Possible Route from Oviedo-Santiago


2018 edition Camino Guides

kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#1
Warm greetings to all. I am planning my tentative route & would appreciate your kind feedback and suggestions if this is feasible. Likely only to use a 32/35L Backpack on the trip.

I will be Arriving in Madrid on 21/5/2018 at 9.40am and take the 11.48am train to Oviedo. Overnight in Oviedo.

Walking starts on 22/5/2018 as follows :
Day 1 - Oviedo to Escamplero (via the Narinco Site) = 17.2kms
Day 2 - Escamplero to Cornellana = 23.8kms
Day 3 - Cornellana to Bodenaya = 17.6kms
Day 4 - Bodenaya to Campiello = 25.2kms
Day 5 - Campiello to Berducedo = 30.8kms (not sure if via pola or hospitales route)
Day 6 - Beducedo to Grandas De Selime = 20.2kms
Day 7 - Grandas De Selime to Padron = 29.2kms
Day 8 - Padron to O Cadavo = 23.8kms
Day 9 - O Cadavo to Lugo - 31kms
Day 10 - Rest Day & Sightseeing in Lugo
Day 11 - Lugo to Ferreira = 29.8kms
Day 12 - Ferreira to Melide = 20kms
Day 13 - Melide to Arzua = 15.1kms
Day 14 - Arzua to Santa Irene = 17.8kms
Day 15 - Santa Irene to Santiago = 24.5kms
Day 16 - Santiago (perhaps bus trip to Finnestre)
Day 17 - Santiago back to Madrid

All advice is most welcome. Thank you.
 

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Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#2
Excellent idea for day 1 to go Oviedo to Esclampero via the Naranco sites. You will not regret it. Keep in mind that in Esclampero one picks up the keys at the local restaurant/hotel but that it closes one day a week (I thnk it was Wednesday when I walked), so you may want to check in with them 1) to find out which day they close, especially if thinking of staying at the hotel, 2) where to pick up the key on that day (I’m assuming the small shop or carniceria, but don’t know).

You have a few 30km days in there. If you prefer, there are ways to make these shorter.

To avoid the Frances, it really can be a shock after the Primitivo, you might want to cosider the Camino verde: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ng-from-primitivo-to-norte-yes-you-can.42599/

Finally, make sure your bring a duvet or sleeping bag, it can get cold up there at night in May.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#3
Hi, Kaje,
Welcome to the forum. Most Primitivo pilgrims will be doing stages similar to the ones you propose, they sound very do-able.

Just a couple of comments. If you haven't seen it,this thread might help you sort out whether you will go via Hospitales or Pola (of course, the weather will be a huge determinant), both are quite nice: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/hospitales-or-pola-de-allande.28334/

Ferreira to Melide may seem kind of short, and as Momonne says, getting to the Francés may be quite a shock to the system. What I did the last time I was on the Primitivo was to walk from Ferreira to the private albergue in Boente, it's only 6 beyond Melide. We called and reserved a bed from Ferreira the night before and then had a long pulpo break in Melide. From there to Boente was fine. Leaving Melide in mid afternoon, the camino was prettty empty. Leaving from Boente the next morning, we were ahead of the Melide rush and behind the Arzua rush, so we didn't really get smacked with the crowds until we got to Pedrouzo. Then the next day into Santiago was short and sweet. Another option to avoid the crowds would be to spend the last night in the very nice casa rural outside Lavacolla, (in Vilamaior actually), Casa de Amancio. It's an old home that is a popular bar-café stop,but at night it is empty and peaceful.

And I second Momonne's praise of the Naranco sites. They are a wonder, one of my favorite ancient sites in Spain. Which reminds me -- if you like these old places, consider a short detour to Santa María de Eulalia on the Lugo to Ferreira stage. Reserve a bed in Ferreira so you won't need to worry about it. There is a Roman painted crypt with peacocks, chickens, birds, floral decorations, it is very nice! The Ferreira albergues have a page with info on how to do the detour: https://www.alberguesdeferreira.com/2015/02/primitive-way-santa-eulalia-de-boveda/?lang=en. I have done it and highly recommend it. Just make sure it will be open on the day you go (check in the Lugo tourist office).

Buen camino, you will love the Primitivo, Laurie
 

MikeJS

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis (2011), Norte (2012), VdlP (Apr 2016). Next - Sureste.
#4
In the end it depends as much on what you are comfortable with. Stages of less than 25 kms are not my preference as I tend to walk quite fast and wake up early! I would be at my destination before midday and prefer to arrive in late afternoon which gives me time to do daily tasks such as washing and go out in the evening. However, it also depends on the availability of accommodation.
 

kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#5
You have a few 30km days in there. If you prefer, there are ways to make these shorter.

To avoid the Frances, it really can be a shock after the Primitivo, you might want to cosider the Camino verde: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ng-from-primitivo-to-norte-yes-you-can.42599/

Finally, make sure your bring a duvet or sleeping bag, it can get cold up there at night in May.
Thank you for the kind advice Momonne. Im not familiar with the Camino at all, and hence I tried my best to work out a schedule that could be done in 14 days. Could you perhaps suggest how to make some of the walking days shorter? Typically 25kms would be ideal, but I also have lots of shorter more relaxed walks to ease the burden of the longer days. Much appreciated.
 

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kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#6
Hi, Kaje,
Welcome to the forum. Most Primitivo pilgrims will be doing stages similar to the ones you propose, they sound very do-able.

