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Question about Food and Water on el Camino Frances

dcalderon20

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk June 12th 2013
Hello everyone!

I will be starting my camino from SJPP on june the 10th. Ive been doing a lot of reading, training, and researching. One of the question i had was on food. For those that have walked el camino, what did you do about breakfast, lunch and dinner? I hear most people eat breakfast and dinner at the albuergues. Are there other options? How do you handle lunch? Do you pack a lunch and snack? Will there be places to stop for lunch along the way? And finally, are there lots of water fountains along the way? I do have a water pouch but also wanted to know if there was going to be water available along el camino. I am very forgetful and will probably forget my water pouch at some point haha! :D
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Hi - lot of questions there - don't be afraid, day by day you will know what is coming up on the next stage. Some days are dry and some aren't - you will know by asking the evening before.

Personally I always carry sausage, cheese and bread - some tomatoes sometimes. This way you are pretty independent of caring about what is next ...

... and that is the thing - learning not to care about what is next, it will rise up and meet you anyway.

Eating in bars and so on can become extremely dull after a few days as it seems to be just about the same meal, mass produced, all along the Camino, with some exceptions ( par ex: the first refugio at CastroJeriz, which is also a camping site, has a pilgrim menu with three choices on each course and you can have paella if you want - all cooked by mother, fantastic food and place!!!)

- also, the cost adds up, so if you are on a budget - it IS a pilgrimage after all - well, you can carry a pack of pasta - add that to water at the refugio, olive oil, salt and pepper and some of your cheese and sausage and you have a fantastic meal for the cost of a coffee or two.

Buen Camino! :wink:
 

dcalderon20

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk June 12th 2013
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Thank you so much for the info! I really appreciate it. Im just nervous about my first camino, and i want to make sure that i am prepared as much as possible
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

My only advice is never pass an opportunity for a cafe con leche or a tortilla Frances. The next listed bar or cafe in your guide book may be shut when you get there. Carry water always. Food: unless you have metabolic issues; trust the Camino to provide - there is always a bar / meson or tienda that will provide some fuel. Sources suggest that the human body can survive without food for for fifty days but without water for fifty hours.

Buen, well fuelled, Camino
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Agree with that, except for the coffee - you get used to that caffeine hit, it seems a normal thing to do, but every time you get that caffeine hit your adrenal glands secrete - makes you feel good. But an hour or so later your energy levels are lower than before the hit .. it is a real drug .. eventually (years) your adrenal glands are exhausted, and then so are you and the caffeine hit only makes your mind go fast, your body has had it. Try giving up caffeine and watch - irritability, afternoon exhaustion for days and days - until your adrenal glands, rested now, repair - and then you become pretty cool.

One thing about carrying a small amount of your own food supplies (and not being addicted to caffeine) is that you no longer think about 'when is the next cafe', you no longer have to look ahead, you no longer have to worry - you are independent, you are free (to some extent).

Your thing about being nervous, wanting to work it all out, to be prepared - ah - but there you are - you have two minds, the chattering mind which demands certainty and is terrified of the unknown, and your real mind, the silent observer, that knows that all is well and all has always been well, and is not afraid. This nervousness before Camino is completely normal, this trying to prepare for the unknown and not being able to is completely normal too.
Remember that first day at senior school? Your first date? Your first job? Remember the days before those events and your chattering mind going on and on and on? Exactly! - waste of time.

All will be well - let your chattering mind chatter on, go sit quietly somewhere and watch calmly from your other mind - you have survived this planet pretty well so far, you will be fine, all will be fine - all, already, is fine.

Buen Camino!!!! :wink:
 

dcalderon20

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk June 12th 2013
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Thank you guys! VERY helpful info
 

skilsaw

Veteran Member
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

As the wise man of the mountains said to the pilgrim, "OOwungalema"
There is a small village every 4 or 5 km, and a bigger village or town every 20 to 25 kms.
When I did it in 2004, not every village had a cafe, bar or albergue. But now they are everywhere.
No problems finding food or water.

I found always having an extra litre of water good because you cannot be certain where the next fountain is. Or when you will come across a pilgrim who had way too much wine the night before and is desparately dehydrated. I also carried a tent, cot, air mattress, stove, waterfilter, insect repellent, spare boots, 7 underpants and 7 pairs of socks so that I only had to do laundry once a week.

You can find anything your heart desires... A gypsy from Romania will tell your fortune or read your tarot cards. A hippie from Amsterdam will have 3 kinds of pot for you to try. A nymphomaniac from Paris will... well, you know!

