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Luggage Transfer Correos

Primitivo - May - reducing backpack weight

jostony

Camino del Vino
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPdP 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues 2017
Finisterre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Hello. Finally decided on my route and stages and prebooked most of accommodation. Now dithering on what to take and leave behind. Backpack currently weighs in at 7kg which = 8% body weight. Would like to knock off at least 1/2kg. Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not? Will be taking & using Pacerpoles. Rectangular Sleeping bag is 1.15kg (don't like mummy bags). Are there any ultra low weight sleeping bags around 600g that aren't mummy style? I have always taken my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals (562g) for evenings and shower. Are there any better lighter weight alternatives that I can consider. All thoughts/contributions gratefully received.
 

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven Compostelas in Three years and counting......
7kg is really good!

Boots are up to you, I wear them because I have weak ankles from my army days, I carry 16 kilo's, and I am tiny. So boots I need.

Good luck lightening your kit, though it may get expensive. Let us know how you get on!

And Buen Camino, the Primitivo is wonderful !

Davey
 
Camino(s) past & future
del Norte/Primitivo May 2019
OOFOS lightweight sandals instead of Keens? maybe a liner instead of a bag? I am using trail runners instead of boots. I will be doing Norte/Primitivo beginning 5/8 from Irun... maybe i'll see you out there?
 
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andralynn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I am leaving for Barcelona May 20th, 2019 and will begin my Camino in San Sebastian May 27th, 2019
OOFOS lightweight sandals instead of Keens? maybe a liner instead of a bag? I using trail runners instead of boots. I will be doing Norte/Primitivo beginning 5/8 from Irun... maybe i'll see you out there?
When are you going? I am starting in San Sebastián May 27th
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not?
Individually held preferences are something which cannot and should not be debated. Folks have a right to make choices based on whatever criteria they believe is important to them. To that end, I want to say that whatever your reason for wanting boots, flip-flops, bare feet, sandals, trail runners, etc. do not feel that you must change your decisions based on what 'everyone else' does. Be comfortable with your choice.

It is not my intention to offend anyone, as I believe that there are times and situations where boots are a reasonable choice to make when hiking, backpacking, or walking. I own and use a pair of Lowa Camino boots in certain cold weather seasons and weather conditions in the mountains when backpacking.

That being said, if one is looking for and asking for factual information in order to make decisions between choosing boots or trail runners (and running shoes) to wear for Camino, ankle support is not a reason to choose boots.

First, there are defined and diagnosed medical issues where an ankle needs to be supported. However, the only sure ankle support for medically indicated need are ankle braces which can fit inside of the shoe.

Despite anecdotal evidence and subjective opinion to the contrary, research has repeatedly shown that boots do not provide the level of stiffness and the shear rigidity needed to keep ankles free from injury.

The ankle is best protected with exercise and use, where the ankle is allowed to use uneven surfaces, exercise, and balancing on one foot in order to build strength and endurance and lessen susceptibility to injurious fatigue.

Boots can, in fact, exacerbate the risk of injury.

A foot in a boot is sitting higher off the ground than when in a shoe because the outer and midsoles are much thicker and built up. Additionally, the outer sole of boots are trimmed closer to shell of the boot, meaning that the outer sole has a fairly narrow profile. Both of these factors have been shown to have a higher risk of the footwear 'rolling' when stepping on an unstable surface or piece of debris like loose rocks or uneven surfaces.

As the boot begins to roll, the boot carries the foot with it, the higher material of the boot above the ankle exerts more force against the foot to make it roll with the boot. That material is not stiff enough to keep from flexing, which means that your ankle is going to start bending as the roll of the boot continues. And because the foot is higher off the ground inside the boot, the ankle can be forced into a more significant bending.

Another factor about boots that helps lead to injury is their weight. The heavier the weight that the foot and lower legs need to lift, the more stress and fatigue the ankles and supporting structures are exposed to. Such weakens the ability of the ankle structures to maintain resiliency.

Trail shoes and trail runners, on the other hand, do the opposite when confronted with the same type of uneven surface or debris. The outer and midsoles are much closer to the ground. They are also wider than the shoe making for a contact point with the ground that is more stable. Their much lighter weight keeps ankle structures from fatiguing.

Now here is the thing researchers found as most significant: A foot in a shoe that is kept a bit loose can compensate, to a large degree, when the shoe starts to roll off of an uneven surface. As the shoe rolls, the shoe tends to slip around the foot. In other words, the shoe moves around the foot for the most part, so the ankle won't immediately bend out of place with the shoe. This allows the wearer of the shoe to have enough time to react to the rolling and twisting shoe to keep the ankle from injurious strain.

Yes, there are people who get ankle injuries in trail shoes and trail runners. But those injuries are less frequent and less severe, on an average, than with a foot encased in an above the ankle hiking boot.

As I stated above, there will be any number of folks that, with no predisposing medical conditions, will state anecdotal evidence along the lines that they, or a friend, or other family members, et al, were saved by above the ankle boots. Subjective opinion is like that. :) But objective evidence begs to differ on the best way of protecting ankles from injury.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
del Norte/Primitivo May 2019
When are you going? I am starting in San Sebastián May 27th
I will be starting out before you...May 8th. I have a desire to veer off the Camino to catch a bit of the Giro de Italia so that could put me back several days time wise.
 
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NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Create a spreadsheet and weigh every item in your list. Everything has a weight, everything. Weigh your options. When I started doing this, I shaved off weight.

