Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Preferred/Nicest Stretches of Camino Frances?

Gipsy Moon

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2015 - Camino del Norte
March 2016 - Camino del Ebro
April 2016 - Camino Frances
Feb. 2017 - Camino Frances
March 2017 - Camino Salvador
March 2017 - Camino Primitivo
Hello,

From el Camino del Ebro I will reach el Camino Frances in Logrono very beginning of April this year.
Was wondering if there will be many walking pilgrims already? (what is many?)

And what are your preferred/nicest stretches of the Camino Frances from there not to be missed in your experiences?

Thanks a lot for sharing
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015

Aidan21

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to SDC 2013/14
SJPP to SDC 2016
Porto to SDC 2017
VdlP Sevilla/Salamanca 2018
If you ask 100 people I guess you will get 100 different answers. I found all of it wonderful. Even Galicia, which I swear is a lost Irish province, thanks to the rain. However the part of the CF that I have very fond memories of is the Meseta. I loved the gently flowing landscape that stretched all the way to the horizon, the sunrises, the wind turbines in the distance and the very easy walking. At times I felt totally alone in a beautiful and bountiful landscape but never lonely.
 

Gipsy Moon

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2015 - Camino del Norte
March 2016 - Camino del Ebro
April 2016 - Camino Frances
Feb. 2017 - Camino Frances
March 2017 - Camino Salvador
March 2017 - Camino Primitivo
If you ask 100 people I guess you will get 100 different answers. I found all of it wonderful. Even Galicia, which I swear is a lost Irish province, thanks to the rain. However the part of the CF that I have very fond memories of is the Meseta. I loved the gently flowing landscape that stretched all the way to the horizon, the sunrises, the wind turbines in the distance and the very easy walking. At times I felt totally alone in a beautiful and bountiful landscape but never lonely.

thank you for taking the time to describe your feelings of the Meseta Aidan : ) sounds like some part I would really enjoy too
 

LesBrass

Likes Walking
Camino(s) past & future
yes...
Every time I think of a favourite place... I remember another. I loved the area out of Burgos... but loved from Leon also... and Galicia (also reminded me of Devon) And the pyrenees in the spring? You see... it's impossible :rolleyes:

Are there things that you really love? History, open spaces, or forests? Maybe that could help narrow the choices :)
 

Gipsy Moon

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2015 - Camino del Norte
March 2016 - Camino del Ebro
April 2016 - Camino Frances
Feb. 2017 - Camino Frances
March 2017 - Camino Salvador
March 2017 - Camino Primitivo
Every time I think of a favourite place... I remember another. I loved the area out of Burgos... but loved from Leon also... and Galicia (also reminded me of Devon) And the pyrenees in the spring? You see... it's impossible :rolleyes:

Are there things that you really love? History, open spaces, or forests? Maybe that could help narrow the choices :)

Thank you : ) funny rolling eyes : ) )
What I really love is Nature - capital letter... so except for the Ocean first place - reason why first Camino was del Norte
it doesn't really matter if forest, flat, climb, challenging ... changes of landscape are great ... long meditative stretches also ok

I guess it is the energy - more rolling eyes : ) ... energy that you can feel outdoor as well as in and around monuments and churches
... energy that has meaning

does that really help ? : ) )
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
Thank you : ) funny rolling eyes : ) )
What I really love is Nature - capital letter... so except for the Ocean first place - reason why first Camino was del Norte
it doesn't really matter if forest, flat, climb, challenging ... changes of landscape are great ... long meditative stretches also ok
)

In that case Gipsy Moon,
There's a strong chance you will enjoy the Meseta, and if you have the time the stretches from Santiago de Compostela to Muxia and/or Finisterre.
Buen (Nature-filled) Camino
 

Sue M

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-Burgos(2012)Leon-Santiago(2013)Sarria- Santiago(Sept 2013),Frances (coach,2013),Le Puy-Conques(May 2014), parish pilgrimage organised for June 2015.
The eucalyptus woods, nearing Santiago. The worst bit was the flight of steps leading up to Portomarin, mainly because I collapsed at the top due to heat exhaustion!
 

