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Question about Altras

peregrina2000

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#1
I saw that Chris is looking at Hokas and has gotten some good advice. Hoping there are as many Altra users out there. I have read every post I can find talking about Altras, and on Friday bought a pair. The ONLY reason I bought them is because they seem to have the widest toe box in the world. I get very painful "wet corns" between my fourth and fifth toes every year like clockwork after about my first week on the Camino. I am pretty good at ignoring the pain, and it hasn't stopped me from walking, but omg it can be very painful. There is no way to get rid of them till I stop walking, and then they dry up and go away withn a few days. My doctor has told me to find wider toe boxes, so that was what I found at REI last week.

The whole "no drop" feature is not something I really care about one way or the other, and I suppose it may be foolish to start out on a camino in about 3 1/2 weeks in a shoe with a totally different construction than I have ever worn. But I am thinking it may be worth the risk, since I know I will otherwise get those dang corns.

My main questions, other than general advice (I see a range of opinions, as is to be expected -- I got the Lone Peak 3.0 on the recommendation of the REI guy and can´t change that now since I am three hours away from the store)

-- how much adjustment time did you need? Does this no-drop system work for you?

-- will an orthotic mess the whole no-drop system up? I always walk with heavy, but very squishy, silicone orthotics. I got them in response to a big heel pain problem back more than 10 years ago when I had to stop the Vdlp, and haven't had that problem since.

Thanks for your help. Buen camino, Laurie
 

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ritaj

Member
Donating Member
#2
Have always walked in my Vasque boots that were part of my uniform in the National Park Service for many many years. Always got blisters by the second week of a camino. Last summer bought Altra Lone Peaks, walked my usual 4 mile exercise walk (over a hill and down again) for about a month, then walked the San Salvador in early September -- no blisters. Don't know about "no drop." Just one person who swears by Altras and will be wearing them on the Primitivo in May.
 

peregrina2000

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Staff member
Donating Member
#3
Have always walked in my Vasque boots that were part of my uniform in the National Park Service for many many years. Always got blisters by the second week of a camino. Last summer bought Altra Lone Peaks, walked my usual 4 mile exercise walk (over a hill and down again) for about a month, then walked the San Salvador in early September -- no blisters. Don't know about "no drop." Just one person who swears by Altras and will be wearing them on the Primitivo in May.
Thanks, Rita,

So when you say that you "don't know about 'no drop'", does that mean you are unsure about whether it's a good system, or are you saying that you didn't even notice it? What I understand, according to the REI guy, is that the Altra makers were runners who decided that having your heel elevated by the shoe, the way all other shoes are, was bad for your feet. So there is no heel elevation in these things. It feels different, and he told me to be prepared for some calf and achilles pain, since I will be using those muscles totally differently in the Altra.
 

OzAnnie

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#4
Laurie @peregrina2000
Hmmmmmm sounds interesting- I’ll be on the lookout for the verdict after the real-time test on camino. Sounds like you’re offering yourself as a Guinea pig. I looked at Hoka ones but the odd base made me a bit nervy about the walking mechanics, so didn’t buy them.
I have had corns (2) in same place as yours between 4 and 5 toe on right foot. I can’t walk long without my tiny ‘podiatrist special for me’ soft spacer . Even though I’ve been back a few times for extra backup ., none have been as good as the first one she made for me. You just have to be lucky there too.
I had tested shoes recently and bought a pair of Brooks Ghost. So comfy and wide toe box but I’m going to walk in my old Keens mid boots as they are goretex lined and it’s going to be cold and wet for me this time I think. The ghosts are ‘airy ‘ and would be great if warm and dry.

Good luck with the test Laurie
Buen camino
Annie
 

edandjoan

Active Member
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#5
Love Altras. Have walked in Lone Peak 3.0..and run in the one squared model, just discontinued. Oh well just ran my last half and have sworn off running and plan only to walk at this point in my life. I have also converted my husband.
Shoes, even the same brand and model, change almost every year and some small change is made. The 3.5 has a slightly smaller toe box, but the updated model coming this summer should be wider....according to two conversations I had with reps at two different events.
For me, as a runner the shoe should not have to have a break in period. I should be able to go out and run 6 miles out of the box and if not the shoes isn't for me.
The Lone Peaks have been fine out of the box as well. I wouldn't even consider the vortex model. Rain will cause shoes to get wet and lighter fabric dries faster.
 

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LesBrass

Likes Walking
Camino(s) past & future
yes...
#6
I wore the Lone Peak 3.0 on the VdlP and loved the wide toe box. I did get foot pain but it was better than not having the usual terrible blisters. I have tried the newer 3.5 and it is narrower (I'll be very interested to see if the 4.0 is wider) However, last week I think I bought the very last pair of 3.0 in my size in europe (that I could find on-line) ... they came from a German shop selling on ebay. I am very very happy to have them.

I bought them as a last minute choice for the VdlP so no breaking in but they seemed comfy right out of the box. The wide toe box feels so nice. For some reason I seem to remember reading that you should strike with the heel first and roll onto the toes when walking? When I had my foot pain I tried to remember this and it felt comfortable... but I have no idea where I read that. I never experienced any leg pain, I did feel like I wanted to jog along whilst wearing them.

I don't really know what caused my foot pain. I did wonder if they were a little too loose which allowed my foot to move from side to side too much. I've been playing with different lacing this evening to try and ensure my toe box stays as wide as possible without causing the mid foot to move, and locking in the heel.

I dont think the orthotic will mess up the zero drop as such... Altra did sell an insoles and stability wedges to add a few mm so maybe it will be a good thing? I'm thinking of doing the same so I'll be interested to hear how you get on.
 

peregrina2000

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#7
For me, as a runner the shoe should not have to have a break in period. I should be able to go out and run 6 miles out of the box and if not the shoes isn't for me.
The Lone Peaks have been fine out of the box as well. I wouldn't even consider the vortex model. Rain will cause shoes to get wet and lighter fabric dries faster.
This is encouraging. I read on their website, and was told at REI, that I should not go "cold turkey" with Altras. The no-drop totally changes the footstrike, they say, and it may result in achilles and/or calf muscle problems if you don't transition. I'm taking from your comments that that was not your experience?
 

edandjoan

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#8
This is encouraging. I read on their website, and was told at REI, that I should not go "cold turkey" with Altras. The no-drop totally changes the footstrike, they say, and it may result in achilles and/or calf muscle problems if you don't transition. I'm taking from your comments that that was not your experience?
I was excited several years ago when Altra's were new on the market as the New Balance I had been running in had just been discontinued. The NB's had a wide width although the toe box did not have the volume that Altra's have. The NB was not a zero drop but had a low drop. I had no transition time and no achillies or calf pain. I have also worn Earth Shoes for years and they have a negative heel drop.
My opinion on the achilies and calf pain could be those that are used to wearing shoes with heels. The muscles and tendons are shortened when walking in heels if not stretched and trying to go to a zero drop could be an issue. A good read is Born to Run. Short of it...we weren't born with shoes on our feet.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Fisterra and Muxia May-June 2017
#9
I LOVE my Altras. I have a C width foot, which is awkward since most women's shoes are a B and men's/women's wide are a D, so having that extra space in the toe box is perfect for me.