I always had a little bag of pitted dates, rasins, nuts... good energy food when you find yourself getting tired. In Spain, they call this stuff "Fruitas Seco" or something like that. If you don't know the word, just point and grunt. They are use to rude pilgrims.

And the pilgrim replied to the old man of the mountain, "NOw-wellygambelameala."
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

dcalderon20 said:
... what did you do about breakfast, lunch and dinner?

... are there lots of water fountains along the way?...
Here my two cents worth ;-)

Breakfast - some albergues do offer breakfast, if not I just shopped the day before for something to eat in the morning.
Lunch - either in a bar (bocadillo = baguette with different fillings) or a picknick, normally shopped also the day before.
Dinner - either cooking together with other pilgrims in the albergue, if possible, or a pilgrim menu in a bar or restaurant.
Shops - There are plenty of shops, basically every village has at least one, but bear in mind that these small shops do NOT accept cards, only cash. A good travel guide will tell you where ATMs can be found and where not.
Water - Plenty of fountains around (potable=drinkable / no potable = not drinkable), but the water has a lot of chlorine in it, but one get used to that taste ;-) Also here a good Camino Guide will warn you when there are longer stretches without water source.

Hope that helps, SY
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

dcalerone20,

When walking alone in late autumn and winter breakfast and a big late lunch are my norm with periodic bar stops throughout the walking day for coffee, hot chocolate or fresh orange juice and the loo. In Léon hot chocolate is so thick that the spoon almost stands in the cup. Served with freshly made crullers it is a delicious, caloric treat and fuel for trekking! For a delicious pick-up try freshly squeezed zumo naranja or orange juice. No champagne has ever tasted better!

In those albergues which offer kitchens many pilgrims for either dietary reasons and/or to cut costs prepare their own meals; except in emergencies I generally don't. However we all realize that today's food provides the fuel necessary for tomorrow's walking. Furthermore BASIC RATIONS are always carried since the only shop or bar in town may NOT be open! My basics include tea bags, packets which make a cup of soup (even including croutons !), firm cheese, small sausage, simple cookies and some chocolate. Often these same ingredients serve as a predawn breakfast hours before any Spanish bar would dream of opening!

Some hospitaleros provide delicious dinners; communal meals at Granon and Ruitelan have always been memorable feasts. Generally for lunch or dinner many places along the way offer a standard three course Peregrino Menu (Pilgrim Menu) for 8€ or 9€. Although edible these often are only basic courses. A better alternative is the Menu de Dia (Daily Menu) which costs a bit more but provides much better quality and choice.

Buen Camino,

Margaret Meredith
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

skilsaw said:
You can find anything your heart desires... A gypsy from Romania will tell your fortune or read your tarot cards. A hippie from Amsterdam will have 3 kinds of pot for you to try. A nymphomaniac from Paris will... well, you know."
In your dreams.
 

Olivares

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 1997 (Leon to Santiago); Sections Camino Frances: May 2011, May 2012, May 2013, October 2013, June-July 2014 (Sahagun to Santiago).
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

dcalderon20 said:
For those that have walked el camino, what did you do about breakfast, lunch and dinner?
Dcalderon20-- your question is a really good one; nothing like properly calibrated expectations. 8)

One of the most pleasant surprises I got while walking the Camino was how little you really need to eat to get by and how you learn to listen to your body when its telling you to refueled (or not!). The idea of always having a snack with you is good advice. Do remember to stock with some food the night before, mots critical if starting from SJPDP; do it before markets close. I bought fruits, nuts and bread. The fruits were heavy; only one would had suffice. Orisson has some limited snacks, but it is a nice break. After Orisson you are on God's Good Humor when it comes to food ! I learned to appreciate an open market and even more a freshly baked pastry and a potable water fountain. They are available often, but sometimes your timing and theirs do not synchronize. That's when having a snack handy till the next town becomes often a lifesaver. I also learned to check for fruit markets later on the day. Prices were cheaper an I was able to buy more to share.

Buen Camino. I am heading back on May 16th and am already beside myself with anticipation! :D
 

brawblether

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/Jul 2012; Feb 2014
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

I couldn't bear the thought of adding to my pack weight by carrying anything more than snacks. I'd have a packet of museli bars of which I'd eat one each day for breakfast along with a piece of fruit or two bought the night before.

I found that there was a distinct lack of vegetables, either in meals or in the shops. I'd hoped to supplement my meals by eating carrots or beans or cucumbers etc on their own but never really found any that looked edible so I did feel that my eating there was overly carb based...and I'm not usually someone who worries about that much!

