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Question for DSLR users

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Maxcheese

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances autumn 2019 or spring 2020
Hi again guys!

I was wondering, how do you carry your camera on the camino? I want mine accessible at all times so I don't want to stuff it in my pack and I'm looking for a way to strap outside somehow.

I bought a Peak Desing clip but it feels really unnatural when dangling from the belt or straps. Just letting it hang from the neck is obviously not an option either.

Do any of you have an homemade/original solution for this ?

Thank's again for your input!

Max
 
Camino(s) past & future
2011, 2012, 2014-(19) CF
2013 Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 HærvejenDK
How do I carry my DSLR on the camino?? I don’t. I leave it at home so it doesn't get dropped or dirty or stolen, but I do take my Nikon Coolpix A900, a good-quality compact camera, with excellent zoom, macro, and high-resolution capabilities, in a padded case that has a 'half-loop' on the back and slides easily onto the waist strap of my backpack, so the camera is always accessible.
 
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C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
If you enter "dslr strap" or similar words in the Search box (in the upper right corner of the screen), you will find a number of threads discussing options for carrying cameras. I seem to recall some homemade designs, too.
 
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debra

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2010, Frances 2010
Via Francigena 2014 bicigrino
Way of St. Francis 2017 bicigrino
I carry a small very small mirrorless with a couple lenses in a poach/camera case on the front of my hip belt. Please note this is a very small m43 and smaller lenses. the poach has a thin shoulder strap I use in the evenings. The poach is not part of the backpack but has belt loops.

I don't think this is the solution for a SLR due to size.

The total weight is 700g for body, 3 lenses, batteries and located in backpack charger and spare sd cards.
 
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debra

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2010, Frances 2010
Via Francigena 2014 bicigrino
Way of St. Francis 2017 bicigrino
Here is a link to the bag I use with a padded camera insert that is 3x4x3 inch I also hold my passport, atm card, and a little money in it.

 
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
I used to carry my Canon but now have pretty much given up and use the iphone 10 instead. I took comparable pictures about a year ago and found no real difference when you factor in weight cost etc. Ended up selling most of my DSLR stuff. As much as I love the feel and fun of a good DSLR, I fear that they are going to have to go the way of film. The only thing I find lacking is that a good DSLR with a good telephoto can take some really nice shots that are pretty much unavailable to the phone user. But then I think about the weight and just keep walking. :)
 

Simon B

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles and Camino Frances. VDLP Spring 2019
Hi again guys!

I was wondering, how do you carry your camera on the camino? I want mine accessible at all times so I don't want to stuff it in my pack and I'm looking for a way to strap outside somehow.

I bought a Peak Desing clip but it feels really unnatural when dangling from the belt or straps. Just letting it hang from the neck is obviously not an option either.

Do any of you have an homemade/original solution for this ?

Thank's again for your input!

Max
Use a smart phone to save weight!
 

Jean Ti

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte, Primitivo, Frances
For my last 2 caminos I was carrying a Fuji XT1 camera in a pouch attach with 2 mountain clips attach in the front of my packsac. This way I do not hold the camera with my neck but I am using the packsac.

I use this approach for 50 days and I was never bother with the camera.

Hope this help!
 

Attachments

JimGeier

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Spring 2016
CF Autumn 2017
VDLP Spring 2020
I carry a Sony rx100 m6 (love that camera!) in an Osprey camera case attached to the shoulder strap of my Osprey backpack. It was always handy, easily accessible, and used frequently (I took over 2400 pictures on each Camino Frances pilgrimage). See attached picture of me first day in September 2017 between SJPdP and Roncesvalles. Yes, I look a little tired...it was a long day, and very cool.
Buen Camino,
--jim--
 

Attachments

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I carry a Sony rx100 m6 (love that camera!) in an Osprey camera case attached to the shoulder strap of my Osprey backpack. It was always handy, easily accessible, and used frequently (I took over 2400 pictures on each Camino Frances pilgrimage). See attached picture of me first day in September 2017 between SJPdP and Roncesvalles. Yes, I look a little tired...it was a long day, and very cool.
Buen Camino,
--jim--
Your camera isn't a DSLR one and that was what the OP was interested in. But it is still much better than smartphone cameras in my opinion ;)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
For my last 2 caminos I was carrying a Fuji XT1 camera in a pouch attach with 2 mountain clips attach in the front of my packsac. This way I do not hold the camera with my neck but I am using the packsac.

I use this approach for 50 days and I was never bother with the camera.