The transition to the zero-drop construction will largely depend on what type(s) of shoes you were wearing before. If your shoes had a larger drop (10-12mm--you can usually find this info online), it'll take more time. A smaller (4-6mm) drop will take much less time and you may not notice it at all. As others have said, the main place you'll feel it is in the achilles and calf, so some extra stretching in those areas will do you good. Also, if you don't want to/can't spend a ton of time walking in your Altras before your camino, walk around barefoot or in socks as much as possible. This can also wake up those foot/leg muscles that are used to just relaxing. Lastly, as far as the zero-drop totally changing your foot strike, this is more true in running than in walking. When walking our heels can withstand the impact much more than they can in running, so an ideal running foot strike would be in the middle of your foot, rather than hitting on the heel and then rolling forward. When running, the impact on your foot is several times your body weight, and our heels just aren't made for that. I'll stop now, but I cannot recommend Altras enough!

@peregrina2000 For the corns, have you tried toe socks? I don't know if this would make a difference or just exacerbate the problem, but Injinji makes a whole line of athletic toe socks--another must-have for me when I run.
 

edandjoan

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Leon/SDC/Muxia ‘12
SJPP/Leon Aug ‘14
Oviedo/SDC/Muxia ‘14
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#10
I LOVE my Altras. I have a C width foot, which is awkward since most women's shoes are a B and men's/women's wide are a D, so having that extra space in the toe box is perfect for me.

@peregrina2000 For the corns, have you tried toe socks? I don't know if this would make a difference or just exacerbate the problem, but Injinji makes a whole line of athletic toe socks--another must-have for me when I run.
LOVE INJINJI! They have NuWool which is a merino wool. Years ago I broke my little toe on my right foot and it likes to curl in under the next toe. The injinji help keep the little guy from doing that. I wear the light weight for running.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#11
I LOVE my Altras. I have a C width foot, which is awkward since most women's shoes are a B and men's/women's wide are a D, so having that extra space in the toe box is perfect for me.

The transition to the zero-drop construction will largely depend on what type(s) of shoes you were wearing before. If your shoes had a larger drop (10-12mm--you can usually find this info online), it'll take more time. A smaller (4-6mm) drop will take much less time and you may not notice it at all. As others have said, the main place you'll feel it is in the achilles and calf, so some extra stretching in those areas will do you good. Also, if you don't want to/can't spend a ton of time walking in your Altras before your camino, walk around barefoot or in socks as much as possible. This can also wake up those foot/leg muscles that are used to just relaxing. Lastly, as far as the zero-drop totally changing your foot strike, this is more true in running than in walking. When walking our heels can withstand the impact much more than they can in running, so an ideal running foot strike would be in the middle of your foot, rather than hitting on the heel and then rolling forward. When running, the impact on your foot is several times your body weight, and our heels just aren't made for that. I'll stop now, but I cannot recommend Altras enough!

@peregrina2000 For the corns, have you tried toe socks? I don't know if this would make a difference or just exacerbate the problem, but Injinji makes a whole line of athletic toe socks--another must-have for me when I run.
Oh, thanks so much @MilerMilo. I haven't worn a pair of heels in ten or fifteen years, so I assume I am in the low risk category as far as having a transition problem to the Altra goes. But based on your post, I am thinking that maybe something less drastic than a change to new shoes might help, like toe socks or those little tubes you put around your toes.

So my question for forum members who like obsessing about shoes:

If you were going to start walking in 3 1/2 weeks, and if you had suffered from these horrible corns for the last 5 or 6 years (only on Camino), would you:

-- use your beloved Salomons with a protector around your toes
OR
-- take the plunge with Altra Lone Peaks 3.0 ?

That is my dilemma, which, as my daughter always tells me, is clearly a first world problem.
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Donating Member
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Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#12
Just a thought Peregrina2000... I didn't see that you have consulted/talked to a Podiatrist (you may have). In my experience, a lot of Podiatrists keep up to date with shoes and various insoles for varying sporting activities and are quite well versed in making recommendations based on a foot's condition. I've seen where the latest generations of Altra's, Brooks, and New Balance -- among others -- were on the referral sheets.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Aragones and Camino Frances (2018)
#13
Wore out my first pair of Altras doing pre-Camino hiking and now have a new pair for my April start - LOVE THEM!!!!

The wide toe box is perfect for my wide feet and the zero drop had no effect on my legs. ALTRA says it takes 2-3 weeks of walking to adjust to the difference, but I literally wore them out of the store and onto the trail the next day with no ill effects.

Highly recommend the brand. HOWEVER, I’m wearing the Altra TIMP and found the Altra King to not fit as well. Definitely do several consecutive day walks this week to assure yourself that it’s the right shoe.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
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C. Frances
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C. de Salvador/Primitivo (2018)
#14
Hi Laurie!
I didn't have any transition issues with the zero drop. Maybe it's because I walk barefoot or wear flip flops a lot of the time?

However, while training before the Camino in my Altra Lone Peaks, when I added my orthotics, I started getting rubbing in the back of the heel cup which caused a blister. It seemed to me my heels were a bit higher because of the orthotic, so didn't seat well into the cup of the shoe. You may not have this issue with your orthotics. (I also wear the men's Altras, because of the extra width, so it's possible I wouldn't have that problem in the women's shoes. But they are too narrow for my duck feet). I didn't want to rely on taping the backs of my heels every day, which would be a hassle and I'd have to carry all that tape, etc. So I wrote to Jon at www.fixingyourfeet.com (This site and this guy are the absolute best resource I've ever found on foot issues... even better than my podiatrist).

He wrote back immediately,

[["Good luck on the Camino. First, here’s a non-tape suggestion that I think you could gain from. Check out ENGO Blister Prevention Patches. They go in the shoes and not on your feet. You can find them at http://www.goengo.com and on Amazon. Their Heel Blister Prevention Patch could help with your heel blisters. They go in the back of your shoe around the inside, side to side. The large and small ovals can go on the insole and up the heel counter if the blisters are low on your heel. Apply them to dry shoes and they should last a log time. They are thin and easy to carry, and inexpensive."]]

So I got the ENGO patches and put them in the back of my heels and they completely solved the problem. No heel blisters. While walking, at some point I started to get a hot spot on the side of my foot near my baby toe, so I put an ENGO patch in there and it solved that one, too. I also gave one to another walker who was having problems, and she never had a blister after installing the patch. They lasted the whole Camino for me, so I highly recommend taking some as prevention and in case of any friction issue that comes up while you're on the trail.

