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Re Umbrellas?

windeatt

Active Member
#1
I'm tempted to take an umbrella. I've found them useful in the past when it is raining - especially for evenings/rest days. I also wondered - for this trip - if one might be useful on those bits where you have to walk in the sun and there is no shade?

. . . but - even though mine only weighs 138g - it's still 138g more than I really want to carry . . .

What do people think?

Windy.
 

Trudy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2006) Roncesvalles to Leon (2007) Leon to Compostela
#3
I have a lightweight travel umbrella which I took last year, and used. It will be with me again this year.

It was invaluable keeping the sun off me on a couple of really hot, windless, days. And was also useful after a days walking, when sightseeing in the rain, and I didn't want to wear a rainjacket.
 

marktqm

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2006)
#4
An umbrella is a good idea, if the weight won't be a problem. Next time (if there is a next time) I'll be bringing one myself.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#5
Windy, don't think twice, take it, please take it :!: (am serious) I have a friend who looks absolutely regal walking the Caminos with his umbrella! Just to look at him walking with it, brought much needed smiles when we badly needed them. Isn't that interesting, how a simple object like that, which I have not seen often enough in the Caminos, can make one so :D :!: Best, xm 8)
 
#6
Umbrellas designed for backpacking.

Here is an umbrella designed for backpacking:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin ... eview.html

In case you are still interested.

Personally I suspect it would most appropriate in the hot summer months so as to provide cooler shade to walk under, rather than just for rain protection. Besides, if it is really hot, often it is more refreshing just to walk in the rain without rain gear.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#9
Umbrellas

Perhaps an umbrella cap would be a worthwhile purchase?
If you type 'umbrella cap' into a google image search you will be offered thousands of pictures of umbrella hats.
(Not to be worn on a windy day!)
 

Minkey

Active Member
#11
I don't see the point of extra things to carry.

Re: Rosary beads... A) they don't take up that much space and B) I think that remark is particularly unpleasant.
 

Minkey

Active Member
#13
The reference to rosaries.

If you've got a hat, a poncho/rain jacket, what is the point in having an umbrella? (bringing the thread back on topic)
 
#14
I have walked the Camino in June and November and again this last May.
For my last pilgrimage I took an umbrella for the first time. It was THE most useful piece of kit that I have ever had with me. No need for capes, just a light watherproof and the umbrella took care of the rest as well as the backpack. The face is kept dry and uncluttered and thus nice and cool.
Try sewing a strap loop to your shoulder strap on the rucksack to put your hand that is holding the umbrella into so that the wieght of the arm
doesn't become tiresome. This is no joke subject. Do it. :)
 
#15
Hallo

Am not sure an umbrella is of use, when there is heavy wind along with heavy rain. especially in the hilly regions of the camino, o-cebreiro, foncebaddon. It would become a liability rather than an asset


I for one would not take it. But thats my opinion.

Cheers
 
#16
"In Lieu of..."

Minkey said:
The reference to rosaries.

If you've got a hat, a poncho/rain jacket, what is the point in having an umbrella? (bringing the thread back on topic)
The umbrella can be used in lieu of the poncho/rain jacket-particularly for the warmer months- and not used along with those aforementioned items. Depending upon the weight of one's poncho/rain jacket, smallish umbrellas designed for hiking just might become a weight savings as well. They are not for everyone, and perhaps not for every season, either.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#18
Umbrellas

Idf this is a trick question, there are three (maybe more) possible replies.

a) Because the rain in Spain falls mainly on the granjero?
b) Because the granjero never walks el camino?
c) Because they all saw Mary Poppins on Rtve?
 
#19
If you read Clear Waters Rising - A Mountain Walk across Europe (Santiago to Istanbul) by Nicholas Crane you will see one man who agrees with the umbrella tactic.
ISBN-10: 0140243321
ISBN-13: 978-0140243321



He has since done documentaries on Historic Maps and Coast and still carries one everywhere.

It is not everyone's idea of the right way but don't knock it till you've tried it.

