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Review of Engo Blister Prevention Patches

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Due to word count limits, this is posted in two parts. Part Two appears below as a separate post in this thread.

PART ONE

Engo is a company which has created a line of friction-reducing products related to various health and safety concerns. One of these products are known as “Engo Blister Patches”. This is what I will be talking about in this posted review.

I will also note that there have been a few Forum members who have successfully used this product, are enthusiastic about the Patches, and who have also posted information about Engo Blister Patches on the Forum for all to read. I mention this so that Forum readers can also seek out those postings using the Search Engine.

Let me underscore the fact that I have no vested interest in any Engo products, including the Blister Patches. I have never been in contact with the company that manufactures the product, nor do I have any wholesale or retail or stock market, etc. connections which will earn me cash if someone purchases this product.

Conclusion and Bottom Line:

When applied properly, and as a part of one’s blister prevention strategy, Engo Blister Patches can be remarkably effective at preventing or reducing the incidence of blisters. There are a few things to consider when purchasing Engo Blister Patches, including the permanence of installation, and varied experiences of this product’s usable longevity. Those concerns will be addressed.

Background

As I have mentioned in previous posted reviews, many Forum members are aware that I have been employed by various backpacking gear, footwear, and clothing manufacturers to test their products for quality assurance, usability, and the workability of modifications and prototypes. As a contracted gear tester, my reports only go to the company that has hired me for their internal use; I do not publish those reports for public consumption as reviews of those items, or to provide public recommendations. I make mention of this because as an experienced professional gear tester, I feel I have the skill set and objectivity to cut through Engo’s claims in order to examine the Blister Patches’ actual effectiveness at blister prevention.

Engo did not hire me to test their product. Nor did I inform Engo of my intentions to review their Blister Patch products. I purchased the Engo Blister Patches myself, from an online vendor.

Rationale and Motivation for the review

Blister prevention is a primary interest to Forum members, as it is to the general backpacking community. I wanted to know for myself if Engo Blister Prevention Patches effectively implements blister prevention. I also wanted to provide increased knowledge to Forum members about this product, especially if the Patches perform as marketed.

A second aspect of Engo Blister Prevention Patches grabbed my attention: They act in a manner that, if they ARE effective, replaces the need to incorporate liner or dual socks as a strategy for blister prevention. Engo Patches would perform the same function. This would be good because dual sock systems add extra heat retention to the foot which can be largely eliminated. It also removes the need of keeping track of the increased blister risk of having more sock material which can ruck and rub against the skin of the foot, sometimes undetected until it is too late.

The Manufacturers Explanation of How the Engo Blister Patch Works

On its website, Engo’s explanations of how and why the Blister Patch works appears consistent with my understanding of the known facts of how blister formation occurs, and how the risk for blistering can be reduced. In looking at the published opinions of training specialists and blister prevention experts, there is much positive regard for the Engo Blister Patch products.

There is no specific mention of how Engo manufactures the Blister Patch, or the formula for producing the product’s slick top coating. I did not research whether the Engo Blister Patch ‘ingredients’ are proprietary and patented, or whether this a new use for an existing formula.

How does Engo claim that its Blister Patches prevent blistering?


It provides a surface which is slippery to sock material. This is attached to individual problem areas of a shoe. Some people may find that they only need to apply them to one area in the shoe; others may find that they need several of the Patches installed.

The slippery surface of the Patch allows the sock to slide over the surface of that Patch. This keeps the sock in place against the foot, thereby keeping it from sliding against the skin. This eliminates the shear friction from the sock that creates a blister.


Engo Blister Patch: Testing

Note
: I do not usually blister. The appearance or absence of blisters is not important for the purposes of this testing. What is important is the ability to determine if the Engo Blister Patches function to reduce shear force friction, and the long-term durability of that effectiveness.

The test began September 2018 during training hikes then continued during a pilgrimage on Camino Frances. The testing continued after returning back home and was completed on June 5, 2019. Now, in June 2021, I have spent the last 17 days reviewing this review by testing a new batch of Engo Stuff, looking for any significant changes outside of some new sizes, and determining if the 2019 review needs any 'freshening'.

Not so surprisingly, very little has changed as to the functionality of Engo Patches and as to how they work to help prevent blisters. I feel that the first posted review is still valid as to my findings, and so is posted as it was initially written.