Perhaps the green t-shirt weighs less than the blue one you were going to bring. Perhaps the grey trousers weigh less than the black ones.

Is there a lighter-weight toiletry bag than the really nice one you have? A simple lightweight cloth bag with an s hook will do the job ... as will a zip-lock bag. Dry soap bars instead of liquid ... half a bar instead of a full one. How much do all of your zip-lock and dry-bags and packing cubes weigh (if you have any) - do you really need them all?

A down quilt/throw and silk liner will weigh less than a sleeping bag.

It's easy to say, 'oh, that item weighs nothing', but every ouce adds up. Everything has a weight-price ... is its value to have worth carrying the weight?

Good luck
 

Left Coaster

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014)
Camino Primitivo (2017)
I did the Primitivo in mid May of 2017. My 5c sleeping bag (850 gram) was a bit much but there were nights when I really appreciated it. Next time I will use shoes rather than boots. I think the weight difference will be noticeable. Someone once told me that a pound on your feet is like 5 on your back. That might be an exaggeration but there is a point. I would also think about very light weight gators to keep your feet free of sand a dirt, perhaps Dirty Girls. There are a few sections that can be tricky if it has been raining but in those spots boots won't help.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I did the Primitivo in mid May of 2017. My 5c sleeping bag (850 gram) was a bit much but there were nights when I really appreciated it. Next time I will use shoes rather than boots. I think the weight difference will be noticeable. Someone once told me that a pound on your feet is like 5 on your back. That might be an exaggeration but there is a point. I would also think about very light weight gators to keep your feet free of sand a dirt, perhaps Dirty Girls. There are a few sections that can be tricky if it has been raining but in those spots boots won't help.
Dirty Girl gaiters are terrific for keeping detritus out of shoes. I love 'em.

The military studies did find that weight on the feet creates a multiplication effect on expended energy, hence the 1 pound equals 5 pounds thingy. :)
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Hello. Finally decided on my route and stages and prebooked most of accommodation. Now dithering on what to take and leave behind. Backpack currently weighs in at 7kg which = 8% body weight. Would like to knock off at least 1/2kg. Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not? Will be taking & using Pacerpoles. Rectangular Sleeping bag is 1.15kg (don't like mummy bags). Are there any ultra low weight sleeping bags around 600g that aren't mummy style? I have always taken my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals (562g) for evenings and shower. Are there any better lighter weight alternatives that I can consider. All thoughts/contributions gratefully received.
A lot of Forum members have lists with pack contents and weights that have been shared before. If you would like to have some of those posted, just holler. My advice is to ignore that rule of pack weight as a percentage of body weight. It is nonsense. There is no correlation between body weight and ideal pack weight.

The Rule is: Get your backpack weight as low as possible without being 'Stupid Light". Stupid Light means that one goes for hyperlight pack weights by relying more on technique and knowledge, than on equipment; but doing so to such an extreme that any slip up can put one at risk.

Because you are not in the wilderness of the backcountry, but walking town to town, it is easy to eliminate taking "what in case" items.
 

josephmcclain

Active Member
Beginning Primitivo on May 7. I have only a silk liner with me. No sleeping bag since on the Francés I ended up giving it away to lighten my pack. Am sort of counting on maybe blankets in most places. Is that reasonable? It worked actually on the Francés. Am a very warm sleeper. should I stick in some kind of light weight cover? Interested in advice from those who have been on the primitivo in very much a transition month. Early May
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Hello. Finally decided on my route and stages and prebooked most of accommodation. Now dithering on what to take and leave behind. Backpack currently weighs in at 7kg which = 8% body weight. Would like to knock off at least 1/2kg. Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not? Will be taking & using Pacerpoles. Rectangular Sleeping bag is 1.15kg (don't like mummy bags). Are there any ultra low weight sleeping bags around 600g that aren't mummy style? I have always taken my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals (562g) for evenings and shower. Are there any better lighter weight alternatives that I can consider. All thoughts/contributions gratefully received.
Consider swapping he sleeping bag for an Alps Mountaineering microfiber sleeping bag liner.


it is available in a mummy shape as well, has a full separating zipper and weighs less than half of what the sleeping bag does. When stored, it rides in the bottom of my rucksack in a one-gallon ziplock bag.

Hope this helps.

But, as others have said, your present overall weight is most excellent. I cannot get mine below 11 kg, and I have been doing this for six years.
 

Raz

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Gathering info for a future trip
Re extra footwear - I struggled with this before doing the CF. Two weeks before I left, I came upon a pair of plastic birkenstock sandals (only 214 grams and sturdy)- I wore them comfortably both into the shower and out and abt in the evenings and I could also add socks if my feet were cold in the evening as they were the slip-in type. (For size 39 euro - this would save you 348 grams alone)
Re weight on back and feet - I always heard it stated the opposite way - a pound on your back is like 5 pounds on your feet. (5 lb on the back would be like 25 lb on feet not one!).
Good luck but your pack weight sounds quite doable! Buen Camino!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018

Suzanne S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Camino Frances/Muxia/Fisterre (2017) Caminho Portuguese/Fisterre
(2019) Camino del Norte
Hi @jostony ! Alas, for me, my pack will be about 7 kg, when all is said and done (water, etc.). I'm think I can reduce the weight of my " towel" and perhaps leave my scarf behind, but it seems I was mis-weighing the last two Camino's, when I thought I was carrying 6kg.