William
 
#20
But Nick (who lives just 5 minutes walk away from me) is a much tougher character altogether, having been camping outdoors since his childhood and his idea of a decent walk is disappearing up into some remote mountains with a three-day supply of bread, cheese and meat

And his first major walk was done years before Gore-Tex pac-lite and restrictions on hand baggage on airlines
 

windeatt

Active Member
#22
Hi again
- Just thought I would round this off - I did take it and it WAS useful. It was useful for walking in the rain (we did a lot of that) but especially for sightseeing in towns when it was quite warm and we were in t-shirts but subject to frequent short downpours.

I also used it when the sun got a bit hot . . .
http://www.suzielda.com/camino/viewphot ... =TC48C1089
http://www.suzielda.com/camino/viewphot ... =TC10C1071
http://www.suzielda.com/camino/viewphoto.php?id=TC10C11
http://www.suzielda.com/camino/viewphot ... d=TC10C601
http://www.suzielda.com/camino/viewphot ... d=TC10C307

P.S. I read that Nick Crane book on his walk across the mountains of Europe and he bought his umbrella in Santiago and dubbed it 'Que Chova' (What rain?). He also used it instead of a tent when sleeping up on the mountains and as a walking stick substitute for poking at things, balancing and fending off dogs and bears.

Windy
 
#23
Nick bought his first umbrella in London before he set off - so the Santiago one was a replacement after he'd walked across the Pyrenees - but he was climbing rather serious mountains and living for a couple of days on bread and cheese whilst out of reach of shops - by contrast the Camino from SJPP to Santiago is a series of relatively gentle day walks (apart from a couple of steady climbs) with shops and accomodation almost always close at hand (less so in the meseta) - I was fortunate in that I encountered very little rain and passed only a few docile dogs along the way
 

windeatt

Active Member
#24
Oh, in the book I read he started in Finisterre and got rained on all the way to Santiago and so bought an umbrella there before setting off along and up and down the moutain ranges of northern Spain towards the Pyrenees. Well, in fact he didn't have to buy it because it was given as a present by the manufacturers.

But many thanks, Spurs, for the reassurance that the way from the SJPP to Santiago is 'relatively gentle'. We did Le Puy to Pamplona and found that quite taxing. There was lots of rain and quite a few angry dogs. I'm hoping the next section in Spain will be easier . . .
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#25
windeatt said:
But many thanks, Spurs, for the reassurance that the way from the SJPP to Santiago is 'relatively gentle'. I'm hoping the next section in Spain will be easier . . .
"Relatively gentle?" Yeah...kind of like a swift kick in the pants is relatively gentle compared to a baseball bat upside the head...;-) Galicia wasn't easy, and while there are some flat stages between Pamplona and there, you can count on some hard ones as well.

I dunno...maybe I'm getting old, but "gentle" didn't enter my mind very much on the Way (I started in St. Jean and made it to Santiago about 40 days later). If you did Le Puy to Pamplona, then I'm sure you'll be fine - but don't expect a cakewalk. :arrow:
 

windeatt

Active Member
#26
Well, you're not alone, vinotinto, I'm definitely getting old if not already there. I did do Santiago to Finisterre and that wasn't too bad (although I was having my luggage carried for that bit - took the old man along for those last four days and he couldn't hack the packing light and carrying stuff - so we used a company). I won't expect a cakewalk then - thanks!
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
#27
....only neggy I have on Umbrellas is getting poked in the eye with one of those ribs, just another thing I have to turn the other cheek too :wink: , but as someone(Anthony Hopkins) said, oh well I've got a spare one on the other side :mrgreen:

......with continuous muggy drizzzzzle they are perfect :D/just needing some shade :D

Buen Camino
 

ouroboros

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from St. Jean to Santiago (2012)
Camino Portuguese Porto-Santiago (2017)
#28
I carried a Go-Lite Chrome Dome umbrella on the CF from St. Jean to Santiago and thought is was the most useful thing in my pack. At 227grams (8 ounces) it was worth its weight many times over.
I used it on the Meseta and on hot days in the relentless sun in late September, sharing it with my husband and it covered us both. The silver material on the outside reflects sun's rays and makes it several degrees cooler under the umbrella. We ended up in Santiago 34 days later on October 30, walking in rainy, windy fall weather. It holds up well in wind and rain bursts as it is designed as a trekking umbrella. There are no metal parts in the ribs, only flexible plastic and I think it is brilliant!
If the wind bent it, I just smoothed out the ribs in the closed position, no harm done.
Through rainy Galicia it was invaluable on and off the Way and I used it in conjunction with a light, cheap poncho and windbreaker/water resistant anorak. No rain pants or gaiters required, so it saved me much rain gear weight in my pack. My husband used the Altus poncho, which was great, of course, but I had more versatility in the on/off rainy day walks.
 

ouroboros

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from St. Jean to Santiago (2012)
Camino Portuguese Porto-Santiago (2017)
#30
That's the one! Thanks Abbeydore!