Just a couple of comments. If you haven't seen it,this thread might help you sort out whether you will go via Hospitales or Pola (of course, the weather will be a huge determinant), both are quite nice: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/hospitales-or-pola-de-allande.28334/

Ferreira to Melide may seem kind of short, and as Momonne says, getting to the Francés may be quite a shock to the system. What I did the last time I was on the Primitivo was to walk from Ferreira to the private albergue in Boente, it's only 6 beyond Melide. We called and reserved a bed from Ferreira the night before and then had a long pulpo break in Melide. From there to Boente was fine. Leaving Melide in mid afternoon, the camino was prettty empty. Leaving from Boente the next morning, we were ahead of the Melide rush and behind the Arzua rush, so we didn't really get smacked with the crowds until we got to Pedrouzo. Then the next day into Santiago was short and sweet. Another option to avoid the crowds would be to spend the last night in the very nice casa rural outside Lavacolla, (in Vilamaior actually), Casa de Amancio. It's an old home that is a popular bar-café stop,but at night it is empty and peaceful.

And I second Momonne's praise of the Naranco sites. They are a wonder, one of my favorite ancient sites in Spain. Which reminds me -- if you like these old places, consider a short detour to Santa María de Eulalia on the Lugo to Ferreira stage. Reserve a bed in Ferreira so you won't need to worry about it. There is a Roman painted crypt with peacocks, chickens, birds, floral decorations, it is very nice! The Ferreira albergues have a page with info on how to do the detour: https://www.alberguesdeferreira.com/2015/02/primitive-way-santa-eulalia-de-boveda/?lang=en. I have done it and highly recommend it. Just make sure it will be open on the day you go (check in the Lugo tourist office).

Buen camino, you will love the Primitivo, Laurie
Thank you Laurie for the kind response. Still uncertain which route to take (hospitales or pola), as they both sound very nice, albeit in different ways. Will cross that bridge when I finally get to it.

Based on your suggestion (please correct me if I am wrong):
Day 12 - Ferreira to Buente = 26.1kms
Day 13 - Buente to O Pedrouza = 29.2kms
Day 14 - O Pedrouza to Santiago = 22.1kms
Day 15 - Santiago (perhaps bus trip to Finnestre)
Day 16 - Santiago back to Madrid
(Therefore I will save 1 whole day of walking)

Unfortunately, I could not find any information on "lavacolla/Villamaior" using http://www.urcamino.com/planner
 

kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#7
In the end it depends as much on what you are comfortable with. Stages of less than 25 kms are not my preference as I tend to walk quite fast and wake up early! I would be at my destination before midday and prefer to arrive in late afternoon which gives me time to do daily tasks such as washing and go out in the evening. However, it also depends on the availability of accommodation.
Thank you kindly for sharing your experience Mike. We are on opposites scales as I am neither a fast walker, nor an early riser, often coming in on the tail end when trekking with a group.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#8
Thank you for the kind advice Momonne. Im not familiar with the Camino at all, and hence I tried my best to work out a schedule that could be done in 14 days. Could you perhaps suggest how to make some of the walking days shorter? Typically 25kms would be ideal, but I also have lots of shorter more relaxed walks to ease the burden of the longer days. Much appreciated.
Let´s see, removing the full rest day but having a couple of 15km days istaead, so adding one day.

Day 7 - Grandas De Selime to Castro
Day 8 - Castro to A Fonsagrada
Day 9 -A Finsagrada to O Cadavo
Day 9 - O Cadavo to Castroverde
Day 10- Castroverde to Lugo
Day 11 - Lugo to San Romao de Retorta
Day 12 - San Romao to As Seixas, and from there onto Melide, etc.
 

falcon269

sidra; no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#10
I am neither a fast walker, nor an early riser
You will control the speed of your walking, but don't count on NOT being an early riser if you stay in albergues. You probably will get up with the crowd, and you can expect it to be predawn! ;)

Most albergues will throw you out by 8-8:30 am, quite rudely at times. Buen camino. :)
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#11
Thank you Laurie for the kind response. Still uncertain which route to take (hospitales or pola), as they both sound very nice, albeit in different ways. Will cross that bridge when I finally get to it.

Based on your suggestion (please correct me if I am wrong):
Day 12 - Ferreira to Buente = 26.1kms
Day 13 - Buente to O Pedrouza = 29.2kms
Day 14 - O Pedrouza to Santiago = 22.1kms
Day 15 - Santiago (perhaps bus trip to Finnestre)
Day 16 - Santiago back to Madrid
(Therefore I will save 1 whole day of walking)

Unfortunately, I could not find any information on "lavacolla/Villamaior" using http://www.urcamino.com/planner
Yes, that is what I was suggesting, I hadn't focused on the fact that it makes your days longer and in fact cuts out one walking day!

Here is the website of the Casa de Amancio http://www.casadeamancio.com. I was there last summer for a café con leche in the morning and it was packed. But I don't think it's packed at night. The original family has sold the operation to two young guys who are much more business-like and efficient. But of course some of the charm got lost in the translation. This was an old family home that they built a ring of rooms around in a back courtyard. When I stayed there years ago, I was the only person spending the night there. I had a really nice long chat with the young guy who was running things and he told me all sorts of stories like how his grandma (or was it great grandma) had been born on a particular slab in the now cafeteria which had then been the cow barn. Had a wonderful home cooked meal, too. I don't know how the new owners run the casa rural part of this operation, but I know they won't have grandma stories to tell you! For me, it was nice to be out of the rush and also nice to have a VERY short walk into Santiago the next day.

