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Luggage Transfer Correos

Poles, Poles, Poles...and Planes

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KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(
I fully appreciate the topic has been discussed ad nauseam and usually ends in arguments regarding poles on planes. Some will claim they never had an issue putting their poles into their packs and walking onto the airplane with them for the overhead, others have had them confiscated at the airport, some forced to check their bag because of the poles. Opinions will vary greatly based on experiences at the airports.
Here are a few things to consider:
I was told by a friend who works for the TSA in the US that it is largely the call of the screening agent. His/her opinion to allow or not will be based on whether or not the poles pose a threat in any way. If they are deep inside your bag rather than strapped to the outside, they become less of a threat. If they are broken down as small as possible ( preferably z-poles )and have no sharp point ( hard tips removed and capped with rubber ) they become less of a threat. If you take the time to wrap them tightly in 'cling' wrap / Saran / plastic wrap, they become less of a threat because they would not be readily accessible.

I take a large mailer envelope and length of bubble wrap to the airport in my tote bag. The envelope has my identification info on it already and is self sealing with a tape strip. Should the poles be refused at the TSA check, I can simply place the poles only in the envelope and check them in without having to check my entire pack. It will be easier to replace poles than an entire lost pack. It will be easier to collect them at the airport also as small or very large odd shaped checked items go to a different collection spot at most airports and not off of the carousel.

( if you don't end up needing your mailer envelop and plastic bubble wrap you can discard it or simply place it flat in your pack for the trip home. It makes a nice waterproof cushion to sit on along the way too...lol )


*** EDIT posting not meant to incite another riot of " pole or not to pole "...just some things to consider if one is leaning towards trying to bring onboard.
 
Last edited:

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Nice ideas. I may try the cling wrap. I have had my poles disassembled with specially purchased large rubber "boots" on the ends and fully inside my backpack...still confiscated. After getting so far in the long line I do not want to backtrack to leave the line and start all over at the check-in counter to send them below. Another time I had them disassembled and tied together laying on the trampoline portion of my backpack and they sailed on through the screening conveyor belt...go figure.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
Check them or buy poles when you arrive. It is really easy. Why screw around and stress out. I know this is shocking but I have heard there are 1 or 2 TSA agents that aren't the nicest people in the world and have a touch of a power trip.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I have checked my poles a number of times. The times I haven't wanted to check them were if I'd purchased train tickets ahead of time and not sure I'd have enough time in between.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Check them or buy poles when you arrive. It is really easy. Why screw around and stress out. I know this is shocking but I have heard there are 1 or 2 TSA agents that aren't the nicest people in the world and have a touch of a power trip.
I have purchased poles at Decathlon a couple of times upon arrival, but not always gotten them back home if not checked. I have limited bus service after my flight gets back to ORD, so often prefer to avoid checking them at the end.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
I recommend people buy the CHEAPEST aluminum poles Decathlon carries. They are €4,99 each, use spring-button length adjusters, and are suitable to purpose.

These poles come in one color, turquoise. You need only obtain rubber tips for them to avoid the dreaded click-clack noise

At that price point, just abandoning them at the Pilgrim Office is reasonable. They are recycled. Those not used by other pilgrims are sent to aluminum recycling. This is why I recommend these particular poles as low cost, but effective solution.

Hope this helps.
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
I recommend people buy the CHEAPEST aluminum poles Decathlon carries. They are €4,99 each, use spring-button length adjusters, and are suitable to purpose.

These poles come in one color, turquoise. You need only obtain rubber tips for them to avoid the dreaded click-clack noise

At that price point, just abandoning them at the Pilgrim Office is reasonable. They are recycled. Those not used by other pilgrims are sent to aluminum recycling. This is why I recommend these particular poles as low cost, but effective solution.

Hope this helps.
As usual, Tom, you provide practical advice.
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(
I recommend people buy the CHEAPEST aluminum poles Decathlon carries. They are €4,99 each, use spring-button length adjusters, and are suitable to purpose.

These poles come in one color, turquoise. You need only obtain rubber tips for them to avoid the dreaded click-clack noise

At that price point, just abandoning them at the Pilgrim Office is reasonable. They are recycled. Those not used by other pilgrims are sent to aluminum recycling. This is why I recommend these particular poles as low cost, but effective solution.

Hope this helps.
Please share the exact location of the Decathlon you are recommending. Would be helpful for those considering this option to know where you are referring to. Thank you !
 