I liked my Altras, but I did have to alternate them with my Chacos on long walks. I think that would be true of any kind of real shoe I tried to wear. The Chacos are made perfectly for my feet.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
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C. Frances
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#15
LOVE INJINJI! They have NuWool which is a merino wool. Years ago I broke my little toe on my right foot and it likes to curl in under the next toe. The injinji help keep the little guy from doing that. I wear the light weight for running.
Yes, I have that toe overlap issue too and love the injinji socks.
 

VNwalking

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#16
f you were going to start walking in 3 1/2 weeks, and if you had suffered from these horrible corns for the last 5 or 6 years (only on Camino), would you:

-- use your beloved Salomons with a protector around your toes
OR
-- take the plunge with Altra Lone Peaks 3.0 ?

That is my dilemma, which, as my daughter always tells me, is clearly a first world problem.
Oooo, that's a hard question.
Salomons are tried and true. But. The corns.
Which only happen on the Camino. So there's no way to road-test any alternatives.
You could end up with no corns, but with blisters instead (or something else more drastic, like tendonitis or shin splints). So for a long walk I would tend to stay with what I know, and road-test the new shoes with a shorter camino, if that's possible. Or maybe you can beg friends in Spain to hold your Salomons so they can be posted to you someplace if the new shoes totally totally don't work...
As you know, Laurie, I swear by paper tape around the third and fourth toes to prevent blisters between and under them. Would that work for corns, do you think, or make them worse? (Toe socks didn't do it for me, too bulky)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via Francigena (2017), plus more than 2000 Km/year of trekking, hiking and minor caminos since 2000.
#17
-- how much adjustment time did you need? Does this no-drop system work for you?
-- will an orthotic mess the whole no-drop system up? I always walk with heavy, but very squishy, silicone orthotics.
1) Adjustment.
It depends on your age, how athletic/fit you are, how much time you (have to) wear high heel shoes in daily life.
Walking barefoot or with slippers at home helps very much.
Do some stretching on the calves every day.
With soft progression, walk with your Altra in daily activities, both to break them in and to make your feet familiar with the feeling of "walking on clouds" :cool:

2) Orthotic
A good deal of runners and nordic walkers that I coach and coached use orthotic insoles in their zero drop shoes (Altra included).
Personally, since ages I use Noene insoles with my maximum comfort in all my running and hiking shoes.
And you can see in other posts that I'm a ultra-fan of Altra. ;)

peregrina2000 said:
-- take the plunge with Altra Lone Peaks 3.0 ?
YESSSSS! By all means!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Planning our first Camino with our twin grandsons who are almost 12. Walking mid April-May(2018)
#18
I saw that Chris is looking at Hokas and has gotten some good advice. Hoping there are as many Altra users out there. I have read every post I can find talking about Altras, and on Friday bought a pair. The ONLY reason I bought them is because they seem to have the widest toe box in the world. I get very painful "wet corns" between my fourth and fifth toes every year like clockwork after about my first week on the Camino. I am pretty good at ignoring the pain, and it hasn't stopped me from walking, but omg it can be very painful. There is no way to get rid of them till I stop walking, and then they dry up and go away withn a few days. My doctor has told me to find wider toe boxes, so that was what I found at REI last week.

The whole "no drop" feature is not something I really care about one way or the other, and I suppose it may be foolish to start out on a camino in about 3 1/2 weeks in a shoe with a totally different construction than I have ever worn. But I am thinking it may be worth the risk, since I know I will otherwise get those dang corns.

My main questions, other than general advice (I see a range of opinions, as is to be expected -- I got the Lone Peak 3.0 on the recommendation of the REI guy and can´t change that now since I am three hours away from the store)

-- how much adjustment time did you need? Does this no-drop system work for you?

-- will an orthotic mess the whole no-drop system up? I always walk with heavy, but very squishy, silicone orthotics. I got them in response to a big heel pain problem back more than 10 years ago when I had to stop the Vdlp, and haven't had that problem since.

Thanks for your help. Buen camino, Laurie
I love my lone peak 3.0. I plan on walking in them starting next month on my first Camino. I also have custom orthotics in them as I have issues with neuromas. I recently switched to wearing toe socks and this has also been therapeutic for my feet. They are much happier. Hope you get it all sorted out! Maybe we will see you out there. We hope to start April 11 from SJPdP. Buen Camino !
 
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Frances,2014,
Frances,2015
Madrid,2015
Salvador,2015
Mozarabe,
Sanabres,
Porto,2016
Levante,2017
#19
I used to like the Lone Peak's and have recommended them in the past. But they have changed the design of the soles and the last designs have caused problems at the ball of the foot. Just putting them on around the house brings the "discomfort" back. The problem is that the ball of the foot ( for me ) lands right in between a couple of the wide ridges on the bottom of the sole and the pressure after a couple of 100 miles forms a slight cup on the insole and sole which causes the pain on the metatarsal. I imagine that a stiffer carbon based insole would help this but I have not tried. Altra used to sale a rock guard that could/might fix this but I have not found them in the market. I have switched to Hoka for the next walk.
 

gloria lowe

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2017 or Sept 2017
#20
I loved the comfort of the Lone Peak but I must step really hard because I wore down the soles after only about a 100 miles. Knew they would never make the Camino. I went to a wide shoe store and found Brooks Trail runners that I wore and love, that came in wide. Did find them cheaper on Amazon. Have a new pair ready for the Norte in May.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#21
Wow, thanks so much to everyone. Rather than respond to everyone's comments/questions indiviually, I can comment on them all here. And of course they raise even more questions!

My current thinking is that I will wear the Altras and leave the Salomons home. If I have problems by the time I hit Granada (only 200 km from Almeria), surely I can find some Salomons there and ditch the Altras. I will also bring my heavy chacos (rather than the light ones I brought last year for walking around after walking and in shower). I spent two weeks on a fairly active trip in 2016, and wore nothing but my chacos. No day hit 30 plus kms, but many were surely around 20 at least. I think that's pretty good evidence that my feet are generally fine in Chacos and I can try them in a pinch.

In case anyone else is agonizing over the choice of shoe (you have to agonize about something pre-Camino, right?), here is more of my reasoning.

-- I haven't worn heels, other than an occasional wedding, in more than 15 years probably.

-- Though this construction does feel a bit weird (as Earth shoes always did for me), I am in day 2 of just wearing them around and I am adjusting.

-- Though my heels slide up a bit when I walk, since I do have narrow feet everywhere but the metatarsal and toe box area, I am going to buy some of the ENGO patches and put them in before I start. Hopefully that will make for a better heel fit.

-- I have been to three podiatrists in town and two sports medicine doctors. None offered me the kind of advice that Dave got. But since Altras are on the sheet he saw, that suggests that there is some professional consensus with the REI recommendation.

-- I take VN's caution very seriously, it would be just my luck to solve one problem and create another. For me the problem of tendonitis/shin splints is a real one, but it is in my Salomons as well, and I obsessively search for off-road alternatives, even if it means walking gingerly through knee high weeds. I will return to my practice of preventitive icing, and hope that helps.