There were three primary reasons for my deciding to conduct this length of testing:
  • To allow me adequate time to make direct comparisons using identical insoles in the same shoes – one insole with an Engo Patch, the other without a Patch. The insoles would be swapped out every third day.
  • To allow adequate time to determine the durability of the Patches.
  • To find and test an easy and effective method for extending both the effectiveness and the longevity of the Engo Blister Patches.
The shoe I used throughout the testing period was the Hoka One One Bondi v6. I consider the materials used in the construction of the ‘upper’ part of these shoes to be like that of most trail or running-style shoes.

The insoles I used were the Timberland Pro Men's Anti-Fatigue Technology Replacement Insole. I would expect that any shoe or insole combination would have produced similar results.

The socks I wore were primarily Smartwool’s PhD light padded crew socks. I also tried socks made of various synthetics, and cotton (I do NOT advocate or recommend cotton socks for distance walking) for brief periods in order to compare their performance with the Engo Blister Patches to my Smartwool socks.

Note: Although I found that all the sock materials that I wore for the test performed as intended with the Engo Blister Patches, cotton-heavy sock fabrics would become a bit ‘grabbier’ when they became wet with either sweat or water. Wool socks and synthetic blend socks performed the best under wet conditions.

Normally, the socks I purchase and use fit snug, but not horribly tight, on my feet. This keeps the socks in place, reducing or eliminating their movement on my feet, which dramatically reduces a sock’s ability to create the shear force friction which causes blisters. As part of the test I purchased socks which were purposefully much larger than what I like to wear. I wanted socks that were very loose on my foot and would be noticeable if they slid around while walking. Why?

To help me determine the limits of the Engo Blister Patch’s effectiveness, wearing the baggy socks for a period of time during the testing was an important evaluation tool. I had to observe IF the Engo Blister Patch could prevent poorly fitting socks from sliding around over the skin on the foot and therefore still prevent blistering.

Placement of the Engo Blister Patches was just below where the tips of my toes sit at the front of the insole, to the point on the insole where the arch of the foot begins. In other words, a large portion of the forefoot area.

The Engo Blister Patches were installed about two weeks prior to leaving for Camino. I began using them on training and workout and recreation day hikes and backpacking. Conditions included dry and dusty trails, rain and wet shoes, steep uphill grades and downhill grades, rocky and rutted trails, pavement, sand, and grassy paths.

On Camino Frances, I began in St. Jean Pied de Port and ended in Santiago de Compostela. My son, Caleb, joined me in Leon and brought me a new pair of Hoka One One Bondi v6 shoes. I mailed the old pair back home. (The old shoes are far from worn out, and I am currently wearing them when I go out on day hikes).

I kept the same insoles, with the attached Engo Blister Patches, and continue to wear them the rest of the Camino. I began daily training day hikes again in March, using the same insoles with the same Patches, until just a few days ago.


Findings

Installation


Installing the Engo Patches was straight forward. I found it easy to refine the shape of the Patch for the proper fit by using scissors. The backing that covers the adhesive on the Patch was easy to remove.

I did add one additional step to the Engo instructions. I used a rag, lightly dampened with alcohol, to wipe the area of the new insoles where I would apply a Patch. I wanted to make sure that any left-over oily residue from manufacturing and handling was removed. The area was then allowed to thoroughly dry, which did not take long.

Once I positioned the Patch and pressed it into place, I made sure that I applied firm pressure to the installed Patch from the center to the outside to reduce any trapped air bubbles. Then I applied additional pressure all around the edges, as well as the center.

I choose to forgo the hair dryer option, as accidentally over-doing the heat with the dryer can harm or degrade the material of the Patch, as well as the adhesive’s holding power. I used the friction of rubbing the material with my fingers to do the job of heating the adhesive, instead.

END OF PART ONE
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
PART TWO

Performance: Blister Prevention


The primary test was how the Engo Blister Patch performed with loose (baggy) socks. If the loose sock material rubbed against the skin of my feet, then that would create the conditions for Shear Force Friction, which is the key factor for blister formation.

I started out the testing period with brand new insoles, one which had the Engo Blister Patches applied, and a pair which did not have the Patches (Plain).

