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Puzzled about sending backpacks ahead

domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I am just wondering... (As you do...)

People talk about sending backpacks ahead because they don’t want to/cannot carry them. Fair enough.

Then immediately comes the advice: don’t forget to carry rain gear, snacks, water, first aid stuff, a fleece (if you are not already wearing it), a change of socks.... in your day pack. Oh, and medicines if you need them as they could get lost...

So what is left to transport? A sleeping bag, toiletries, a towel, a change of clothes...I can’t think of anything else...

Even if your sleeping bag is on the heavy side (600gr?), the whole thing can’t weigh more than one kilo? Maybe one and a half kilo?

I obviously have a lot of time on my hands thinking of those things (we’re still in some sort of lockdown here in the UK 🙄😁) but I’d love to hear what you think. It just doesn’t add up (to me).
Am I missing something? 🙂
 
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Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
My meds alone are a kilo. My day-pack is a 6 L Osprey with hydration bladder that is 1.5 litres (ergo 1.5 kilos) when full. I generally carry a banana and almonds, a bit of chocolate, so another 500 g there. The pack itself is probably 250g. A change of socks is another 75 g I think. Passport, pilgrim passport, cash, other cards (insurance, 1 VISA)... the cell phone and a charger, probably I'm at 2.5 kilos when I start out.... and 1 at the end of the day...

My entire pack weight, including the 6 L day pack, comes in at about 7 kilos. I'd *love* not to carry my meds, but my health insurance would be void if I didn't have that stuff with me.

I'm always curious about what folks have to do if, like my mum, they have to carry insulin with them. It's very temperature sensitive. But i know insulin-dependent diabetes do go on Camino. Can't ask my mum -- she's not a walker of any description.

Oh, and I've only sent my main bag twice -- once it was in a package set up by a man in a group at Zubiri and he didn't ask any of us. He just shipped our packs all the way to Cizur Menor *and* booked all 7 of us coincidental companions into a hotel there. It was beyond my budget at the time, and forced me to go beyond Pamplona and then backward for a nano-SIM (when they were rare).... I was *furious*.

The second time was from Carion de los Condes to Calzadilla de la Cazuela when my knees were completely blown out. Alas, I forgot to put 5 euros in my bag and I fretted for the last half of my walk that day when I realized my failure. I phoned the albergue there but my Spanish was too poor to grasp what the man was saying. When I arrived, we discovered we both spoke French, and things could have been easier, but there was my bag anyway! And nobody would take my 5 euros!!

My Spanish is much much better now.
 
Last edited:

CalgaryLynn

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I am just wondering... (As you do...)

People talk about sending backpacks ahead because they don’t want to/cannot carry them. Fair enough.

Then immediately comes the advice: don’t forget to carry rain gear, snacks, water, first aid stuff, a fleece (if you are not already wearing it), a change of socks.... in your day pack. Oh, and medicines if you need them as they could get lost...

So what is left to transport? A sleeping bag, toiletries, a towel, a change of clothes...I can’t think of anything else...

Even if your sleeping bag is on the heavy side (600gr?), the whole thing can’t weigh more than one kilo? Maybe one and a half kilo?

I obviously have a lot of time on my hands thinking of those things (we’re still in some sort of lockdown here in the UK 🙄😁) but I’d love to hear what you think. It just doesn’t add up (to me).
Am I missing something? 🙂
The other thing to consider is some people, like myself will have 2 days in Porto and 6 days after the Camino to go see other sites. I won't want to wear the same clothes that I have had on for the Camino and also clothes to travel home in to be comfortable on the plane. I will have some guide books for after as well and my computer stuff so sending it on before me makes the most sense.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
The other thing to consider is some people, like myself will have 2 days in Porto and 6 days after the Camino to go see other sites. I won't want to wear the same clothes that I have had on for the Camino and also clothes to travel home in to be comfortable on the plane. I will have some guide books for after as well and my computer stuff so sending it on before me makes the most sense.
Yes, that I understand. Thank you.
 