You can see the "chrome" effect on the outside which reflects the sun's rays away.
And you can see that it is capacious enough to cover two people, or one person and
backpack. I tended to thrust the back portion over my pack and let the handle
rest against my chest in an easy balancing fashion. It has a loop for the wrist
which I almost cut off but am glad I didn't as it hangs nicely on the wrist for quick
access and doesn't interfere with one's gait at all.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2011), Camino Portugués (2013), Camino St. Jaume (2013)
#31
I loved the Go-Lite umbrella and am glad I had it when walking the Camino in Sept and Oct 2011. It was cooler to use than a hat and I could shade more of me with it than a visor could. Very often, I was the envy of other pilgrims.

It is very strong for its weight and I had no problems using it on windy days.
 
A

AJ

Guest
#32
Re:

Minkey said:
If you've got a hat, a poncho/rain jacket, what is the point in having an umbrella? (bringing the thread back on topic)
You don't need a poncho or rain jacket if you have an umbrella. An umbrella doesn't make you sweat. BUT not so good in strong winds.

I carried a goretex jacket for more than 5000 km and wore it twice. I wouldn't be without my umbrella.
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
#33
Re: Re:

AJ said:
Minkey said:
If you've got a hat, a poncho/rain jacket, what is the point in having an umbrella? (bringing the thread back on topic)
You don't need a poncho or rain jacket if you have an umbrella. An umbrella doesn't make you sweat. BUT not so good in strong winds.

I carried a goretex jacket for more than 5000 km and wore it twice. I wouldn't be without my umbrella.
& if you suffer from claustrophobia(with those poncho hoods) then a brollie must be the bees-knees :D , being able to look around with free-will!
 

ouroboros

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from St. Jean to Santiago (2012)
Camino Portuguese Porto-Santiago (2017)
#34
Re: Re:

Minkey said:
& if you suffer from claustrophobia(with those poncho hoods) then a brollie must be the bees-knees :D , being able to look around with free-will!

Yes, I personally do not fare well wearing hats of any sort.
I can tolerate them, but I prefer not to wear them for any extended time.
Hence the umbrella was perfect.

Yes, I too was the envy (and sometimes butt of gentle jokes) of other pilgrims,
especially when shading myself on a scorching day.
 

ffp13

Addicted pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Caminos: 2009 SJPP, 2011 Roncessvalle , 2012 Pamploma, 2013 Roncessvalle, 2013 Porto, 2014 Burgos, 2014 Porto

Future: Roncessvalle
#36
I have never used an umbrella on the Camino, but I have walked a few days with an elderly Spanish gentleman from Sydney , at first I thought it was a silly idea to take an umbrella, but my opinion soon changed, it kept his pack dry and provided shade, it was quick to use for sudden showers and pack up. He keg it strapped outside his pack.
 

ward4e

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
APR 2012... Future APR 2014?
#37
I ended up using my umbrella a a ton of times over the way... The first day I used it was a wind break and spray shield walking over to Roncesvalles. It was so successful that two other pilgrims were walking beside me keeping in the leeward side of the shield.