Sorry to reminisce so much, but it is interesting to see how many family labors of love on the Camino became successful businesses and then the familly sold out. Buen camino, Laurie
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#12
FWIW I know that the bar in Escamplero, El Tendejon, is trying to open up their own private accommodation option. Nothing concrete with regards to dates, I'll followup in a months time.
They already offer private accomodations, at least they did three years ago.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#13
You will control the speed of your walking, but don't count on NOT being an early riser if you stay in albergues. You probably will get up with the crowd, and you can expect it to be predawn! ;)

Most albergues will throw you out by 8-8:30 am, quite rudely at times. Buen camino. :)
The Primitivo is actually more more relaxed than that. I didn’t not experience plastic bag rustling at 5 am, nor walking in the dark with frontal lamps. Early risers would be those layzily gerring out of bed at 6:00, 6:30. Perhaps because people don’t want to walk 10-15 km without coffee, so they wait for the one local bar to open at 7:30.
 

kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#14
You will control the speed of your walking, but don't count on NOT being an early riser if you stay in albergues. You probably will get up with the crowd, and you can expect it to be predawn! ;)

Most albergues will throw you out by 8-8:30 am, quite rudely at times. Buen camino. :)
Thank you Falcon for the gentle reminder on waking up early. Generally, I am up by 7 am, but I do not consider that as being an early rise. My apologies for the miscommunication.
 

kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#15
T
Yes, that is what I was suggesting, I hadn't focused on the fact that it makes your days longer and in fact cuts out one walking day!

Here is the website of the Casa de Amancio http://www.casadeamancio.com. I was there last summer for a café con leche in the morning and it was packed. But I don't think it's packed at night. The original family has sold the operation to two young guys who are much more business-like and efficient. But of course some of the charm got lost in the translation. This was an old family home that they built a ring of rooms around in a back courtyard. When I stayed there years ago, I was the only person spending the night there. I had a really nice long chat with the young guy who was running things and he told me all sorts of stories like how his grandma (or was it great grandma) had been born on a particular slab in the now cafeteria which had then been the cow barn. Had a wonderful home cooked meal, too. I don't know how the new owners run the casa rural part of this operation, but I know they won't have grandma stories to tell you! For me, it was nice to be out of the rush and also nice to have a VERY short walk into Santiago the next day.

Sorry to reminisce so much, but it is interesting to see how many family labors of love on the Camino became successful businesses and then the familly sold out. Buen camino, Laurie
Thank you Laurie for being gracious enough to share this information. I am at quite a loss in general, as all previous treks I have done were planned by other people, with guides, food ot lodging already sorted out. Very grateful for the kind input.
 

kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#16
The Primitivo is actually more more relaxed than that. I didn’t not experience plastic bag rustling at 5 am, nor walking in the dark with frontal lamps. Early risers would be those layzily gerring out of bed at 6:00, 6:30. Perhaps because people don’t want to walk 10-15 km without coffee, so they wait for the one local bar to open at 7:30.
Thank you mommone for your kind suggestions and opinions (I'm not sure whether this is the correct term). They have been most helpful.
 

kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#17
Out of curiosity, is there a possibility of just winging it, or is it always a better option to pre-plan? Thank you once more.
 

peregrina2000

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#19
Out of curiosity, is there a possibility of just winging it, or is it always a better option to pre-plan? Thank you once more.
I don't think those two things are inconsistent. I freely admit to being an obsessive pre-planner, but for me it is a very enjoyable part of getting ready to walk rather than actually walking. I do research things a bit :p more than most. I like to know where the ancient sites are, I like to know when the castles and churches are open, I like to know what time of day I would have to leave a certain place in order to be likely to arrive when something is open, I like to know the accommodation lay of the land, etc etc. Then I draft a rough walking schedule, add a couple of days, and then buy my RT plane ticket. When I actually walk, I don't think I have ever followed my plan exactly. In some weird way, having the plan actually frees me from worrying about where I will be each day and I can go with the flow. I know when I have to stop walking, I know where stuff is, and I just make choices as I go based on what I experience. SO... longwinded way of saying, winging it, IMO, is totally consistent with planning! Others may well disagree, I know. Just depends on what you mean by "winging it," I guess.
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
#20
for day 4 it might be worth considering staying in Borres instead of Campiello, because you skip the 3km road walk from Campiello. of course, the albergue in Borres cannot be reserved, but last year Casa Ricardo in Campiello offered to come and pick up pilgrims if the Borres albergue would fill up - so you have an option. that also reduces the next day's walk and you start with the climb straight away.

I've seen on gronze.com that albergue in O Padrón is closed. there is albergue O Pineral about 3-4km onwards.

I second laurie's suggestion for a visit to Santalla de Boveda. here is how I did it: https://es.wikiloc.com/rutas-senderismo/camino2016-079-lugo-a-pena-de-galina-18106774. even when I passed the public albergue in Retorta at about 14h, it wasn't full. the last kms to Ferreira seemed quite long and lots of ups and downs.
 

arch

New Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Del Norte from Irun to Santander, Primitivo from Oviedo to Frances to Santiago September 2016
#21
Warm greetings to all. I am planning my tentative route & would appreciate your kind feedback and suggestions if this is feasible. Likely only to use a 32/35L Backpack on the trip.

I will be Arriving in Madrid on 21/5/2018 at 9.40am and take the 11.48am train to Oviedo. Overnight in Oviedo.

Walking starts on 22/5/2018 as follows :
Day 1 - Oviedo to Escamplero (via the Narinco Site) = 17.2kms
Day 2 - Escamplero to Cornellana = 23.8kms
Day 3 - Cornellana to Bodenaya = 17.6kms
Day 4 - Bodenaya to Campiello = 25.2kms
Day 5 - Campiello to Berducedo = 30.8kms (not sure if via pola or hospitales route)
Day 6 - Beducedo to Grandas De Selime = 20.2kms
Day 7 - Grandas De Selime to Padron = 29.2kms
Day 8 - Padron to O Cadavo = 23.8kms
Day 9 - O Cadavo to Lugo - 31kms
Day 10 - Rest Day & Sightseeing in Lugo
Day 11 - Lugo to Ferreira = 29.8kms
Day 12 - Ferreira to Melide = 20kms
Day 13 - Melide to Arzua = 15.1kms
Day 14 - Arzua to Santa Irene = 17.8kms
Day 15 - Santa Irene to Santiago = 24.5kms
Day 16 - Santiago (perhaps bus trip to Finnestre)
Day 17 - Santiago back to Madrid

All advice is most welcome. Thank you.
My daughter and I did the Primitivo September 2016. Hospitales was one of the best days. Don't miss it.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#22
Out of curiosity, is there a possibility of just winging it, or is it always a better option to pre-plan? Thank you once more.
Wing it as long as every time you get ready to leave a town you figure out where the next available may be: it may be far, far away. And as long as you are ok with not walking the last 100km into Santiago, having to bus something if you lag behind your original schedule.
 