-- I will also take some of those little squishy tubes that go around the toes and try them out. I was reluctant to try them in the Salomons, since I fear that it will just reduce the space available for my toes to spread out. Is that a silly concern?

Bet you didn't think I could have so many reactions to these posts. I guess you would say I have entered the "obsessing phase" of my shoe dilemma.

Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. And @ortemio, this issue will create an immediate bond between us when we meet up in the Bar Entremares in Almería in a few weeks!
 

J F Gregory

Preparing for the Norte
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
March-April,2016 finished
October- November 2018 to walk the Del Norte.
#22
I hike in Altra 3.0's and I love them. I used to wear Keen hiking shoes which I still wear when it is really cold. I change out the insole to Super Feet because of my planter feet. In wet weather I wear waterproof socks, bit most of the time I wear smart wool socks. I am wearing my 2nd pair of Altra's they don't need to be broken in. I can walk about 500 miles in a pair before the wear out.
 

VNwalking

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#23
I fear that it will just reduce the space available for my toes to spread out. Is that a silly concern?
No, not at all. I tried these, but found that they are bulky, and don't breathe at all, too. Lambswool does the same thing really well and has none of these disadvantages. And it's lighter, too. So lambswool and paper tape have become my go-to defenses against toe trouble.
 

edandjoan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon/SDC/Muxia ‘12
SJPP/Leon Aug ‘14
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#24
-- Though my heels slide up a bit when I walk, since I do have narrow feet everywhere but the metatarsal and toe box area, I am going to buy some of the ENGO patches and put them in before I start. Hopefully that will make for a better heel fit.

Buen camino, Laurie

!
Are the shoes laced all the way? I notice many people neglect to use all the "eyes" provide, leaving the last set empty. Does that make sense? I lace my shoes using all the eyes and don't have an issue with slipping on the heel.

EDIT: I have trained and run marathons, half marathons, 10k etc and walked thousands of miles and don't get blisters. I use the simple criss cross lacing method using all the eyes. I'm a keep it simple type person.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Via Francigena (2017), plus more than 2000 Km/year of trekking, hiking and minor caminos since 2000.
#25
Are the shoes laced all the way? I notice many people neglect to use all the "eyes" provide, leaving the last set empty. Does that make sense? I lace my shoes using all the eyes and don't have an issue with slipping on the heel.
In this video you can see how to correctly use all the "eyes". That's the standard way for running shoes. :cool:
So you have the maximum comfort and total control.

 

ritaj

Member
Donating Member
#26
Wow, thanks so much to everyone. Rather than respond to everyone's comments/questions indiviually, I can comment on them all here. And of course they raise even more questions!

My current thinking is that I will wear the Altras and leave the Salomons home. If I have problems by the time I hit Granada (only 200 km from Almeria), surely I can find some Salomons there and ditch the Altras. I will also bring my heavy chacos (rather than the light ones I brought last year for walking around after walking and in shower). I spent two weeks on a fairly active trip in 2016, and wore nothing but my chacos. No day hit 30 plus kms, but many were surely around 20 at least. I think that's pretty good evidence that my feet are generally fine in Chacos and I can try them in a pinch.

In case anyone else is agonizing over the choice of shoe (you have to agonize about something pre-Camino, right?), here is more of my reasoning.

-- I haven't worn heels, other than an occasional wedding, in more than 15 years probably.

-- Though this construction does feel a bit weird (as Earth shoes always did for me), I am in day 2 of just wearing them around and I am adjusting.

-- Though my heels slide up a bit when I walk, since I do have narrow feet everywhere but the metatarsal and toe box area, I am going to buy some of the ENGO patches and put them in before I start. Hopefully that will make for a better heel fit.

-- I have been to three podiatrists in town and two sports medicine doctors. None offered me the kind of advice that Dave got. But since Altras are on the sheet he saw, that suggests that there is some professional consensus with the REI recommendation.

-- I take VN's caution very seriously, it would be just my luck to solve one problem and create another. For me the problem of tendonitis/shin splints is a real one, but it is in my Salomons as well, and I obsessively search for off-road alternatives, even if it means walking gingerly through knee high weeds. I will return to my practice of preventitive icing, and hope that helps.

-- I will also take some of those little squishy tubes that go around the toes and try them out. I was reluctant to try them in the Salomons, since I fear that it will just reduce the space available for my toes to spread out. Is that a silly concern?

Bet you didn't think I could have so many reactions to these posts. I guess you would say I have entered the "obsessing phase" of my shoe dilemma.

Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. And @ortemio, this issue will create an immediate bond between us when we meet up in the Bar Entremares in Almería in a few weeks!
Laurie -- I guess I "just didn't notice" the drop in the Altra Lone Peak -- feeling kinda foolish about not knowing about it. But I didn't feel it (can't remember the last time I wore heels!) and really had no break in time at all. Given my experience of loving a style and then, when I'm ready to replace it, finding that it no longer is made (try finding that bra you loved still for sale) I bought a second pair when I got back from the San Salvador and it also needed no break-in time. Lately have been wearing them (alternately) in tramped down snow paths and they are just wonderful.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#27
In this video you can see how to correctly use all the "eyes". That's the standard way for running shoes. :cool:
So you have the maximum comfort and total control.

Wow, so helpful! I had always figured that since the laces weren't long enough to do a regular criss-cross and use both holes, that we were just supposed to pick the hole we liked the best and use it. Doing it the right way made my heel much more secure in the heel box. Thanks so much.
 

Priscilla NC

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spring 2016: Camino Frances, Finisterre and Muxia
#28
I'm another Altra Lone Peak fan -- I need both the wide toe box and the zero rise (no drop).

I have a friend who was training for another Camino and decided to buy these shoes. Right away, she had some discomfort (I can't remember but I think here issue was knees???). She went back to her foot doc and he told her that her issue was with the no drop, and that she should more slowly break them in.

She did, and walked the CF with no foot issues or other pain.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
C. de Salvador/Primitivo (2018)
#29
Are the shoes laced all the way? I notice many people neglect to use all the "eyes" provide, leaving the last set empty. Does that make sense? I lace my shoes using all the eyes and don't have an issue with slipping on the heel.
And of course there is the lacing trick involving the top two lace holes that makes a huge difference in seating down the heels.
 