Camino(s) past & future
Spring 2016: Camino Frances, Finisterre and Muxia
April 2019: Frances, Salvador, Primitivo
For my first Camino I used a mailing tube for poles and a couple toiletries. For my second, I was meeting a friend along the way who was worried that we would not make the train from Madrid if we had to retrieve checked stuff.

So I did all that you mentioned, KJFSophie. I brought a mailing tube addressed to me, I wrapped my z-poles well, had rubber tips and buried them deep inside my pack. All was good, no problems. I gave the mailing tube to my brother, who was standing by (not traveling with me).

I did lose the poles along the CF and had to buy new ones at Decathlon. Let me just say that they were not nearly as wonderful as my z-poles. But they did just fine.
 

LesR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
I fully appreciate the topic has been discussed ad nauseam and usually ends in arguments regarding poles on planes. Some will claim they never had an issue putting their poles into their packs and walking onto the airplane with them for the overhead, others have had them confiscated at the airport, some forced to check their bag because of the poles. Opinions will vary greatly based on experiences at the airports.
Flying out of Oz tonight for CP 2019 - poles are buried deep in my backpack, which will go aboard as checked luggage.

I understand concerns about lost or pilfered luggage and therefore the advantages on taking everything as carry-on luggage, but in my experience, damage whilst in transit is a bigger issue than lost or stolen items (maybe I have just been flying with reputable carriers?) - consequently the many straps on my backpack are all tied up to keep them out of harms way, with the added bonus of significantly increasing the time anyone with light fingers might take to get in for a look-see and possibly a five finger discount on used walking gear...
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Please share the exact location of the Decathlon you are recommending. Would be helpful for those considering this option to know where you are referring to. Thank you !

Here is the direct URL to specific product page at www.decathlon.com (the US site). You can mail order.


The price difference from USD 6.99 for each pole is approximately the same as the €4,99 price I mentioned above.

To find these same sticks on other countries Decathlon web sites, search using the model... 8493063. I believe this is actually the UPC code assigned to this item. If correct, this number is the same worldwide.

Alternatively, search using this product code: 8110360264815

Hope this helps.
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(
Here is the direct URL to specific product page at www.decathlon.com (the US site). You can mail order.


The price difference from USD 6.99 for each pole is approximately the same as the €4,99 price I mentioned above.

To find these same sticks on other countries Decathlon web sites, search using the model... 8493063. I believe this is actually the UPC code assigned to this item. If correct, this number is the same worldwide.

Alternatively, search using this product code: 8110360264815

Hope this helps.
Thank you for that info @t2andreo , but online mail order would bring me back to having poles in my possession that need to get to Spain somehow. I thought your suggestion to buy these cheap poles indicated there was a physical store upon arriving in Spain/France where one would walk to and purchase.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
You did not ask that. Your question, and home location, suggested you wanted to obtain poles in the US. I answered based on that.

There are Decathlon stores all along the Camino Frances. The first one along your route of march is near Pamplona. But, check in the Forum or at www.decathlon.es and search for tiendas. There are also Decathlon stores near Burgos, Leon, Ponferrada, and Santiago. There are others that I do not recall off hand.

Here is the direct link to the listing of stores in Spain: http://www.decathlon.es/es/store-locator

If doing a Camino Portugal, go to www.decathlon.pt. I know for a fact that there are here are Decathlon stores near Lisbon, Coimbra, and Porto. There are likely others along the Camino Portuguese.

Here is the direct link to the listing off stores in Portugal: https://www.decathlon.pt/pt/loja

SCROLL DOWN TO SEE TOWNS / CITIES

There is no Decathlon in or near St. Jean Pied de Port. However, there is one near Bayonne that can easily be reached from the train station at Bayonne by bus or taxi. I have shopped there. Check www.decathlon.fr for specific location, address, hours etc.

You can use their web site to check on in store availability of the item(s) you want.