Tia Valeria

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Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#23
We stayed at Castro after Grandas. If planning this it is best to phone and check that they are not booked by a youth group.
We made rough plans and then when wanting to book just phoned one day ahead which worked well for us. We walked most days under 20kms. If you check out Gronze you can see the stages they use and then make your own; also they give both bookable and non-bookable albergues and other accommodation.
Buen Camino
 

peregrina2000

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#24
We stayed at Castro after Grandas. If planning this it is best to phone and check that they are not booked by a youth group.
We made rough plans and then when wanting to book just phoned one day ahead which worked well for us. We walked most days under 20kms. If you check out Gronze you can see the stages they use and then make your own; also they give both bookable and non-bookable albergues and other accommodation.
Buen Camino
One of my "camino regrets" is that I have walked this route three times and have never stayed at Grandas. Tia Valeria years ago described the pre-historic hill for and museum and I thought it sounded so interesting. They seem to have put a lot of money and energy into developing this site for visitors -- look at their website. http://castrochaosamartin.esy.es/?lang=en.

In addition to the youth hostel (albergue juvenil) there is also a hotel there that people have enjoyed. If I get back to the Primitivo again, this will be a stop for me! Buen camino, Laurie
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#25
Tia Valeria years ago described the pre-historic hill for and museum and I thought it sounded so interesting. They seem to have put a lot of money and energy into developing this site for visitors -- look at their website. http://castrochaosamartin.esy.es/?lang=en.

In addition to the youth hostel (albergue juvenil) there is also a hotel there that people have enjoyed. If I get back to the Primitivo again, this will be a stop for me! Buen camino, Laurie
Laurie,

The ruins are of a Roman village, not pre-historic. You can even see signs of indoor « plumbing ». Really worth going at the time of the guided tour, one hour before closing normally. Lots to discover and learn.

The albergue is lovely, in an old stone house with a very large backyard, perfect for having a nap in good weather. The girl running it when I was there prepared an excellent meal for us, with veggetable soup and non fried, non breaded fish! The Casa rural had apparently been closed for a while and there were no indications on when it would open again. A beautiful place I could be tempted to spend a weekend at.
 

peregrina2000

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#26
Laurie,

The ruins are of a Roman village, not pre-historic. You can even see signs of indoor « plumbing ». Really worth going at the time of the guided tour, one hour before closing normally. Lots to discover and learn.

The albergue is lovely, in an old stone house with a very large backyard, perfect for having a nap in good weather. The girl running it when I was there prepared an excellent meal for us, with veggetable soup and non fried, non breaded fish! The Casa rural had apparently been closed for a while and there were no indications on when it would open again. A beautiful place I could be tempted to spend a weekend at.
I think we're both right. According to the website, this place has Bronze Age, Iron Age, Roman, and even some medieval remnants.
http://castrochaosamartin.esy.es/el-castro/?lang=en

I would love to go there, not sure how I can squeeze another Primitivo into my growing list of caminos and my decreasing years of walking ability!
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#27
I think we're both right. According to the website, this place has Bronze Age, Iron Age, Roman, and even some medieval remnants.
http://castrochaosamartin.esy.es/el-castro/?lang=en

I would love to go there, not sure how I can squeeze another Primitivo into my growing list of caminos and my decreasing years of walking ability!
The website mentions the Bronze age and 800bc. Didn’t prehistory end a long thousands of years before that?
 

kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#28
for day 4 it might be worth considering staying in Borres instead of Campiello, because you skip the 3km road walk from Campiello. of course, the albergue in Borres cannot be reserved, but last year Casa Ricardo in Campiello offered to come and pick up pilgrims if the Borres albergue would fill up - so you have an option. that also reduces the next day's walk and you start with the climb straight away.

I've seen on gronze.com that albergue in O Padrón is closed. there is albergue O Pineral about 3-4km onwards.

I second laurie's suggestion for a visit to Santalla de Boveda. here is how I did it: https://es.wikiloc.com/rutas-senderismo/camino2016-079-lugo-a-pena-de-galina-18106774. even when I passed the public albergue in Retorta at about 14h, it wasn't full. the last kms to Ferreira seemed quite long and lots of ups and downs.
Thank you Caminka for sharing that useful piece of information with me. I may indeed look at Borres and save a few kms the next day. As for the detour to Santalla de Bodeva, it may be a little difficult for me, as time is not quote on my side.
 

kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#29
One of my "camino regrets" is that I have walked this route three times and have never stayed at Grandas. Tia Valeria years ago described the pre-historic hill for and museum and I thought it sounded so interesting. They seem to have put a lot of money and energy into developing this site for visitors -- look at their website. http://castrochaosamartin.esy.es/?lang=en.

In addition to the youth hostel (albergue juvenil) there is also a hotel there that people have enjoyed. If I get back to the Primitivo again, this will be a stop for me! Buen camino, Laurie
There seem to be so many different options in terms of
i) villages and accommodation for the night
ii) things to see and do
iii) distances to walk
iv) each with their own positives and negatives.

