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Post your favorite flower photo taken on Camino.


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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#2
I have no idea what the above flower's name is, but it is so unusual and 3 dimensional...an all time favorite of mine!
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breathe properly.
Stay curious.
And walk a camino.
#5
I took tons of pictures of flowers on the camino, including in France. The sad part is that I maybe know one or two names of them, despite the fact my dad was a garden architect and my mom used to work in a flower shop.
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#15
@Purky, what a wonderful selection of colorful flowers. I knew this thread would provide lots of lovely photos for many of us to enjoy! :)
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breathe properly.
Stay curious.
And walk a camino.
#16
Not strictly on Camino but taken on pilgrimage in Japan a few days ago. Cherry blossom - "sakura" in Japanese - is a national obsession. When you see it in the landscape and set against so many beautiful buildings it is easy to see why.

View attachment 41210 View attachment 41211 View attachment 41212
Nice that you mention 'Sakura'. I've never been to Japan, but do share their love for cherry blossom. So much so that I planted a cherry tree in our backyard when our son was born 17 years ago. And each spring I marvel at the speed and abundance with which that tree explodes in lush and delicate flowers. It is blossoming as we speak: I think tomorrow it will hit its peak.
And at the same time our cherry tree does its thing, I always make a point to go look at a huge magnolia tree a couple of streets away. It is equally impressive to see that one, one of the most beautiful in the Netherlands, according to a national contest that was held some years ago (as I was told by the proud owners).
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#18
Hi John, I have only walked in spring, so have yet to see the sunflowers in bloom on the Camino...they have such happy faces. :)
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#19
And at the same time our cherry tree does its thing, I always make a point to go look at a huge magnolia tree a couple of streets away. It is equally impressive to see that one, one of the most beautiful in the Netherlands, according to a national contest that was held some years ago (as I was told by the proud owners).
The Japanese have some lovely magnolias too. I took this photo on the same day as the ones above :)

IMG_20180326_132224.jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP – SdC (2017)
Waiting for an opportunity to walk again...
#20
I've never been much of a flower person. Especially cut flowers in vases don't do anything for me.
But I really learned to see, appreciate and love the wild flowers along the Camino.

IMG_0679.jpg This picture I took just after Navarrete in May 2017.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#26
Not as good a photo as yours but looks like the same flower. Photo was taken in the Pyrenees in early April. The flowers seemed to be growing straight out of the ground in clumps. Most unusual.
I think it is an odd plant called purple toothwort in English or clandestine in French. Doesn't need leaves because it is actually a parasite growing on the roots of other plants, especially some tree species.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lathraea_clandestina
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#30
Here’s another one for you. It’s a wild thistle and you can see dried versions hanging on doors in Basque country in Navarra apparently to protect against evil spirits.
I did think I had a photo of one on a door but can’t find it.
CD9DBFB3-8B18-4547-9C2D-F7D41453EDC4.jpeg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#31
Here’s another one for you. It’s a wild thistle and you can see dried versions hanging on doors in Basque country in Navarra apparently to protect against evil spirits.
I did think I had a photo of one on a door but can’t find it.
View attachment 41304
I remember seeing a few huge thistles here and there, but don't recall noticing the flower at the top...although not too pretty, it's still very interesting!
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017 Francés
March 2018 Inglés
(May 2019) Baztan
#32
Here’s another one for you. It’s a wild thistle and you can see dried versions hanging on doors in Basque country in Navarra apparently to protect against evil spirits.
I did think I had a photo of one on a door but can’t find it.
View attachment 41304
It’s an eguzkilore. It keeps the bad spirits away.
 

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Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#34
It’s an eguzkilore. It keeps the bad spirits away.
In Scotland it used to be believed that a rowan tree growing near a house was a protection against witches and black magic. Many houses had one near the front door. Much of the Highlands was cleared of people in the 19th century and almost all the houses were torn down. Very little left to be seen. Sometimes you can still tell where they once were because a solitary rowan tree is growing in the middle of a wide open landscape. It can be a very poignant sight.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#35
In Scotland it used to be believed that a rowan tree growing near a house was a protection against witches and black magic. Many houses had one near the front door. Much of the Highlands was cleared of people in the 19th century and almost all the houses were torn down. Very little left to be seen. Sometimes you can still tell where they once were because a solitary rowan tree is growing in the middle of a wide open landscape. It can be a very poignant sight.
Bradypus, I have been waiting for a chance to say I noticed your new avatar, although I miss the old one! ah, the clearances! A similar story holds where I now live, Ireland, but it is the hawthorn, which is the Fairy tree and not to be disturbed...
 