The umbrella provided enough cover on drizzly days for myself an my bag and my raincoat was generally tucked over the top. Later on when walking the meseta I ran out of sunscreen, a near fatal error for a ginger. So once again umbrella to the rescue and I notice it was easier walking in the shade... :)

I think for the future I will take a larger sturdy semi golf sized umbrella and rig it to my back pack with some cable ties!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#38
only problem with an umbrella is it usually requires a hand to hold it. For the True Believers of the Pacer Pole/two-hiking-pole faction, this is a clear challenge. Walking with two poles is a commitment... are you willing to risk sun and rain to hang on to your beloved sticks? Will you continue on through the storm encased in the sauna-like embrace of a plastic poncho, your hands firmly held in the familiar grips? Or will you lay aside your poles, and be seduced away by these silvery shiny contraptions?
 

freescot

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
La Plata (2010) Portuguese from Coimbra(2010) Levante (2011) La Lana (2013) Francés from Roncevalles to Molinasaca then the Camino de Invierno (2014)
#40
Just to revive this thread for those planning for the first time. My partner always walks with an umbrella and encouraged me to do so. I resisted for two years but bought a small one in an Oxfam shop in Kendal spurred the Lake district rain when I was in the middle of a long camino.
Back in Spain, I use fingers instead of rosary beads and exchanged my North Face 2kg rucksack for a 1kg Go-lite and took along my 400g Oxfam umbrella. On the Ruta de La Lana I had plenty of snow and rain and on the Francés, after Burgos, more rain and snow (May last year). It was a great help and in driving snow helped me see where I was going by keeping the snow off my glasses.
 

evanlow

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances06
Primitivo07
Plata08
Norte12
Levante(14-15)
Vasco16
Mozarabe(16-17)
Madrid17
Portuguese18
#41
I'd substituted the rain poncho with an umbrella on my last Camino and it was really useful. Since my rugsack already has it's own raincover the umbrella is only for me. Advantages:

1. No worries about face getting wet.
2. Rain that last just minutes or sporadically you don't need to put on/off the hot poncho.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
#42
Wind driven rain turns the umbrella inside out.
How do you stay dry then if you do not have any rain gear?
I have seen many inside out umbrellas discarded along the path.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata 2010, Camino de Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo 2013, Olvidado, Invierno 2014
#43
Wind driven rain turns the umbrella inside out.
How do you stay dry then if you do not have any rain gear?
I have seen many inside out umbrellas discarded along the path.
Umbrellas does indeed turn themselves inside out when it's windy, but then it's only to turn them back right again. Which is done in a few seconds.
The best umbrellas I think are these small telescopic lightweight ladies umbrellas, as they can be turned inside out many times without getting broken. I carried umbrellas on all my caminos and had no problems with them.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
#44
I actually was thinking of the problem of strong winds and rain on the Meseta as an example. It would be constantly turned inside out no matter how many times you turned it back.
I have walked many days on Caminos in both France and Spain where an umbrella just would not work.
I think an umbrella makes good sense and take a lightweight one with me.
My point is that leaving all other rain gear at home and JUST taking an umbrella could mean a lot of very wet days.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata 2010, Camino de Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo 2013, Olvidado, Invierno 2014
#45
I actually was thinking of the problem of strong winds and rain on the Meseta as an example. It would be constantly turned inside out no matter how many times you turned it back.
I have walked many days on Caminos in both France and Spain where an umbrella just would not work.
I think an umbrella makes good sense and take a lightweight one with me.
My point is that leaving all other rain gear at home and JUST taking an umbrella could mean a lot of very wet days.
But it does work. You must hold the umbrella close to you, and hide under it, while walking towards the wind. Then it won't turn inside out. If it's really windy then it's like walking inside a bell.
I will leave my rain jacket at home next camino (walking in June-July) as I'm tired of it.
Will get back with a report of how wet I got.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#46
I laughed at people carrying umbrellas until I carried one this year.
Now I will never walk without one!

I bought a long stationary umbrella (not a folding one) in Spain for 8 euros.
It was very sturdy.
I just latched it to my pack and it wasn't a problem.

I used it when it rained and stayed perfectly dry.
I used it in the sun and walked in the shade when others were sweltering.

I loved it!
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#47
I am a fervent advocate of the umbrella. Any spectacle wearer will benefit and in some strange way a dry face makes wet feet tolerable. Yes strong winds can be a problem but i crossed the Meseta with my 'brolly mostly held side-ways. It's in urban environments with turbulent winds that umbrellas face their greatest challenges, out in the wild world in sustained directional winds they are a wonderful way of moderating your environment.

They are also really useful for "wooshing" over territorial dogs.
 