For the first 14 days, during hiking conditions mentioned above, I wore baggy socks. During the first 5 days, I first established how the baggy socks moved on my feet while wearing the ‘plain’ insoles - - the insoles without the Engo Blister Patches installed. To prevent blistering, I applied Leukotape P to my feet whenever ‘hot spotting’ became noticeable.

It was quickly clear that the was significant movement of the sock as I hiked and walked using the plain insoles. The insole material ‘grabbed’ the extra material, forcing it to move. I would tighten my shoe’s laces and use various lacing patterns during the 14-day period to try and reduce that sock movement, with varying results. I found that however I tied the shoes, the loose-fitting socks would move against the skin.

Hot spotting would occur every time I hiked or walked during this testing period.

After I had established the baseline for sock movement over that first 5-day period, I swapped out the ‘plain’ insoles for the insoles which had the Engo Blister Patches applied. Other than swapping the insoles, everything else remained the same: same shoes, same loose/baggy socks, same shoelace tying patterns and tightness or looseness.

The difference in the movement of the socks against the feet was quickly noticed. There was a pronounced decrease in sock movements where the Engo Blister Patches were applied. There was still some small amount of sock movement. However, the amount of movement was not significant enough to create nearly the same level and number of hot spots on the feet. The next 9 days were spent trying to force as much movement from the socks as possible.

Even with the loose/baggy socks, it became obvious that the most decrease in sock movement happened when the shoes were tied a bit looser. This makes sense because has been known for a while now that the tighter a shoe is tied, the more likely that the insole of the shoe will force the sock to move against the foot. So even with the horribly loose/baggy socks, the combination of the Engo Blister Patches with a looser tension to the laces could eliminate blister causing hot spotting.

I found this same phenomenon with temporary applications of Engo Blister Patches to the heel and back collar areas of the shoes and replicating large amounts of heel movement. The blister prevention aspects were extremely positive.

Performance: Durability and Longevity

The cost of equipment is more than the purchase price. I evaluate the money value of my gear and clothing based on how many miles/kilometers it will last, not on its initial purchase price.

For example: I can buy a $60.00 backpack which works and feels adequate, but not great. It ends up nagging at me for the 600 miles it is usable before it breaks down. The real price of the backpack: 10 cents per mile.

Instead, I spend $225.00 on a higher-grade backpack. Better materials and construction. It feels great, it fits great, it is lighter, and it lasts me 5200 miles (about three years of use). Even though the initial purchase is greater, that backpack ends up being cheaper at .04 cents per mile.

For me, the same issue applies to Engo Blister Patches. Engo Blister Patches are not cheap. If they must be frequently replaced, the amount of money spent would really add up to a chunk of cash. So, part of what I wanted to learn from testing was how long would one Engo Patch last under the hard conditions that I put my footwear through.

For assessing durability and longevity, the tools I used consisted of visual inspections, how the Patches felt to the touch, and how quickly their effectiveness degraded.

In order to effectively spot changes to the Engo Blister Patches, I would visually and tactilely (run my fingers over them) inspect them every 5th day of wear . . . a more frequent exam would have made it difficult to discern marked changes. Using a flashlight, I would look for wear patterns. I would then feel the material for roughness and wear, and for reductions in the Patch’s lubricity or ‘slipperiness’.

The enemy to the Engo Blister Patch is what I call a ‘Scrubbing Action’. The scrubbing action occurs with each step as the sock material rubs against the Patch. The sock material itself is an extremely light abrasive, but it is the particles of micro dust, dirt, and other debris which naturally gets into the footwear and embedded into the sock fibers, that accelerates the ‘scrubbing’ action.

Engo states that the Blister Patches will last up to 300 miles. At an average cost of $2.50 usd per patch, that makes the real cost about 0.8 cents per mile. What I found for MY usage is that a Patch would remain noticeably effective for about half that stated mileage. . . 125 to 150 miles. I found this to be the case before Camino and DURING Camino. That makes the real cost of the Engo Blister Patch to me of 2 cents per mile.

I have described the test conditions which I used for the Engo Blister Patches. Others will experience differences in the products longevity due to their own unique usage patterns. Factors, such as the overall weight of the person, will affect the lifespan of the product. But overall, the cost of the Engo Blister Patches is not out-of-line when compared to some other commonly used consumable anti-blister products . . .many of which do not work well unless very frequently applied to the feet, if even then.