Laurie Sanantone

New Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Burgos-SdC May-June 2016; the whole enchilada April-June 2018?
#30
Laurie, i’m planning to wear my Brooks Cascadia‘s on the Camino next month. But I also bought a pair of Altra 3.5s to train with part of the time, so that I can save the wear and tear on my Cascadia‘s. I LOVE both pairs of shoes, but here is my observation:
The first day I wore my Altras for 7 miles with pack, I had a bit of soreness in the front of my ankles the next day. I also felt that my hamstrings worked a little harder than when I wear the Cascadia‘s. But I also felt that if I wore that the Altras exclusively, those problems would go away pretty quickly.
Have a very buen Camino! We’re starting from SJPDP April 26, can’t wait!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#31
Laurie, i’m planning to wear my Brooks Cascadia‘s on the Camino next month. But I also bought a pair of Altra 3.5s to train with part of the time, so that I can save the wear and tear on my Cascadia‘s. I LOVE both pairs of shoes, but here is my observation:
The first day I wore my Altras for 7 miles with pack, I had a bit of soreness in the front of my ankles the next day. I also felt that my hamstrings worked a little harder than when I wear the Cascadia‘s. But I also felt that if I wore that the Altras exclusively, those problems would go away pretty quickly.
Have a very buen Camino! We’re starting from SJPDP April 26, can’t wait!
Thanks, Laurie,
I have been wearing the 3.0 version for a week, inside and on occasional walks outside (my REI guy told me that the 3.0 was more well loved than the 3.5, who knows). I am going to try them out on a hike with pack next week. I don't have many good hiking options with elevation in my flatlands, but there is one forest preserve that has a decent 12 mile loop with a few hills. I will report back.
 

islandwalker

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozárabe
#32
Laurie, I’ve just finished 300 km in Andalucia in my Lone Peak Altras, and it’s the first time in ten years that I’ve been able to hike all day with no foot pain. The zero drop feature takes the pressure off the front of your foot. My podiatrist recommended them. I wear a custom orthotic in mine with no problems. Every day I am thankful to have found them. Two drawbacks compared to my husband’s Keens: mine slip more easily on wet rocks, and although they are supposedly the waterproof version, they get wet inside much faster than his. However, I wouldn’t trade them for anything! I hope you love yours as much as I love mine. ( And you are very wise to be starting in Almería. The Serranía de Ronda where we are has had almost a month of steady rain.)
Elaine
http://hiking.topicwise.com/doc/GenalValley
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#33
Laurie, I’ve just finished 300 km in Andalucia in my Lone Peak Altras, and it’s the first time in ten years that I’ve been able to hike all day with no foot pain. The zero drop feature takes the pressure off the front of your foot. My podiatrist recommended them. I wear a custom orthotic in mine with no problems. Every day I am thankful to have found them. Two drawbacks compared to my husband’s Keens: mine slip more easily on wet rocks, and although they are supposedly the waterproof version, they get wet inside much faster than his. However, I wouldn’t trade them for anything! I hope you love yours as much as I love mine. ( And you are very wise to be starting in Almería. The Serranía de Ronda where we are has had almost a month of steady rain.)
Elaine
http://hiking.topicwise.com/doc/GenalValley
Great news, Elaine (not about the rain, which is really too bad, but about the shoes!). I am not concerned about getting wet, since my feet always get wet in goretex anyway, at least if it's a big rain. These look like they will dry faster than my salomon goretex, and that's just as important IMO.

Now that I have heard from several who have walked in these Altras with a custom orthotic, I am more sanguine about it. I do hope to take a 20 km walk next week, probably just on pavement, to test them out.

Three weeks from today, I will start walking! Looks like the rain in southern Spain is stubbornly refusing to leave, at least according to long term forecasts. This is a good heads up for me to bring my lambswool gloves, they have saved me from freezing many times while walking in 8 hours of cold Galician rains.
And thanks for the link to the blog, I will head there next!
 
Camino(s) past & future
We are planning to do the Camino Portuguese in May!!
#34
I saw that Chris is looking at Hokas and has gotten some good advice. Hoping there are as many Altra users out there. I have read every post I can find talking about Altras, and on Friday bought a pair. The ONLY reason I bought them is because they seem to have the widest toe box in the world. I get very painful "wet corns" between my fourth and fifth toes every year like clockwork after about my first week on the Camino. I am pretty good at ignoring the pain, and it hasn't stopped me from walking, but omg it can be very painful. There is no way to get rid of them till I stop walking, and then they dry up and go away withn a few days. My doctor has told me to find wider toe boxes, so that was what I found at REI last week.

The whole "no drop" feature is not something I really care about one way or the other, and I suppose it may be foolish to start out on a camino in about 3 1/2 weeks in a shoe with a totally different construction than I have ever worn. But I am thinking it may be worth the risk, since I know I will otherwise get those dang corns.

My main questions, other than general advice (I see a range of opinions, as is to be expected -- I got the Lone Peak 3.0 on the recommendation of the REI guy and can´t change that now since I am three hours away from the store)

-- how much adjustment time did you need? Does this no-drop system work for you?

-- will an orthotic mess the whole no-drop system up? I always walk with heavy, but very squishy, silicone orthotics. I got them in response to a big heel pain problem back more than 10 years ago when I had to stop the Vdlp, and haven't had that problem since.

Thanks for your help. Buen camino, Laurie
Hi Laurie!! I have a pair of Altras. Mine are the Timp Trails. I have Plantar fasciitis and my shoes take the pain away. I love them!! I have done a lot of hiking with them on the weekends. I have put an insert in them. I did call the company and asked if doing that would negate the zero drop. I was told no but my logic says yes. Either way it feels good with the insert and makes me feel good to protect my feet as much as possible. They do not hurt when hiking and they do not hurt afterwards. And I absolutely love the wide toe box! We start walking the Camino Portuguese on May 8 out of Coimbra!
 

islandwalker

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozárabe
#35
Laurie, another thing I just thought of: I am actually using my orthotic on top of the inserts that came in the Lone Peak high-tops. There is enough height in the toe box for me to do this. It is saving the heel area inside the shoe from being chewed up by my orthotic. I don’t imagine everyone would have enough room to do this, but it works for me. Another unusual thing that has worked is loose lacing (to the point of “sloppiness”) in the lower part of the shoe and fairly snug lacing in the ankle. I thought this might cause blisters, but it hasn’t. One day I tightened up the toe area to lessen the sliding around, but it turned out to be an uncomfortable solution. I mention this because maybe some things that are conventional wisdom don’t apply to Altras. It’s worth experimenting to see what works for you.
Altras have changed my walking comfort so much that I am actually carrying two pairs (and I weigh every ounce that goes into my pack). My second pair is the knit top Escalante (see the soles in the journal entry going up later today). I brought them “just-in-case” but the Lone Peak high-tops have worked out so well, I could have left the Escalantes behind. They have been great for stream crossings, though.
Have a wonderful walk. I’ll be looking for your entries on the forum!
Elaine
 
Camino(s) past & future
2017
#36
I saw that Chris is looking at Hokas and has gotten some good advice. Hoping there are as many Altra users out there. I have read every post I can find talking about Altras, and on Friday bought a pair. The ONLY reason I bought them is because they seem to have the widest toe box in the world. I get very painful "wet corns" between my fourth and fifth toes every year like clockwork after about my first week on the Camino. I am pretty good at ignoring the pain, and it hasn't stopped me from walking, but omg it can be very painful. There is no way to get rid of them till I stop walking, and then they dry up and go away withn a few days. My doctor has told me to find wider toe boxes, so that was what I found at REI last week.