#48
I took my small lightweight umbrella on my second camino and now never do one without it. It's especially useful in the evenings when I go for a walk round because I usually walk in the winter and it always rains, especially in Santiago.
Liz
 
Camino(s) past & future
Tunnel Le Puy Via De Plata Ingles Primitivo Norte Frances Portuguese Fisterra Muxia hospitalero
#49
I like the idea but only from a fashion perspective....
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#50
I like the idea but only from a fashion perspective....
The first time you walk in the summer sun with one, you may change your mind.
I swear it was 20 degrees cooler under that umbrella.
I didn't feel the sun, just the cool breeze, while others were sweating and burning.
Anyway, it was also fashionably PURPLE! ::laughing::
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#53
Do you mean you found a way to hook it to your pack to have hands free???

...or just lashing on your pack when not using?
I have a top loading pack with straps on the sides.
I just stuck it in the side straps (hook end up) along with my bread and could pull it out when I needed it.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
#54
I have a top loading pack with straps on the sides.
I just stuck it in the side straps (hook end up) along with my bread and could pull it out when I needed it.
......I had hoped you had worked out a way to hook it to your pack while it was up and leave both hands free...

I did manage to do this a bit on the VdlP in August but it was not comfortable as I just had the handle stuck under my shoulder strap.
Some needs to get clever ....
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#55
http://caminosantiago2.blogspot.com/2014/01/an-umbrella-for-camino.html

Ohhhhh… well, I actually did do that and it worked fine.
I shoved it into the side straps and walked with both hands free much of the time unless it was windy.

Also, as you'll see in the photo on the blog, I could stick it in the front straps too.

A couple of small bungie cords might be a good thing?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Tunnel Le Puy Via De Plata Ingles Primitivo Norte Frances Portuguese Fisterra Muxia hospitalero
#56
The first time you walk in the summer sun with one, you may change your mind.
I swear it was 20 degrees cooler under that umbrella.
I didn't feel the sun, just the cool breeze, while others were sweating and burning.
Anyway, it was also fashionably PURPLE! ::laughing::
Purple!!!----sweeeet!
 

AZgirl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2012 , via de la Plata 2014
Madrid/frances Sept/Oct 2017
Next : Levante Sept 2019
#57
I'm fan of umbrellas, mostly for shade. Use them not only hiking here in the desert, but parades, sporting events etc. I didn't have one when I did the Frances, but am planning on one this time. Can they be brought as carry ons?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#58
I'm fan of umbrellas, mostly for shade. Use them not only hiking here in the desert, but parades, sporting events etc. I didn't have one when I did the Frances, but am planning on one this time. Can they be brought as carry ons?
Well, that's what I didn't want to mess with.
So I just bought mine there.
They have awesome umbrellas in Spain for very little cash.
Nice sturdy ones.
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
#59
If you think you will need it - take it. Nicholas Crane finds his invaluable on his hikes - I recommend 'Two Degrees West' as a particularly good read! A brolly could be useful in so many circumstances, shelter from rain, sun, a privacy shade for changing or peeing... Each to their own I say.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Too many caminos to list in the permitted 100 characters!!
#60
Last year I took a small, folding umbrella: no problems taking it on the 'plane. And I used it several times. So useful when it starts to rain for a short period - better than taking off the back-pack, getting out the poncho, putting on the poncho, putting on the back-pack cover, putting the back-pack back on, then ...... for heaven's sake, it's stopped raining! Take off the back-pack ....... etc etc ;)
I'll certainly take one this May/June.
If I take a brolly, maybe that'll make sure it doesn't rain!
 

