A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Preguntas from a Newbie

alikki1201

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
5683Gato
Hi - I have a few questions about logistics: What time do people start in the morning usually? What time does breakfast start (so then, what is the earliest people can start walking? Do people stop for lunch or eat on the way (with something that they brought?) Or do they eat once they have arrived? I'm assuming 6-7 hours of walking, so it is possible to arrive at the next village by 2 PM. I believe lunch is served late? So do you eat upon arrival? Also, is dinner late? What time do they eat dinner on the Camino? Finally, are siestas alive and well in Spain still? Trying to understand the flow of the day. Gracias to anyone who can chime in and help me understand life on the Camino.
 

Jo Jo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, July 2014 & Sept-Oct 2016
Via di Francesco (Italy), July 2015
CP Oct. 2017 & Sept. 2019
As a general answer to all of your questions: there are as many ways to walk the Camino as there are pilgrims, and the Camino will show you how you need to walk. As a second note, the route and time of year you walk will greatly impact the answers. Please write back with the route you plan to take (if the CF, Norte, or other long route, where you plan to start from) and time of year you are thinking of going. That information will help us answer.
 

alikki1201

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
5683Gato
HI - Thanks for your note. I'm leaving on April 25. I'm walking the first 7 days to Logrono from Saint Jean Pied de Port. So, the French Way. I'm walking 21-28 km per day. Hope this gives you enough information to help answer.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
The answers are: yes. Seriously, the daily schedule varies as much as each individual does. Folks walk early or late, eat breakfast or don’t, have lunch in restaurants or as a carry-away picnic. There is no “one way” that people follow.

As for siestas? Absolutely still alive, but there are occasional places that stay open through that period to serve hungry pilgrims (not everywhere, though).
 

Jo Jo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, July 2014 & Sept-Oct 2016
Via di Francesco (Italy), July 2015
CP Oct. 2017 & Sept. 2019
That helps. I've never walked in the Spring, so others will probably chime in with better information. Below is my observations from walking in the autumn with similarly chilly weather and less sunlight.

Generally, people do not leave the alburgue until the sun is up (especially if its cold or rainy). About 7am that time of year. That time of year also expect one in three days to be rainy from Pamplona on (probably even rainier in the mountains before Pamplona), and temps in the low 40s F in the morning when you are leaving. On the other hand, no penalty for walking during the afternoon (not so in the summer). Indeed, afternoon will probably be the best walking of the day.

So that time of year, I'd expect a lot of pilgrims to stay in the alburgues getting coffee, eating breakfast (from food purchased the day before) until the alburgue kicks them out (varies by alburgue, but often 8am or 8:30). Or walking 500 meters to a cafe and doing the same thing. Note, Spanish breakfasts are often caffeine, sugar (in some form) and orange juice. That doesn't work for me, so I always made sure I had other food to get enough fuel to walk.

During the summer we would often just picnic by the side of the road for lunch because stopping at a restaurant for lunch can take hours (the Spanish believe in taking your time to eat a meal). The time of year you are going, I think you may want to get out into a warm restaurant for a couple of hours at noon. Usually, you will be hungry for lunch and want to stop before you get to your next destination. We only would push though and have lunch in the village where we would sleep in the height of the summer when we did not want to walk in the afternoon sun. You sort of have the opposite issue--you'll want that afternoon sun.

Many Spanish stores observe a siesta (and may not be open at all on Sundays). Do your shopping accordingly. Some restaurants observe a siesta, but I've had less issues there (your experience may vary--this is a very unscientific study). Restaurants have always been open on Sunday (again, in my experience). The alburgues know that we straggle in during siesta time and are generally (but not always) open. Some of them will not let you check in until a certain time (because they are still cleaning from the last night's pilgrims).

When you get to the alburgue, my usual custom is a shower, laundry and a nap (in that order, so the clothes stand a minor chance of actually drying by morning).

Then start chatting with your fellow pilgrims in the alburgue and figure out who knows where a good restaurant is in town (if you have an option). Unless the alburgue has a meal (in which case, offer to help).

We always try to find a group to eat together with for dinner. The bigger the group, the better the chance that someone will be able to translate across the language barriers. The Dutch and Germans are ridiculously good at this (again, my experience). Most restaurants on the Camino know that pilgrims are starving, so they open early by Spanish standards (often 7pm). They feed the pilgrims, and then we all shuffle off to bed, after which they then feed to locals (10pm ish).