The whole "no drop" feature is not something I really care about one way or the other, and I suppose it may be foolish to start out on a camino in about 3 1/2 weeks in a shoe with a totally different construction than I have ever worn. But I am thinking it may be worth the risk, since I know I will otherwise get those dang corns.

My main questions, other than general advice (I see a range of opinions, as is to be expected -- I got the Lone Peak 3.0 on the recommendation of the REI guy and can´t change that now since I am three hours away from the store)

-- how much adjustment time did you need? Does this no-drop system work for you?

-- will an orthotic mess the whole no-drop system up? I always walk with heavy, but very squishy, silicone orthotics. I got them in response to a big heel pain problem back more than 10 years ago when I had to stop the Vdlp, and haven't had that problem since.

Thanks for your help. Buen camino, Laurie

Hello Laurie .. I have worn Altra's for a couple of years, and like you, it is because of the toe box. I wear them with an insole, purchased at a sports store -- not a prescription orthotic, but it provides extra arch support and a firmer heal cup which seems to suit me. I didn't find the adjustment to wearing a zero drop shoe to be difficult. Like all shoe purchases prior to setting out on the Camino, it would be wise to wear them steadily for a few weeks and do some distance walking, to get used to the new pair of shoes.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016), Le Puy Route (planned 2018)
#37
Another vote for the Altras. I’m a woman but wear the men’s, I like the extra width. I did need to adjust to the zero drop, but it only took a couple of weeks. I wear them with a superfeet insole and love them, for both running and hiking. Walked the Camino Frances in Altras without getting a single blister!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#38
Laurie, another thing I just thought of: I am actually using my orthotic on top of the inserts that came in the Lone Peak high-tops. There is enough height in the toe box for me to do this. It is saving the heel area inside the shoe from being chewed up by my orthotic. I don’t imagine everyone would have enough room to do this, but it works for me. Another unusual thing that has worked is loose lacing (to the point of “sloppiness”) in the lower part of the shoe and fairly snug lacing in the ankle. I thought this might cause blisters, but it hasn’t. One day I tightened up the toe area to lessen the sliding around, but it turned out to be an uncomfortable solution. I mention this because maybe some things that are conventional wisdom don’t apply to Altras. It’s worth experimenting to see what works for you.
Altras have changed my walking comfort so much that I am actually carrying two pairs (and I weigh every ounce that goes into my pack). My second pair is the knit top Escalante (see the soles in the journal entry going up later today). I brought them “just-in-case” but the Lone Peak high-tops have worked out so well, I could have left the Escalantes behind. They have been great for stream crossings, though.
Have a wonderful walk. I’ll be looking for your entries on the forum!
Elaine
Hi, Elaine,
I will fiddle around with this and see how it goes. I will have an assortment of things to play around with, like Engo patches in the heels, injinji socks, inserts in or out, lacing experiments, oh the fun that awaits!

I plan to take one or two long walks just to make sure the foot feels good, and then it's just a matter of hoping that the corns don't reappear on Day 5 or 6 as they always do.

I took a look at your website, wow that itinerary is a planning marvel. Looks absolutely lovely, what a great idea to use the circle as a base and then peel off for day hikes. This is a terrific resource for anyone looking for some non-Camino hiking in the south. I did see some nice blue sky pictures so I was glad that you have had some good weather. Hopefully there will be more sunny days in your future, since you have a lot of time left before those Schengen rules mean you have to leave. Thanks so much for providing the link.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2014 Camino France's, 2016 Camino del Norte, (Le Puy 2108)
#39
Hi Elaine,

I admit that I have not read all of the responses. But I have been a runner for over 40 years and can provide some advice based on my own experience, which may not apply to you. A "no drop" shoe has little to no difference when comparing the height to the ground of the toe box area of the shoe and the height to the ground of the heel of the shoe. So your foot is kind of flat as if you were standing on the ground. Sounds good huh? However other things to consider. The first one is what is the drop in your current shoes? This is very important as this is what your feet are used to. My feet are used to a 13mm drop, in addition to my orthotic. So if I were to change to a "no drop" shoe, it could cause some, and maybe even a lot, of stress on my achilles tendon. Personally I would not make this change just prior to starting a camino. I would spend months making sure this option works first, before setting out on a camino with a new shoe concept. Many caminos are not just one day or one week of stress on your body, but week after week of stress on your body. As an alternative, ask at a running shoe store (the best ones are not the chains but mom and pop type that employ real runners and hikers). Hokas also focus on minimal drop shoes, which is why I can't wear them. I do love the cushioning though. My views are likely tainted by years of running and various injuries. No drop is a good thing, just not for the 65 year old body with lots of scars and beautiful memories from experiences. Buen Camino
 

Suzanne H

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Baztan and Frances 2017
#40
Love my Lone Peaks! Walked 1000 kms on the Frances/Finisterre last year, then returned home and immediately bought another pair. I used a Superfeet insert, and am now choosing a Spenco insert. I can’t imagine wearing anything else. But. My feet needed a bit more cushion on the long walks so I remain
 

Suzanne H

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Baztan and Frances 2017
#41
Love my Lone Peaks! Walked 1000 kms on the Frances/Finisterre last year, then returned home and immediately bought another pair. I used a Superfeet insert, and am now choosing a Spenco insert. I can’t imagine wearing anything else. But. My feet needed a bit more cushion on the long walks so I remain open to alternatives... love the open toe box.
 

DebraK

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(Spring 2016)
#42
I Love Altra shoes. I switched to the Timp style after the Lone Peaks were updated with a narrower toe box. I wore Altra Lone Peak for 2 Caminos, and will be wearing the Timp on the Norte this coming May. I never had any transition issues with the zero drop. I am female, 60 yrs with D width feet.
 

islandwalker

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozárabe
#43
I’m glad you thought the journal would be useful to others, Laurie. I’ve incorporated a lot of things I learned from this forum and am hoping more people will come to walk in these small mountain villages. They can’t survive without more economic support.
The forecast is for sunshine for several days to come - maybe even after you arrive! I know you will have a great walk no matter what!
Elaine
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#44
Wow, thanks so much to everyone. Rather than respond to everyone's comments/questions indiviually, I can comment on them all here. And of course they raise even more questions!

My current thinking is that I will wear the Altras and leave the Salomons home. If I have problems by the time I hit Granada (only 200 km from Almeria), surely I can find some Salomons there and ditch the Altras. I will also bring my heavy chacos (rather than the light ones I brought last year for walking around after walking and in shower). I spent two weeks on a fairly active trip in 2016, and wore nothing but my chacos. No day hit 30 plus kms, but many were surely around 20 at least. I think that's pretty good evidence that my feet are generally fine in Chacos and I can try them in a pinch.

In case anyone else is agonizing over the choice of shoe (you have to agonize about something pre-Camino, right?), here is more of my reasoning.

-- I haven't worn heels, other than an occasional wedding, in more than 15 years probably.

-- Though this construction does feel a bit weird (as Earth shoes always did for me), I am in day 2 of just wearing them around and I am adjusting.