Peter Fransiscus

Be a Rainbow in someone else's cloud.
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
Hello,

From el Camino del Ebro I will reach el Camino Frances in Logrono very beginning of April this year.
Was wondering if there will be many walking pilgrims already? (what is many?)

And what are your preferred/nicest stretches of the Camino Frances from there not to be missed in your experiences?

Thanks a lot for sharing
Hi, love to walk over the mountains.
That means that crossing the Pyrenees is my favorite.
Wish you well and a Buen Camino, Peter.
 

marylynn

Ontario Canada
Camino(s) past & future
2011-2019 CF, Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 HærvejenDK
If you ask 100 people I guess you will get 100 different answers. I found all of it wonderful. Even Galicia, which I swear is a lost Irish province, thanks to the rain. However the part of the CF that I have very fond memories of is the Meseta. I loved the gently flowing landscape that stretched all the way to the horizon, the sunrises, the wind turbines in the distance and the very easy walking. At times I felt totally alone in a beautiful and bountiful landscape but never lonely.

That's EXACTLY what I was going to say. I love 99% of the Camino, but especially the meseta - alone but never lonely, feeling tiny in a majestic landscape. Even in the fall, the light on the fields makes the landscape ever-changing and beautiful.
 

Gipsy Moon

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2015 - Camino del Norte
March 2016 - Camino del Ebro
April 2016 - Camino Frances
Feb. 2017 - Camino Frances
March 2017 - Camino Salvador
March 2017 - Camino Primitivo
Thank you very much @mspath , @domigee , @JohnMcM , @Sue M , @Peter Fransiscus and @marylynn
Pretty curious about the Meseta :) and the eucalyptus forest.... though not with the chicken :oops:
the Pyrenees of course !... just not sure when... going back from Logrono by bus and start from beginning Frances Camino in SJPP instead ???
;) Already sold on Fisterra Camino... yes!

Any idea if there are usually many pilgrim very beginning of April (from Logrono... or who knows :cool:...SJPP?)
 

norelle

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011 April, 2014 March) San Salvador, Primitivo, Finisterre, Muxia (June 2015) Del Norte (Sept/Oct 2016)
I think this is a lovely time of year to walk.

In 2014 I left Pamplona March 23 - so about the same time as you will be in Logrono. The camino wasn't too busy at all and I really enjoyed walking in Spring.

It only got a bit crowded near the end as I managed to time walking into Santiago on Easter Saturday (not an issue with you this year!). However, I must say being in Santiago at Easter was wonderful in it's own way.

buen camino
 

cherrys

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept/Oct (2013), Finisterre/Muxia Oct (2013), Camino Frances and on to Finisterre Sept/Oct (2016)
I think my favorite stretch was from Astorga (although not the first part with the endless pylons) up to Rabanal, Acebo, then down into Molinaseca. The mountains were beautiful. Then the stretch from Villafranca del Bierzo (took the right hand high route - a las montanas) to Ruitelan, O'Cebreiro, Fonfria, then on to Sarria. I loved the views and being up high, and the solitude I found on a lot of it. And the Meseta. In other words, just go back to SJPP and start again! It's all great. As were the views along the coast from Finisterre to Muxia. I'd better stop before I name everything! Enjoy your time there - Cherry
 

GreatDane

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF to Burgos Sept/Oct 2014, Burgos to Astorga April 2016, Astorga to SdC 2017
I planned the meseta portion of my 3 part CF for April, hoping that I would be there for green and wildflowers. I can see treeless and brown at home 350 days a year!! Green would be a treat to the eyes.
 