Modification to Engo Blister Patches

When I was at the point for replacing my Engo Blister Patches for the second time from when I had started testing them, I was taking a two-day layover in Leon. I had walked from St Jean Pied de Port, and I was waiting in Leon for my son, Caleb, to join me.

I used the lodging’s hair dryer in the bathroom to gently heat up the old Patches in order to soften the adhesive for easier removal. I slowly peeled up the old Patch so that it didn’t tear the fabric of the insole. I then used a small amount of alcohol-based hand sanitizer on a cloth to gently remove any excess, old adhesive on the insole that was left behind. It was during this chore that I started thinking of ways to improve the longevity of the Patches, and perhaps their effectiveness a bit.

I decided that trying an application of an anti-chafing/anti-blister agent to the top of the Engo Blister Patches was worth a go. The problem was, what kind? Whatever was added must work in concert with the Patches, not replace the action of the Patches. The modification would also need to be harmless to the adhesive holding the Patches in place. The last major concern was that the modification not damage the ‘slipperiness’ of the top layer of the Patch.

After I found some Body Glide, and a Compeed Blister Stick at a local outdoor store, I had four different products to consider for the modification.
  • Compeed Blister Stick
  • Body Glide
  • Hiker Goo
  • 2Toms Sports Shield

Body Glide, Compeed Blister Stick, and Hiker Goo are products which act as a coating to the skin. The coating is supposed to reduced friction between the skin and the sock to prevent shear force friction and blisters. For a variety of reasons, I do not like these types of products for anti-blister prevention. They are, however, an anti-friction product worth considering for this test.

2Toms is also a skin application product, but it is significantly different than Body Glide, Compeed, and Hiker Goo and other coating-type products. 2Toms Sports Shield is a liquid that applies wet, and then quickly dries to a very slick coating which is far more durable than the Body Glide-type products. Another significant difference is that while the Body-Glide type products have a waxy-type film which can hold onto dirt and dust particles, 2Toms has no such waxy layer.

I verified the dust and dirt capture of Compeed Blister Stick, Body Glide, and Hiker Goo by separately applying several rows of the four products on different sheets of paper. After allowing the 2Toms product to dry – as it is the only liquid – I dumped a layer of dirt onto each sheet of paper, pressed on the dirt, waited for 5 minutes, then shook each sheet of paper over the waste bucket.

Much of the dirt fell off each sheet of paper. Because each sheet keeps some of the dirt smudging, I had to try and carefully distinguish that expected dirt smudging from dirt being held by the products themselves. When all was said and done, the waxy products still retained a significant number of small particles, while I didn’t see the 2Toms trap anything.

With the new Engo Blister Patches attached to my insoles and allowing a bit of time for the adhesive to set, I applied 2Toms to the Patches. Because I carry an extra set of lightweight insoles (the ones that came with the shoes), I put those insoles into my shoes for the rest of the day’s sightseeing of Leon, and set aside the ‘walking’ insoles aside to allow the 2Toms to dry and set.

Performance: Modified Engo Blister Patch

Bottom Line:
2Toms increased the usable life of the Engo Blister Patches for me by at least 100 miles.

The wear and performance of the 2Toms modified Engo Blister Patches were evaluated as compared to the unmodified Engo Blister Patches while on the Camino Frances from Leon to Santiago de Compostela, and to the ending of the test at home on June 5, 2019.

There were two significant and interesting things that occurred with the modifications:

After the 2Toms application, I found the performance characteristics of the Engo Blister Patch lasted significantly more miles, and it also increased the desired performance for eliminating Shear Force Friction. Even though I was not wearing baggy socks but my usual Smartwool snug fitting socks, I found that I wanted to increase the tension to my shoelaces to make up for the socks sliding a bit more on the Engo Patches.

I do not know why, although I am sure the explanation is simple, but the application of the 2Toms induced a ‘squeaking’ noise when I would step off with my foot during walking. Or maybe it was just me

I began noticing a pattern to the squeaking which started occurring and started using it as a marker for when to reapply the 2Toms to the Engo Blister Patches. I made the connection - - which resulted in much laughter - - that when the ‘squeaking’ decreased in frequency, it was time to reapply 2Toms to the Patches. For me, an application would last for several days.