I hope that helps. But probably the most useful advice is to be prepared to adapt to whatever the Camino brings your way. Flexibility (mental, spiritual, psychological) makes for a much more enjoyable walk.

Buen Camino,
Jo Jo
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
I hope that helps. But probably the most useful advice is to be prepared to adapt to whatever the Camino brings your way. Flexibility (mental, spiritual, psychological) makes for a much more enjoyable walk.
Buen Camino,
Jo Jo
Great advice @Jo Jo , particularly that last bit.
@alikki1201 . Don't worry too much about a 'schedule'.
It will be like going on a Scout Camp, just follow everyone else and go with the flow ;)
You will adapt to your surroundings as you go.

There will be plenty of people starting with you at that time of year.
We left from St Jean the same date this year.

Stay hydrated.
And always have a 'just in case' snack in your pack as a reserve. ;)

But you will find the CF has so many places to stop to eat and drink and is so geared to Pilgrims, your challenge will be not to overeat! :oops:

All the questions and planning are great. And the members here are very helpful.
The answers will put your mind at rest and boost your confidence.

But just know one thing.............
Within the first day you will wonder what you were worried about ;)
Letting go is the key..........

Must go.
Still working on my 2020 Camino packing list!
 
Last edited:

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Pilgrims may not start out until 7am but the Bag Rustlers will be at it from 5!

Early morning cafes can be hard to find - the Spanish tend to retire late and rise late (a generalisation I know)

Like Scout Camp be prepared. I haven't walked the route from SJPP for three years or so but there can be snow in April/May (a friend of mine stepped off the piste in mid May to take a photo and ended up in thigh deep snow).

Although Robo's comment about lots of places being available is true for a lot of of the CF I can't recall much in the way of refuelling stops between SJPP and Roncesvalles (unless you go via Valcarlos); Burguete to Zubiri; Zubiri to Pamplona or Cizur Menor to Puenta (the snack bar on top of Sierra de Perdon might be there). But the situation changes year on year.

So that's the first four of your days. It will be cold/cool, you will need the calories. You should be carrying more than just a snack (IMO). If you leave at 7am and arrive at 2pm that's 7 hours of walking on nuts and chocolate bars? Buy bread when you can. I always carry a tin of sardines (in olive oil so no need for butter), Vache qui Rit cheese, Trail Mix and, of course fruit and chocolate. You might also want to pick up something to contribute to communal meals - packets of sliced meats, potato chips etc (you are taking a beast of burden to carry all of this I take it ;))

It might be too chilly to sit around and picnic but you can always walk and munch!

The advice on arrival still holds true - shower/launder/siesta, except at Roncesvalles where you might find it better to book somewhere to eat first.

What JoJo says about restaurant opening times is true - the Spanish make an effort to feed pilgrims out of their normal schedule and you can often find a plato combinado of eggs, some kind of pork meat, fries in bars and cafes out of the usual hours (try doing that in France!)

Good luck - hope it goes well for you.
 
Last edited:

alikki1201

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
5683Gato
That helps. I've never walked in the Spring, so others will probably chime in with better information. Below is my observations from walking in the autumn with similarly chilly weather and less sunlight.

Generally, people do not leave the alburgue until the sun is up (especially if its cold or rainy). About 7am that time of year. That time of year also expect one in three days to be rainy from Pamplona on (probably even rainier in the mountains before Pamplona), and temps in the low 40s F in the morning when you are leaving. On the other hand, no penalty for walking during the afternoon (not so in the summer). Indeed, afternoon will probably be the best walking of the day.

So that time of year, I'd expect a lot of pilgrims to stay in the alburgues getting coffee, eating breakfast (from food purchased the day before) until the alburgue kicks them out (varies by alburgue, but often 8am or 8:30). Or walking 500 meters to a cafe and doing the same thing. Note, Spanish breakfasts are often caffeine, sugar (in some form) and orange juice. That doesn't work for me, so I always made sure I had other food to get enough fuel to walk.