D

Deleted member 36903

Guest
As you like nature and others have written of specific landscapes I would mention the fauna of the Camino, unexpected to me and an absolute delight. At that time of the year the almond trees will be in blossom and from Logrono onwards you will be accompanied every step, except in cities by the sound of cuckoos and the sight of myriad small birds flying just ahead of you in the hedges, as well as the statuesque cranes making their nests on every church tower, pylon, telegraph pole and tall chimney that takes their fancy. A couple of miles after Calzadilla de Los Hermanillos, if you are lucky, you will see a group of Bustards (and yes, I have spelled it correctly) in the fields to the left towards the rail tracks. I assume they were reintroduced to the area, as they have been here in the UK. Also listen out for the awesome sound of mating frogs. If you are from the US or Australia this might not be a big deal for you but they are four times bigger than those here in the UK and make a noise that reflects their size.
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo
As you like nature and others have written of specific landscapes I would mention the fauna of the Camino, unexpected to me and an absolute delight. At that time of the year the almond trees will be in blossom and from Logrono onwards you will be accompanied every step, except in cities by the sound of cuckoos and the sight of myriad small birds flying just ahead of you in the hedges, as well as the statuesque cranes making their nests on every church tower, pylon, telegraph pole and tall chimney that takes their fancy. A couple of miles after Calzadilla de Los Hermanillos, if you are lucky, you will see a group of Bustards (and yes, I have spelled it correctly) in the fields to the left towards the rail tracks. I assume they were reintroduced to the area, as they have been here in the UK. Also listen out for the awesome sound of mating frogs. If you are from the US or Australia this might not be a big deal for you but they are four times bigger than those here in the UK and make a noise that reflects their size.
When are the heaviest pollen seasons? I walked the CF from St. Jean this past Sept/Oct and five days in, came down with acute bronchitis that lasted the whole trip and it continued for two months after my return to Victoria, BC. Fortunately, the Camino angels were there to get me through it….walked into Santiago on the 37th day.
 
J

James R B

Guest
As you like nature and others have written of specific landscapes I would mention the fauna of the Camino, unexpected to me and an absolute delight. At that time of the year the almond trees will be in blossom and from Logrono onwards you will be accompanied every step, except in cities by the sound of cuckoos and the sight of myriad small birds flying just ahead of you in the hedges, as well as the statuesque cranes making their nests on every church tower, pylon, telegraph pole and tall chimney that takes their fancy. A couple of miles after Calzadilla de Los Hermanillos, if you are lucky, you will see a group of Bustards (and yes, I have spelled it correctly) in the fields to the left towards the rail tracks. I assume they were reintroduced to the area, as they have been here in the UK. Also listen out for the awesome sound of mating frogs. If you are from the US or Australia this might not be a big deal for you but they are four times bigger than those here in the UK and make a noise that reflects their size.
The sound of frogs make me sleep like a baby.
 

cherrys

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept/Oct (2013), Finisterre/Muxia Oct (2013), Camino Frances and on to Finisterre Sept/Oct (2016)
As you like nature and others have written of specific landscapes I would mention the fauna of the Camino, unexpected to me and an absolute delight. At that time of the year the almond trees will be in blossom and from Logrono onwards you will be accompanied every step, except in cities by the sound of cuckoos and the sight of myriad small birds flying just ahead of you in the hedges, as well as the statuesque cranes making their nests on every church tower, pylon, telegraph pole and tall chimney that takes their fancy. A couple of miles after Calzadilla de Los Hermanillos, if you are lucky, you will see a group of Bustards (and yes, I have spelled it correctly) in the fields to the left towards the rail tracks. I assume they were reintroduced to the area, as they have been here in the UK. Also listen out for the awesome sound of mating frogs. If you are from the US or Australia this might not be a big deal for you but they are four times bigger than those here in the UK and make a noise that reflects their size.
In Palais de Rei there was a choral group, I believe from France, practicing in the church just before I ate my jamon, cheese and bread (and wine) dinner in the garden outside. Delightful. The following day there was a robin hoping along in front of me making all these great chirps. The same group was following along behind me and singing, and he was obviously spurred on by their sound. I had slowed down to accommodate his pace, and when they caught up to me I motioned for them to slow down too. Unfortunately they stopped singing to comment on his singing, at which point he stopped and flew off. Still one of the best memories. As were all the little lizards running up and down the walls amongst the roses in the walled garden behind the church in Trinadad de Arre.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_1969.JPG
    IMG_1969.JPG
    1.1 MB · Views: 11

NualaOC

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few and hopefully lots more. See signature.
When are the heaviest pollen seasons?
I don't know the scientific answer Maggie, so I can only speak from my own experience. I had my worst ever bout of hayfever & wheeziness last June in the forests between Fisterra and Muxia. I had no symptoms at all on the Ingles in September and was delighted that I could actually smell the eucalyptus.
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
I agree with the others - please write that book, Margaret! You are a mine of information but more importantly, you have a very unique perspective and a lovely way with words. Your book would be a joy.