Hope this help!
I'm using something similar for my Canon very successfuly for last 12 years. It's Lowepro Off Trail 2 which serves as an over the shoulder pack after I finish walking. While walking its weight is distributed between hips and neck. So when I go uphill it's more on my hips and otherwise somehow equally distributed.

And if you don't bring additional lenses you can use two side pockets for water bottles, rolled guide book or just anything else that you want to have in reach. Highly recommend it.
 

JimGeier

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Spring 2016
CF Autumn 2017
VDLP Spring 2020
Your camera isn't a DSLR one and that was what the OP was interested in. But it is still much better than smartphone cameras in my opinion ;)
You are right - I realized it just after I posted. I find myself in the same mindset as @marylynn, I do not bring my DSLR & lenses with me on the Camino. And because of the convenience and quality of my Sony rx100, I'm gravitating more and more to my Sony rx100 and less and less to my other DSLR cameras.
--jim--
 

gschmidl

sator arepo tenet opera rotas
Camino(s) past & future
Kumano Kodo (11/2018), Camino Sanabres (4/2019)
I have a Peak Design strap, which makes the camera weigh almost nothing. Between photo opportunities, I leave it in the backpack.
 

Anthony18

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019
Hi again guys!

I was wondering, how do you carry your camera on the camino? I want mine accessible at all times so I don't want to stuff it in my pack and I'm looking for a way to strap outside somehow.

I bought a Peak Desing clip but it feels really unnatural when dangling from the belt or straps. Just letting it hang from the neck is obviously not an option either.

Do any of you have an homemade/original solution for this ?

Thank's again for your input!

Max
I know that camera choice is very personal and you're looking for a solution for a DSLR. However, I have a mirrorless, a DSLR, point and shoots, GoPros, drones, you name it. Recently got back from CF and after 35 days of hiking, I saw 2 people with DSLR's. 90% of people use their smartphones. I'm a HUGE fan of the higher-end point and shoots which I think are still better than smartphones, they're compact, have great zoom capabilities, and easily attach to your belt or backpack strap with red whips which are incredibly convenient.

I shot 90 percent of my footage on a point and shoot. My advice is leave the DSLR and lenses and bring a high-end P&S and you'll thank me and everyone suggesting the same. With today's editing tools, a P&S in the hands of a good photographer can really give DSLR users a run for their money.
 
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tomnorth

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); Fall (2020) I hope
Hi again guys!

I was wondering, how do you carry your camera on the camino? I want mine accessible at all times so I don't want to stuff it in my pack and I'm looking for a way to strap outside somehow.

I bought a Peak Desing clip but it feels really unnatural when dangling from the belt or straps. Just letting it hang from the neck is obviously not an option either.

Do any of you have an homemade/original solution for this ?

Thank's again for your input!

Max
My approach was purely homemade. I've attached a photo. I attached two carabiners to my backpack straps. I then snapped the camera strap onto the carabiners. That way, my camera was always accessible but the weight was spread through the backpack straps rather than around my neck or one shoulder. I would definitely do this again, although I'm now using the Domke Gripper camera straps rather than the ThinkTank strap shown in the photo.Camino_2015-31.JPG
 

Terri B

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
1998 St Cuthberts Way, 1999 West Highland Way
2016 & 2019 Camino Frances SJPDP to Santiago
I have my DSLR and two lenses in a Lowepro topload zoom 2 carabinered to the waistband of my pack. It is off to the side of my hips and doesn't get in the way. The front pocket is also handy for sunscreen and a few other small essentials.
I know done people don't get it, but I want to record my journey my way and that involves having multiple lenses with me.
So long as you're comfortable with your decision that's what counts.
Buen Camino
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
As my DSLR is so heavy I wisely decided against taking it on any of my caminos. The best investment I made was buying a Sony RX100m4. Great weight and superb photos. I carry in in a pouch with shoulder strap across chest, so easy access.
 

tomnorth

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); Fall (2020) I hope
Thank you all for your input! Lots of great suggestions here! I think I'll try to patent something like @tomnorth . Since I carry a fairly light M4/3, it should be a breeze :)
I carried a Nikon D800 this way and hardly noticed it. Carrying a M43 camera this way should be a piece of cake. One additional factor to consider is how you will protect your camera from rain. This is where I made a mistake. I brought an Apple Store plastic bag that has a rope to cinch it up. The mistake I made was putting the camera into the bag wet and then cinching the bag closed tight. The condensation inside the sealed bag caused the camera to quit working for ten days. I would have been better off leaving the camera exposed to the elements.

