A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Camino Forum Donation

Recommendations for Albergues between Santiago and Finisterre and Muxia

Lee R. Jordan Jr.

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2017)
I have seen the excellent lists of albergues on the Camino Frances. I would like to continue walking after Santiago, so does anyone know of a list of albergues between Santiago and Finisterre, and Finisterre and Muxia? Any help would be appreciated.

Lee
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
The tourist office in Santiago has (had in 2015) a handout for walking to Finesterre/Muxia. I actually forget whether it had a list of albergues or not but it did have the towns to stop in. The handout was all I needed to do the walk.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Via Tolosana
The tourist office in Santiago has (had in 2015) a handout for walking to Finesterre/Muxia. I actually forget whether it had a list of albergues or not but it did have the towns to stop in. The handout was all I needed to do the walk.
Yes there is a list of albergues and it's from the Galician tourist office.

Rúa do Vilar, 30-32, 15705 Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Yes there is a list of albergues and it's from the Galician tourist office.
Thank you @domigee. With that I decided to link (as usual) to a map and then I decided to go all out.

Santiago Tourist Office

Oficina de Turismo de Santiago de Compostela
Rúa do Vilar, 30-32
15705 Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain
+34 981584081
ot.santiago@xunta.es
http://www.turismo.gal/ficha-recurso?langId=en_US&cod_rec=19600&ctre=160
https://mappingsupport.com/p/gmap4.php?ll=42.878845,-8.544530&z=17&t=h
 

JRO

Member
Camino(s) past & future
santiago to muxia
I have seen the excellent lists of albergues on the Camino Frances. I would like to continue walking after Santiago, so does anyone know of a list of albergues between Santiago and Finisterre, and Finisterre and Muxia? Any help would be appreciated.

Lee
The comments here on where to get "a list" are correct. We walked this route in early June 2016. I can give very high marks to Bela Muxia in Muxia (beautiful, beautiful albergue and people, private suites available, but regular accommodations are fab.) In Dumbria (we went to Muxia first, then Finesterre) the municipal albergue is new, very modern, 3 roomy sleeprooms with a balcony each, and 3 bunkbeds along each wall, so 12 people per room. Lovely separate laundry room, outside lines, and mens/womens rooms with all private toilet/shower stalls. In Negreira, the municipal albergue is nice, with a kitchen and twin beds upstairs, two 1/2 baths there and large communal baths downstairs. However, it is on the other side of town, and out of the main drag, from where you enter the town....so quite a walk if you arrive tired. We chose the private El Carmen, on one of the main corners. It looks old and dark, but the upstairs sleeping rooms (2, probably 10 bunks each) have lockers and sleeping bags each bed, windows, and the baths are nice, with private toilet compartments. Showers are separated with glass panels, so not super private, but the bathrooms are sex segregated. Laundry room with washer, dryer and racks. Common room with WIFI, and vending machines. Downstairs is dining room with excellent pilgrim menu, plus a bar. Fruit market across street, super market 1/2 block. And a wide spot in the road between two towns (can't remember) Casa Pepa, mentioned in Brierly's Muxia/Finesterre guide. Casa Pepa has lovely owners and is an experience. Be prepared, however, for an old, stone cottage with one room and about 10 twins and 8 bunks. One bathroom with two private toilet and shower stalls, shared sinks. Two 1/2 baths off the downstairs restaurant. Great food, just a little rural experience. We felt well cared for, but it was crowded the night we were there. Outside laundry with lines, a hose and large washtub. Nice place to sit at outside tables. And finally, in Finesterre, we stayed at a pension in town that we booked on Booking.com. The only thing I remember is that it was above a sporting goods store, and the lady ran the store and the pension. Rooms were very clean, twin beds, nice baths/showers. We slept well there, and our room was right above the street - a bit noisy into the night but a fabulous value, and just having our own room felt luxurious.