Thank you for your kind comments. For the immediate future please simply consider my major blogs All My Caminos and Camino Gazetteer as books, unpublished but written with love.

Margaret Meredith
 
Last edited:

Gipsy Moon

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2015 - Camino del Norte
March 2016 - Camino del Ebro
April 2016 - Camino Frances
Feb. 2017 - Camino Frances
March 2017 - Camino Salvador
March 2017 - Camino Primitivo
As you like nature and others have written of specific landscapes I would mention the fauna of the Camino, unexpected to me and an absolute delight. At that time of the year the almond trees will be in blossom and from Logrono onwards you will be accompanied every step, except in cities by the sound of cuckoos and the sight of myriad small birds flying just ahead of you in the hedges, as well as the statuesque cranes making their nests on every church tower, pylon, telegraph pole and tall chimney that takes their fancy. A couple of miles after Calzadilla de Los Hermanillos, if you are lucky, you will see a group of Bustards (and yes, I have spelled it correctly) in the fields to the left towards the rail tracks. I assume they were reintroduced to the area, as they have been here in the UK. Also listen out for the awesome sound of mating frogs. If you are from the US or Australia this might not be a big deal for you but they are four times bigger than those here in the UK and make a noise that reflects their size.

@cherrys thank you for sharing the cute robin pic :D @SEB will appreciate any animal encounter :) and definitely look up for the cranes (no stork? ) and bustards... for the frog's size, it's the song that count : ) ) :rolleyes::confused: always so nice to meet feather or fur companions while walking... this one was a surprise : ) )
 

Attachments

  • lama.jpg
    lama.jpg
    305.8 KB · Views: 6
D

Deleted member 36903

Guest
When are the heaviest pollen seasons? I walked the CF from St. Jean this past Sept/Oct and five days in, came down with acute bronchitis that lasted the whole trip and it continued for two months after my return to Victoria, BC. Fortunately, the Camino angels were there to get me through it….walked into Santiago on the 37th day.

Hi movinmaggie, I walked end of March through April and got ill in the early stages and had to stop for a while at Los Arcos. I had some kind of upper respiratory tract illness, but my nose had been streaming since leaving Monjardin owing, I think, to the pollen coming off the many vast fields of rapeseed oil plants which were in full bloom. I picked up some anti-histamines in Los Arcos at the Pharmacia there and didn't suffer after that.
 
D

Deleted member 36903

Guest
Thank you cherrys for reminding me of those wonderful neon-green fat lizards. The hedge along the autopista from Fromista seemed to teem with them, as did the trek to Astorga. Gypsy moon I meant to write storks not cranes, obviously I needed to turn off the computer and get some sleep.
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo
Hi movinmaggie, I walked end of March through April and got ill in the early stages and had to stop for a while at Los Arcos. I had some kind of upper respiratory tract illness, but my nose had been streaming since leaving Monjardin owing, I think, to the pollen coming off the many vast fields of rapeseed oil plants which were in full bloom. I picked up some anti-histamines in Los Arcos at the Pharmacia there and didn't suffer after that.
Thank you SEB. I had to stop twice at clinics, but it was mostly for the non-stop cough, but perhaps ananti-histamine would have done as well. As lovely as the folks were at the clinics, the cough didn't ease up much. I do find the Pharmacias very helpful overall. I experienced Autumn- now I'd like to try Spring.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
Thank you SEB. I had to stop twice at clinics, but it was mostly for the non-stop cough, but perhaps ananti-histamine would have done as well. As lovely as the folks were at the clinics, the cough didn't ease up much. I do find the Pharmacias very helpful overall. I experienced Autumn- now I'd like to try Spring.