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I located a Decathlon in Lisbon, Portugal, but it was quite far out on the north side of the city, so I took a taxi. There was no outdoor shop in the historical area in my research that carried poles and I stopped in at a couple of them to check first.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
For the uninitiated, new and soon to be pilgrims out there, your best option if you are only doing carry-on with your kit is to simply buy a pair (or just one if that's your style) of trekking poles in Spain, Portugal or France. Believe me, the inexpensive ones work just as well as the expensive ones, especially for someone who in all likelihood only use trekking poles once or twice in their life. I have used expensive ones (about 70 euros a pair) and inexpensive ones (about 15 euros a pair) and could detect no noticeable advantage to the expensive set. Don't waste your time shopping and comparing etc. Spend that time training for the walk instead. When finished leave/donate the trekking poles at an albergue or something.
One thing I do recommend doing is bringing about three sets of extra rubber tips for the poles that you will purchase upon arrival as they usually only have the tips that are on them and those wear down and everyone has to then listen to your pole's steel tips hitting the concrete...ugh.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I recommend people buy the CHEAPEST aluminum poles Decathlon carries. They are €4,99 each, use spring-button length adjusters, and are suitable to purpose.

These poles come in one color, turquoise. You need only obtain rubber tips for them to avoid the dreaded click-clack noise

At that price point, just abandoning them at the Pilgrim Office is reasonable. They are recycled. Those not used by other pilgrims are sent to aluminum recycling. This is why I recommend these particular poles as low cost, but effective solution.

Hope this helps.
This time I'm leaving my Leki trekking poles at home, and then purchasing a set at the Decathlon in Ferrol. I would rather use my Leki poles, but even though TSA has always allowed me to carry them onboard from the US, I have to pay to ship them back home if I want to avoid checking a bag.

So this time I'll give it a try with a Decathlon set. . . although I will look at the 'pricier' models for an extra 10 Euro :)
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
Check them or buy poles when you arrive. It is really easy. Why screw around and stress out. I know this is shocking but I have heard there are 1 or 2 TSA agents that aren't the nicest people in the world and have a touch of a power trip.
I'll say. I wasnt allowed to carry the wine I bought in the Madrid airport duty free shop on board flying home. They said give it up or check it. I had to go to another terminal on the other side of the airport to check it. I almost missed my flight but I wasnt gonna #$@! let them confiscate it.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
This time I'm leaving my Leki trekking poles at home, and then purchasing a set at the Decathlon in Ferrol. I would rather use my Leki poles, but even though TSA has always allowed me to carry them onboard from the US, I have to pay to ship them back home if I want to avoid checking a bag.

So this time I'll give it a try with a Decathlon set. . . although I will look at the 'pricier' models for an extra 10 Euro :)
Since there is no need to carry much food and no tent, the Decathlon poles are totally sufficient for Caminos, even though they are not the awesome lightweight Leki's. You and Jill will be just fine with them! Enjoy the Ingles!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
This time I'm leaving my Leki trekking poles at home, and then purchasing a set at the Decathlon in Ferrol. I would rather use my Leki poles, but even though TSA has always allowed me to carry them onboard from the US, I have to pay to ship them back home if I want to avoid checking a bag.

So this time I'll give it a try with a Decathlon set. . . although I will look at the 'pricier' models for an extra 10 Euro :)
When are you heading out on the Ingles?
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(
We'll arrive in Ferrol early on the 17th, and start the 18th. :)
I hope to bump into you along the way...we walk out of Ferrol on 9/16 but are doing very very short days as my companion is older and a newbie. I'm sure you'll blow right by us! Buen Camino to you @davebugg and company !
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I hope to bump into you along the way...we walk out of Ferrol on 9/16 but are doing very very short days as my companion is older and a newbie. I'm sure you'll blow right by us! Buen Camino to you @davebugg and company !
I don't know if we'll be moving THAT fast. Most days are only around 20 km. The single longest day will be from Betanzos to Odes at 29 km, but that is because I want to stay at a specific place that night and the other options are too short.

I will be wearing a Gossamer Gear Silverback backpack with a Forum Member Badge attached. So if you see me and Jill, be sure to holler :)

(I was planning on using the ULA Circuit backpack, but Gossamer Gear sent me the Silverback to try out and I ended up really liking it, so decided to keep it. I like my Circuit, but the Silverback likes ME even more :) )
 

Ian @ Camino Ramblings

Camino Rambler
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés-Sept 17 & July 18
Skikoku 88-March 19 Camino Portuges-May 19
Camino Ingles - Sept 19
I fully appreciate the topic has been discussed ad nauseam and usually ends in arguments regarding poles on planes. Some will claim they never had an issue putting their poles into their packs and walking onto the airplane with them for the overhead, others have had them confiscated at the airport, some forced to check their bag because of the poles. Opinions will vary greatly based on experiences at the airports.
Here are a few things to consider:
I was told by a friend who works for the TSA in the US that it is largely the call of the screening agent. His/her opinion to allow or not will be based on whether or not the poles pose a threat in any way. If they are deep inside your bag rather than strapped to the outside, they become less of a threat. If they are broken down as small as possible ( preferably z-poles )and have no sharp point ( hard tips removed and capped with rubber ) they become less of a threat. If you take the time to wrap them tightly in 'cling' wrap / Saran / plastic wrap, they become less of a threat because they would not be readily accessible.

