A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Requirements

0 Euro Camino Bank Note

mikewashburg

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2020)
I am not worried about average distances, or how many days it takes others to bike a particular Camino route. I go at my own pace. And when I find interesting things along the way I stop to take it in and explore. Or sometimes I just stop along the way to read a book, fly a kite, or whatever. So my question is: Are there requirements for how long it takes a bicigrino to arrive. If I spend 20 or even 30 days on a route that usually takes an average of 10 days, will I still qualify for a compostela as long as I ride and obtain two stamps per day for the last 200 km?
 

mikewashburg

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2020)
No rules about how long you take. Just the 200km with at least 2 stamps per day.
So I could do the last 200km in 2 days with 4 stamps, or 30 days and 60 stamps, it's all the same? And a rest day (or days) with no travel are okay too? Should you still obtain stamps on days you're not travelling?
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
So I could do the last 200km in 2 days with 4 stamps, or 30 days and 60 stamps, it's all the same? And a rest day (or days) with no travel are okay too?
Yes. All the same. No rules about daily distances. Or the number of rest days. Just make sure that you get the stamps to show that you are making your way towards Santiago at whatever speed.
 

mikewashburg

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2020)
Yes. All the same. No rules about daily distances. Or the number of rest days. Just make sure that you get the stamps to show that you are making your way towards Santiago at whatever speed.
Thanks for the response, Bradypus. The information is helpful. I want to make my first Camino all about the journey, and not how fast I get there.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Just to clarify, the requirements for biking a Camino are essentially the same as for walking. EXCEPT the required minimum distance is the FINAL 200 kilometers on any recognized / accepted route ending at the Cathedral in Santiago. That is the sole difference.

The requirement to have at least two sellos each day remains the same. So yes, you might be able to do two, consecutive “century” rides. Just make certain you obtain at least two sellos each day. I always recommend getting more than two if it is possible.

For reference, perhaps the most popular starting place for folks desiring to do a short, but qualifying (for the Compostela) bicycle Camino is to start at Ponferrada and follow the Camino Frances. IIRC this is 229 km.

But, the other reason for starting from Ponferrada is because this small city has excellent train and bus connections. It also has a support infrastructure (shops and markets) to support bicycles. There is even a Decathlon sports superstore with a large bicycle repair shop inside.

There are other starting places to accomplish the minimum 200 km requirement. But, I defer to the other cyclists in the forum for an assist.

In closing, in the I streets of comity and safety, I IMPLORE all bicycle pilgrims to use the parallel road routes INSTEAD of the off road trails that walking pilgrims use. It might be of interest to note in passing that, for much of it’s length, the N-120 carretera is the paved-over original route of the classic Camino Frances.

During the 1970s and 1980s, the present mostly off-road route was determined and marked to avoid the need for pedestrians using the road. So, while both routes cover the same daily starting and ending places, and while some of the off-road paths ARE the original path, a route that keeps both walking and cycling pilgrims separate almost all the time, is available.

This said, if you are going to cycle the Camino and you intend to share the paths and sendas with walking pilgrims PLEASE, PRETTY PLEASE, use a bell, whistle, or other LOUD signaling device to alert walking pilgrims BEFORE you overtake them.

Thank you.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
During the 1970s and 1980s, the present mostly off-road route was determined and marked to avoid the need for pedestrians using the road. So, while both routes cover the same daily starting and ending places, and while some of the off-road paths ARE the original path, a route that keeps both walking and cycling pilgrims separate almost all the time, is available.
I walked the Camino Frances in 1990 when the proportion of cyclists to walkers was actually higher than today. But the big difference was the bikes themselves. At that time cyclists used road touring bikes which would have been wrecked if they attempted many of the off-road paths. Instead they found alternative parallel routes. I think that a lot of the conflict and antagonism between cyclists and walkers on the Caminos in recent years lies in the shift towards the use of off-road mountain bikes and a corresponding determination by cyclists to make use of paths previously deemed impractical.
 

sugargypsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
First one planned for May 2019: Camino Francés
The requirement to have at least two sellos each day remains the same. So yes, you might be able to do two, consecutive “century” rides. Just make certain you obtain at least two sellos each day. I always recommend getting more than two if it is possible.
Is it also necessary to get 2 sellos a day on the second day, if for instance I arrive in Portomarin and stay there for two nights and continue then my way to SdC?
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Is it also necessary to get 2 sellos a day on the second day, if for instance I arrive in Portomarin and stay there for two nights and continue then my way to SdC?
Simple answer is YES!
 

freeflyer123

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
I rode the Camino de Santiago with my husband in 2013. We started at Bayonne and rode down to SJPdP first. I agree with T2Andreo that it's best to keep to designated roads and, indeed, we used the N120 most of the way. We did try going off-road for a short while but that was a total disaster, beginning in what had begun as a nice wide track it soon morphed into a narrow, boggy lane and we got totally lost trying to find out way back to the road, any road. We ended up walking the rest of the way until we again found a road. If you are tempted to use a path choose one that is nice and wide and you give the walkers fair warning before passing. Remember many of them are not looking out for passing traffic and often lost in their own thoughts so that someone intent on whizzing passed could cause a real scare.

I always think it's a shame when people seem so intent on getting from A to B as quickly as they can. For that, you need to enter a race. But the Camino should be enjoyed and savoured, whether walking or cycling. Stop off often, make an excuse to walk up some hills because that way you get some lovely views you might have missed otherwise. Spend time with other pilgrims and you will have a wonderful time and make some amazing memories along the way. Reaching Santiago brings its own special joys, but be mindful that you will have one regret - that all too soon it is over.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
Is it also necessary to get 2 sellos a day on the second day, if for instance I arrive in Portomarin and stay there for two nights and continue then my way to SdC?
You can get the same sello, different date. Its not a competition. If you spend two nights in the same accommodation ask them to provide you with two separately date-stamped sellos. If you spend two evenings in the same bar you can do likewise.
 

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.4%
  • February

    Votes: 6 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 43 4.0%
  • April

    Votes: 165 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 265 24.4%
  • June

    Votes: 83 7.6%
  • July

    Votes: 21 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 23 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 311 28.7%
  • October

    Votes: 134 12.4%
  • November

    Votes: 13 1.2%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.6%
Top