It is rather bewildering to me.
 

peregrina2000

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#30
There seem to be so many different options in terms of
i) villages and accommodation for the night
ii) things to see and do
iii) distances to walk
iv) each with their own positives and negatives.

It is rather bewildering to me.
Hi, Kaje,
Don't let the information overload distract and detract from the experience (and sorry for being part of the reason you have so much information with all the pluses and minuses :eek:). No need to make any decisions on any of those things now. Once you start to walk it will all fall into place and the decisions will come easily and naturally, you will see. Things you can't predict, like the weather, how you are feeling, who you are walking with, etc are likely to be the primary determinants anyway!

Buen camino, Laurie

The website mentions the Bronze age and 800bc. Didn’t prehistory end a long thousands of years before that?
Once again, learning so much on the forum! I always thought Bronze and Iron ages were part of what was meant by "prehistoric" -- I am now more educated on that one! https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prehistory Thanks, Momonne
 

kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#31
Thank you all for the very kind support. I have booked my flight to madrid and accommodation in oviedo, lugo and santiago de compostela.

Out of curiosity, is a day trip by bus to finnestre a worthwhile experience? Or should a day be spent in santiago itself?
Thank you once more.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#32
Thank you all for the very kind support. I have booked my flight to madrid and accommodation in oviedo, lugo and santiago de compostela.

Out of curiosity, is a day trip by bus to finnestre a worthwhile experience? Or should a day be spent in santiago itself?
Thank you once more.
How much time will you have in Santiago?

Santiago can be difficult after a Camino, very anticlimiatic. So after a quick walk on the 4 streets or so around the cathedral may be enough for you. On the other hand, one can spend a couple of days there chilling, doing the cathedral roof top tour (best guided tour anywhere ever!).

Also, will not seeing Fisterra bug you? Will you keep wondering what ot’s like?

If you decide to bus out to the coast, and if you can spend a night, in good weather, my vote is for Muxia, a perfect place for a quiet wind down, reflection, and the beauty of the coast. A very different vibe than Fisterra, but not the place you read about so often.

Did I just add more anxiety to your planning? :cool:

Tell you what: decide on the spot. If you have been walking with someone in particular, your decision may be based on that, and then you go with what ever that cowalking has led you to want to do.
 

kaje

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#33
How much time will you have in Santiago?

Santiago can be difficult after a Camino, very anticlimiatic. So after a quick walk on the 4 streets or so around the cathedral may be enough for you. On the other hand, one can spend a couple of days there chilling, doing the cathedral roof top tour (best guided tour anywhere ever!).

Also, will not seeing Fisterra bug you? Will you keep wondering what ot’s like?

If you decide to bus out to the coast, and if you can spend a night, in good weather, my vote is for Muxia, a perfect place for a quiet wind down, reflection, and the beauty of the coast. A very different vibe than Fisterra, but not the place you read about so often.

Did I just add more anxiety to your planning? :cool:

Tell you what: decide on the spot. If you have been walking with someone in particular, your decision may be based on that, and then you go with what ever that cowalking has led you to want to do.
Thank you mommone for the quick response. I have only 2 nights in santiago before I am off. Sadly a night in finnestre or muxia is not possible based on my schedule, unless i only spend 2 nights in madrid before leaving. It is already a long trip away from work, and I cannot push the dates further.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#34
How much time will you have in Santiago?

Santiago can be difficult after a Camino, very anticlimiatic. So after a quick walk on the 4 streets or so around the cathedral may be enough for you. On the other hand, one can spend a couple of days there chilling, doing the cathedral roof top tour (best guided tour anywhere ever!).

Also, will not seeing Fisterra bug you? Will you keep wondering what ot’s like?

If you decide to bus out to the coast, and if you can spend a night, in good weather, my vote is for Muxia, a perfect place for a quiet wind down, reflection, and the beauty of the coast. A very different vibe than Fisterra, but not the place you read about so often.

Did I just add more anxiety to your planning? :cool:

Tell you what: decide on the spot. If you have been walking with someone in particular, your decision may be based on that, and then you go with what ever that cowalking has led you to want to do.
Totally agree with Momonne. Decide when you get there. There is no way to predict how you will feel when you actually walk into Santiago. Some are elated, some are depressed, some just have a flat dull sense. I have had all of those reactions myself in different years.

I know that some pilgrims band together and hire a cab to go out to Finisterre and/or Muxia and then back. The bus is around 3 hours each way, so that would not be much of a fun day trip. I took a cab back to Santiago from Muxia last year because there was a bus strike. For four of us it was cheap, can't remember exactly but around 12-15 I think.
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
#35
One of my "camino regrets" is that I have walked this route three times and have never stayed at Grandas. Tia Valeria years ago described the pre-historic hill for and museum and I thought it sounded so interesting. They seem to have put a lot of money and energy into developing this site for visitors -- look at their website. http://castrochaosamartin.esy.es/?lang=en.
I stayed in castro for this very reason. only, it was sunday, and by the time I got there the site has closed down for the day. :( I did contemplate climbing over the protective fence for a minute or two. what I saw was from a distance, from the entrance to the museum.

perhaps it's worth mentioning that this castro is not in grandas, but about 1h further on in castro. etnographic museum in grandas is said to be very nice, too, with lots of examples of rural architecture.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#36
The museum in Grandas closes at 14.30 Sunday and all day Monday, otherwise it is open 11.30 to 14.00 and 16.00 to 18.30 (winter) or 19.30 (summer)
The museum in Castro is open at 11.00 then closes at 13.00 to visit the actual Castro; then again at 16.00 closing for the Castro tour at 17.30. Sunday hours 11.30 to 13.30 (for tour). Hours are slightly longer in summer and it is closed in January and on Mondays all year.

We have visited both and it is well worth trying to time arrival in Grandas and Castro to see the museums. We took a rest day and then a short day to do so.
 