You will no doubt find your own albergue experiences, but perhaps if you enter one of these towns and see one of the afore-mentioned places you will find the descriptions helpful for your needs. Buen Camino!
 

clearskies

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Here and there
I walked to Finisterre last month and there were a number of albergues I stayed in and enjoyed.
- Albergue Alecrin, Negriera
- Albergue Casa Pepa, Santa Marina
- Albergue Bar O Logoso, O Logoso
- Albergue Cabo da Villa, Finisterre

I didn't make it to Muxia but I hear Bela Muxia is recommended.

Buen Camino!
 

Yellowfriend

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Porto- Santiago / Fisterra- Muxia sept 2016
SJPP- Santiago may 2017planninh
There is a very nice B&B in lires, halfway Muxia and Fisterra, we stayed there for Some days after finishlijn my Camino from Porto.
Is is Casa Raúl, they have a website. It is very very nice and good atmosphere and also a stamp point. There is. Alberque closeby also in Lires.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
Is is Casa Raúl, they have a website. It is very very nice and good atmosphere and also a stamp point. There is. Alberque closeby also in Lires.
Great stop and all should visit both Finisterre and Muxia

- Albergue Casa Pepa, Santa Marina
- Albergue Bar O Logoso, O Logoso
Both are very good , in the country and outside of the normal stages.

high marks to Bela Muxia in Muxia
A great way to finish , only a few years old and brilliant from day one.

We have walked this 4 times after getting to Santiago.
We return to SDC after we reach and stay in Muxia.
We had a wonderful stay in Roxos on 2 occasions after having lunch in SDC.
Its only a few hours walk and the accommodation in both Hotels [Amador and O' Desivo] is deserved after the 800km.
From Casa Pepa in Santa Marina we reached Dumbria , lovely and new.

help would be appreciated.
Take your time Lee R in this final stage...... stay in the best rooms you can ......... dine in the best restaurants attached in these villages and when you reach Muxia sit in the church for 30 minutes , feel very proud and wipe that little tear away.
Buen Camino
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Walking across the hills towards Cee you can at last glimpse the sea! Near-by a re-purposed schoolhouse serves as a favorite simple, welcoming albergue at San Roque/Corcubion. From their dorm window glimpsing the distant lighthouse beacon at Finisterre shining at night was magical.

Next morning I have always walked the last kilometers down into Finisterre and out to that lighthouse mentally saying adieu to 'my' camino. At the final rocks I silently gave thanks and then in the nearby bar treated myself to a flute of champagne, toasting all who helped to make such a journey possible. Watching the sea I would slowly sip savoring the moments.

When that glass was empty it was time to turn back towards home.
 
Last edited:

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Walking across the hills towards near Cee you can at last glimpse the sea! Near-by a re-purposed schoolhouse serves as a favorite simple, welcoming albergue at San Roque/Corcubion. From their dorm window glimpsing the distant lighthouse beacon at Finisterre shining at night was magical.

Next morning I have always walked the last kilometers down into Finisterre and out to that lighthouse mentally saying adieu to 'my' camino. At the final rocks I silently gave thanks and then in the nearby bar treated myself to a flute of champagne, toasting all who helped to make such a journey possible. Watching the sea I would slowly sip savoring the moments.

When that glass was empty it was time to turn back towards home.
Indeed, San Roque looks like an absolutely gorgeous place, the only problem is, it is past the town of Corcubión, and if there is no room you will have to retrace your steps back to Corcubión or Cee, which might not be very appealing after a long day. I would have loved to stay there, but I chose instead the safety of booking (a very common practice in this particular camino) in O Bordón, in Cee, an albergue in exceptional condition, whose owner is a pilgrim himself, Pedro, 100% nice and helpful, it was my favourite albergue in the whole Santiago-Fisterra stretch.
In general, you will be spoilt for choice in this camino!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Indeed, San Roque looks like an absolutely gorgeous place, the only problem is, it is past the town of Corcubión, and if there is no room you will have to retrace your steps back to Corcubión or Cee, which might not be very appealing after a long day. I would have loved to stay there, but I chose instead the safety of booking (a very common practice in this particular camino) in O Bordón, in Cee, an albergue in exceptional condition, whose owner is a pilgrim himself, Pedro, 100% nice and helpful, it was my favourite albergue in the whole Santiago-Fisterra stretch.
In general, you will be spoilt for choice in this camino!
San Roque is a bit special place as you have to climb from the sea shore high up above and there's no infrastructure so stock up. The last chance is in the bar to the left at the plaza a little bit before entering that narrow uphill path. But if it is full this July I saw offers for pilgrims at 15€ for a bed in Estorde and also in Sardineiro. And that's really not so far from San Roque and for me even nicer with its beaches.