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When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
The other thing to consider is some people, like myself will have 2 days in Porto and 6 days after the Camino to go see other sites. I won't want to wear the same clothes that I have had on for the Camino and also clothes to travel home in to be comfortable on the plane. I will have some guide books for after as well and my computer stuff so sending it on before me makes the most sense.
I usually spend some time before and after my Camino sightseeing, and I don't want to do it in Camino clothes either! I bring a suitcase which I send ahead to Santiago - it's so nice to have something different to wear after wearing the same two outfits for weeks on end!
I also pack my poles in the suitcase, which I check in, while I carry my backpack with everything else on the plane.
 

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
That is what I was wondering... So you trust sending your meds ahead?
On my last Camino, sadly I needed meds too. But I would never have parted with them....
No,I carry mine in my day pack, and onto the plane... but always check my bag now because I take my good walking poles.
 
Past OR future Camino
06,CF;13,CP;17,SSal;19,Ingles
I am just wondering... (As you do...)

People talk about sending backpacks ahead because they don’t want to/cannot carry them. Fair enough.

Then immediately comes the advice: don’t forget to carry rain gear, snacks, water, first aid stuff, a fleece (if you are not already wearing it), a change of socks.... in your day pack. Oh, and medicines if you need them as they could get lost...

So what is left to transport? A sleeping bag, toiletries, a towel, a change of clothes...I can’t think of anything else...

Even if your sleeping bag is on the heavy side (600gr?), the whole thing can’t weigh more than one kilo? Maybe one and a half kilo?

I obviously have a lot of time on my hands thinking of those things (we’re still in some sort of lockdown here in the UK 🙄😁) but I’d love to hear what you think. It just doesn’t add up (to me).
Am I missing something? 🙂
Hi, @domigee. Enjoy the free time for wondering!
On my last camino, the Ingles, I decided to book accommodation because I had done a bit of research and knew, because of my slow pace, that I would be unlikely to get a bed in a public albergue. I was right. We coincided with a bunch of young people, and generally found them lounging around the said albergues well ahead of us! Two of us walk together, so when I organised to send on one pack, we arranged the contents of the pack to be sent on to hold as much as possible. That left the other pack lighter, and my daypack also with just essentials. I have to take a few tablets every morning, but I sent the rest in the rucksack. I did not have any problems, using Correos.
 
Past OR future Camino
Frances (14), Portuguese (15), Le Puy (17), Ingles (17), VDLP (18), Lana (18), Madrid (19) + more
Hi Domigee!

Backpack transport is a wonderful service for many walkers who suffer physical difficulties. Or for pilgrims who carry a lot of heavy photography gear! :) I've never used the service, but if I suffered an injury I would utilize it to keep going, rather than end the Camino.

Even five pounds of weight off the back can be a huge difference from terrible knee pain or plantar fasciitis. No sense suffering and having a miserable time if the majority of gear can be sent ahead. Especially through hot sections like the Meseta on the Camino Frances where the extra water weight of just 2L adds 4.4 lbs.

Also, a smaller daypack keeps you more mobile to do so side trips like visiting museums/castles in the cities you pass by.

If I was sending my backpack ahead along the Camino I'd probably take more luxuries like a paper journal, novel, fancier clothes, pillow case, fluffier sleeping bag, extra grocery food (like a box of my favourite energy bars), nicer toiletries, and perhaps a small laptop computer.

I think the sweet spot is when couples walk together - and they backpack transport just one backpack/small suitcase. Then they are paying for one daily transport!
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018
I am just wondering... (As you do...)

People talk about sending backpacks ahead because they don’t want to/cannot carry them. Fair enough.

Then immediately comes the advice: don’t forget to carry rain gear, snacks, water, first aid stuff, a fleece (if you are not already wearing it), a change of socks.... in your day pack. Oh, and medicines if you need them as they could get lost...

So what is left to transport? A sleeping bag, toiletries, a towel, a change of clothes...I can’t think of anything else...

Even if your sleeping bag is on the heavy side (600gr?), the whole thing can’t weigh more than one kilo? Maybe one and a half kilo?