Once in Santiago I put the camera in a bag full of rice. After a day in that bag it came back to life and has been fine ever since. I have picked up a super lightweight plastic camera covering that allows my to shoot while still providing some protection for the camera. It is not sealed.
 

Tommy Barr

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances ,Le Puy, Norte,Primitivo, VDLP,Ingles,Portuguese, Mozarabe
Hi again guys!

I was wondering, how do you carry your camera on the camino? I want mine accessible at all times so I don't want to stuff it in my pack and I'm looking for a way to strap outside somehow.

I bought a Peak Desing clip but it feels really unnatural when dangling from the belt or straps. Just letting it hang from the neck is obviously not an option either.

Do any of you have an homemade/original solution for this ?

Thank's again for your input!

Max
Hi use a large 'bum bag' in which i also carry my credential and passport. i have the bag on my front. It protects the camera and makes it easily accessible. Its a Nikon D750 with a 18-300 zoom lens - so pretty big.
 

Jean Ti

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte, Primitivo, Frances
I carried a Nikon D800 this way and hardly noticed it. Carrying a M43 camera this way should be a piece of cake. One additional factor to consider is how you will protect your camera from rain. This is where I made a mistake. I brought an Apple Store plastic bag that has a rope to cinch it up. The mistake I made was putting the camera into the bag wet and then cinching the bag closed tight. The condensation inside the sealed bag caused the camera to quit working for ten days. I would have been better off leaving the camera exposed to the elements.

Once in Santiago I put the camera in a bag full of rice. After a day in that bag it came back to life and has been fine ever since. I have picked up a super lightweight plastic camera covering that allows my to shoot while still providing some protection for the camera. It is not sealed.
I have a D800 and you have ALL my respect for carrying this! I was wondering what lens did you bring with you?
 
Camino(s) past & future
planning Camino Frances fall (2019)
You are right - I realized it just after I posted. I find myself in the same mindset as @marylynn, I do not bring my DSLR & lenses with me on the Camino. And because of the convenience and quality of my Sony rx100, I'm gravitating more and more to my Sony rx100 and less and less to my other DSLR cameras.
--jim--
Though technically you were talking about a different camera, I for one am grateful you did. Just purchased the Sony RX100 VI, and the same exact Osprey camera case as in your photo... to go with my Osprey pack. So, thank you!
 

jrenner

camino Frances SEPT 18
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Sept - Oct (2018)
Check out the Black Rapid straps. I used one to sling my D500 daily, except in heavy rain. Unless you hand is on the camera, you may miss many useable shots.
 

NavyBlue

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy and Camino Frances. Via Francigena. Tro-Breiz in progress.
Hi,

I have carried my DSLR + lens, along with 2 or 3 other lenses (e.g. a 90 mm macro + a catadioptric 500 mm) with this type of torso bag (in fact a previous version of the same concept). Not on caminos but on week-long hikes.

What I like : immediate access to my equipement, good protection against shocks, convenient to keep costly equipment with me in the evenings...
Cons : arrangement could be sweaty on hot days.
 

debra

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2010, Frances 2010
Via Francigena 2014 bicigrino
Way of St. Francis 2017 bicigrino
Thanks to everyone who has replied to the question. Yes the question comes up every year but it is great to see changes in how cameras are carried. As to if a DSLR should be taken we all have our own answers depending on our own camera use.
 

jozero

Been there, going again...
Camino(s) past & future
CF
With today's editing tools, a P&S in the hands of a good photographer can really give DSLR users a run for their money.
Sorry but, nope. These two, P&S and DSLR, are two different products and to-date there is no P&S that will give the average DSLR a run for the money. Can you get a nice photo with an iPhone or P&S and post it on Facebook, Instragram, email home to family, blog site, etc? Yes. But at this point in camera sensor and lens technology a P&S photo cannot match the photo you can take with an average DSLR.