That said, I'll continue to try to whittle away, thinking a liner instead of my sleeping bag might help...I'm in the "what if I need it" stage. I know better...🙄
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
Here is an idea if you increase your body weight you can take a proportional adjusted 10 % weight with you. Or you loose a kilo body weight you have with boots still the same weight. Now the question is muscle mass or body fat? Sorry guys feeling silly.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPdP 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues 2017
Finisterre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Thank you for all your helpful thoughts and contributions. First decision now made on the sleeping bag. I am ditching my current bag that weighs 1.15kg and will take a Big Agnes McKinnis Down Sleeping Bag = 512g. This knocks off 600g. Not sure yet, but may also take my RAB silk liner 153g. I am also strongly veering towards sticking with my Meindl Portland GTX walking shoes, as these are 433g less weight on my ,feet compared to my Meindl Gomera GTX Walking boots (1.4kg) which I used on my first CF camino. Still exploring options on different after camino/evening/shower footwear.
 
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jostony

Camino del Vino
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPdP 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues 2017
Finisterre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Create a spreadsheet and weigh every item in your list. Everything has a weight, everything. Weigh your options. When I started doing this, I shaved off weight.

Perhaps the green t-shirt weighs less than the blue one you were going to bring. Perhaps the grey trousers weigh less than the black ones.

Is there a lighter-weight toiletry bag than the really nice one you have? A simple lightweight cloth bag with an s hook will do the job ... as will a zip-lock bag. Dry soap bars instead of liquid ... half a bar instead of a full one. How much do all of your zip-lock and dry-bags and packing cubes weigh (if you have any) - do you really need them all?

A down quilt/throw and silk liner will weigh less than a sleeping bag.

It's easy to say, 'oh, that item weighs nothing', but every ouce adds up. Everything has a weight-price ... is its value to have worth carrying the weight?

Good luck
Designed a lovely spreadsheet and my family laugh at me and think I am mad , as I weigh everything on kitchen scales! After a few caminos I have finally learned that every gram adds up. On first Camino I took everything and at every City along the way I sent back more and more stuff back home!
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPdP 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues 2017
Finisterre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Hi @jostony ! Alas, for me, my pack will be about 7 kg, when all is said and done (water, etc.). I'm think I can reduce the weight of my " towel" and perhaps leave my scarf behind, but it seems I was mis-weighing the last two Camino's, when I thought I was carrying 6kg.

That said, I'll continue to try to whittle away, thinking a liner instead of my sleeping bag might help...I'm in the "what if I need it" stage. I know better...🙄
Funny how our fears creep back in and we talk ourselves into relabelling something back and forth between "Fear", "Need" and "Essential". I have changed my sleeping bag so backpack currently equals 6.5kg without food and water.
 

jimmyc

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015
I carried 5kg but did not take a sleeping bag. All the albergues I stayed in had blankets. I would point out however, that it was early September and very mild and most evenings I did not use the blankets. I did carry a silk liner.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
I am on the Primitivo right now and so far have found blankets in Oviedo (municipal), Grado (municipal), La Espina (private, Bodenaya was closed for the day😞), Samblismo (private) and Grandas de Salime (municipal).

There are NO blankets in the municipal in A Fonsegrada (but I do have a sleeping bag from Decathlon with me that weights about 600 grams) and I do not expect there to be any in the rest of Galicia. From my experience, the Xunta Albergues are very well heated, in fact too much. Last December in Lugo I didn't even sleep in my bag and the heating is on full blast now in A Fonsegrada.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPdP 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues 2017
Finisterre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
I have always carried a separate pair of waterproof trousers and probably only worn them once or twice during a Camino. Has anyone just worn and walked in trousers/pants that combine hiking and waterproof qualities without need for separate waterproofs? If so which do you recommend and how do they feel and perform?
 

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I only bother with waterproof pants on November - March caminos when cold and wet is to be avoided. Outside of those times, I find wet pants really aren't an issue while walking because I'm warm enough.
 

Island

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP (2019)
Florida Trail
Appalachain Trail
The balance between weight and cost of items will always be an individual consideration. For your sleeping bag, you can drop considerable weight by moving to a down quilt. For example, Enlightened Equipment, Hammock Gear and even REI make quilts that will cut your weight in half or more (ex: EE Revelation quilts pack small and start around 325 grams - two thirds less than you bag!). For evening shoes, I prefer the Aleader style water shoes though Amazon that weigh in at roughly 120g. The question that only you can answer is what would that 800g - 1kg of savings be worth to you. Hope this helps.
 

Via2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
06/07 & 12 Camino Francés, 08-10 Via de la Plata, 13/14 & 17 Camino Portugués, 18 Camino Primitivo
Hi,

I walked the Primitivo in low walking shoes last year (Meindl Nebraska) and saw many pilgrims using trail runners. So high and heavy boots are definitely no must. Trekking-poles are useful, but also no must. I found a wooden walking stick for the two stages where it was useful.
As a second pair of shoes for showers/evening I take my Teva Mush (160 g).
I have a mummy-shape sleeping-bag 700g and take a micro-fibre blanket in addition. So I can open the sleeping-bag.

BC
Alexandra
 

Via2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
06/07 & 12 Camino Francés, 08-10 Via de la Plata, 13/14 & 17 Camino Portugués, 18 Camino Primitivo
Sounds like a sauna suit
I can also not recommend clothes that promise to be both waterproof and breathable. Usually things can only be either the one or the other. So if you combine both, thei will neither be completly waterproof neither really breathable. It is always a compromise.