I obviously have a lot of time on my hands thinking of those things (we’re still in some sort of lockdown here in the UK 🙄😁) but I’d love to hear what you think. It just doesn’t add up (to me).
Am I missing something? 🙂

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electrical cord
 
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Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I have only sent my pack ahead once, on the walk from Castilblanco de los Arroyos to Almaden de la Plata on the VdlP. About half of the pilgrims walking this long day (29k) had booked a taxi to take them and their bags along the road 16 km to a park entrance, where they would leave the taxi, with their bags in it, to go on to Almaden, while they walked the remaining 13 k. I was determined to walk the whole way, but sent my pack ahead with the rest of the luggage to Almaden and carried a day pack, with nothing much in it but a bit of food, some water, a few personal care items, and my money and documents (no rain gear needed in that weather). It was a very long, hot, hard on the feet day, ending with a steep climb over a ridge and downhill into Almaden. This was only my third day of walking, and I would not have wanted to lug my hiking pack over that ridge so early in my camino. I was able to change a possibly challenging day into an ordinary one, just by sending my pack on. The opportunity did not arise after that on the VdlP, but I guess that I did not need it, as I am still alive to reminisce about it.
 

jsalt

Jill
Past OR future Camino
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
I’d love to hear what you think

Your post reminds me of a trip to Mauritius (not far from here, so not that expensive to get to) – a girls’ only week away – yippee!

Being a camino addict I pack light – so I arrived at the airport with my little cabin bag.

The other five stared in disbelief, shaking their heads, as they all had HUGE suitcases.

Not only that, I had two bottles of good South African wine in my tiny cabin bag, to save a few bob (actually LOTS of bobs), for a pre-dinner aperitif on the balcony . . .

. . . . the wine didn’t last long as I had to share it! It was SO expensive there compared to here.

While they all took a different outfit to wear for every day, and every evening, I mixed and matched.

The camino teaches us lots of things . . .
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
The other thing to consider is some people, like myself will have 2 days in Porto and 6 days after the Camino to go see other sites. I won't want to wear the same clothes that I have had on for the Camino and also clothes to travel home in to be comfortable on the plane. I will have some guide books for after as well and my computer stuff so sending it on before me makes the most sense.
We sent things we needed for after the camino on ahead to Ivar in Santiago de Compostela. Then we carried our own lightened packs. It worked out well.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
A few times
A few times while walking the Frances I was tempted to spend a few euros and send my pack ahead and see what it was like to walk a full day with just a small bag carrying water and snacks. If it felt a bit liberating, maybe even a wee bit naked in a sense. I never did because I did not want to lock myself into a schedule. Having to go to a specific town and albergue.
 
D

Deleted member 73526

Guest
Then immediately comes the advice: don’t forget to carry rain gear, snacks, water, first aid stuff, a fleece (if you are not already wearing it), a change of socks.... in your day pack. Oh, and medicines if you need them as they could get lost...
If you know that you have a fine day ahead of you and you won't feel peckish, you could, of course, opt to send your rain gear, fleece, socks, and snacks ahead with your heavy bag.

That leaves water, a few sticking plasters, and your essential medication in your daypack. Depending on your preferences, that might be the best for you. Other people may feel that they have more comfort when carrying an energy bar and an extra layer.

I guess it boils down to "we're all different."
 
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Scott Fraser

Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018
Le Puy - SJPdP 2019
I don’t ship my backpack ahead, I ship a 24 liter dry sack which has the things in it that I don’t need for the coming day: sleeping bag, the pair of walk-around-town shoes, flip flops and shower gear, rain gear (if the forecast is good), the jacket or sweater I won’t need because the day is warm, tooth brush etc. The sack is big enough that it also takes things my walking companion(s) don’t need or want to carry that day. The sack often weighs 5-6 kilos. My knees thanked me every night.
 

Caligal

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF April 4- May 12, 2018
CF Sept 10-27 2019
CP Sept 28- Oct12 2019
C Finisterre Oct 16-Oct 20
I usually spend some time before and after my Camino sightseeing, and I don't want to do it in Camino clothes either! I bring a suitcase which I send ahead to Santiago - it's so nice to have something different to wear after wearing the same two outfits for weeks on end!
I also pack my poles in the suitcase, which I check in, while I carry my backpack with everything else on the plane.
Can you use Correros to send a suitcase to Ivar in Santiago? My last trip I went to post office, bought a box and sent my stuff that way. It would be much easier to send a suitcase. Thanks
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Can you use Correros to send a suitcase to Ivar in Santiago? My last trip I went to post office, bought a box and sent my stuff that way. It would be much easier to send a suitcase. Thanks
Yes. When I did the Norte I mailed my suitcase to Ivar via Correos. You can also mail your suitcase to be held at the Correos office in Santiago.
When I've done the Norte starting in SJPDP I use the excellent Express Bourricot service, which is especially nice because they store the luggage at a hotel in Santiago with 24/7 reception, so you can pick your suitcase up whenever it's convenient for you.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I found it easier to shop for some post Camino clothes in Santiago at the mall for traveling around Portugal for two weeks by car afterward.
I always find it easier to find things that I like when I'm not looking for them. When I have to buy something I can never find anything suitable. So for me, it's easier to spend a few minutes at the post office than hours at a shopping center. 😊
 