Since we know nothing about what the OP uses his photos for it is not feasible to suggest what equipment he should take with him. What is feasible is to help him with suggestions about the question he did ask, how to carry his DSLR. For the OP, I would suggest to continue trying the Peak Design clip. It took me a little while to get used to it as well but after a while it became second nature and the weight did not bother me in the least with my 5lb DSLR/lens combo and the convenience of having it right at hand all the time was fantastic and ensured I didn't miss shots I would have otherwise if I had to continually stop to take my camera out of a bag all the time.
 

jozero

Been there, going again...
Camino(s) past & future
CF
I carried a Nikon D800 this way and hardly noticed it. Carrying a M43 camera this way should be a piece of cake. One additional factor to consider is how you will protect your camera from rain. This is where I made a mistake. I brought an Apple Store plastic bag that has a rope to cinch it up. The mistake I made was putting the camera into the bag wet and then cinching the bag closed tight. The condensation inside the sealed bag caused the camera to quit working for ten days. I would have been better off leaving the camera exposed to the elements.

Once in Santiago I put the camera in a bag full of rice. After a day in that bag it came back to life and has been fine ever since. I have picked up a super lightweight plastic camera covering that allows my to shoot while still providing some protection for the camera. It is not sealed.
I recently purchased the Peak Design rain cover. It is water proof (neoprene) and works well with their clip when hanging in the downward position. It's also easy enough to slip the cover up and over the back of the camera for a quick shot and then back down in protection mode. So far I've been pretty happy with it.

1565699789795.png
 

debra

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2010, Frances 2010
Via Francigena 2014 bicigrino
Way of St. Francis 2017 bicigrino
Thanks for the information on the rain cover. Can I ask what camera you are using it with as it gets poor review with mirco4/3 cameras due to being too large?
 
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jozero

Been there, going again...
Camino(s) past & future
CF
Thanks for the information on the rain cover. Can I ask what camera you are using it with as it gets poor review with mirco4/3 cameras due to being to large?
For the Camino I have a Canon 5D MK3 with a 16-35mm lens plus a 50mm lens in the bag. Fits very well for this camera but perhaps a little larger than a micro4/3? My body and lens weighs in around 5lbs / 2.3kg
 

Anthony18

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019
Sorry but, nope. These two, P&S and DSLR, are two different products and to-date there is no P&S that will give the average DSLR a run for the money. Can you get a nice photo with an iPhone or P&S and post it on Facebook, Instragram, email home to family, blog site, etc? Yes. But at this point in camera sensor and lens technology a P&S photo cannot match the photo you can take with an average DSLR.

Since we know nothing about what the OP uses his photos for it is not feasible to suggest what equipment he should take with him. What is feasible is to help him with suggestions about the question he did ask, how to carry his DSLR. For the OP, I would suggest to continue trying the Peak Design clip. It took me a little while to get used to it as well but after a while it became second nature and the weight did not bother me in the least with my 5lb DSLR/lens combo and the convenience of having it right at hand all the time was fantastic and ensured I didn't miss shots I would have otherwise if I had to continually stop to take my camera out of a bag all the time.
You missed a crucial piece of information from my quote, so I'll quote myself: "With today's editing tools, a P&S in the hands of a good photographer can really give DSLR users a run for their money. What I meant by that is... if you can take a great shot with a P&S, and you know your way around photo editing software, then the P&S's end result will give the DSLR's end result some competition. I never said, nor meant to say that a P&S is better/superior/whatever, to a DSLR. If you'd like to continue this conversation, feel free to PM me. Good day.:cool:
 
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debra

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2010, Frances 2010
Via Francigena 2014 bicigrino
Way of St. Francis 2017 bicigrino
For the Camino I have a Canon 5D MK3 with a 16-35mm lens plus a 50mm lens in the bag. Fits very well for this camera but perhaps a little larger than a micro4/3? My body and lens weighs in around 5lbs / 2.3kg
Thanks for the answer. The rain cover has good reviews with bigger DSLR but I think I will keep with my thought that my camera can take a bit of rain with no problem.
 

Jean Ti

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte, Primitivo, Frances
Thanks for the answer. The rain cover has good reviews with bigger DSLR but I think I will keep with my thought that my camera can take a bit of rain with no problem.
The best rain cover for a camera the Ziplock freezer bag! The absolute best value for the $ € £ ¥
 

sunwanderer

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago
Sep/Oct 2015
if you can take a great shot with a P&S, and you know your way around photo editing software, then the P&S's end result will give the DSLR's end result some competition.
I use both P&S's and DSLR's. The P&S cameras are good for snapshots to share with friends and family.

I use the DSLR for fine art photos. Even after using Photoshop, a P&S image cannot match my DSLR image.
 

Darby67

Enólogo caminando
Camino(s) past & future
2018 CF Jan-Feb
2019 CF Jan-Mar
Best rain cover that I have used to date is the Think Tank Hydrophobia, so much so that I have them in 3 sizes for smaller lenses all the way up to super-telephoto . Expensive, but much less so than replacing/repairing $$$$ of camera gear.