-- Though my heels slide up a bit when I walk, since I do have narrow feet everywhere but the metatarsal and toe box area, I am going to buy some of the ENGO patches and put them in before I start. Hopefully that will make for a better heel fit.

-- I have been to three podiatrists in town and two sports medicine doctors. None offered me the kind of advice that Dave got. But since Altras are on the sheet he saw, that suggests that there is some professional consensus with the REI recommendation.

-- I take VN's caution very seriously, it would be just my luck to solve one problem and create another. For me the problem of tendonitis/shin splints is a real one, but it is in my Salomons as well, and I obsessively search for off-road alternatives, even if it means walking gingerly through knee high weeds. I will return to my practice of preventitive icing, and hope that helps.

-- I will also take some of those little squishy tubes that go around the toes and try them out. I was reluctant to try them in the Salomons, since I fear that it will just reduce the space available for my toes to spread out. Is that a silly concern?

Bet you didn't think I could have so many reactions to these posts. I guess you would say I have entered the "obsessing phase" of my shoe dilemma.

Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. And @ortemio, this issue will create an immediate bond between us when we meet up in the Bar Entremares in Almería in a few weeks!
God Bless you Laurie, you keep obsessing until you feel you've got a good pair of shoes. In my mind, I can put up with discomfort and ill fitting equipment that I am carrying as long as my feet are doing OK. For me, getting the right combination of shoe, insole, and socks is near nivana :)
 

elsbeth

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April (2017)
#45
I saw that Chris is looking at Hokas and has gotten some good advice. Hoping there are as many Altra users out there. I have read every post I can find talking about Altras, and on Friday bought a pair. The ONLY reason I bought them is because they seem to have the widest toe box in the world. I get very painful "wet corns" between my fourth and fifth toes every year like clockwork after about my first week on the Camino. I am pretty good at ignoring the pain, and it hasn't stopped me from walking, but omg it can be very painful. There is no way to get rid of them till I stop walking, and then they dry up and go away withn a few days. My doctor has told me to find wider toe boxes, so that was what I found at REI last week.

The whole "no drop" feature is not something I really care about one way or the other, and I suppose it may be foolish to start out on a camino in about 3 1/2 weeks in a shoe with a totally different construction than I have ever worn. But I am thinking it may be worth the risk, since I know I will otherwise get those dang corns.

My main questions, other than general advice (I see a range of opinions, as is to be expected -- I got the Lone Peak 3.0 on the recommendation of the REI guy and can´t change that now since I am three hours away from the store)

-- how much adjustment time did you need? Does this no-drop system work for you?

-- will an orthotic mess the whole no-drop system up? I always walk with heavy, but very squishy, silicone orthotics. I got them in response to a big heel pain problem back more than 10 years ago when I had to stop the Vdlp, and haven't had that problem since.

Thanks for your help. Buen camino, Laurie
I hunted and hunted for the perfect shoe for my camino last spring and about the 4th or 5th pair I tried was the Altra Lone Peak. I replaced the insole with a better quality and have to say the shoe worked out 100% for me. The no-drop system was fine, didn't affect my walk or my back. I too was looking for a wide toe bed thinking about the swelling I might experience in the second half of my walk. And on the forum this shoe was recommended by many. When I purchased the shoe I was told "they would only last for about 500 miles" and that pretty much was true as some of the tread pattern was gone. But I replaced them when I returned with another identical pair, my feet love them. They might be big and square but they worked just fine for me - no blisters!
 

CsakazertisLia

New Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
April, 2018
#46
I've tried many different hiking boots and shoes and always struggled with blisters. After reading all the recommendations for trail runners on this forum, and reading tons of reviews of different makes, I decided to give a try to Altra Lone Peak 3.5. I've walked / hiked a few hundred kms in them in the past few months in all kinds of conditions (snow, rain, mud) and haven't had a single blister, not even on the days, when my feet were wet all day from the snow. I'm a happy camper :)
Unlike most who commented above, I definitely needed a transition period of a couple weeks however, as I had significant calf pain in the beginning. Then I found this video and this warm-up / stretch helped and I have no discomfort any more:
Hope this helps, if anyone else has the same problem :)
 

HedaP

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#47
Next camino I think I will go back to Topos but I liked the Altra 2.5 that I wore last camino. No blisters, no other foot problems and the treads provided good protection and good grip. 800 kms resulted in very little wear on the treads but there were a couple of small holes worn on the uppers.
Not sure if this will be useful to you but because I have or rather had problems with Morton’s neuroma, I lace my shoes according to advice on the Altra website which means skipping the middle eyelet holes while using all the others, especially the top eyelet holes which are laced quite firmly to hold the heel in place.
https://www.altrarunning.com/blog/running-tips/run-technique/lacing-technique/
It does make sense because my lay person’s understanding is that there are major nerve systems and major blood supplies that run down the top of the foot.
Now, Laurie do you have any advice about socks because I still haven’t found a pair I really like? o_O
Buen camino, peregrina.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#48
You know that sinking feeling when you are about halfway into your walk and your feet start to hurt? I am pretty bummed. After wearing the Altras around as my day shoe for a couple of weeks, I took a 12 mile walk with pack just to see how they felt. All seemed well till I was about halfway through (and with no alternative but to keep walking). I started to get a pain on the top of my foot, on top of the bone that runs through the top of the foot from my leg to the big toe. Relacing didn't help. Nothing disabling, but even after a night´s sleep, it still hurts. Flexing my foot, it hurts more when I bring the toes up towards the leg than when I push the toes away from the leg, if that makes any sense.

Since I will be landing in Almería in exactly two weeks, I am tempted to go back to the Salomons, knowing that I have walked with these awful corns for years and can pretty well block them from my conscience, but that seems kind of pathetic.

No calf pain, though! Any ideas about what might be going on? Buen camino, Laurie
 

islandwalker

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozárabe
#49
Uh oh, Laurie. That doesn’t sound good at all. Here are two thoughts that occur to me. Your pain sounds like it is in the same area where I had pain when I laced my boots too tight a few weeks ago, but it sounds like you already adjusted for that. Do you have the high top version or the ankle version? It’s easier to get really loose lacing over the top of the foot with the high top version because you can leave the whole foot part loose and just tighten the top two speed-lace type eyelets around the ankle. They don’t touch any of the foot bones. Another thing you might try is changing whatever insert you are using. If you change the height of your arch support, maybe it will change the stress on that top bone of your foot. I’m hoping you can find a solution! Elaine
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#50
Thanks, Elaine,
I agree that the pain is very similar to pain I have had further up my foot, which was definitely caused by lacing too tight. I didn't think I was lacing too tight, but I did use the lacing technique recommended here. I had never used that technique before, so I decided to go back to my old habit of just ignorng the last lace hole.