During the summer we would often just picnic by the side of the road for lunch because stopping at a restaurant for lunch can take hours (the Spanish believe in taking your time to eat a meal). The time of year you are going, I think you may want to get out into a warm restaurant for a couple of hours at noon. Usually, you will be hungry for lunch and want to stop before you get to your next destination. We only would push though and have lunch in the village where we would sleep in the height of the summer when we did not want to walk in the afternoon sun. You sort of have the opposite issue--you'll want that afternoon sun.

Many Spanish stores observe a siesta (and may not be open at all on Sundays). Do your shopping accordingly. Some restaurants observe a siesta, but I've had less issues there (your experience may vary--this is a very unscientific study). Restaurants have always been open on Sunday (again, in my experience). The alburgues know that we straggle in during siesta time and are generally (but not always) open. Some of them will not let you check in until a certain time (because they are still cleaning from the last night's pilgrims).

When you get to the alburgue, my usual custom is a shower, laundry and a nap (in that order, so the clothes stand a minor chance of actually drying by morning).

Then start chatting with your fellow pilgrims in the alburgue and figure out who knows where a good restaurant is in town (if you have an option). Unless the alburgue has a meal (in which case, offer to help).

We always try to find a group to eat together with for dinner. The bigger the group, the better the chance that someone will be able to translate across the language barriers. The Dutch and Germans are ridiculously good at this (again, my experience). Most restaurants on the Camino know that pilgrims are starving, so they open early by Spanish standards (often 7pm). They feed the pilgrims, and then we all shuffle off to bed, after which they then feed to locals (10pm ish).

I hope that helps. But probably the most useful advice is to be prepared to adapt to whatever the Camino brings your way. Flexibility (mental, spiritual, psychological) makes for a much more enjoyable walk.

Buen Camino,
Jo Jo
Thanks so much JoJo. I should have mentioned that I am not staying at augerges but at standard simple hotels booked through Camino Ways. Not sure if that changes much of what you mention. Great info. I appreciate all advice I can get. Sounds like I need a good umbrella. I have good rain gear
 
Last edited:

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
HI - Thanks for your note. I'm leaving on April 25. I'm walking the first 7 days to Logrono from Saint Jean Pied de Port. So, the French Way. I'm walking 21-28 km per day. Hope this gives you enough information to help answer.
We walked in that section late March in 2014 and again this year in early October. Breakfast is not so easy to find before about 7 in either March or October. But I would assume that by late April you should be able to get it by 6-6:30. How early you want/need to start depends on what time you want to get to your evening accommodation. If yo are booking ahead there’s no real rush to leave early. Small towns are pretty closed at siesta time :) Have fun walking - it’s wonderful.
 

p_mci

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, Inglés, Portugués (2014) Norte, Primitivo (2015) Vía de la Plata (2017) Mozárabe (2018)
Great advice here! I have never quite managed to sync up with the Spanish schedule re. mealtimes as they are a bit late for me. So I depend a lot on supermarkets and small grocery stores for provisions. But I have been caught out a couple of times with supermarkets/ groceries being closed all day on Sundays. And in small villages, the supermarkets will often be closed for the siesta 14:00-17:00 which is the time I usually arrive. :)
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
What time do people start in the morning usually?
Whenever they kick me out of the albergue, I am not a morning person ;-) So, normally around 8am.

What time does breakfast start (so then, what is the earliest people can start walking?
I just hit the next open bar for coffee or munch a banana on the way.

Do people stop for lunch or eat on the way (with something that they brought?) Or do they eat once they have arrived?
I prefer to have my big meal once I have arrived or shortly after. Or I have a picnic lunch on the way, it depends.

I'm assuming 6-7 hours of walking, so it is possible to arrive at the next village by 2 PM. I believe lunch is served late? So do you eat upon arrival?

Sometimes ;-) Or in the evening ;-) Or I cook for myself/with others in the albergue.

Also, is dinner late? What time do they eat dinner on the Camino?
Restaurants now cater to pilgrim hours - dinner is often served 7pm or even earlier.

Finally, are siestas alive and well in Spain still?
Yes, they are!

As you can see, it differs from day to day, just take each day as it comes and always carry a snack in your backpack ;-)

Buen Camino, SY
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
Thanks so much JoJo. I should have mentioned that I am not staying at augerges but at standard simple hotels booked through Camino Ways. Not sure if that changes much of what you mention. Great info. I appreciate all advice I can get. Sounds like I need a good umbrella. I have good rain gear
Then your schedule is set for you ;)
As mentioned above, day 1 is really the only day without much in the way of eating places along the way, if you are walking the Naploean Route. So definitely carry some food. There is a stop after 8 kms at Orisson but nothing then till you reach Roncesvalles.
Depending on the weather, it can be cold going over the top. On the day you are departing, this year we had about 2-5 C on top with high winds. But you are really only exposed for an hour or so. So you won't be stopping to picnic.