#37
Warm greetings to all. I am planning my tentative route & would appreciate your kind feedback and suggestions if this is feasible. Likely only to use a 32/35L Backpack on the trip.

I will be Arriving in Madrid on 21/5/2018 at 9.40am and take the 11.48am train to Oviedo. Overnight in Oviedo.

Walking starts on 22/5/2018 as follows :
Day 1 - Oviedo to Escamplero (via the Narinco Site) = 17.2kms
Day 2 - Escamplero to Cornellana = 23.8kms
Day 3 - Cornellana to Bodenaya = 17.6kms
Day 4 - Bodenaya to Campiello = 25.2kms
Day 5 - Campiello to Berducedo = 30.8kms (not sure if via pola or hospitales route)
Day 6 - Beducedo to Grandas De Selime = 20.2kms
Day 7 - Grandas De Selime to Padron = 29.2kms
Day 8 - Padron to O Cadavo = 23.8kms
Day 9 - O Cadavo to Lugo - 31kms
Day 10 - Rest Day & Sightseeing in Lugo
Day 11 - Lugo to Ferreira = 29.8kms
Day 12 - Ferreira to Melide = 20kms
Day 13 - Melide to Arzua = 15.1kms
Day 14 - Arzua to Santa Irene = 17.8kms
Day 15 - Santa Irene to Santiago = 24.5kms
Day 16 - Santiago (perhaps bus trip to Finnestre)
Day 17 - Santiago back to Madrid

All advice is most welcome. Thank you.
Just finished my first Camino Frances in November and am fascinated with the Primitivo. Look forward to hearing the responses. There is, I know, a very nice Albergue in Grado, too. Just beyond Escamplero.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#38
Just finished my first Camino Frances in November and am fascinated with the Primitivo. Look forward to hearing the responses. There is, I know, a very nice Albergue in Grado, too. Just beyond Escamplero.
Not quite “just beyond Esclampero », some 13 km. Makes a big difference for some, especially those who may be suffering from jetlag.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Primitivo (2017)
#39
Warm greetings to all. I am planning my tentative route & would appreciate your kind feedback and suggestions if this is feasible. Likely only to use a 32/35L Backpack on the trip.

I will be Arriving in Madrid on 21/5/2018 at 9.40am and take the 11.48am train to Oviedo. Overnight in Oviedo.

Walking starts on 22/5/2018 as follows :
Day 1 - Oviedo to Escamplero (via the Narinco Site) = 17.2kms
Day 2 - Escamplero to Cornellana = 23.8kms
Day 3 - Cornellana to Bodenaya = 17.6kms
Day 4 - Bodenaya to Campiello = 25.2kms
Day 5 - Campiello to Berducedo = 30.8kms (not sure if via pola or hospitales route)
Day 6 - Beducedo to Grandas De Selime = 20.2kms
Day 7 - Grandas De Selime to Padron = 29.2kms
Day 8 - Padron to O Cadavo = 23.8kms
Day 9 - O Cadavo to Lugo - 31kms
Day 10 - Rest Day & Sightseeing in Lugo
Day 11 - Lugo to Ferreira = 29.8kms
Day 12 - Ferreira to Melide = 20kms
Day 13 - Melide to Arzua = 15.1kms
Day 14 - Arzua to Santa Irene = 17.8kms
Day 15 - Santa Irene to Santiago = 24.5kms
Day 16 - Santiago (perhaps bus trip to Finnestre)
Day 17 - Santiago back to Madrid

All advice is most welcome. Thank you.
Hello Kaje. I did the Camino Primitivo this past September (2017) and thoroughly enjoyed it. The first day, I stopped in Grado. It had rained all day and I was very tired by then. The albergue in Grado is very comfortable and the hospitaleros are fantastic. The next three days, I followed a different itinerary than what you have planned but I stopped in Campiello on day 4 like you plan to do. I highly recommend the albergue in Campiello. It is relatively new, you can wash clothes and they have an electric dryer. Four of us pooled our resources and washed and dried clothes while we relaxed in the late afternoon. The dinner in the albergue was fantastic, the hospitaleros even prepared a vegetarian meal for one of the pilgrims. You plan to go from O'Cadavo to Lugo on day 9. I did that as well. It is a long stretch. You are wise to plan a day of rest in Lugo. I did the same and it helped to regain much needed energy for the rest of the pilgrimage. Do not miss a visit to the cathedral and the roman walls in Lugo. From Lugo to Santiago in 5 days is very feasible. I followed an itinerary similar to your plan except that I did not stop in Santa Irene but in a small village closer to Santiago. Unfortunately, I do not recall the name. The reason for this is that I wanted to arrive in Santiago earlier in the day and a 25 kms walk would have put me in Santiago in late afternoon. When you join the Camino Frances in Melide, you can expect a lot more pilgrims so it is wise to reserve your albergue in advance. When we arrived in Santiago, one of the people that I walked with had not reserved in advance and she had a very difficult time to find a place to stay for the first night. I did not go to Finestere, instead I stayed in Santiago for 2 days and visited many of the sites in and around the cathedral. I flew back to Madrid. If you plan on doing the same, book your flight on the internet. I found that I was overcharged by the travel agency that has an office close to the pilgrim house where you get your Compostela. Buen Camino y Ultreia.
 
#41
Hi everybody, i am also planning to do Primitivo this year, after having done Camino Frances and the Portuguese route in 2016 and 2017. However, i cannot be away from work for long this year. I am coming from Asia, and travelling to the start point itself will already take some time.
So, May i know, for those who have done it, what is the shortest possible number of days one can complete it? Any suggested way to compact the route is welcome, though i wish i don't have to be in a rush to complete it. Walking is not really any issue, i can cover 27-30km per day without issue. Appreciate your advice, please. Thank you.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#42
So, May i know, for those who have done it, what is the shortest possible number of days one can complete it? Any suggested way to compact the route is welcome, though i wish i don't have to be in a rush to complete it. Walking is not really any issue, i can cover 27-30km per day without issue. Appreciate your advice, please. Thank you.
So, you have walked into Santiago twice. Do you need to do it again?