Camino(s) past & future
North
#36
In Scotland it used to be believed that a rowan tree growing near a house was a protection against witches and black magic. Many houses had one near the front door. Much of the Highlands was cleared of people in the 19th century and almost all the houses were torn down. Very little left to be seen. Sometimes you can still tell where they once were because a solitary rowan tree is growing in the middle of a wide open landscape. It can be a very poignant sight.
Rowan tree? Is like this? This one is from my family second home in the mountain

AB1628F1-A8F0-4992-866A-B9B6E4CBE1BB.JPG
 
Camino(s) past & future
'
#39
Much of the Highlands was cleared of people in the 19th century and almost all the houses were torn down. Very little left to be seen. Sometimes you can still tell where they once were because a solitary rowan tree is growing in the middle of a wide open landscape. It can be a very poignant sight.
Interesting. It reminded me of the solitary stone pines or parasol pines that one sees along the ways of Saint James through Les Landes, shortly before one reaches the Pyrenées. They are said to have marked the houses of Protestants or Huguenots when they lived under difficult circumstances, including persecution, in 16th and 17th century France. I photographed one such pine tree and duly felt a certain frisson and the breath of history (I know that's not English ... what do you say?).

So these pine trees marked homes where a Protestant could find shelter and kindred spirits in the South West of Catholic France:

Pin parasol.jpg

Turns out that they have a life span of only 150 years ...

Apparently, that's similar to the lifespan of the rowan trees but of course they may still be the originals. :cool:
 
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#40
Co-incidence! I was just visiting a friend in hospital this afternoon, and she was amusing herself looking at photos of wildflowers she took on the meseta two years ago. She's a wonderful photographer. My photos are not nearly as good, but I was pleased with this, because it is unusual. A wild orchid:

Wild orchid.jpg

And on the Norte, in Galicia, we kept finding these beautiful roses - profusely covered bushes, and the flowers themselves varied in colour from a deep to a light pink, all on the same bush. I've asked various knowledgeable gardeners, and so far no-one has come up with exactly what it is. The locals just shrugged and said "rosa común".

Wild roses.jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 29th to July 4th 2016
SJPDP to Santiago
And many, many more I pray
#42
The poppies inspired me. They appear so fragile on their delicate stems and equally delicate petals. Yet they’d continue to stand proudly during the extream heat as well as the strong rain and wind. When I’d feel tired or in pain I’d spot one and stand straighter....and walk stronger.
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#43
Interesting. It reminded me of the solitary stone pines or parasol pines that one sees along the ways of Saint James through Les Landes, shortly before one reaches the Pyrenées. They are said to have marked the houses of Protestants or Huguenots when they lived under difficult circumstances, including persecution, in 16th and 17th century France. I photographed one such pine tree and duly felt a certain frisson and the breath of history (I know that's not English ... what do you say?).

So these pine tress marked homes where a Protestant could find shelter and kindred spirits:

View attachment 41313

Turns out that they have a life span of only 150 years ...

Apparently, that's similar to the lifespan of the rowan trees but of course they may still be the originals. :cool:
Is this the same tree? I've read that this house on the alternate path near Villafranca del Bierzo is the most snapped photo on the Frances...don't know if it's true.
I've seen these trees in Rome and love them. I call them Umbrella pines. Lol. Screenshot_2018-04-16-06-19-17.jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
North
#44
Is this the same tree? I've read that this house on the alternate path near Villafranca del Bierzo is the most snapped photo on the Frances...don't know if it's true.
I've seen these trees in Rome and love them. I call them Umbrella pines. Lol. View attachment 41320
I think it's the same as Kathar1na refers. Pinus Pinea
 
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Camino(s) past & future
North
#47
Yes - that's the one. Sometimes also called the mountain ash.


We known it as Serbal (Sorbus aucuparia ); in the foto I´ve uploaded before, you can see in the left down several Fresnos (Fraxinios excelsior); ash tree is the name in english?, and above them, on the hillside, can see an oak forest.


Sorry, I love trees :rolleyes:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#52
Is this the same tree? I've read that this house on the alternate path near Villafranca del Bierzo is the most snapped photo on the Frances...don't know if it's true.
I've seen these trees in Rome and love them. I call them Umbrella pines. Lol.
Really good photo, Chris. Best I’ve seen of that house and there have been a few.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#54
Have so many but one that makes me smile every time is this one from Camino Francés. Taken here: https://www.google.com/maps?q=loc:42.5245563,-5.6763314
Have some roses I really like as well like this one from CP and a lot of thistles from the Meseta :)
View attachment 41453
Beatrice, the excellent lighting on your sunflower picture makes it very special!

The rose photo is outstanding, graced with perfectly placed beads of rain or dew droplets...very unique!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: See post signature.
Upcoming: ?+VdlP (Sept 2018)
#55
Beatrice, the excellent lighting on your sunflower picture makes it very special!

The rose photo is outstanding, graced with perfectly placed beads of rain or dew droplets...very unique!
Thanks! Yes I was lucky with both the sunrise and the rain :)
 

zrexer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15 & 16 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo (Sept.)
#57
Is this the same tree? I've read that this house on the alternate path near Villafranca del Bierzo is the most snapped photo on the Frances...don't know if it's true.
I've seen these trees in Rome and love them. I call them Umbrella pines. Lol. View attachment 41320
Same picture more or less from April 2014.

FB_IMG_1475674337834.jpg
 

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