I take a large mailer envelope and length of bubble wrap to the airport in my tote bag. The envelope has my identification info on it already and is self sealing with a tape strip. Should the poles be refused at the TSA check, I can simply place the poles only in the envelope and check them in without having to check my entire pack. It will be easier to replace poles than an entire lost pack. It will be easier to collect them at the airport also as small or very large odd shaped checked items go to a different collection spot at most airports and not off of the carousel.

( if you don't end up needing your mailer envelop and plastic bubble wrap you can discard it or simply place it flat in your pack for the trip home. It makes a nice waterproof cushion to sit on along the way too...lol )


*** EDIT posting not meant to incite another riot of " pole or not to pole "...just some things to consider if one is leaning towards trying to bring onboard.
Hi - as a strictly hand baggage only pilgrim this year – within size limits and under 8 kg for some my flights – putting the polls in may have been a problem.

After reading everything on This forum and others - sleeping on it for a night I came up with a solution that worked Perfectly.

I ordered my favourite walking poles on Amazon – gave them my address of my first night hostel – (I checked with them and they were happy to receive a package ) – And they were duly delivered to Spain five days later.

Clearly I couldn’t take them home with me – so after a very satisfactory walk – I donated them.

Just a thought!
 

Anthony Rocco

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2014, Ignaciano +Aragones +Parts of Frances 2016, Salvador, Primitivo, Ingles (2017)
I fully appreciate the topic has been discussed ad nauseam and usually ends in arguments regarding poles on planes. Some will claim they never had an issue putting their poles into their packs and walking onto the airplane with them for the overhead, others have had them confiscated at the airport, some forced to check their bag because of the poles. Opinions will vary greatly based on experiences at the airports.
Here are a few things to consider:
I was told by a friend who works for the TSA in the US that it is largely the call of the screening agent. His/her opinion to allow or not will be based on whether or not the poles pose a threat in any way. If they are deep inside your bag rather than strapped to the outside, they become less of a threat. If they are broken down as small as possible ( preferably z-poles )and have no sharp point ( hard tips removed and capped with rubber ) they become less of a threat. If you take the time to wrap them tightly in 'cling' wrap / Saran / plastic wrap, they become less of a threat because they would not be readily accessible.

I take a large mailer envelope and length of bubble wrap to the airport in my tote bag. The envelope has my identification info on it already and is self sealing with a tape strip. Should the poles be refused at the TSA check, I can simply place the poles only in the envelope and check them in without having to check my entire pack. It will be easier to replace poles than an entire lost pack. It will be easier to collect them at the airport also as small or very large odd shaped checked items go to a different collection spot at most airports and not off of the carousel.

( if you don't end up needing your mailer envelop and plastic bubble wrap you can discard it or simply place it flat in your pack for the trip home. It makes a nice waterproof cushion to sit on along the way too...lol )


*** EDIT posting not meant to incite another riot of " pole or not to pole "...just some things to consider if one is leaning towards trying to bring onboard.
 

Anthony Rocco

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2014, Ignaciano +Aragones +Parts of Frances 2016, Salvador, Primitivo, Ingles (2017)
This is our 8th Camino. We concluded some years ago it was so much better to have only carry on and buy poles in Spain. We take multiple flights to get to Spain, so we have no worries and no wait on arrival. And poles are cheap here. On this Camino, we started in Loyola and there was an outdoor shop right across the street. 10 Euros. We like them, so will wrap and check them when we leave. If they are taken, so be it.
 