If not, take your time to walk from Oviedo to As Seixas, do not even think of setting foot in Melide with your Primitivo mind set unless you are ok with a shock, and enjoy every minute of the Primitivo before it joins the Frances.

Here is a website to help plan stages. http://www.urcamino.com/camino-primitivo
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Primitivo (2017)
#43
@AlainC , Campielo has hospies?!
Yes, it does. I stopped there in September 2017. The albergue is next to the general store and restaurant. It looked new and was very clean. I recommend it as the owners are really wonderful and the service is great. We paid 10 Euros for the bed and 12 Euros for the dinner. The cost was well worth it and one of the best meals that I had on the Camino. We were also able to buy some food and water in the store for our journey the next day.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#44
Yes, it does. I stopped there in September 2017. The albergue is next to the general store and restaurant. It looked new and was very clean. I recommend it as the owners are really wonderful and the service is great. We paid 10 Euros for the bed and 12 Euros for the dinner. The cost was well worth it and one of the best meals that I had on the Camino. We were also able to buy some food and water in the store for our journey the next day.
Good to know, thank you. Yet another example of private albergues using hospies. Since they are being called hospies I am guessing not paid, and perhaps foreigners? Or am I being unfair? But that is just me making assumptions. Because both Ricardo’s and Erminia’s places are private/for profit.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Primitivo (2017)
#45
Not quite “just beyond Esclampero », some 13 km. Makes a big difference for some, especially those who may be suffering from jetlag.
I stayed in the albergue in Grado this past September (2017). It is very nice, well kept and the hosteleros are great. It is not difficult to find if you follow the signs when you get into the town. Also, it is close to some restaurants should you wish to go for a good meal after a long day of walking.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Primitivo (2017)
#46
Good to know, thank you. Yet another example of private albergues using hospies. Since they are being called hospies I am guessing not paid, and perhaps foreigners? Or am I being unfair? But that is just me making assumptions. Because both Ricardo’s and Erminia’s places are private/for profit.
I am not sure that I get your drift. The albergue is runned by local people. Yes, there were some volunteers also. There was not a fix price and they rely on donativos to run the place.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Primitivo (2017)
#47
I am not sure that I get your drift. The albergue is runned by local people. Yes, there were some volunteers also. There was not a fix price and they rely on donativos to run the place.
Sorry, this may be a reply to another question. This comment applies to the albergue in Grado. The albergue in Campiello is runned by local people and they charge 10 Euros for a bed.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#48
I am not sure that I get your drift. The albergue is runned by local people. Yes, there were some volunteers also. There was not a fix price and they rely on donativos to run the place.
Oh, that’s interesting. I didn't realise Ricardo ran his place on a donativo basis. Eroski doens’t list him as a donativo, nor does Gronze. They both say 10€.

I have to say I really struggled with for profit albergues using foreign « hospies » instead of paying local staff legal wages for the work they need done.


Oh, your second post just came in. Yes, Grado is city owned and a donativo. Very different situation than a private albergue using free foreign labour rather than paying employees while the owners make money/live their Camino dream on someone else’s back.
 
#49
So, you have walked into Santiago twice. Do you need to do it again?

If not, take your time to walk from Oviedo to As Seixas, do not even think of setting foot in Melide with your Primitivo mind set unless you are ok with a shock, and enjoy every minute of the Primitivo before it joins the Frances.

Here is a website to help plan stages. http://www.urcamino.com/camino-primitivo

Thanks for the prompt suggestion, Momonne. Yes, while I have walked into Santiago twice, and the place can get a bit touristy, somehow I still enjoy the feeling of ending it there, and it's a form of closure for me too. Agree with you about Melide. I am wondering if it's possible to cover the route in about 10 days, considering there may not be as many readily available accommodation enroute, as compared to Frances.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#50
Thanks for the prompt suggestion, Momonne. Yes, while I have walked into Santiago twice, and the place can get a bit touristy, somehow I still enjoy the feeling of ending it there, and it's a form of closure for me too. Agree with you about Melide. I am wondering if it's possible to cover the route in about 10 days, considering there may not be as many readily available accommodation enroute, as compared to Frances.
Ern, use www.urcamino.com to plug in the number of days you have available and see what it suggests in terms of stages. It’s a fun site.
 
#51
. I did the Camino Primitivo this past September (2017) and thoroughly enjoyed it. The first day, I stopped in Grado. It had rained all day and I was very tired by then. The albergue in Grado is very comfortable and the hospitaleros are fantastic. The next three days, I followed a different itinerary than what you have planned but I stopped in Campiello on day 4 like you plan to do. ....... Buen Camino y Ultreia.
Hi, would you be able to share your itinerary and how many days did you complete the entire route?
 