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Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I always find it easier to find things that I like when I'm not looking for them. When I have to buy something I can never find anything suitable. So for me, it's easier to spend a few minutes at the post office than hours at a shopping center. 😊
I hear ya, but we already had the car and it only took me an hour to shop as I found all I needed at the H&M. It's all good as what is preferable to one may not be for another...we are all different.
 

Caritas33

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Wow. Thank you all so much for the information. This has been worrying me since I have handicaps and LOTS of meds. I’m very excited to try to do this, but there’s always the possibility that I won’t be able to finish and will have to just end my walk and meet up with my companions in Santiago.
 

Caritas33

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Have you or anyone you know had to ditch their plan at the last minute, and is it easy to get a driver if necessary? I will DEFINITELY be sending a bag ahead because of arthritis in my knees and back, but I want to be able to try to go as far as I can with the lightest pack possible.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
If you are walking the Frances and have not sent your pack ahead in the morning, you may want to keep your eyes open for small notices of local taxi services in the vicinity where you are walking. They are often stuck on trees. The first one that you see in a day will be the one to make a note of, so you can call that number (or another which you see later) if you have an urgent need to get your pack, or yourself and your pack, taken ahead by taxi. You can also ask the hospitaleros where you have stayed for the night before if they can give you information on a taxi service in that area. To be certain about getting your bag carried, it is advisable, and cheaper, to make arrangements in advance for your pack to be picked up in the morning. You must then have decided where you will stay for the night.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
I used Correos to send a package to Ivar from Pamplona. I had rented a bike there and switched from hiking to biking so I decided to send my boots, back pack, etc. ahead to SdC. I arrived in SdC several days before my parcel arrived at Casa Ivar. Thankfully, I was staying there for a week; otherwise it would have been a disaster. Something to think about!
 
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Caritas33

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
I used Correos to send a package to Ivar from Pamplona. I had rented a bike there and switched from hiking to biking so I decided to send my boots, back pack, etc. ahead to SdC. I arrived in SdC several days before my parcel arrived at Casa Ivar. Thankfully, I was staying there for a week; otherwise it would have been a disaster. Something to think about!
Is this the service you used? https://www.elcaminoconcorreos.com/en/luggage-storage. I was just looking at it and then saw your comment.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Not exactly but that does look like a photo from the inside of the Correos in Pamplona. I was not storing my bag I was posting it to Casa Ivar.
 

LesBrass

Likes Walking
Past OR future Camino
yes...
I walked with a small group of pilgrims for a week in 2019... 6 folks who lived near me in France who wanted to try walking the camino as a taster. As they didn't know if they would ever walk again, one of them pointed out that she wasn't going to invest a great deal of money on expensive walking gear only for her to decided that it wasn't for her. I'd never thought of that before but it's a really valid point. My group came with the comfortable walking clothes that they normally used at home and carrying all of that gear would have been very heavy. Over the years I've invested quite a lot in my lightweight gear and I can totally see the logic of their reasoning.

A few years ago when we walked the Primitivo we chose to have our pack sent on... my husband had hurt his back and I had injured my knee... it seemed a good idea. My pack is always less than 7kg full but my day pack was half that weight and it did make a difference BUT... having the pack sent on comes at a price... it isn't as liberating as walking with your pack on your back and I did get a little anxious about the pack being in the right place at the end of the day... there was certainly one day when we would have walked on but we had to consider the pack... but backs and knees stayed in good health throughout the walk!