In my opinion "Supplex" or "Travex" is a material for trousers which dries very quickly and still makes you feel comfortable when it is hot. Another possiblity, though a bit heavier, is a combination of Cotton and Polyester.
 

Island

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP (2019)
Florida Trail
Appalachain Trail
It's difficult if not impossible to generalize for woven fabrics, as no two weaves perform the same even when the materials and percentage of materials are identical. For example, a loosely woven nylon pants (e.g. larger "gaps" between fibers") may feel more breathable than a cotton/polyester blend. If that same loose weave nylon is coated with a DWR water resistant coating, then you should have a breathable pant that repels water. That's a more expensive finish. A tightly woven nylon will feel hot and less breathable. You can buy 10 models of pants from different makers and each may perform differently. If its a key decision point, then I suggest you study how they are woven to speak to breathability. If you are not as concerned, then just buy pants you love and pack a rain kilt. ;)
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
It's difficult if not impossible to generalize for woven fabrics, as no two weaves perform the same even when the materials and percentage of materials are identical. For example, a loosely woven nylon pants (e.g. larger "gaps" between fibers") may feel more breathable than a cotton/polyester blend. If that same loose weave nylon is coated with a DWR water resistant coating, then you should have a breathable pant that repels water. That's a more expensive finish. A tightly woven nylon will feel hot and less breathable. You can buy 10 models of pants from different makers and each may perform differently. If its a key decision point, then I suggest you study how they are woven to speak to breathability. If you are not as concerned, then just buy pants you love and pack a rain kilt. ;)
Island has some great observations and well worth considering. I will add two things:

1. Generally speaking, the synthetics that are more loosely woven also tend to be lighter, which is an advantage. The feature set may include leg bottom zips to allow easy on and off over shoes. Many brands of both zip-off style pants and non-zips offer such materials. REI Sahara, Kuhl, North Face, pRana, Outdoor Research, Columbia. . .

2. Island mentioned that DWR (Durable Waterproof Coating) acts as a water 'repellent'. He is right on target and that is something to keep in mind, because the longer the DWR'd fabric is exposed to rain, the more likely it will 'wet out' and become soaked. Many waterproof/breathable (WP/B) laminates, like Goretex, often require a non waterlogged outer fabric in order to function properly, which is why DWR is most often paired with those types of "waterproof" garments.

As Island stated, DWR will effectively repel water, even without a WP/B laminate. Depending on the fabric it is applied to, it will be great for rain protection for short durations.

DWR does wear 'off' so to speak, and becomes ineffective as the garment becomes dirty. It can be 'renewed and there are products which will do so. Additionally, DWR can be added to a fabric without a WP/B laminate, depending on what the fabric is.

If interested, this is one product line for DWR treatment and renewal. This is another. Both are well regarded products.
 

calmeg

Member
Jostony- we walked the Norte/Primitivo 4 years ago and will do so again mid May. Our packs were ~7 Kg, with light sleeping bags that we were very glad to have, and a pair of Keen sandals each. The sandals will change this year to something lighter. My wife has changed to trailrunners but I will stay with my Keen hiking shoes. We did not weigh everything- and probably could have reduced the overall pack weight, but were happy with the decision. We were hit by rain several times and were glad for easy on rain pants! That worked for us - but figure out where your comfort zone is!
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPdP 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues 2017
Finisterre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Jostony- we walked the Norte/Primitivo 4 years ago and will do so again mid May. Our packs were ~7 Kg, with light sleeping bags that we were very glad to have, and a pair of Keen sandals each. The sandals will change this year to something lighter. My wife has changed to trailrunners but I will stay with my Keen hiking shoes. We did not weigh everything- and probably could have reduced the overall pack weight, but were happy with the decision. We were hit by rain several times and were glad for easy on rain pants! That worked for us - but figure out where your comfort zone is!
Thanks for sharing your experiences. I have decided to stick with, and take, separate waterproofs. The final decision is now whether to stick with my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals to relax in post walking or explore a lighter footwear option such as the Hoka One One ORA RECOVERY SHOE.
 

mike mcbroom

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis June 17, 2015 ,Portagusee from Porto to Santiago August 2016, Francis may 2018 this year wil
7kg is really good!

Boots are up to you, I wear them because I have weak ankles from my army days, I carry 16 kilo's, and I am tiny. So boots I need.

Good luck lightening your kit, though it may get expensive. Let us know how you get on!

And Buen Camino, the Primitivo is wonderful !

Davey
i never prebook until the day of. nev se r been let down
 

Roni

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2017
Hello. Finally decided on my route and stages and prebooked most of accommodation. Now dithering on what to take and leave behind. Backpack currently weighs in at 7kg which = 8% body weight. Would like to knock off at least 1/2kg. Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not? Will be taking & using Pacerpoles. Rectangular Sleeping bag is 1.15kg (don't like mummy bags). Are there any ultra low weight sleeping bags around 600g that aren't mummy style? I have always taken my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals (562g) for evenings and shower. Are there any better lighter weight alternatives that I can consider. All thoughts/contributions gratefully received.
There are 2 places to buy ultra light sleeping equipment, ZPacks.com and enlightened equipment.com 18-20 oz bags expensive but worth it.
 