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#52
Hello Kaje. I did the Camino Primitivo this past September (2017) and thoroughly enjoyed it. The first day, I stopped in Grado. It had rained all day and I was very tired by then. The albergue in Grado is very comfortable and the hospitaleros are fantastic. The next three days, I followed a different itinerary than what you have planned but I stopped in Campiello on day 4 like you plan to do. I highly recommend the albergue in Campiello. It is relatively new, you can wash clothes and they have an electric dryer. Four of us pooled our resources and washed and dried clothes while we relaxed in the late afternoon. The dinner in the albergue was fantastic, the hospitaleros even prepared a vegetarian meal for one of the pilgrims. You plan to go from O'Cadavo to Lugo on day 9. I did that as well. It is a long stretch. You are wise to plan a day of rest in Lugo. I did the same and it helped to regain much needed energy for the rest of the pilgrimage. Do not miss a visit to the cathedral and the roman walls in Lugo. From Lugo to Santiago in 5 days is very feasible. I followed an itinerary similar to your plan except that I did not stop in Santa Irene but in a small village closer to Santiago. Unfortunately, I do not recall the name. The reason for this is that I wanted to arrive in Santiago earlier in the day and a 25 kms walk would have put me in Santiago in late afternoon. When you join the Camino Frances in Melide, you can expect a lot more pilgrims so it is wise to reserve your albergue in advance. When we arrived in Santiago, one of the people that I walked with had not reserved in advance and she had a very difficult time to find a place to stay for the first night. I did not go to Finestere, instead I stayed in Santiago for 2 days and visited many of the sites in and around the cathedral. I flew back to Madrid. If you plan on doing the same, book your flight on the internet. I found that I was overcharged by the travel agency that has an office close to the pilgrim house where you get your Compostela. Buen Camino y Ultreia.
Thank you Alain for sharing your experience, and I hope to enjoy the Camino Primitivo as much as you did.
 
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#53
Considering I reach Oviedo in the late evening, and leave in the morning, where and what would be the best way to get the camino credential ?

Many thanks in advance.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#54
Considering I reach Oviedo in the late evening, and leave in the morning, where and what would be the best way to get the camino credential ?

Many thanks in advance.
The albergue should have them, you may want to contact them ahead of time and make sure. Also, the tourist kiosk on Calle Uria at the intersection of the street that takes you to the cathedral (at the bottom corner of the park) has them. The kiosk can also give you a city map to show you the way tomthe Naranco buildings. I think I got mine at the cathedral but it opens mid-morning (tenish if I recall). It was still closed to visitors when I popped in but open for those wanting to pray and i was able to get my credencial then, maybe around 9am.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#55
Good to know, thank you. Yet another example of private albergues using hospies. Since they are being called hospies I am guessing not paid, and perhaps foreigners? Or am I being unfair? But that is just me making assumptions. Because both Ricardo’s and Erminia’s places are private/for profit.
The owner of at least one of these is the hospitalera, helped by her husband and son. They are lovely people and we actually visited them last year when passing with the car just to say hello.

In other places folk are glad to volunteer to give something back to the Camino. That is not exploitation.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#56
The owner of at least one of these is the hospitalera, helped by her husband and son. They are lovely people and we actually visited them last year when passing with the car just to say hello.

In other places folk are glad to volunteer to give something back to the Camino. That is not exploitation.
I have nothing against people giving back by volunteerng in munis, religious or association albergues, as these places are non for profit and would never hore payed staff to act as hospies, but « giving back » by replacing what would be and should be legally employed locals is not giving back to the Camino, only filling the pockets of the private albergue owners.

Wonder what would happen at the boarder if those coming in to work for free in private albergues actually told customs officers that’s what they were coming into the country to do. Taking jobs away.

And then we tap ourselves on the back, congratulating ourselves for saving dying villages in Spain with our 30€ a day...
 
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#57
The albergue should have them, you may want to contact them ahead of time and make sure. Also, the tourist kiosk on Calle Uria at the intersection of the street that takes you to the cathedral (at the bottom corner of the park) has them. The kiosk can also give you a city map to show you the way tomthe Naranco buildings. I think I got mine at the cathedral but it opens mid-morning (tenish if I recall). It was still closed to visitors when I popped in but open for those wanting to pray and i was able to get my credencial then, maybe around 9am.
Thanks Momonne. I won't be staying at an albergue in oviedo so I hope the tourist kiosk will be open when I reach in the evening circa 5pm.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid.
#58
@kaje why not order one from Ivar who runs this forum? He's very efficient at sending them out and that way you will have it before you leave home. See here for the link for ordering.
 
Camino(s) past & future
No camino(s) yet. Camino Primitivo in May 2018.
Everest Base Camp April 2015
#59
@kaje why not order one from Ivar who runs this forum? He's very efficient at sending them out and that way you will have it before you leave home. See here for the link for ordering.
Thank you kanga for the kind suggestion. It will be the best option, especially if the credential is sent to the hotel in oviedo. Almost like a welcoming treat.
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
#60

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid.
#61
Thank you kanga for the kind suggestion. It will be the best option, especially if the credential is sent to the hotel in oviedo. Almost like a welcoming treat.
I always get Ivar to send mine to me at home. Often months before I leave! In fact, I have two sitting in a drawing - waiting...
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#62
I have nothing against people giving back by volunteerng in munis, religious or association albergues, as these places are non for profit and would never hore payed staff to act as hospies, but « giving back » by replacing what would be and should be legally employed locals is not giving back to the Camino, only filling the pockets of the private albergue owners.

Wonder what would happen at the boarder if those coming in to work for free in private albergues actually told customs officers that’s what they were coming into the country to do. Taking jobs away.

And then we tap ourselves on the back, congratulating ourselves for saving dying villages in Spain with our 30€ a day...
If the albergue is donativo then I see no problem, it will not be making a profit but may be bringing some cash into the area. I don't think you will find volunteers taking jobs from locals in reality.

However we stray from the original topic of the possible route and time from Oviedo to Santiago. We walked short days so took longer than most to complete the Camino. See blog for Camino Primitivo 2012 in the link below. Some people walk from Lugo to Friol to join the Norte and then the Frances nearer to Santiago. We walked from Ferreira to Palas de Rei, joining sooner. there were so many more pilgrims but I would not have wanted to miss the last days into Santiago in spite of the extra numbers.
We had our credenciales before we left home and had them stamped at the start of our journey.
Buen Camino
 

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