Though on my first Camino, same time of year, I had sun and blue skies! But it was still cold.

Buen Camino
 

John Finn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances - Sarria to Santiago (2013), Burgos to Leon (2014), St Jean Pied de Port to Logrono (2015), Logrono to Burgos (2016), Leon to Sarria (May 2017).
All good advice above. I did that same stage in 2015 and I'll be doing it again next May. I'm not sure if you are serious about the umbrella but I would advise against it - more trouble than it's worth, in my view, and pretty useless in high winds. Don't worry about food - stock up with some snacks in St Jean the day before and eat them on the hoof as required as you make your way across the mountains. The café at Orisson will be open and you should reach that about two hours after setting out. At the end of each day's walking you will have no trouble finding a place to eat. Hang out with some of your fellow walkers and have a drink and a snack, check in to your accommodation and freshen up and maybe have a nap, and then go back for an evening meal. Then, early to bed and do it all again the next day!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I think that everyone has their own preferences as to meals, how far to walk, how much food to carry, when to eat, etc.
For example, I don't really like to eat before I start out. I generally walk about 5 - 8km/3 - 5 miles, depending on when the next town with a bar (restaurant) is, and stop for tortilla and juice, or cafe con leche and croissant. Then, I'l normally walk another 5 miles or so, and stop for some lunch. After about another 5 miles I'm usually at my destination for the day. I don't usually relax until I have showered and washed my clothes and hung them to dry. Then I'll hang out with other pilgrims, explore the town, etc. I normally get a pilgrim's dinner around 7 pm. I rarely carry more than an orange and a chocolate bar or some nuts. Of course everything depends on how far apart the towns are each day, so if there is a longer distance to walk I before I reach another bar I'll carry a more substantial snack.

I'm not sure if you are serious about the umbrella but I would advise against it - more trouble than it's worth, in my view, and pretty useless in high winds.
I took an umbrella on summer/early fall Caminos, but not for the rain so much as the sun on the Meseta. For a short Camino between St and Logroño, I agree that it's probably not worth the weight and hassle.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Hi - I have a few questions about logistics: What time do people start in the morning usually? What time does breakfast start (so then, what is the earliest people can start walking? Do people stop for lunch or eat on the way (with something that they brought?) Or do they eat once they have arrived? I'm assuming 6-7 hours of walking, so it is possible to arrive at the next village by 2 PM. I believe lunch is served late? So do you eat upon arrival? Also, is dinner late? What time do they eat dinner on the Camino? Finally, are siestas alive and well in Spain still? Trying to understand the flow of the day. Gracias to anyone who can chime in and help me understand life on the Camino.
What time to people start in the morning? It depends on the season and the people. Some people naturally start earlier and some naturally start later. There are stories that when pilgrim traffic is highest, some people start earlier to arrive earlier in a "bed race" before albergues are full. In my experience, people who are really concerned about full albergues tend to book ahead and not worry about racing, especially now that there are more private albergues that take bookings. In the heat of summer some also leave earlier to get as much walking done as possible before the hottest part of the day. When I was walking with my teenage son in July/August, we liked to leave close to 5:30 for that reason. When I walked in October, I was happier to leave at 7 or 7:30. But I often found myself leaving closer to 6 when the noise of other people leaving woke me up and I figured since I was up anyway, I might as well be on my way. But some people don't start their day's walk until 9:00 or later.

What time does breakfast start? That is also quite variable. Some albergues leave out breakfast the night before. Others serve it (if memory serves) closer to 7. When I was walking in the summer, we often missed breakfast leaving before it was served. It was more important to us to walk in the cool morning and avoid as much as possible walking in the hot afternoons. We'd pick up a substantial breakfast in a bar along the way. Early in the Camino that might be four or five km down the road. Later, my son preferred to push it to ten to twelve km so there would be less to walk afterward.