Ah, O Bordon in Cee, that hospitalero was really weird. It was very hot and dump in the kitchen as I was writing my journal and sending e-mails so I opened the windows and nice gentle flow of afternoon wind got into it. Everytime I went outside for a smoke the hospitalero turned up and closed the windows. And when I returned I'd opened them again. And when I was for another smoke the thing repeated. He saw me standing in front of the building but still that went on for hours. Not a word spoken to me or anything... Creepy... ;):rolleyes:
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
haha, weird story about the hospitalero, indeed! Maybe he does not speak a lot of English.
 

AcrossTheWater3008

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances x 2 - 2016, 2017
C Portuguese x 2 2016, 2017
C Muxia/Finisterra x 2 2016, 17
CdM
Definitely albergue Bela Muxia in Muxia, and dont forget to dine at the D Alvaro restaurant whilst there..... sensational food!
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
the new albergue in vilaserio, Casa Vella. beautifully restored old house (including a stone fireplace), very welcoming owners, roofed space for drying clothes, good dinner (they don't have a kitchen, despite what consumer site says, but they still let me warm up a dish I brough along).

Casa da Fonte in cee. very nice owners (pilgrims, so they know what you need), lots of space, really good beds (I loved the lower pillows), very well equipped kitchen, lovely sitting area. the dorm is fairly lit at night from the street, but I slept very well.

O Logoso in logoso. cause it was getting chillier in the evening, hospitalero lit the fireplace that heats the albergue. it was very cosy congregating around it. okay kitchen.
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Camino(s) past & future
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
Everytime I went outside for a smoke the hospitalero turned up and closed the windows. And when I returned I'd opened them again. And when I was for another smoke the thing repeated.
Maybe he was allergic to cigarette smoke?
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Camino(s) past & future
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
I would highly recommend Albergue turístico de Logrosa. There are dorm beds and private rooms, everything was very clean and warm, and a wonderful dinner accompanied by wine late into the night. In Muxia, hotel de encanto a de lolo both for their relaxing rooms (and they will make sure no one feels they've lost the internet) and their delicious restaurant.
 

MonaLisa

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF , SJPP to Santiago Sept/Oct 2016
I have seen the excellent lists of albergues on the Camino Frances. I would like to continue walking after Santiago, so does anyone know of a list of albergues between Santiago and Finisterre, and Finisterre and Muxia? Any help would be appreciated.

Lee
OCEANUS in FINISTERRE IS THE PLACE!!!!
I have just returned... The morning that I was to depart Santiago for Finisterre, I overheard a perigrina telling someone of the most wonderful Albergue in Finisterre... "Excuse me? May I please have the name again?" After much praises of the facility she added: "... and ocean view!" This gem is named Oceanus... Your cubicle has it's own light and pluggings, the place is new, clean, has a great kitchen and a perfect Mercado across the street... Men and women showers are separated, wash machines AND the very best part is the hospetalerio, the joyous, helpful, welcoming, kind and amazing Diego! He loves his job! Very proud of beautiful Oceanus and goes out of his way to help pilgrims find what can make their experiences, at the End of the World, a memorable one... ( The price: 13 Euro! )
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
This spring I walked from Porto to Muxia and did not want to spend a night in Santiago. I opted to stay at Casa Riamonte, a lovely home in which the ownwers have converted sections for bunk beds and a private room. We ate outside under the porch with lovely views to the garden. A good choice.