kathrynwb

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis (2013);
Camino Portuguese (2016)
#61
I took an umbrella with me when I walked last Oct./Nov. It was the best thing I took with me! Many days when it was raining but warm out I used the umbrella instead of putting on rain gear which would have overheated me. Wouldn't walk without it.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#62
Very handy in the evening, but it is 8 oz. that now always ends up in the nice to have pile in the cull to lower pack weight.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#63
Last year I took a small, folding umbrella: no problems taking it on the 'plane. And I used it several times. So useful when it starts to rain for a short period - better than taking off the back-pack, getting out the poncho, putting on the poncho, putting on the back-pack cover, putting the back-pack back on, then ...... for heaven's sake, it's stopped raining! Take off the back-pack ....... etc etc ;)
I'll certainly take one this May/June.
If I take a brolly, maybe that'll make sure it doesn't rain!
I shower proofed our fleeces reversible linings with a spray-on proofer - worked well. Our ponchos throw on over our packs and cover everything. If we were walking in the heat then a 'parasol' would be good. My Argentine umbrella was waterproof but was actually sold as a sunshade and mostly used as that. Old fashioned stick style so not suited to the Camino.
Yes - take yours Stephen and keep the rain away - hopefully not just while you are there :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Past? Not enough.
Future? Sure!
#64
I confess that I'm (still ?) not a member of the electric coil club, but I'm definitively an adept of the umbrella congregation.
Anyone with glasses will quickly understand me!

Cheers, Jacques-D.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#65
I shower proofed our fleeces reversible linings with a spray-on proofer - worked well. Our ponchos throw on over our packs and cover everything. If we were walking in the heat then a 'parasol' would be good. My Argentine umbrella was waterproof but was actually sold as a sunshade and mostly used as that. Old fashioned stick style so not suited to the Camino.
Yes - take yours Stephen and keep the rain away - hopefully not just while you are there :)
Oh, I LOVED my old fashioned stick style! Not much heavier and so much more convenient for me. Sturdier too!
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#66
Oh, I LOVED my old fashioned stick style! Not much heavier and so much more convenient for me. Sturdier too!
I love it at home, but on the Camino with my walking pole I like my other hand free. My Grandmother always carried an umbrella, I think for her it was like but better than a walking stick although she did use one of those when in her 90s. Maye I'll reverse her thinking, if I am still walking in my 90s and carry an umbrella then ;)
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#67
I may never have taken a handier item than my umbrella. However, when I am out to save half a pound, I always cast it aside these days. It kept many a raindrop from dropping down my neck in a hot summer rain, but I always had something else that would do the same thing -- my hat, my windbreaker, or my poncho. It was a half pound I loved, but a half pound I did not NEED. I would take it every time if I were not "weight sensitive." Chacun a son gout.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Too many caminos to list in the permitted 100 characters!!
#68
I confess that I'm (still ?) not a member of the electric coil club, but I'm definitively an adept of the umbrella congregation.
Anyone with glasses will quickly understand me! Cheers, Jacques-D.
Jacques - I sympathise 100%. I wear glasses all the time except when asleep, and don't enjoy groping my way in the rain.
As for the electric coil club ... it sounds like a painful form of contraception to me ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 26 (2014)
#69
Thanks for all the very helpful comments. My husband, daughter Michelle, and I will be starting from St. Jean Pied de Port on May 24. My husband and I are inclined to bring umbrellas.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Tunnel Le Puy Via De Plata Ingles Primitivo Norte Frances Portuguese Fisterra Muxia hospitalero
#70
Just came back from 6 weeks in Spain where I completed the Camino Primitivo, Camino Sanabrese and the Camino Rebekah (Pamplona to Moratinos). My lovely blue umbrella was used on a number of occasions, including a charming post shower walk to dinner on the Sanabrese. On that occasion, the apparent elegance of the moment lifted my spirits considerably.
I would bring it again, and it really doesn't have that much to do with keeping dry.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#71
We firmly believe in taking an umbrella! We bought our first one in Leon back in 2009, when in the pouring rain, our flimsy Chinese rain capes ended their days with fabric fatigue.
Since then, we have always taken it (it's a big one, that we both can fit under).
It has been used far more when walking under the hot sun. It brings the temp way down and makes walking bearable, especially when there are no trees around.
This year, I have bought two lighter weight collapsible ones, made of a special anti-sun material. Still have to try them out! Anne
 

Gigipro

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Coming this month - June 2018. Deciding route.
#72
Umbrellas

Perhaps an umbrella cap would be a worthwhile purchase?
If you type 'umbrella cap' into a google image search you will be offered thousands of pictures of umbrella hats.
(Not to be worn on a windy day!)[/QUOTE

Not to be worn on a windy day? It could be nice to see the camino from above like the flying nun. I think the idea sells me on umbrella hats. : )
 
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