Do people stop for lunch or eat on the way (with something that they brought?) We ended up doing more of a brunch along the way, usually at a bar with bocadillos, pastries, coffee and juice. On days where that didn't seem feasible, we would eat on the way with something we'd picked up at a grocery store. We didn't eat the more substantial (three course) lunch that some were eating. When we got to the albergues we didn't have the energy to go out for that. :) Some people stop for a full lunch and continue walking after that, but in the summer, I'd say they were the definite minority. Lunch in Spain is served late my North American standards (2-3:30).

Also, is dinner late? What time do they eat dinner on the Camino?
Dinner (supper) for Spaniards is quite late by North American standards. Many restaurants don't even open until 9:00 and it is not uncommon to start eating at 10:00, when pilgrims need to be back in their albergues. On the Camino, many places will accommodate pilgrim schedules and pilgrims tend to eat earlier, more like 7 pm (or sometimes 6). Sometimes this is a "pilgrim's menu" (three course meal). Sometimes it is plates of raciones (like tapas but larger) or pizza or something like that at a bar. Of course, where pilgrims are preparing dinner for themselves in an albergue kitchen, they can eat whenever they like.

Finally, are siestas alive and well in Spain still? Yes. You can expect shops in the villages to shut down in the afternoons, generally just as you arrive. :)

Trying to understand the flow of the day. For us the flow eventually worked out to something like: Get up before dawn and start walking. Walk two or three hours and have a big breakfast. Walk more until arriving at the albergue in the early afternoon, or on short days in the late morning. Either have a shower and flop on the bed for a bit or vice versa. Do laundry. Maybe snack during that. Hang out a bit and connect with other pilgrims at the albergue. Do shopping/banking/see the local sights. Have supper. Prepare the pack for minimal disruption the next morning. Go to bed. Before sleep read, connect to friends back home, share photos, etc.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
What time does breakfast start? That is also quite variable. Some albergues leave out breakfast the night before. Others serve it (if memory serves) closer to 7.
And many albergues don't offer breakfast. And when they do it's often just toast, coffee and juice.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
Hi @alikki1201 . As you are using a tour company I suspect that you won't be staying in Albergues? (Dormitory rooms) or you might have a private room in an Albergue.

This allows for a more relaxed schedule ;)
Other than Day 1 where there is only really 1 stop along the way at Orrison.

My 'slow' schedule was something like this. But very flexible!
6:30 - 7:00 ish Wake up, stretch, get ready, (no shower as need to keep feet dry)
7:30 - 8:00 ish. Breakfast at accommodation if provided or a nearby cafe (scouted the night before)
very rarely start without breakfast.
Start walking.
10:00 ish. coffee, maybe a small second breakfast
12:00 - 1:00 ish. light Lunch
3:00 ish coffee/snack stop
4:00 - 5:00 ish. Stop for the day..........
Find accomodation. Do washing, shower etc.
Relax. book the next night accommodation.
Plan stops for next day dependent on how far I want to walk......... note water stops, plan what food water I might need to carry.
6:00 head out to look around ATM, shopping etc...
7:00 ish. Dinner
9:00 ish ready for bed, read etc.

Note. I walk slowly and only about 20-25 kms a day
The stops are obviously based around how far the next village is, which may or may not have a cafe etc. The larger ones all do.
Some days there are less villages and so less stops. so picnic by the path.
I use private accommodation booked a day ahead.
So I can take my time and arrive later than others.
If I'm going to be late, I ring ahead and tell them.

The point?
We all have a different routine
You'll find one that works for you ;);)
 

alikki1201

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
5683Gato
Thanks for your post. Some think I might have a better time if I stay at Auberges but I’m booked through an agent at smaller modest inns along my 7 days on the Camino. The company does not offer bookings for Auburges.and am not sure I want to change anyway. I do want some time to myself but hope I will still be able to loop into the social scene, dinner etc wirh people I meet along the way. Another person said that if I was at a inn it might be isolating

Thoughts?
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Thanks for your post. Some think I might have a better time if I stay at Auberges but I’m booked through an agent at smaller modest inns along my 7 days on the Camino. The company does not offer bookings for Auburges.and am not sure I want to change anyway. I do want some time to myself but hope I will still be able to loop into the social scene, dinner etc wirh people I meet along the way. Another person said that if I was at a inn it might be isolating

Thoughts?
You definitely have to put more effort into meeting and socializing with other pilgrims when you aren't staying in albergues. Have you checked to see if your booked accommodations are actually on the Camino? Sometimes they are a few km out of town.
 

