpacking trip that combines a portion of the CDT (Continental Divide Trail) thru some of Montana and Idaho, to end with at a southern terminus of a Wind River Range High Route (Wyoming). The very high elevations on this trip means that I want to be done with this hike by the end of September to avoid the potential for heavy snowfalls, which are a possibility at that time of year.

That would mean that I would have to cancel Camino plans by August. That is three weeks earlier than I would need to cancel IF I wanted to wait until the last possible moment for Camino/tourist news of a 'yea or nay' on things reopening by my late September Camino start. Since all my tickets and stuff are fully refundable for any reason, I am not pressured into cancelling Camino plans in order to recoup my costs.

[I am not in denial :) I am simply focused on the fact that no one knows what will be happening to international tourism by Late Fall. The Magic 8 Ball is on vacation. Whatever occurs, will occur, and I am not risking money or jobs by waiting and seeing what unfolds].

The other alternative choice Caleb (son) and I might consider as the Plan B, is doing a second thru-hike on the Colorado Trail. There are two major variations offered which form a part of the hike, and we would take the variation that we did not choose the first time.

Either choice would be take fewer days (28) than what would be needed for the combined Caminos, but the travel logistics are much simpler, quicker, and involve no airport security or passports or stuff. :) And since we already have the gear for backpacking, the only issue is putting together the resupply strategies for food and fuel at various points along the trails. Again, since I have done this a few times before with various thru and multi-week hikes, it is a pretty straight forward process to get that logistical detail done and arranged in a short timeframe.

Neither 'Plan B' involves a religious or spiritual aspect as the motivation or focus, although I always love being out in God's creation. That inevitably brings about a prayerful and thankful attitude as a backpacking trip proceeds on its course, though, despite its intent. :)
 

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
This is an interesting thread. I have always been of a mind that I do not do a Camino de Santiago as a walk or hike, I do it as a Pilgrimage for a spiritual/religious purpose. If all I wanted to do was to hike or walk or backpack, then I would not spend the money and time going to Europe to do so; I have a gazillion choices to do that sort of activity much closer to home :)

But, if I end up cancelling my Fall Aragone and Portuguese pilgrimages, what will I do instead, since that chunk of time is already cleared on the calendar?

Right now, one possibility is to do a backpacking trip that combines a portion of the CDT (Continental Divide Trail) thru some of Montana and Idaho, to end with at a southern terminus of a Wind River Range High Route (Wyoming). The very high elevations on this trip means that I want to be done with this hike by the end of September to avoid the potential for heavy snowfalls, which are a possibility at that time of year.

That would mean that I would have to cancel Camino plans by August. That is three weeks earlier than I would need to cancel IF I wanted to wait until the last possible moment for Camino/tourist news of a 'yea or nay' on things reopening by my late September Camino start. Since all my tickets and stuff are fully refundable for any reason, I am not pressured into cancelling Camino plans in order to recoup my costs.

[I am not in denial :) I am simply focused on the fact that no one knows what will be happening to international tourism by Late Fall. The Magic 8 Ball is on vacation. Whatever occurs, will occur, and I am not risking money or jobs by waiting and seeing what unfolds].

The other alternative choice Caleb (son) and I might consider as the Plan B, is doing a second thru-hike on the Colorado Trail. There are two major variations offered which form a part of the hike, and we would take the variation that we did not choose the first time.

Either choice would be take fewer days (28) than what would be needed for the combined Caminos, but the travel logistics are much simpler, quicker, and involve no airport security or passports or stuff. :) And since we already have the gear for backpacking, the only issue is putting together the resupply strategies for food and fuel at various points along the trails. Again, since I have done this a few times before with various thru and multi-week hikes, it is a pretty straight forward process to get that logistical detail done and arranged in a short timeframe.

Neither 'Plan B' involves a religious or spiritual aspect as the motivation or focus, although I always love being out in God's creation. That inevitably brings about a prayerful and thankful attitude as a backpacking trip proceeds on its course, though, despite its intent. :)
Sounds like you're looking ahead and doing the same thing. I've still got hopes that I'm going to complete my pilgrimage but I sure don't want to be left unprepared.
Best of luck with your planning.
Cheers!
John
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Sounds like you're looking ahead and doing the same thing. I've still got hopes that I'm going to complete my pilgrimage but I sure don't want to be left unprepared.
Best of luck with your planning.
Cheers!
John
:) It doesn't take much planning on my part for a backpacking trip. It takes a very short time to grab the necessary gear and clothing out of my equipment storage area, put gas in the car, and then head to the appropriate trail-head. I always keep a good supply of the freeze-dried meals, that I like to eat while on the trail, already on hand; and it doesn't take much shopping time to pick up the between-meal snacks and stuff.

The biggest thing that I am doing right now, is to determine my resupply points if I hike the CDT and Wind River option. for the Colorado Trail, I already know where my resupply points would be. Packing resupply boxes and getting them ready to ship, is a pretty straight-forward chore for me to get done.

My biggest decision is when that hard deadline will be for me to make the decision to cancel Camino. :eek:
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
... I need ideas and opinions on other possible routes ...
My kicks for 2020 were to return to Langres early April and Continue to Rome. About now I expect I would be pushing onto Siena. I was planning to pause there and do a side walk to Florence, following the in the footsteps of my "uncles" as they fought their way along that route.