Karl G

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2019 - Somport to Santiago de Compostela
Hello. Finally decided on my route and stages and prebooked most of accommodation. Now dithering on what to take and leave behind. Backpack currently weighs in at 7kg which = 8% body weight. Would like to knock off at least 1/2kg. Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not? Will be taking & using Pacerpoles. Rectangular Sleeping bag is 1.15kg (don't like mummy bags). Are there any ultra low weight sleeping bags around 600g that aren't mummy style? I have always taken my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals (562g) for evenings and shower. Are there any better lighter weight alternatives that I can consider. All thoughts/contributions gratefully received.
Here’s some evening and shower sandals from Croc that are only 173g (6.1 oz.) I’m planning on using these this September but don’t have any first hand experience with them yet. https://www.amazon.com/Crocs-Mens-Swiftwater-Mesh-Water/dp/B07DGSLNRV/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=Mesh+wave+crocs&qid=1555769623&s=gateway&sr=8-2&th=1
 

Andresin

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino francés May 2017, Camino del Norte October 2017
Hello. Finally decided on my route and stages and prebooked most of accommodation. Now dithering on what to take and leave behind. Backpack currently weighs in at 7kg which = 8% body weight. Would like to knock off at least 1/2kg. Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not? Will be taking & using Pacerpoles. Rectangular Sleeping bag is 1.15kg (don't like mummy bags). Are there any ultra low weight sleeping bags around 600g that aren't mummy style? I have always taken my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals (562g) for evenings and shower. Are there any better lighter weight alternatives that I can consider. All thoughts/contributions gratefully received.
I am arriving in Oviedo on May 7 and start my trek on May 9. If you are around then we could get together. Let me know.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPdP 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues 2017
Finisterre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
I am arriving in Oviedo on May 7 and start my trek on May 9. If you are around then we could get together. Let me know.
Hello. We arrive in Oviedo on 16th May and will start our slow camino on 18th. Sure you will catch us up!
 

Eric G

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
1st timer
Hello. Finally decided on my route and stages and prebooked most of accommodation. Now dithering on what to take and leave behind. Backpack currently weighs in at 7kg which = 8% body weight. Would like to knock off at least 1/2kg. Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not? Will be taking & using Pacerpoles. Rectangular Sleeping bag is 1.15kg (don't like mummy bags). Are there any ultra low weight sleeping bags around 600g that aren't mummy style? I have always taken my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals (562g) for evenings and shower. Are there any better lighter weight alternatives that I can consider. All thoughts/contributions gratefully received.
Take a sleeping bag liner instead of a bag. Also, look at the "Hoka" recovery sandals. Good luck. I loved the Primitivo!!
 

Roni

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2017
There are 2 places to buy ultra light sleeping equipment, ZPacks.com and enlightened equipment.com 18-20 oz bags expensive but worth it.
Also walked the Francis all the way to Finesterra in my Teva sandals , not one blister , I’m a teva believer , will be walking the Norte this year in my Tevas 😊Buen Camino
 

Mera

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte
Hello. Finally decided on my route and stages and prebooked most of accommodation. Now dithering on what to take and leave behind. Backpack currently weighs in at 7kg which = 8% body weight. Would like to knock off at least 1/2kg. Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not? Will be taking & using Pacerpoles. Rectangular Sleeping bag is 1.15kg (don't like mummy bags). Are there any ultra low weight sleeping bags around 600g that aren't mummy style? I have always taken my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals (562g) for evenings and shower. Are there any better lighter weight alternatives that I can consider. All thoughts/contributions gratefully received.
Are you carrying water bottles? Last time I carried 2 "klean kanteen," which weighted over 1 pound when empty. This time I ordered the below, "collapsible bottles," weight pretty much nothing.
tems in this shipment


Platy 2.0L Ultralight Collapsible Water Bottle × 2
 

cbacino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte - Primitivo (2018)
Via Francigena (2017)
Appalachian Trail (2016)
Hello. Finally decided on my route and stages and prebooked most of accommodation. Now dithering on what to take and leave behind. Backpack currently weighs in at 7kg which = 8% body weight. Would like to knock off at least 1/2kg. Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not? Will be taking & using Pacerpoles. Rectangular Sleeping bag is 1.15kg (don't like mummy bags). Are there any ultra low weight sleeping bags around 600g that aren't mummy style? I have always taken my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals (562g) for evenings and shower. Are there any better lighter weight alternatives that I can consider. All thoughts/contributions gratefully received.
Boots will not give ankle support; only metal braces do that. Cheap, lightweight shower sandals weight next to nothing.
 

TerryB

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte/Primitivo (April/May) 2009: Norte/Primitivo (parts) (April/May) 2010: Inglés (May) 2011: Primitivo (April/May) 2012: Norte / Camino de La Reina (April/May) 2013: Camino del Mar / Inglés (May/June) 2015
Beginning Primitivo on May 7. I have only a silk liner with me. No sleeping bag since on the Francés I ended up giving it away to lighten my pack. Am sort of counting on maybe blankets in most places. Is that reasonable? It worked actually on the Francés. Am a very warm sleeper. should I stick in some kind of light weight cover? Interested in advice from those who have been on the primitivo in very much a transition month. Early May
Having been in Asturias / Galicia in late April and early May for the last 10 years (bar one), we have experienced every kind of weather possible!! The only advice to give is dress in layers and be prepared for sun, rain, mud and even snow at higher levels. Our feeling would be that a medium / light sleeping bag is a necessity. If you are a warm sleeper then an ultra-light would do the job. I would question the availability of blankets in all albergues. We like to keep our feet dry, even in mud and rain - see photo for example - so good boots, well kept, are a must, as are good waterproofs. Unfortunately the original Rohan poncho is no longer available.If it is cold and wet, - light snow in Tineo on 13th. May in 2010 - then over trousers are a help.
Having said all that, we have known the temperature up into the high 20's - shirt sleeve weather.