I have worn the shoes (I have the ankle version) and walked 9 miles today and with the loose lacing, nothing got worse. Still a bit tender, and my heel does slip. but my heel slips in my Salomons too and I haven't had any problems (famous last words, I know). So we will see. I am lucky that I will have a big city after the first 200 kms, so the idea is that I will see how these go and then just buy some Salomons if I am having trouble when I reach Granada.

Hope you continue to enjoy your walk -- your post reminded me to head back to your wonderful blog!
Buen camino, Laurie
 

C clearly

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#51
This might not be easy to do, but consider slowing your pace and shortening your stride a bit while you are still getting used to them. Force yourself to stroll rather than walking "with purpose". It puts less stress on the feet and other moving parts!
 
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Laurie Sanantone

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Camino Frances, Burgos-SdC May-June 2016; the whole enchilada April-June 2018?
#52
I had a similar problem when I started wearing my new Brooks Cascadias. I found that there was a kind of wrinkle or bump where the tongue connected to the side of the shoe in the inside. The wrinkle caused pain in the same part of my foot that you described. I did a little surgery to remove a bit of material from the shoe, So now it lays flat enough that it doesn’t hurt my foot. Also doesn’t seem to have compromised the shoe itself. Only affected my right foot. You might check that part of your shoe to see if it’s wrinkling up and causing pressure.

My Altra 3.5s haven’t bothered me that way at all, though. Hope you can get this sorted out!
 

islandwalker

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Camino Mozárabe
#53
I looked carefully at my shoes as I walked (in the rain again) to Benaoján this morning and realized that this conversation about lacing has clarified why my Altra high tops work better for me on the trail than the regular height Altas I wear at home: I have no tension at all on the laces in the shoe part. The only part I am tightening is the speed laces in the ankle, and that is what is keeping the shoe on my foot. Trying to think how you could try out something similar in low tops...would elastic laces provide more “give” over the top of the foot while securing your heel enough to keep it on the shoe? They are available online.
 

peregrina2000

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#54
The rain just won't stop, will it?!

Thanks for the suggestion. I am thinking that I might put a couple of those ENGO patches Jill recommended on the heels of the shoe, maybe wear a liner, and then hope for the best. Blisters haven't been a problem for me since I started wearing Salomons, and I know I am tempting fate with this move to Altras, but it would be lovely to have a corn-free camino!
 

VNwalking

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#55
Uh-oh, Laurie, I do not like the sound of this. If you get that kind of pain after walking half a day, then...
In your shoes, I'd be cautious - and yes, play with the laces, too and see how it goes. But you are short on time to really give them a long work-out.
And I said it before, but will again because I am thrilled thrilled thrilled at how well it works: about the corns - have you tried taping the toes? I use paper tape and lambswool to wrap the toes (any CVS has it). Both together is a prevention that has been close to miraculous for me for preventing blisters under the calluses between my toes.
 
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peregrina2000

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#56
Hi VN,
Pain totally gone today after an admittedly shorter walk yesterday. (About 9 miles). I think Elaine was right that I had laced them too tightly. I may be a heretic but I am going to forget about the last eyehole because that seemed to solve the problem yesterday.

I have two options at this point as I see it, since I will be in Almeria in two weeks!!!!

Number one would be to try the taping or toe gel wraps in my Salomons and hope that works. And if it doesn’t just put up with the corns as I have for the past years.

Number two would be to try the Altras with the corn prevention techniques. If they don’t feel good after a few days I will go back to Salomons when I get to Granada. I do like the feel of the Altras, and the Salomons felt a bit tight when I put them on right after wearing the Altras, so i am currently leaning towards starting out with the Altras.

I know I am obsessing about this but I would be obsessing about something camino related at this point anyway!
 

VNwalking

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#57
Yay ~ I am happy to read this!
get to Granada. I do like the feel of the Altras, and the Salomons felt a bit tight when I put them on right after wearing the Altras, so i am currently leaning towards starting out with the Altras.
Yeah, well, why not if all goes well over the next fortnight? And you can throw a roll of micropore tape and a packet of lambswool in your pack easily enough. They weigh very little.
I know I am obsessing about this but I would be obsessing about something camino related at this point anyway!
Feet are worth obsessing about. Full stop.:)
(Which is what happens if you don't think about them...)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via Francigena (2017), plus more than 2000 Km/year of trekking, hiking and minor caminos since 2000.
#58
Feet are worth obsessing about. Full stop.:)
(Which is what happens if you don't think about them...)
That's the difference between to experience fullness, awareness, bliss and fun in a Camino and...
to walk mourning and weeping in this valley of tears (citation from "Hail Holy Queen"). :cool:
 

Ninja

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Camino Frances to Santiago June/July (2011) (2013) (2014) (2017)
El Camino del Norte July (2015)
#59
Laurie, I follow your obsession here and all the comments and good advice - and love everything about it. Oh, but don’t get me wrong; not the pain and problems of course, but the attention to every little detail in how to make your feet happy.

I have been very fortunate never to have blisters (NewLine double layer socks), but on my Camino last summer I had lots of pain in my right foot, probably due to a combination of: wrong boots, walking too long stages, too much weight, not listening to my feet, taking no rest days, getting older, long story… It still troubles me on longer walks, and a couple of weeks ago it became worse and I feared I would not be able to walk the Mozárabe. So I finally went to see a Podiatrist and was ‘diagnosed’ with ‘foot drop’ (if that’s what you call it?). I then got special made soles for my (new) boots – the soles simply prevent me from walking 'on my bones' in the front of my feet. After day 2 testing the strange new soles on a 15 km walk I had absolutely NO pain at all. It’s a miracle! Now I only wonder why it took me eight months to go see a specialist.

I have one little piece of advise to add to the list in this thread, and that has nothing to do with your feet, hiking shoes/boots, laces, socks, tape etc. Remember to straighten your back! Even without a backpack, one has a tendency to lean a little bit forward and this brings an extra strain/weight on the front of your feet.

Buen Camino,
Nina
 

peregrina2000

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#61
Just saw your post Nina! Thanks for the advice. I am delighted to say that on day 8 or 9 my Altras are absolutely fabulous. No blisters, no foot pain and NO PAINFUL CORNS!!!! Knock on wood. I do have to be careful about lacing to prevent the pain across the top,and that means my heel slips a little, but with cloth tape across the back of both feet I am fine.

I am also finding that my feet feel much less weary when walking on asphalt, which I attribute to the good cushioning.

Happy to be sitting in Pinos Puente, shoes off, getting ready for the last bit to Moclin.
Buen camino, Laurie
 

islandwalker

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozárabe
#62
That is really good news! I am now on Day 70 of the same sort of joy. Every day I am both amazed and grateful. For your next long walk, you might want to check out the high-top version as it will eliminate the heel slip. I wondered before I came if I would be sorry to be using the high-top, but it has been perfect for leaving the lacing loose all the way along the foot and only tightening the two ankle speed-lace hooks. It comes in a mesh version as well as a water-resistant one.
Elaine
http://hiking.topicwise.com/doc/GenalValley
 

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