If I ever take another group on a 'taster' walk I will def. recommend a pack service... it's a great idea... And if I ever have an injury I would use this service again... it can make the difference between walking or not walking... and walking is always the most preferred option :cool:
 

Marbe2

Active member
Past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Wow. Thank you all so much for the information. This has been worrying me since I have handicaps and LOTS of meds. I’m very excited to try to do this, but there’s always the possibility that I won’t be able to finish and will have to just end my walk and meet up with my companions in Santiago.

Not sure this was mentioned. Most backpack/ luggage daily transport to albergues/hotels runs from April or late March to end of October on the CF.
However, Correos has also offered transport from OCebriero to SCQ all year long.
 
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Traveller44

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
HI Caritas33 I also am a new member, there is most everything you need to know on this site, but I believe the most important thing I have read is " to walk your own Camino"
 

BigT

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2020)
We were a group of three 70-ish year old men with various arthritis, total joint replacement, and cardiac issues and traveled the Frances from Sarria in early March 2020 just before the Camino closed. We utilized this service:
Jacotrans, servicios al peregrino
www.jacotrans.com

We had absolutely no issues and the service was excellent. Since it was early in the year and many places were not yet open, we did utilize some albergues, casas rurales, private apartments, and small hotels and were glad we did as we were surprised at the number of accommodations and cafes that were closed.

We carried day packs with blister treatments, medications, raingear, hats, food and water, and a Brierly book. Our day packs had about 1/3 of our gear, and our backpacks had extra shoes, soap, toiletries, charger, electric converter, spare glasses, and some extra clothes. ALL of my gear, backpack and absolutely everything weighed 7.30 kg, about 16 pounds, so we travel light.

Our plan worked well for us and we had no illness or significant injuries and arrived on schedule.

We were concerned that we might walk "too far" some day and then have difficult days to follow, but we found that 25 km was our limit, and we had scheduled shorter days after longer days. We averaged 18-20 km per day and were in no rush. We picked early March expecting rain and were not disappointed. More importantly, we avoided crowds, hot weather, and with the trees just starting to get leaf buds, we actually could see more of the scenery of Spain which was part of our plan.

For old, rusty guys we did ok. And we were the oldest people we saw on the Camino except for a few very friendly and welcoming Galicians walking near villages.

I was the tortoise in the group and we all stayed within speaking distance.

Slow beats sore.
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
We were a group of three 70-ish year old men with various arthritis, total joint replacement, and cardiac issues and traveled the Frances from Sarria in early March 2020 just before the Camino closed. We utilized this service:
Jacotrans, servicios al peregrino
www.jacotrans.com

We had absolutely no issues and the service was excellent. Since it was early in the year and many places were not yet open, we did utilize some albergues, casas rurales, private apartments, and small hotels and were glad we did as we were surprised at the number of accommodations and cafes that were closed.

We carried day packs with blister treatments, medications, raingear, hats, food and water, and a Brierly book. Our day packs had about 1/3 of our gear, and our backpacks had extra shoes, soap, toiletries, charger, electric converter, spare glasses, and some extra clothes. ALL of my gear, backpack and absolutely everything weighed 7.30 kg, about 16 pounds, so we travel light.

Our plan worked well for us and we had no illness or significant injuries and arrived on schedule.

We were concerned that we might walk "too far" some day and then have difficult days to follow, but we found that 25 km was our limit, and we had scheduled shorter days after longer days. We averaged 18-20 km per day and were in no rush. We picked early March expecting rain and were not disappointed. More importantly, we avoided crowds, hot weather, and with the trees just starting to get leaf buds, we actually could see more of the scenery of Spain which was part of our plan.

For old, rusty guys we did ok. And we were the oldest people we saw on the Camino except for a few very friendly and welcoming Galicians walking near villages.

I was the tortoise in the group and we all stayed within speaking distance.

Slow beats sore.
What a great post and motto!
Check out this recent post by another slow walker.

Ultreia.
 
Last edited:

RemysMimi

Hooked on the Camino!!
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2018)
Frances or Portuguese (2020)
We were a group of three 70-ish year old men with various arthritis, total joint replacement, and cardiac issues and traveled the Frances from Sarria in early March 2020 just before the Camino closed. We utilized this service:
Jacotrans, servicios al peregrino
www.jacotrans.com

We had absolutely no issues and the service was excellent. Since it was early in the year and many places were not yet open, we did utilize some albergues, casas rurales, private apartments, and small hotels and were glad we did as we were surprised at the number of accommodations and cafes that were closed.