John Finn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances - Sarria to Santiago (2013), Burgos to Leon (2014), St Jean Pied de Port to Logrono (2015), Logrono to Burgos (2016), Leon to Sarria (May 2017).
Thanks for your post. Some think I might have a better time if I stay at Auberges but I’m booked through an agent at smaller modest inns along my 7 days on the Camino. The company does not offer bookings for Auburges.and am not sure I want to change anyway. I do want some time to myself but hope I will still be able to loop into the social scene, dinner etc wirh people I meet along the way. Another person said that if I was at a inn it might be isolating

Thoughts?
I usually stay in hostals (B&Bs) or small hotels and only in albergues if I have to, not because I want to. I don't like albergues - too noisy for a light sleeper like me, not to mention inconveniences like having to bring your valuables with you when having a shower for fear of theft. You will find plenty of fellow walkers in local restaurants and so there will be plenty of opportunities for social interaction.
 

Dorpie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
Hi Alikki and welcome to the forum.

I set off on April 28th nearly 4 years ago and can confirm as others have said that it becomes practical to walk around 7am. For me what worked was to start at 7, then walk for maybe an hour before a good leisurely breakfast (if there was somewhere to have it) , this felt like almost free kilometres as I was generally still half asleep. Then I'd do the bulk of my day's walking (with a couple of short breaks depending on how I and my companions felt) before lunch around noon and then only doing up to 2 hours to finish the day. Outside of siesta time and very early in the morning I never really had much trouble finding places that fit my schedule. Day 1 out of St Jean might be the exception but luckily there's a bakery that also has fruit etc. on the right hand side just after you cross the river on Rue D'Espagne which opens at 6 or 6.30, after that there's usually a roadside stall set up halfway to Orisson with basics like banana, cured meat, drinks etc.

Once the walking was done for me the number one priority is always washing my clothes and then myself, after that I'm free to do whatever I want. Not sure how washing works in non-albergue accomodation but I'm sure they're geared up for it. Dinner would usually be between 6 and 7.

One note contrary to other's experiences is that when I walked at that time of year it was very hot, pushing 30c by the time we reached Logrono, without a drop of rain so be prepared. Zip off trousers worked great for me so I could be warm in the cool mornings and not roast in the afternoon.

Buen camino,

Rob.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
Thanks for your post. Some think I might have a better time if I stay at Auberges but I’m booked through an agent at smaller modest inns along my 7 days on the Camino. The company does not offer bookings for Auburges.and am not sure I want to change anyway. I do want some time to myself but hope I will still be able to loop into the social scene, dinner etc wirh people I meet along the way. Another person said that if I was at a inn it might be isolating

Thoughts?
In three Caminos I have yet to stay in communal Albergue accommodation.
I rarely dine alone and often walk with the same people for days.
There are a lot of people not staying in Albergues, and they want to socialise too ;)

I suspect you will find an organised tour a bit limiting, many do.
But you're only walking for a few days and it will provide you with a great introduction to the Camino, in a manner that you obviously feel comfortable doing.

Getting out there and doing it is the important thing !

You'll have a great time.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
And if you're worried about not joining in the magic phrase is "May I join you?" it works wonders!

Pick a group that's not too large and of an age you'll be comfortable with ie not too young, not too old.

Have fun.
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
One of the best places I have found for ongoing information, on the fly, so to speak, is to follow Efren Gonzalez on his pilgrimage along the CF when he did it in the Summer of 2017. It is all on Youtube on his channel called "Efren." Here is a link to his first vlog;


There are about 37 installments and a further 7 installments where he has grouped up all his drone clips and presents them alone by province. He also provides some historical information on spots to visit / watch for.

Should further interest be raised, Efren has just returned from walking the Via Francigena from England to Rome. Not all installments have been published on that one yet. But like me, watching them can help us with our Camino addiction until we can return.

Hope this helps.
 