DSCF0144.JPG Leaving Salas May 2010 DSCF0157.JPG On the way to Tineo May 2010

Blessings on your Camino
Tio Tel
 

Duffman

DuffMan
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018) with my son.
Hello. Finally decided on my route and stages and prebooked most of accommodation. Now dithering on what to take and leave behind. Backpack currently weighs in at 7kg which = 8% body weight. Would like to knock off at least 1/2kg. Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not? Will be taking & using Pacerpoles. Rectangular Sleeping bag is 1.15kg (don't like mummy bags). Are there any ultra low weight sleeping bags around 600g that aren't mummy style? I have always taken my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals (562g) for evenings and shower. Are there any better lighter weight alternatives that I can consider. All thoughts/contributions gratefully received.
Regarding the sleeping kit: I used a permethrin treated silk liner with an ultralight down quilt tucked inside. Cold nights I was under the quilt. Hot nights I would push the quilt to the bottom of the liner. I kept warm and kept the bedbugs in check.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
There are 2 places to buy ultra light sleeping equipment, ZPacks.com and enlightened equipment.com 18-20 oz bags expensive but worth it.
There are more than two places to purchase that level of sleeping gear, but I am a fan of Enlightened Equipment :) I've thre of their quilts for different times of the year during backpacking.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Boots will not give ankle support; only metal braces do that. Cheap, lightweight shower sandals weight next to nothing.
MY diy bathroom sandals weigh even less than next to nothing :)

This is someone else's picture, but mine are the exact same.
55564
 

andralynn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I am leaving for Barcelona May 20th, 2019 and will begin my Camino in San Sebastian May 27th, 2019
Also walked the Francis all the way to Finesterra in my Teva sandals , not one blister , I’m a teva believer , will be walking the Norte this year in my Tevas 😊Buen Camino
When are you walking the Norte
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Bought a 650 grams sleeping bag today. Very compact. McKinley. Paid 50 Euros for it, in Norway! 1.15 kg is far too much.
 

josephmcclain

Active Member
thanks so much for the expert adv
Having been in Asturias / Galicia in late April and early May for the last 10 years (bar one), we have experienced every kind of weather possible!! The only advice to give is dress in layers and be prepared for sun, rain, mud and even snow at higher levels. Our feeling would be that a medium / light sleeping bag is a necessity. If you are a warm sleeper then an ultra-light would do the job. I would question the availability of blankets in all albergues. We like to keep our feet dry, even in mud and rain - see photo for example - so good boots, well kept, are a must, as are good waterproofs. Unfortunately the original Rohan poncho is no longer available.If it is cold and wet, - light snow in Tineo on 13th. May in 2010 - then over trousers are a help.
Having said all that, we have known the temperature up into the high 20's - shirt sleeve weather.

View attachment 55549 Leaving Salas May 2010 View attachment 55548 On the way to Tineo May 2010

Blessings on your Camino
Tio Tel
 

zrexer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15,16 & 19 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo
I think people tend to obsess a little too much about pack weight. For my first couple of Camino's I weighed everything, now I just pack and go. My current pack at 60L is probably larger than I need and the pack itself is kind of heavy, but it fits great and I am far too thrifty to ditch it for a new one.
I guess for some it is something to fret about before you actually get on the trail and realize that it is actually not really that big a deal that you did not spring for that ultra light toothbrush...
In any case enjoy the Primitivo, probably my favorite Camino so far.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I think people tend to obsess a little too much about pack weight. For my first couple of Camino's I weighed everything, now I just pack and go. My current pack at 60L is probably larger than I need and the pack itself is kind of heavy, but it fits great and I am far too thrifty to ditch it for a new one.
I guess for some it is something to fret about before you actually get on the trail and realize that it is actually not really that big a deal that you did not spring for the ultra light toothbrush...
In any case enjoy the Primitivo, probably my favorite Camino so far.
I agree one can be overly focused on trying to shave fractions of ounces to save a grand total of a quarter of a pound. But what I see mostly is trying to reduce pounds. There is a big difference between hauling 20 pounds vs 12 pounds over the course of a day. :)

As you stated, one should not ditch gear just for Camino just to shave a few ounces of weight, like with your backpack. That is not necessary if a pack is comfortable and works well. On the other hand, there is nothing wrong with doing so, especially if you can sell old equipment at a garage sale or ebay, or donate it to an organization's thrift shop, like the Salvation Army.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Regarding the sleeping kit: I used a permethrin treated silk liner with an ultralight down quilt tucked inside. Cold nights I was under the quilt. Hot nights I would push the quilt to the bottom of the liner. I kept warm and kept the bedbugs in check.
That's exactly the combo that I use, but sadly, it doesn't deter bedbugs. :(
 

Beeman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo,2017,Argonne and salvador,sept.2019
Individually held preferences are something which cannot and should not be debated. Folks have a right to make choices based on whatever criteria they believe is important to them. To that end, I want to say that whatever your reason for wanting boots, flip-flops, bare feet, sandals, trail runners, etc. do not feel that you must change your decisions based on what 'everyone else' does. Be comfortable with your choice.