I also drank probably half of Spain's supply of Kas Limon or Naranja!! LOVE that stuff!

I too worried about such things before I left and thought "it's all find and good for you all to say, play it by ear" but really, cover yourself for water, the rest play it by ear! Except on Sundays...on Sundays be sure to have bought something for your pack as a backup becuase most things are shut, or will be by the time you arrive if you wait till the end of the day.

Trust the Camino! If you don't eat, there's a reason, if only that you savour the next meal all the more :)
Buen Camino!
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Food is only really problematic if you're walking alone -- when you're walking in company, it becomes possible to share out the weight of supplies and cook for yourselves along the way.

Breakfast either is or is not available, and as others have said, carrying some bread, tomatoes, canned fish, etc etc will be fine enough for lunchtime pauses -- depending on your walking routine OFC
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

When I was a child, in the early 50's in England, the children's adventure films always seemed to involve four of five well spoken boys and girls who were on summer in the country and would get onto a bomb plot or spy plot and get into all sorts of scrapes.
Somewhere in the film there would always be an elegant tramp, a 'gentleman of the road' in an old black suit with a colourful waist coat and a battered top hat. They would find him sitting with his back to a hedgerow, looking out over a field and a marvellous view beyond.

He would be having lunch, a large spotted neckerchief spread out over his lap, with bread, cheese, sausage, and an old sharp opened clasp knife. At his feet would be a bottle of brown ale. Sometimes there was a scruffy dog.

He would give them information about what he had seen, and so on ....

for me - well, I always wanted to be that tramp, so free, so calm, so, well, happy I suppose ... maybe that is why I carry the same food and do the same thing, and why I carry a large napkin to spread out over my knees (though mine is brown),

On Camino - try it --- it is wonderful! beats a restaurant every time :wink:
 
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harryandleather

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francaise
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

When I hiked before, I carried nuts and some Cliff Bars for emergency foods. I think we ended up bringing/leaving all of the Bars as we did not need them. We tried to buy bread and cheese, maybe a piece of fruit the afternoon/night before to eat in the morning and for lunch. Stopping to have coffee along the way and maybe a pastry seemed a good break. I agree totally with--carrying a little food, definitely water; knowing that there is going to be food along the way; that there is very little by way of snacking veggies and an abundance of carbs! I liked cooking in the albergues since the meals for dinner in the small towns got tiresome, though I liked the comeraderie of walking through a small town and seeing people I had seen before on the road. Eating dinner with fellow pilgrims and having a drink was fun. Buen Camino!
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

David said:
When I was a child, in the early 50's in England, the children's adventure films always seemed to involve four of five well spoken boys and girls who were on summer in the country and would get onto a bomb plot or spy plot and get into all sorts of scrapes.
Somewhere in the film there would always be an elegant tramp, a 'gentleman of the road' in an old black suit with a colourful waist coat and a battered top hat. They would find him sitting with his back to a hedgerow, looking out over a field and a marvellous view beyond.

He would be having lunch, a large spotted neckerchief spread out over his lap, with bread, cheese, sausage, and an old sharp opened clasp knife. At his feet would be a bottle of brown ale. Sometimes there was a scruffy dog.

He would give them information about what he had seen, and so on ....

for me - well, I always wanted to be that tramp, so free, so calm, so, well, happy I suppose ... maybe that is why I carry the same food and do the same thing, and why I carry a large napkin to spread out over my knees (though mine is brown),

On Camino - try it --- it is wonderful! beats a restaurant every time :wink:
That's exactly what we like to do, David. Take a rest under a tree. Spread our poncho (sorry, no large spotted neckerchief) on the ground, enjoy our cheese, chorizo, some fruit and, of course fresh bread and watch the other Pilgrims passing by!
Anne
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances from Pamplona and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

'Loving this discussion about food and water on the Camino! So helpful too, apart from one comment regarding Parisian pilgrims which definitely was not. Veteran Poster David's imagery of BYO lunches ('bring your own' as we say in Oz) definitely has me packing one of my Mum's circa-1950's cloth napkins for my next Camino - July 2014. Buen Camino 'D' - keep posting!
JennyH94, Sydney, Australia
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF x2, CPL
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

The choice of napkin/neckerchief is of the upmost importance.
It should be largish, brightly coloured, light, and when spread out on the ground it should imply that a bright, footloose and happy person, who enjoys lunching in the great outdoors is currently dining at this 5 star Michelin star restaurant!