I also spent a night at Casa Pepa, the beautiful stone house mentioned above. I enjoyed the large loft where the dorm is, but the only place to lounge other than your bed is sitting at one of the two long dining room tables. The food was good, the family very helpful and hard working. As it was raining I did not do laundry and we were all stuck at the tables, And since people from other albergues near by pop in to eat it gets crowded.

Oceanus in Fisterra is new and impeccable. Also mentioned above. Run by a man and his sister inlaw and is in the family's old garage/autorepair shop. Conviniently located as you head to the center from the beach, just a 3 minute walk to the centre. Love the cubicles for each bed as well as the locable lockers.

Between Fisterra and Muxia is the already mentioned as Eiras. Mostly a restaurant with a blah menu but a large terrace outdoors you could enjoy if it's not raining. Small albergue room to the side ensures a quiet night. Very large modern bathroom.

In Muxia I stayed at the highly recommended Bella Muxia. Yes it's modern, yes it's impeccable, yes the hospi is entertaining and helpful. But the rooms are large and the albergue is not justfor pilgrims so I was kept up by loud obnoxious tourists, and drunk, who had come for the weekend and spent the evening at a bar drinking and watching a game ... Next time I will look for a smaller place.

Also in Muxia, in 2012, my walking partner stayed at A de Lolo, a boutique hotel with an excellent restaurant. Son manages, mother cooks. Since the other 3 of us had not book we did not have a place to stay so they rented us a large and beautiful appartement they own!

Of you like Percebes, the Bella Muxia hospi recommended O Prestige. If he hadn't I would not have gone as the place looks like an old tavern, quite unwelcoming. But I sat outside and was treated like a queen by the ladies running the place.

Now, someone mentioned an albergue behind the small streets where they have a foot bath. Does anyone know which albergue this is? It was highly recommended and I would like to try it next time.
 

Nanc

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (Sept 2016)
SDC/ Finesterre/ Muxia (2016)
The Albergue Arriba in Muxia was a luxury! Cherry wood bunks with wide wooden stairs to upper bunk. Privacy darkening curtains for every bed. Huge blankets. Silent auto sliding glass doors to shower and bunk rooms. Multilingual receptionist. Large foot soaking spa. Kitchen full laundry
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
The Albergue Arriba in Muxia was a luxury! Cherry wood bunks with wide wooden stairs to upper bunk. Privacy darkening curtains for every bed. Huge blankets. Silent auto sliding glass doors to shower and bunk rooms. Multilingual receptionist. Large foot soaking spa. Kitchen full laundry
Nanc,

Thank you so much for the albergue with the foot spa's name. The man I met while waiting for the return bus who stayed there raved about it. Time to grab my guide and make note of it!
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Camino(s) past & future
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
Also in Muxia, in 2012, my walking partner stayed at A de Lolo, a boutique hotel with an excellent restaurant. Son manages, mother cooks. Since the other 3 of us had not book we did not have a place to stay so they rented us a large and beautiful appartement they own!
I loved this place. If all I did was be a tourist in Spain, I would definitely go back here. food, room, hotel, vibe...all amazing. They even packed little box brunches for those of us leaving early to catch the bus back to SdC. I mentioned to them I didn't get a WiFi signal in my room and in well less than an hour someone appeared with a wifi repeater unit for my room! OMG...the parador in SdC said to me the Spanish equivalent of 'use the hall, you little pilgrim pain in the rear"...love love love A de Lolo!
 

OLDER threads on this topic


Book your lodging here

Booking.com


Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 12 1.4%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 38 4.4%
  • April

    Votes: 133 15.5%
  • May

    Votes: 206 24.0%
  • June

    Votes: 61 7.1%
  • July

    Votes: 17 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 13 1.5%
  • September

    Votes: 254 29.6%
  • October

    Votes: 102 11.9%
  • November

    Votes: 12 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.6%
Top