It is not my intention to offend anyone, as I believe that there are times and situations where boots are a reasonable choice to make when hiking, backpacking, or walking. I own and use a pair of Lowa Camino boots in certain cold weather seasons and weather conditions in the mountains when backpacking.

That being said, if one is looking for and asking for factual information in order to make decisions between choosing boots or trail runners (and running shoes) to wear for Camino, ankle support is not a reason to choose boots.

First, there are defined and diagnosed medical issues where an ankle needs to be supported. However, the only sure ankle support for medically indicated need are ankle braces which can fit inside of the shoe.

Despite anecdotal evidence and subjective opinion to the contrary, research has repeatedly shown that boots do not provide the level of stiffness and the shear rigidity needed to keep ankles free from injury.

The ankle is best protected with exercise and use, where the ankle is allowed to use uneven surfaces, exercise, and balancing on one foot in order to build strength and endurance and lessen susceptibility to injurious fatigue.

Boots can, in fact, exacerbate the risk of injury.

A foot in a boot is sitting higher off the ground than when in a shoe because the outer and midsoles are much thicker and built up. Additionally, the outer sole of boots are trimmed closer to shell of the boot, meaning that the outer sole has a fairly narrow profile. Both of these factors have been shown to have a higher risk of the footwear 'rolling' when stepping on an unstable surface or piece of debris like loose rocks or uneven surfaces.

As the boot begins to roll, the boot carries the foot with it, the higher material of the boot above the ankle exerts more force against the foot to make it roll with the boot. That material is not stiff enough to keep from flexing, which means that your ankle is going to start bending as the roll of the boot continues. And because the foot is higher off the ground inside the boot, the ankle can be forced into a more significant bending.

Another factor about boots that helps lead to injury is their weight. The heavier the weight that the foot and lower legs need to lift, the more stress and fatigue the ankles and supporting structures are exposed to. Such weakens the ability of the ankle structures to maintain resiliency.

Trail shoes and trail runners, on the other hand, do the opposite when confronted with the same type of uneven surface or debris. The outer and midsoles are much closer to the ground. They are also wider than the shoe making for a contact point with the ground that is more stable. Their much lighter weight keeps ankle structures from fatiguing.

Now here is the thing researchers found as most significant: A foot in a shoe that is kept a bit loose can compensate, to a large degree, when the shoe starts to roll off of an uneven surface. As the shoe rolls, the shoe tends to slip around the foot. In other words, the shoe moves around the foot for the most part, so the ankle won't immediately bend out of place with the shoe. This allows the wearer of the shoe to have enough time to react to the rolling and twisting shoe to keep the ankle from injurious strain.

Yes, there are people who get ankle injuries in trail shoes and trail runners. But those injuries are less frequent and less severe, on an average, than with a foot encased in an above the ankle hiking boot.

As I stated above, there will be any number of folks that, with no predisposing medical conditions, will state anecdotal evidence along the lines that they, or a friend, or other family members, et al, were saved by above the ankle boots. Subjective opinion is like that. :) But objective evidence begs to differ on the best way of protecting ankles from injury.
Individually held preferences are something which cannot and should not be debated. Folks have a right to make choices based on whatever criteria they believe is important to them. To that end, I want to say that whatever your reason for wanting boots, flip-flops, bare feet, sandals, trail runners, etc. do not feel that you must change your decisions based on what 'everyone else' does. Be comfortable with your choice.

It is not my intention to offend anyone, as I believe that there are times and situations where boots are a reasonable choice to make when hiking, backpacking, or walking. I own and use a pair of Lowa Camino boots in certain cold weather seasons and weather conditions in the mountains when backpacking.

That being said, if one is looking for and asking for factual information in order to make decisions between choosing boots or trail runners (and running shoes) to wear for Camino, ankle support is not a reason to choose boots.

First, there are defined and diagnosed medical issues where an ankle needs to be supported. However, the only sure ankle support for medically indicated need are ankle braces which can fit inside of the shoe.

Despite anecdotal evidence and subjective opinion to the contrary, research has repeatedly shown that boots do not provide the level of stiffness and the shear rigidity needed to keep ankles free from injury.

The ankle is best protected with exercise and use, where the ankle is allowed to use uneven surfaces, exercise, and balancing on one foot in order to build strength and endurance and lessen susceptibility to injurious fatigue.

Boots can, in fact, exacerbate the risk of injury.

A foot in a boot is sitting higher off the ground than when in a shoe because the outer and midsoles are much thicker and built up. Additionally, the outer sole of boots are trimmed closer to shell of the boot, meaning that the outer sole has a fairly narrow profile. Both of these factors have been shown to have a higher risk of the footwear 'rolling' when stepping on an unstable surface or piece of debris like loose rocks or uneven surfaces.

As the boot begins to roll, the boot carries the foot with it, the higher material of the boot above the ankle exerts more force against the foot to make it roll with the boot. That material is not stiff enough to keep from flexing, which means that your ankle is going to start bending as the roll of the boot continues. And because the foot is higher off the ground inside the boot, the ankle can be forced into a more significant bending.

Another factor about boots that helps lead to injury is their weight. The heavier the weight that the foot and lower legs need to lift, the more stress and fatigue the ankles and supporting structures are exposed to. Such weakens the ability of the ankle structures to maintain resiliency.