I do like the looks of that Peak Design cover for using with the PD clip. Nice price too. And it looks like the small size would work for micro 4/3 according to the website.
 

William Garza

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, The Jakobsweg
My approach was purely homemade. I've attached a photo. I attached two carabiners to my backpack straps. I then snapped the camera strap onto the carabiners. That way, my camera was always accessible but the weight was spread through the backpack straps rather than around my neck or one shoulder. I would definitely do this again, although I'm now using the Domke Gripper camera straps rather than the ThinkTank strap shown in the photo.View attachment 62141
Tomnorth..a very practical and ingenious solution. Ide say this is the way the OP should go!
 

William Garza

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, The Jakobsweg
Cant wait for my journey,

My usual gear on the job is a dslr, 2 L glass lenses,an Ipad to transfer-process-distribute to apropriate site..IG,Smugmug(smug loads and stores full size files.ig-fb-etc nerf the photos..re:they change the files to fit) thats why cell phone camera photos look great as ones taken from a real camera.
Lightroom,snapseed both process quickly and beautifully,
My loadout will probably be 15 20lbs and there will be some killer shots.
 

Maxcheese

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances autumn 2019 or spring 2020
Sorry but, nope. These two, P&S and DSLR, are two different products and to-date there is no P&S that will give the average DSLR a run for the money. Can you get a nice photo with an iPhone or P&S and post it on Facebook, Instragram, email home to family, blog site, etc? Yes. But at this point in camera sensor and lens technology a P&S photo cannot match the photo you can take with an average DSLR.

Since we know nothing about what the OP uses his photos for it is not feasible to suggest what equipment he should take with him. What is feasible is to help him with suggestions about the question he did ask, how to carry his DSLR. For the OP, I would suggest to continue trying the Peak Design clip. It took me a little while to get used to it as well but after a while it became second nature and the weight did not bother me in the least with my 5lb DSLR/lens combo and the convenience of having it right at hand all the time was fantastic and ensured I didn't miss shots I would have otherwise if I had to continually stop to take my camera out of a bag all the time.
Just a little Olympus OMD 10 Mark II + kit lens along with a wide angle converter. Very light and small, Got a clip similar to Peak Design but don't like the way the camera hangs. I opted for 2 carabiners on the belt of the backpack with two keychain rings on the camera body which basically let's it hang on the belt, barely feelable, and makes it quick release for quick photo ops!
 

William Garza

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, The Jakobsweg
Just a little Olympus OMD 10 Mark II + kit lens along with a wide angle converter. Very light and small, Got a clip similar to Peak Design but don't like the way the camera hangs. I opted for 2 carabiners on the belt of the backpack with two keychain rings on the camera body which basically let's it hang on the belt, barely feelable, and makes it quick release for quick photo ops!
Very nice camera spec wise,the 5 axis stabilization will be killer!
 

arturo garcia

Pilgrim/Hospitalero/Mountain guide/Photographer
Camino(s) past & future
French way (Dic. 2012), Portuguese way (Dic.2013) and now living on the Camino.
I wonder why Sebastiao Salgado (I got the chance to be with him in a 45 days expedition in the Amazon) or Steve mc Curry are not using iphone or P&S instead a heavy DSLR or Mirrorless camera. It clearly depends on which kind of photography results are you looking for. Photography is an art, the iphone or P&S think for you, there is no art in that by just pressing a button.
 

William Garza

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, The Jakobsweg
I would use my brownie camera if i could..but it sure is nice making clean and clear poster size prints from my big,heavy,old technology DSLR
 

BeatriceKarjalainen

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: See post signature.
Upcoming: Nothing planned
Hi again guys!

I was wondering, how do you carry your camera on the camino? I want mine accessible at all times so I don't want to stuff it in my pack and I'm looking for a way to strap outside somehow.

I bought a Peak Desing clip but it feels really unnatural when dangling from the belt or straps. Just letting it hang from the neck is obviously not an option either.

Do any of you have an homemade/original solution for this ?

Thank's again for your input!

Max
I have made a lightweight camera bag that I attach to the backpack with S-hooks so the weight isn't on my neck. Have the camera on my front. https://beastankar.blogspot.com/2018/08/ny-kameravaska-till-vandringen.html My backpack have a strap (from the shoulder straps) that I clip together in a loop on hte back of the bag so it doesn't bounce.
 

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