@movinmaggie,
You and I were on the Camino Frances at the same time last fall, late September to November. I am beginning to wonder if there was a nasty respiratory bug going around. I arrived home with what I thought was a bad cold, but it turned into bronchitis and I am just finally getting over it, with medical help, three months later. I had then not had a cold or bronchitis for years. I am wondering if, as pilgrims encountering new viruses when we are more tired than normal and possibly not sleeping so well in the albergues, we are vulnerable to having more serious or long-lasting responses to respiratory viruses. I am doing what I can to deal with this, getting over the current virus and planning another camino this fall to get my immune system familiar with the viruses in northern Spain.;)
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo
Sorry we didn't meet AlberaGirl. Sounds like we had the same thing. I would love to return to the Camino in Spring, but perhaps another route; Portuguese or Primitivio? but am wondering if Spring might be even worse for pollen on any of them. Sure wouldn't want to go through that bronchitis again. On the other hand perhaps we both have built up some resistance.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
Sorry we didn't meet AlberaGirl. Sounds like we had the same thing. I would love to return to the Camino in Spring, but perhaps another route; Portuguese or Primitivio? but am wondering if Spring might be even worse for pollen on any of them. Sure wouldn't want to go through that bronchitis again. On the other hand perhaps we both have built up some resistance.
I think that you started three or four days before me. I stayed at Orisson the night of September 30 and went on from there in a fairly leisurely manner, with detours and rest days. The camino seemed like such a long way from Calgary that I wanted to give myself time to relax, enjoy, and experience special religious sites, like the monastery at Samos. Now I am going back in the fall to approach the Frances route through the Somport pass and the Aragones route.
It is possible that you and I came down with the same virus. I would not expect that your experience would be better in the spring if you are allergic to pollen, which I am not. Our experience shows the importance of a strong immune system to older pilgrims, and I am going to be particular about self-care as I walk my camino this fall.
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo
I had never had allergies before, so am still a bit stymied by it. I don't know if it was a virus or if in fact it was caused by the pollen, thus making it an allergy. Either way, I do want to return and will do.
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
Thank you for your kind comments. For the immediate future please simply consider my major blogs All My Caminos and Camino Gazetteer as books, unpublished but written with love.

Margaret Meredith

I greatly enjoy reading your accounts of your many, many journeys along the Camino Frances. Reading them is an excellent reminder of my good times past--walking from October (all of it) through the first week and a half of November, 2015. It helps me to get reoriented to the places, paths, and various sceneries of El Camino Frances, as the day-after-day walk is both so rich and exhausting. I remember thinking that I would never lose track of what a place was like, although I took lots of photos.

Anyway, I love your writing.
 
D

Deleted member 36903

Guest
I would hazard a guess that many of us succumbed to infections in the first weeks because we were not used to sleeping in the same room as so many other people so had low immunity to the benign bugs around us. in addition many pilgrims had just travelled by air, and planes incubate infections, it seems, like no other space.
 

Bogong

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
First, March 2014
Two years ago today I was somewhere around Estella. The whole walk from St JpdeP to Santiago, then on to Fisterre and Muxia was gorgeous. Fisterre to Muxia was especially wonderful scenery-wise and a total absence of other walkers. I skipped the beach bit from Lires (I live on a beachfront) and, yes I did managed to get comprehensively lost but as I was heading in the right direction it didn't matter.

But the pick of it all was the Meseta. Pre-dawn to dawn, early sun glinting on distant snowy peaks, the busy buzz of farmers and their tractors tilling for the next season's crops, the smattering of friendly locals in the near deserted villages, an occasional shepherd with his flock. And day after day seeing scarcely another pilgrim, but I was never alone.

And glorious weather for nine days through La Rioja and the Meseta. The rest of the time was snow, hail, sleet. rain and wind but I loved it all.