My particular favourite is a bright red one emblazoned with the image of, you guessed it, Ernesto "Che" Guevara. "Che" also gets dunked in fountains and then either worn as a neckerchief or plonked under my hat from where he imparts cooling to my addled brain.

Regds
Gerard
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances from Pamplona and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Hi Gerard - the 'Che' napkin/neckerchief sounds so cool! Since reading all the posts on this topic yesterday I've now dug out the retro napkin/neckerchief made in the 50's by Mum (red and white gingham check - very 'Stepford Wives'! but gorgeous nonetheless) and it's on the packing list for next year.
Cheers - JennyH94
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

We will recognise each other by our napkins! :wink:
 
W

whariwharangi

Guest
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

For breakfast I carried a box of muesli and had a bowl mixed with a cup of yogurt purchased the night before. I carried a box of tea bags and had a cup with breakfast except in those albergues where it was not possible to get hot water. Some mornings I had to settle for a coke to get my caffeine kickstart.

I carried a loaf of bread and had cheese or sausage for lunches. I could not find peanut butter. :( When the weather got cold and wet I started buying a hot sandwich for lunch at a bar. There were more bars per kilometer as I got closer to Santiago.

Supper was Menu Perigrino at the local restaurant. It is best to find other pilgrims to go out with. The three course meal and wine was much better than anything I can make, particularly after a long day on the road.

The albergues had cooking facilities. Its pleasant to share a cooked meal with fellow pilgrims but facilities were usually quite limited and the cleanliness of dishes not always spectacular.

I carried a package of soup for several days in the event that I would end up in a place where food was not available but that never happened.

Stores are well stocked even if some are too small to have a lot of variety.

All stores are CLOSED from Saturday afternoon till Monday morning. This is also true for holidays and Spain has a lot of holidays. If you rely on groceries stock up.

Tap water is safe. There is usually a fountain every few kilometers though these are not always gauranteed to be potable. Water in rural areas usually tasted MUCH better than that in cities.

Spain has that nasty modern trend of selling water in plastic bottles which end up littering the countryside. Just cuz someone else left one there doesn't make it alright for you to do so too.
 

Parzival

New Member
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

David said:
Agree with that, except for the coffee - you get used to that caffeine hit, it seems a normal thing to do, but every time you get that caffeine hit your adrenal glands secrete - makes you feel good. But an hour or so later your energy levels are lower than before the hit .. it is a real drug .. eventually (years) your adrenal glands are exhausted, and then so are you and the caffeine hit only makes your mind go fast, your body has had it. Try giving up caffeine and watch - irritability, afternoon exhaustion for days and days - until your adrenal glands, rested now, repair - and then you become pretty cool.

One thing about carrying a small amount of your own food supplies (and not being addicted to caffeine) is that you no longer think about 'when is the next cafe', you no longer have to look ahead, you no longer have to worry - you are independent, you are free (to some extent).

Your thing about being nervous, wanting to work it all out, to be prepared - ah - but there you are - you have two minds, the chattering mind which demands certainty and is terrified of the unknown, and your real mind, the silent observer, that knows that all is well and all has always been well, and is not afraid. This nervousness before Camino is completely normal, this trying to prepare for the unknown and not being able to is completely normal too.
Remember that first day at senior school? Your first date? Your first job? Remember the days before those events and your chattering mind going on and on and on? Exactly! - waste of time.

All will be well - let your chattering mind chatter on, go sit quietly somewhere and watch calmly from your other mind - you have survived this planet pretty well so far, you will be fine, all will be fine - all, already, is fine.

Buen Camino!!!! :wink:
I leave in 3 weeks, and this was just what I needed to hear. Thank you.
 

Alan Pearce

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aragones 2008, del Norte 2009, VdlP 2011, Ingles 2014, Camino de Madri 2015, Frances 2017
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

I was sitting in a bar on the Via de la Plata, gratefully sipping my very welcome cafe con leche in company with 2 other peregrinos, when Ismael from Brazil made the solemn statement that " Cafe con leches are the gasoline of the camino". Marc [from Barcelona] and I, equally gravely, nodded our full agreement.

Alan

Be brave. Life is joyous.
 

yambowski

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
may 2013
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

We just finished our walk from Leon to Santiago on May 16. During the first week, most of the bars did not open until 8AM or later, and we were already on the road. We would eat breakfast at bars along the trail. During the last week, most of the bars were open around 6AM, so we could eat before starting to walk. The basic breakfast is a croissant. So you will run into bars all along the trail where you can eat breakfast or lunch. We had trouble finding potable water anywhere along the trail. Most people would buy bottled water in the bars.
 

Phillypilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C F Sept.(2013) Camino de Madrid & Finisterre/Muxia Sept. (2014)
Finisterre/Muia June (2017).
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Yambowski, could you say more about the lack of potable water? I thought most Camino fountains were
potable. Thanks, Pam
 

ManyMiles2Go

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

whariwharangi said:
I carried a loaf of bread and had cheese or sausage for lunches. I could not find peanut butter. :( When the weather got cold and wet I started buying a hot sandwich for lunch at a bar. There were more bars per kilometer as I got closer to Santiago.

.
NO PEANUT BUTTER :shock: :cry: That is going to add a lot to my pack to bring my own :lol: :roll:
 

NCfishboy

New Member
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Are there microwaves at some of them or just the basic stove range combo?
 

skilsaw

Veteran Member
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Alan Pearce said:
I was sitting in a bar on the Via de la Plata, gratefully sipping my very welcome cafe con leche in company with 2 other peregrinos, when Ismael from Brazil made the solemn statement that " Cafe con leches are the gasoline of the camino". Marc [from Barcelona] and I, equally gravely, nodded our full agreement.
Alan, a moment of Camino clarity. Forever to be seared into your mind.
 
D

Deleted member 12253

Guest
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Maybe I am a bit odd, I don't drink coffee, I drink tea but only when I finish walk for the day, 25/28 km. I eat fruit nuts etc, no bread, white bread to me poison. Lots of potable on camino. I never bought bottled water, I get my main meal afternoon, menu del dei.never menu peregrine , also always where locals eat, don't follow the herd and you will love your camino, go n' eiri an bother leat..
 
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reg2450

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March 2013
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Phillypilgrim said:
Yambowski, could you say more about the lack of potable water? I thought most Camino fountains were
potable. Thanks, Pam
Hi. Just came back 3 weeks ago from Camino Frances. What an amazing, scarey, exhilerating, enlightening time.... but enough of that: WATER SUPPLY ON CAMINO FRANCES. Especially if you're starting in France - NO!! There is not a lot of potable water, not enough to trust the source will always be there. Admittedly - I drink A LOT (at least 3 litres/day), but it was my first scarey disappointment - particularly climbing to Roncesvalles. After that, there are lots of fountains, but at least a 3rd of them were 'not pottable'. Especially when you were really thirsty. Take a camelback.
 

Phillypilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C F Sept.(2013) Camino de Madrid & Finisterre/Muxia Sept. (2014)
Finisterre/Muia June (2017).
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

Reg2450, thank you for the updated, clear response to the water question. I also like your description of your walk! Pam
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: SJPP-Los Arcos (2011), Logrono-Sahagun (2012), Leon-Santiago (2013)
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

I don't know what's going on with the water, but the only time we ever had any problem was between Villamayor de Montjardin and Los Arcos, where we neglected to fill our bottles at the last fountain and ran out of water - walking late in the hot, hot day (see avatar). Fill up at EVERY potable fountain. (My husband and son mistakenly drank from a non-potable one in Lorca and survived. I watched them very closely for 6 weeks. Nothing.)
 

yambowski

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
may 2013
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

We finished our walk from Leon to Santiago on May 17, 2013. We were normally on the road by 7am. The first week there were no bars open at that time, so there was no place to eat breakfast. However, you pass through several small towns each day and can stop for a late breakfast or lunch there. The second week, in Galicia, bars were open early morning and you could get breakfast before you left. We tended to eat bananas and chocolate for lunch each day. As far as water on the trail, it was not as available as we had been told. In addition, I got diarrhea about 5 days into the hike, and began drinking bottled water. That seemed to help.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

I'm confident enough about the water supplies that I frequently carry red wine in my bike bottle. (especially after the fuente del vino). I never touch coffee however.
 

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serenalms

Member
Camino(s) past & future
October 2013
Re: Question about FOOD and water on el camino frances

skilsaw said:
I found always having an extra litre of water good because you cannot be certain where the next fountain is. Or when you will come across a pilgrim who had way too much wine the night before and is desparately dehydrated. I also carried a tent, cot, air mattress, stove, waterfilter, insect repellent, spare boots, 7 underpants and 7 pairs of socks so that I only had to do laundry once a week.
"
Did you really carry all of that?!? If so, holy moly, how heavy was your pack?

And here I am stressing out about bringing two pairs or pants AND a pair of shorts!
 

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