We carried day packs with blister treatments, medications, raingear, hats, food and water, and a Brierly book. Our day packs had about 1/3 of our gear, and our backpacks had extra shoes, soap, toiletries, charger, electric converter, spare glasses, and some extra clothes. ALL of my gear, backpack and absolutely everything weighed 7.30 kg, about 16 pounds, so we travel light.

Our plan worked well for us and we had no illness or significant injuries and arrived on schedule.

We were concerned that we might walk "too far" some day and then have difficult days to follow, but we found that 25 km was our limit, and we had scheduled shorter days after longer days. We averaged 18-20 km per day and were in no rush. We picked early March expecting rain and were not disappointed. More importantly, we avoided crowds, hot weather, and with the trees just starting to get leaf buds, we actually could see more of the scenery of Spain which was part of our plan.

For old, rusty guys we did ok. And we were the oldest people we saw on the Camino except for a few very friendly and welcoming Galicians walking near villages.

I was the tortoise in the group and we all stayed within speaking distance.

Slow beats sore.
I, too, used Jacotrans when I found it necessary to send my pack ahead a few days. I did not have any problems. When I got to my destination my bag was always there waiting for me.
 
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Caritas33

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
We were a group of three 70-ish year old men with various arthritis, total joint replacement, and cardiac issues and traveled the Frances from Sarria in early March 2020 just before the Camino closed. We utilized this service:
Jacotrans, servicios al peregrino
www.jacotrans.com

We had absolutely no issues and the service was excellent. Since it was early in the year and many places were not yet open, we did utilize some albergues, casas rurales, private apartments, and small hotels and were glad we did as we were surprised at the number of accommodations and cafes that were closed.

We carried day packs with blister treatments, medications, raingear, hats, food and water, and a Brierly book. Our day packs had about 1/3 of our gear, and our backpacks had extra shoes, soap, toiletries, charger, electric converter, spare glasses, and some extra clothes. ALL of my gear, backpack and absolutely everything weighed 7.30 kg, about 16 pounds, so we travel light.

Our plan worked well for us and we had no illness or significant injuries and arrived on schedule.

We were concerned that we might walk "too far" some day and then have difficult days to follow, but we found that 25 km was our limit, and we had scheduled shorter days after longer days. We averaged 18-20 km per day and were in no rush. We picked early March expecting rain and were not disappointed. More importantly, we avoided crowds, hot weather, and with the trees just starting to get leaf buds, we actually could see more of the scenery of Spain which was part of our plan.

For old, rusty guys we did ok. And we were the oldest people we saw on the Camino except for a few very friendly and welcoming Galicians walking near villages.

I was the tortoise in the group and we all stayed within speaking distance.

Slow beats sore.
Big T, I will be the tortoise. Ha! My husband said I’ll never make it, but I walked ten miles a day in Madrid two summers ago, and we’ll probably only start in León or Sarria. I may not be able to make all of it, and I’ll probably have to stay in hotels just to get enough rest to do it (one of my handicaps is a sleep disorder... I’m not sure I’d get a wink of sleep in the albergues.) My daughter really, really wants to go, and she’s convinced me that I can do it too. I think at least one friend of hers will join us, and I can go at my own pace even if they leave me in the dust. As long as I go with no expectations and an openness to everything, I think I’ll be ok.

Thank you so much for sharing your story! Now if only we can get there...
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018
Big T, I will be the tortoise. Ha! My husband said I’ll never make it, but I walked ten miles a day in Madrid two summers ago, and we’ll probably only start in León or Sarria. I may not be able to make all of it, and I’ll probably have to stay in hotels just to get enough rest to do it (one of my handicaps is a sleep disorder... I’m not sure I’d get a wink of sleep in the albergues.) My daughter really, really wants to go, and she’s convinced me that I can do it too. I think at least one friend of hers will join us, and I can go at my own pace even if they leave me in the dust. As long as I go with no expectations and an openness to everything, I think I’ll be ok.