When finished at Rome, and after some R&R with family in Scotland, Wales and England I would make my way to Kingston, Ontario to stay with some more family and walk my version of the Rideau, starting at the National War Memorial, Quebec. This is quite a flat journey with a "mountain" (relatively speaking) to ascend/descend near Westport.

Next month my half of the world goes into its winter induced lock down: this limits outdoor activity to one or two day local jaunts when opportunities arise. My return to the Via Francigena is April 2021 at the earliest and subject to international air travel at reasonable prices also returning.

Kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going when you can)
 

evanscl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2016
My kicks for 2020 were to return to Langres early April and Continue to Rome. About now I expect I would be pushing onto Siena. I was planning to pause there and do a side walk to Florence, following the in the footsteps of my "uncles" as they fought their way along that route.

When finished at Rome, and after some R&R with family in Scotland, Wales and England I would make my way to Kingston, Ontario to stay with some more family and walk my version of the Rideau, starting at the National War Memorial, Quebec. This is quite a flat journey with a "mountain" (relatively speaking) to ascend/descend near Westport.

Next month my half of the world goes into its winter induced lock down: this limits outdoor activity to one or two day local jaunts when opportunities arise. My return to the Via Francigena is April 2021 at the earliest and subject to international air travel at reasonable prices also returning.

Kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going when you can)
I wish you a happy return to langres next year. We walked from canterbury to langres in march/april last year then returned beginning of june to walk langres to vercelli and over the alps, then part 3 vercelli to rome in october. From langres we ended our first day at les archots i believe - highly recommended, the lovely lady there fed us so well we could hardly move afterwards - we had made the classic mistake of eating too much of the first course believing it to be the main course, then had cheese thinking it was dessert only to then be presented with huge slices of tart. A historic dinner! Cadw fynd as they say here in wales - keep going.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I live in Ontario and the Bruce Trail will be the first trail I walk when restrictions ease.

Even though I can stealth camp without leaving a trace, I do not wish to break any regulations - and put the trail's relationship with private landowners in jeopardy.

I will obtain permission in advance through friends, the Bruce Trail angel network, and local section clubs for places where I can put my tent (set up at dusk, gone at dawn).

Ideally, later this summer I would love to be able to walk two months on the Great Divide Trail on the continental divide between Alberta and British Columbia. :) All depends on the pandemic restrictions!
@Sara_Dhooma
All Parks Canada facilities are currently closed due to COVID-19, but this situation may change later in the summer. I have walked all of the longer trails and most of the shorter ones in Jasper and Banff Parks and some in the neighbouring parks. You could easily enjoy wandering around there for a couple of months. I am planning to walk from Banff to Lake Louise late in the summer, if the trails are open. I had to cut short my walk a couple of years ago due to a wandering herd of bison. The most complete guide book is the Canadian Rockies Trail Guide. I have the 2007 edition, but there may be a more recent edition. Unless you are totally committed to walking the Great Divide, bear in mind that this is not, as far as I know, an actual trail, but rather a route which follows the divide as far as it is possible to do so, sometimes for considerable distances outside of park boundaries. I am sure that you are capable of planning your route. You may have heard of Dustin Lynx's book, Hiking Canada's Great Divide Trail. Challenges in following such routes often, in my experience, have involved arranging road transportation to and from each section of the trails, which has got more difficult over the years. as buses have disappeared or refuse to drop off and pick up walkers. Good luck in planning your walks for the rest of 2020, in this time of COVID-19.
Mary Louise
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese Coastal {Feb-March 2020}
Camino Frances {March 2019 & 2020}
East Coast Trail and Newfoundland is an adventure anytime but when the icebergs melt in June, Caplin roll in on the beaches followed by whales through July and August.

https://www.eastcoasttrail.com/en/index.aspx

Having walked from Topsail to La Manche via St. John’s and Witless Bay, I hope to walk through Ferryland and Aquaforte to the Spurwink this summer. :)

The trail connects historic coastal fishing villages and offers stunning coastal vistas. Watch Puffins and seals feed while spotting the spray of whales. Snack on wild blueberries, partridge berries, bakeapples and raspberries. Having done many walks in western Europe, north America, the East Coast Trail in summer is hard to beat.

On the Frances in 2019 we met a couple of Germans who thought the Newfoundland’s East Coast Trail was the friendliest place they had ever visited – until they started the Camino Frances.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
In the U.S. there is a rail-to-trails group that has information about the "Great American Trail". While still in development, large sections of this trail, in many states, are available to walk/hike or bike.

 

John R McLean

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portuguese from Porto (2017)
Iona-Rome-Jerusalem (2019-20)
In the U.S. there is a rail-to-trails group that has information about the "Great American Trail". While still in development, large sections of this trail, in many states, are available to walk/hike or bike.

Awesome! I'll check it out.
 

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When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 54 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 196 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 323 24.9%
  • June

    Votes: 94 7.2%
  • July

    Votes: 24 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 373 28.7%
  • October

    Votes: 157 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%
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