Trail shoes and trail runners, on the other hand, do the opposite when confronted with the same type of uneven surface or debris. The outer and midsoles are much closer to the ground. They are also wider than the shoe making for a contact point with the ground that is more stable. Their much lighter weight keeps ankle structures from fatiguing.

Now here is the thing researchers found as most significant: A foot in a shoe that is kept a bit loose can compensate, to a large degree, when the shoe starts to roll off of an uneven surface. As the shoe rolls, the shoe tends to slip around the foot. In other words, the shoe moves around the foot for the most part, so the ankle won't immediately bend out of place with the shoe. This allows the wearer of the shoe to have enough time to react to the rolling and twisting shoe to keep the ankle from injurious strain.

Yes, there are people who get ankle injuries in trail shoes and trail runners. But those injuries are less frequent and less severe, on an average, than with a foot encased in an above the ankle hiking boot.

As I stated above, there will be any number of folks that, with no predisposing medical conditions, will state anecdotal evidence along the lines that they, or a friend, or other family members, et al, were saved by above the ankle boots. Subjective opinion is like that. :) But objective evidence begs to differ on the best way of protecting ankles from injury.
davebugg. I always seem to find myself agreeing with you,and do even more now. I have a week ankle that I was always twisting so wore high-risk boots for the ankle prote tion,and still turned my ankle several times a day. My son called me stumblefoot! I started wearing low-fat trail runners and have not turned my ankle in years. You force your foot muscles to get stronger. My advice for boots is to plant some flowers in them.
 

Beeman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo,2017,Argonne and salvador,sept.2019
Boston, Forgive me if I am repeating what others have said. Forget the boots,like I said in the previous post,take a sleeping bag! I took a silk liner in 17 and was cold almost every night. Blankets were offered only once.I started on August 31,and it never got over 65 degrees F. You have chosen a wonderful route. If you do not like a mummy,get a down quilt. It is what I use in my hammock while backpacking. Your pack seems plenty light,do not obsess about a few punches. Mainly,and most importantly,BUEN Camino.
 

messa777

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future: Mid - late September
Hello. Finally decided on my route and stages and prebooked most of accommodation. Now dithering on what to take and leave behind. Backpack currently weighs in at 7kg which = 8% body weight. Would like to knock off at least 1/2kg. Firstly do you recommend boots for ankle support or not? Will be taking & using Pacerpoles. Rectangular Sleeping bag is 1.15kg (don't like mummy bags). Are there any ultra low weight sleeping bags around 600g that aren't mummy style? I have always taken my Keen Clearwater CNX sandals (562g) for evenings and shower. Are there any better lighter weight alternatives that I can consider. All thoughts/contributions gratefully received.
I'd also agree that you may prefer the quilt/throw style better. For lower cost options than the cottage brands in America (though I'm a fan of Enlightened Equipment Revelation myself), are:
1) https://www.massdrop.com/buy/massdrop-pine-down-blanket?utm_source=linkshare&referer=SR4JKQ (544 g)
2) Costco Down Throw (approx. 450g)

They're great if you're also into DIY, and there are a few blogs or YouTube videos on how people have made mods on theirs.

These days, I only wear hiking boots if I'm carrying pack loads of 10kg and above (multi-day hiking with full pack). I'm moving towards trail runners, but need to practice walking in them. Otherwise, will be using low style hiking shoes myself.

As I'm walking in mid-late September (similar to May), I haven't got my final pack weight just yet. But I'll likely be bringing a lightweight down sleeping bag and a silk liner. The liner minimises the potential washing of the bag, from dirt and body oils etc.

Let us know how your final packing list goes. 6.5kg seems great! I always like to see others' lists to see how I can make mine lighter 😊
 

zrexer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15,16 & 19 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo
That's exactly the combo that I use, but sadly, it doesn't deter bedbugs. :(
After six Camino walks and nary a bed bug, I am beginning to think bed bugs just don't like me for some reason!
I have never sprayed or treated any gear or taken any precautions of any kind. Have stayed in every type of albergue all the way to 3 and 5 star hotels.
I guess it is just the luck if the draw.
Maybe next time I will get lucky...
 

Pilger99

Member
Camino(s) past & future
addicted since 1999 (Aragones, CF), lots of caminos in Spain and Portugal since then
I wouldn't walk any spanish camino without a sleeping bag, except the central ones in high summer.
Rain and wind seem to be common weather for at least some days. As someone else said you can always have a heat wave with 30°C and snow somethere in the mountainous areas.
My down mumie sleeping bag is 700g and for me warm enough for 3 season. A similar retangular version should be around 1kg, while a quilt or blanket is about 500g. Silk liners are nice to keep everything clean and are good for so-called tropical nights while the outside temperature maintains above 25°C. That happend not very often. while passing fresh nights in cold albergues was more common.
I know people who already feel warm to hot at 18°C, but that's not me. Heating of the albergues in May tends to be off (if any).

Speaking about carring water. The water from the supermarket comes already in a wonderful light PET bottle (30g or less per liter) . Water from the tap smells often bad (chlorus), but is also safe. I wouldn't like to put that smelly water into my own aluminium, steel or plastic bottles, because the smell stays longer as I want it.
Public fountains with untreated water can be safe, but I try to avoid them.
I prefer to have two small 0,5l PET bottles in the colder seasons for 10-15km distances. If it is less, one bottle can be empty. If I think these are dirty or smelly I throw them in an recycling container and get new ones in the next supermarket/bar.
 

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