Thank you so much for sharing your story! Now if only we can get there...

Caitas33| Neither the speed at which you walk, nor the daily distances that other people may inadvertently suggest you need to walk, should be factors in the joyful completion of that portion you wish to walk. Walk for yourself at the pace which is comfortable. Be mindful of your surroundings and the
people you meet. Do what you are comfortable with. You'll be fine. Buen Camino
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
Silly question, (and not applicable to all cases): If the pack is too heavy to carry daily, is there, maybe, too much in the pack? Everyone's maximum carry weight is different.

Please, no one be offended by this. I have just found through life experience that the obvious questions are rarely the first ones asked, by me, included. Everyone will answer this the way it suits them. There is no wrong answer.

In this instance, for me, using a service to lug my pack across the country over carrying it myself is something I would only do in an emergency. I speak only from my own experience and do not impose my will on anyone.

Maybe this is why I never saw a single shopping cart when I was in Spain?
 

Caritas33

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
I have to bring many medicines, and authorities insist that the containers have my name and prescription on them, so they need to be in their original packaging. My backpack would be completely full with just those if I had to carry it all. Already the ones that will be necessary to carry on my person in case of emergency will add a lot of weight. I also need special shoes for my knees and back in case I need to switch them out, so I will carry an extra pair in my suitcase since they would be difficult to find if they break or get ruined. Not everyone is perfectly healthy... I can’t carry everything necessary for me to travel safely in a small pack, and I need to be very concerned with how much it weighs if I want to attempt any part of this trip with my daughter. She is 20, and we both really want to make this spiritual journey. Even if I only get to take one step on the Camino I will be grateful. Good health is such a blessing.
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018
I have to bring many medicines, and authorities insist that the containers have my name and prescription on them, so they need to be in their original packaging. My backpack would be completely full with just those if I had to carry it all. Already the ones that will be necessary to carry on my person in case of emergency will add a lot of weight. I also need special shoes for my knees and back in case I need to switch them out, so I will carry an extra pair in my suitcase since they would be difficult to find if they break or get ruined. Not everyone is perfectly healthy... I can’t carry everything necessary for me to travel safely in a small pack, and I need to be very concerned with how much it weighs if I want to attempt any part of this trip with my daughter. She is 20, and we both really want to make this spiritual journey. Even if I only get to take one step on the Camino I will be grateful. Good health is such a blessing.

Do what you need to do in order to undertake this special trip with your daughter. All will be well. No one will think less of you. In fact they should be impressed by the efforts you are making to accomplish this. Buen Camino.
 
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.
Published on Amazon
Guide to the 16 main caminos with maps, pictures, hyperlinks and other information.

Blintintin

Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2018)
There are several companies offering this service. I used Jacotrans...they were great, reliable, and easy to use. You phone or reserve online the evening prior by 8pm, telling them the pick up location and drop location for the next day, and then leave a 5 Euro note in the envelope that they attach to your bag. you can find these envelopes in most/all albergues/hotels, etc. You can do it one day or every day, as often or as little a you want. They even phoned me once when i changed my destination without telling them, just to confirm with me what i wanted. great service ... never worried about my bags or contents. https://www.jacotrans.es/en/
 

BigT

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2020)
Oh, to be young again.
When us older rusty folks go on the Camino, we may make adjustments for heart, sleep, arthritis, amputation, cancer, whatever. Just a sleep apnea device can add 2 kg and medications with containers and blister packs another 1-2 kg.
Our goals include walking, meeting, enjoying, refreshing, sleeping, recovering, praying, experiencing, then rinse and repeat daily for as long as we are able.
No judgements needed. If folks that are less than 100% take some precautions, their day pack supplies will be 2-4 kg and manageable. Sending the rest of your "stuff" ahead is not a failure, and expedites and emphasizes your goals to succeed on YOUR Camino.
Slow beats sore.
And slow surely beats sorry.
If you have issues, address them up front, develop your plan for success. The world of the Camino is waiting for YOU and you have invested mind, body, finance, time, and spirit in YOUR Camino.
Plan for success. Look for your realistic issues to address, then go.
The Camino engages an open heart and tends to your needs.
Your daily world at home goes on while the Camino envelopes you.
Go.
 

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