Caligal

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF April 4- May 12, 2018
CP April 2019
I decided to chance it and carry on my poles from LAX, no problem! However the bottle of water I forgot to dispose of got consficated. Lol! I do have a laundry bag for pack and poles that get checked on my flight home. In Zariquiegui tonite, the Camino is very busy! And HOT😅
 

rnwinters

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
Camino Portugese
I fully appreciate the topic has been discussed ad nauseam and usually ends in arguments regarding poles on planes. Some will claim they never had an issue putting their poles into their packs and walking onto the airplane with them for the overhead, others have had them confiscated at the airport, some forced to check their bag because of the poles. Opinions will vary greatly based on experiences at the airports.
Here are a few things to consider:
I was told by a friend who works for the TSA in the US that it is largely the call of the screening agent. His/her opinion to allow or not will be based on whether or not the poles pose a threat in any way. If they are deep inside your bag rather than strapped to the outside, they become less of a threat. If they are broken down as small as possible ( preferably z-poles )and have no sharp point ( hard tips removed and capped with rubber ) they become less of a threat. If you take the time to wrap them tightly in 'cling' wrap / Saran / plastic wrap, they become less of a threat because they would not be readily accessible.

I take a large mailer envelope and length of bubble wrap to the airport in my tote bag. The envelope has my identification info on it already and is self sealing with a tape strip. Should the poles be refused at the TSA check, I can simply place the poles only in the envelope and check them in without having to check my entire pack. It will be easier to replace poles than an entire lost pack. It will be easier to collect them at the airport also as small or very large odd shaped checked items go to a different collection spot at most airports and not off of the carousel.

( if you don't end up needing your mailer envelop and plastic bubble wrap you can discard it or simply place it flat in your pack for the trip home. It makes a nice waterproof cushion to sit on along the way too...lol )


*** EDIT posting not meant to incite another riot of " pole or not to pole "...just some things to consider if one is leaning towards trying to bring onboard.

Oh, for crying out loud ... just forget the poles and avoid the anxiety. Buy a pair in Europe and give them up before you leave. The Camino provides, right?

They are not that expensive.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I located a Decathlon in Lisbon, Portugal, but it was quite far out on the north side of the city, so I took a taxi. There was no outdoor shop in the historical area in my research that carried poles and I stopped in at a couple of them to check first.
Decathlon now has a small in-city store right next door to the Corte Inglés. They had poles last year when I was there.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Oh, for crying out loud ... just forget the poles and avoid the anxiety. Buy a pair in Europe and give them up before you leave. The Camino provides, right?

They are not that expensive.
Exactly, and in reality they are actually less expensive than buying them in the states. I have seen them on the Frances as cheap as 5 euros each.
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
This time I'm leaving my Leki trekking poles at home, and then purchasing a set at the Decathlon in Ferrol. I would rather use my Leki poles, but even though TSA has always allowed me to carry them onboard from the US, I have to pay to ship them back home if I want to avoid checking a bag.

So this time I'll give it a try with a Decathlon set. . . although I will look at the 'pricier' models for an extra 10 Euro :)
Hey Dave! I'm leaving for the Ingles in about ten days, flying into Santiago before taking the bus to Ferrol. I've arranged with Faith to meet at Pilgrim House to look over the collection of donated poles they have there. If nothing suits I'll check out the Decathlon, there is a small one in the town centre, it might be possible to order a pair in advance and pick up there, rather than the one on the outskirts of town.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Hey Dave! I'm leaving for the Ingles in about ten days, flying into Santiago before taking the bus to Ferrol. I've arranged with Faith to meet at Pilgrim House to look over the collection of donated poles they have there. If nothing suits I'll check out the Decathlon, there is a small one in the town centre, it might be possible to order a pair in advance and pick up there, rather than the one on the outskirts of town.
I had considered (and still am) placing an order at the Ferrol Decathlon, too. Apparently, the day-to-day inventory of trekking poles can be varied, but the online site allows for order and pickup at store, which allows for more certainty in model choice :)

I also noticed that there are one or two other outdoor shops which carry poles, too. I need to re-look them up.
 

Texas Walker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017 summer)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
I located a Decathlon in Lisbon, Portugal, but it was quite far out on the north side of the city, so I took a taxi. There was no outdoor shop in the historical area in my research that carried poles and I stopped in at a couple of them to check first.
The Lisbon metro goes to near there. (If you're taking a day and visiting the Tile Museum, for example.) Bus might also. Don't put the metro/bus pass into your front pocket and sit down, it fries the little electronic gizmo inside when the cardboard bends.;)
 

Texas Walker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017 summer)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
That Decathlon pole is very interesting! I see that the handle is a loop of, basically, paracord or shoelace. Can anyone tell us all how big the slot is that it loops into? I feel the urge to make a padded fabric strap to replace the string, or a pad for the string maybe.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I buy the Decathlon pole one level up from the one you describe as it has "real" straps for only a few euros more.
 

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