Gcmacrae

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Hi - I have a few questions about logistics: What time do people start in the morning usually? What time does breakfast start (so then, what is the earliest people can start walking? Do people stop for lunch or eat on the way (with something that they brought?) Or do they eat once they have arrived? I'm assuming 6-7 hours of walking, so it is possible to arrive at the next village by 2 PM. I believe lunch is served late? So do you eat upon arrival? Also, is dinner late? What time do they eat dinner on the Camino? Finally, are siestas alive and well in Spain still? Trying to understand the flow of the day. Gracias to anyone who can chime in and help me understand life on the Camino.
Where breakfast are available, 6:00 is often the time. In the heat of the summer, 4-5 am departures are common, giving 2 hrs in the dark(ish) before sun up, so bring a morning snack. You can usually find eateries along the way if the CF about 1 hr apart. Still some remote sections are foodless for 15-18 km.by day 3 you’ll have fugured it out.

Enjoy. It is a life altering experience
 

kdespot

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés SJPP-SdC Sept-Oct 2016
I stayed at both albergues and private accommodations. I loved (and still do!) my Camino family (the group with whom my daily walking was interwoven) but I actually felt a need to get a private room at times in order to have a bit of time to myself. The Camino is very social. There are ample opportunities to make friends while you walk and they will easily become your dinner companions. To paraphrase Robo, after one day it will all be so natural. There are LOTS of options about how to do everything. Just don't forget to keep your eyes on the yellow arrows! ¡Buen Camino!
 

Sal Miller

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances
Hi - I have a few questions about logistics: What time do people start in the morning usually? What time does breakfast start (so then, what is the earliest people can start walking? Do people stop for lunch or eat on the way (with something that they brought?) Or do they eat once they have arrived? I'm assuming 6-7 hours of walking, so it is possible to arrive at the next village by 2 PM. I believe lunch is served late? So do you eat upon arrival? Also, is dinner late? What time do they eat dinner on the Camino? Finally, are siestas alive and well in Spain still? Trying to understand the flow of the day. Gracias to anyone who can chime in and help me understand life on the Camino.
The most enjoyable for us was to make a sandwich of cheese and maybe ham the night before, and then have it around noon, along the side of the trail. Breakfast was coffee and croissant. dinner at the albergue. Many days we walked hungry, as the cafes and stores were closed when we came thru town, so bringing along some light lunch became necessary. The Milka chocolate bars were handy in an emergency.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Camino Frances Arrive Madrid 25 March
Hi - I have a few questions about logistics: What time do people start in the morning usually? What time does breakfast start (so then, what is the earliest people can start walking? Do people stop for lunch or eat on the way (with something that they brought?) Or do they eat once they have arrived? I'm assuming 6-7 hours of walking, so it is possible to arrive at the next village by 2 PM. I believe lunch is served late? So do you eat upon arrival? Also, is dinner late? What time do they eat dinner on the Camino? Finally, are siestas alive and well in Spain still? Trying to understand the flow of the day. Gracias to anyone who can chime in and help me understand life on the Camino.
Since I note your start date is a ways off I recommend reading several kindle books that may give you some more insights. They helped me. From what I’ve already understood yes, Spaniard custom is to start dinner around 9. Most pilgrims bedtime at albergues. Note there are numerous sleeping options from donations only hostels to hotels. So food/tapas can also be found in bars and restaurants. YouTube videos is also a great way to hear pilgrims ask/answer questions you may not yet know to ask.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
I am basically a foodie at heart and try to fashion my day around the menu del dia from one of the better restaurant in the town where I am spending the night. It is the best meal of the day and usually served after one or two in the afternoon. It is not the typical fare offered in a pilgrim's menu, it is a hearty full 2 course menu with daily specials, wine and dessert.
I start my morning walk around 7, sometimes the places I stay will have coffee, juice and rolls or bread and sometimes it will be 9 before I finally find a coffee shop that is open. Packing a banana isn't a bad idea.
I walk for 6 to 7 hours and find a place to say shortly after the albergues open. Then I shower, wash my sweaty clothes, grab a beer and go out to eat.
I usually take a nap in the afternoon and I rarely go out to eat dinner, it is too late.
In the evening if I need something to eat there are always tapas, pizza and/or small bocadillos in the bars.
 
Last edited:

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 12 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 41 4.0%
  • April

    Votes: 154 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 254 24.9%
  • June

    Votes: 78 7.7%
  • July

    Votes: 21 2.1%
  • August

    Votes: 18 1.8%
  • September

    Votes: 296 29.0%
  • October

    Votes: 123 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 12 1.2%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.5%
Top