De Colores

Bogong
 

Ray J

Where exactly are we?
Camino(s) past & future
CF
Rota Vicentina & Portuguese
Paris to Moulins & Le Puy
VF
Cornwall & John Muir Way
Last April, we took a side trip from Triacastela to Samos. Only 6 miles (10 kilometers), but it had some of the loveliest and best trails of the entire trip. And while in Samos, we took in the vespers at the Benedictine monastery, which was a beautiful experience, even for skeptics like us.

And a tour of the monastery is well worth doing, also.
 
Last edited:

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Last April, we took a side trip from Triacastela to Samos. Only 6 miles (10 kilometers), but it had some of the loveliest and best trails of the entire trip. And while in Samos, we took in the vespers at the Benedictine monastery, which was a beautiful experience, even for skeptics like us.

And a tour of the monastery is well worth doing, also.

For more on Samos and other monasteries, convents and chapter houses on the Camino Frances see this resource
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
My stand-out day's walking on the CF was from the beautiful village of Santa Catolina de Samoza to Molinaseca, passing by the Cruz del Ferro at around the half way point on this longest day of my camino at 37 kms. I felt strong and enjoyed every step, the scenery was stunning, even in the rain, and the villages we passed through were charming. It was a very special day. I wrote about it on my blog here
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 25, 2016
I could write a book! See these blog posts for 10 years of personal favorites.

Happy planning and Buen camino!

Love your blog - I plan to read a lot of it. I was looking at your tips page and wondered if you could be more specific about the "soft white plastic bags". Are you referring to small garbage bags? or some kind of closable bag you buy at a travel store? Or ? Thanks!
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Love your blog - I plan to read a lot of it. I was looking at your tips page and wondered if you could be more specific about the "soft white plastic bags". Are you referring to small garbage bags? or some kind of closable bag you buy at a travel store? Or ? Thanks!

The bags of silky soft plastic make no noise and were originally ( 10 years ago ) wraps for computer equipment! Unfortunately they are no longer available commercially. Today I might choose waterproof stuff sacks.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Camino Frances SJPP / 2014 Camino Portugues / 2015 Camino Ingles / 2015 Hospitalero Training
2016 (fall) Camino Sanabre / Hospitalero?
Hello,

From el Camino del Ebro I will reach el Camino Frances in Logrono very beginning of April this year.
Was wondering if there will be many walking pilgrims already? (what is many?)

And what are your preferred/nicest stretches of the Camino Frances from there not to be missed in your experiences?

Thanks a lot for sharing
The nicest stretch of any Camino is where you help someone and feel good about yourself ....Ultreya.....willy/Utah/USA
 

Jacobus

Pilgrim since 2008
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés(2008,09 14)
Del Norte (2011)
Portuguese(2015,2017)
Inglés 2015
Fisterre (2015 17)
Hello,

From el Camino del Ebro I will reach el Camino Frances in Logrono very beginning of April this year.
Was wondering if there will be many walking pilgrims already? (what is many?)

And what are your preferred/nicest stretches of the Camino Frances from there not to be missed in your experiences?

Thanks a lot for sharing
Cacabelos to O Cebriero. 2 days of wineries, mountains, A Celtic village, pulpo and it is a test of will and endurance...and entering Galicia on the climb. Priceless!
 

TheTinkerBell

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP - SdC (2013);
OCebreiro - Fisterra (2019)
My stand-out day's walking on the CF was from the beautiful village of Santa Catolina de Samoza to Molinaseca, passing by the Cruz del Ferro at around the half way point on this longest day of my camino at 37 kms. I felt strong and enjoyed every step, the scenery was stunning, even in the rain, and the villages we passed through were charming. It was a very special day. I wrote about it on my blog here

If it's 'energy' Gipsy Moon is looking for, I'd second this days' walking.
The emotion of CdF will remain with me forever.
 

Advertisement

Booking.com

Similar threads

Camino Conversations

Camino Conversations

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 56 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 200 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 329 24.9%
  • June

    Votes: 96 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 24 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.0%
  • September

    Votes: 381 28.8%
  • October

    Votes: 158 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top