The very bottom line to this posted review: You are free to take from it what you will.

Last edited: Jun 7, 2021
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2017
Planning for 2021
Thanks for taking the time to write this. I wonder if a test of the 2Toms without the patches may have made an interesting comparison.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Thanks for taking the time to write this. I wonder if a test of the 2Toms without the patches may have made an interesting comparison.

:) I have used it many times without Engo patches. In fact, it was using the various anti-friction concoctions that made me wonder if there might be an effect on Engo patch longevity.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2017
Planning for 2021
:) I have used it many times without Engo patches. In fact, it was using the various anti-friction concoctions that made me wonder if there might be an effect on Engo patch longevity.
I just wondered if the 2Toms on its own may have been just as good as the patches.
However I do understand you were only testing the patches themselves and for a fair comparison would need to walk in the same conditions again. Mmm, maybe 2Toms might be prepared to finance such a test. 🤔 Well it may be a hellish way to earn a crust but someone may just have to do it😁😁😁
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
I just wondered if the 2Toms on its own may have been just as good as the patches.
However I do understand you were only testing the patches themselves and for a fair comparison would need to walk in the same conditions again. Mmm, maybe 2Toms might be prepared to finance such a test. 🤔 Well it may be a hellish way to earn a crust but someone may just have to do it😁😁😁

2Toms and Engo use differing methods to achieve the same goal. 2Toms can be very effective if applied properly.

I may be misunderstanding your questions, but I have used 2Toms for difficult blister prevention needs for quite a while. HikeGoo and Body Glide are also in my arsenal.

The advantage of Engo patches, if they do work for an individual, is that if hot spots still develop, it is easier to attach adhesive coverings to the skin; you do not need to first clean off the anti-friction goo so that the adhesive can stick.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2017
Planning for 2021
Yep I think you have confirmed my thoughts. All methods OK but use to match circumstance. I will continue to use olive oil with a dash of t-tree oil daily. Even when not hiking. It works for me.

Still think you could get a bit of sponsorship from 2Toms to give a hugely well written review on their product, maybe enough sponsorship for the hike of your dreams?😁😁

Thanks for taking the time to give us your well documented reviews.
 

Chris Gi

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Did April through June 2018 from Pamplona to Santiago.
2020 May or end of September - NO!
2021 ?
Due to word count limits, this is posted in two parts. Part Two appears below as a separate post in this thread.

PART ONE

Engo is a company which has created a line of friction-reducing products related to various health and safety concerns. One of these products are known as “Engo Blister Patches”. This is what I will be talking about in this posted review.

I will also note that there have been a few Forum members who have successfully used this product, are enthusiastic about the Patches, and who have also posted information about Engo Blister Patches on the Forum for all to read. I mention this so that Forum readers can also seek out those postings using the Search Engine.

Let me underscore the fact that I have no vested interest in any Engo products, including the Blister Patches. I have never been in contact with the company that manufactures the product, nor do I have any wholesale or retail or stock market, etc. connections which will earn me cash if someone purchases this product.

Conclusion and Bottom Line:

When applied properly, and as a part of one’s blister prevention strategy, Engo Blister Patches can be remarkably effective at preventing or reducing the incidence of blisters. There are a few things to consider when purchasing Engo Blister Patches, including the permanence of installation, and varied experiences of this product’s usable longevity. Those concerns will be addressed.

Background

As I have mentioned in previous posted reviews, many Forum members are aware that I have been employed by various backpacking gear, footwear, and clothing manufacturers to test their products for quality assurance, usability, and the workability of modifications and prototypes. As a contracted gear tester, my reports only go to the company that has hired me for their internal use; I do not publish those reports for public consumption as reviews of those items, or to provide public recommendations. I make mention of this because as an experienced professional gear tester, I feel I have the skill set and objectivity to cut through Engo’s claims in order to examine the Blister Patches’ actual effectiveness at blister prevention.

Engo did not hire me to test their product. Nor did I inform Engo of my intentions to review their Blister Patch products. I purchased the Engo Blister Patches myself, from an online vendor.

Rationale and Motivation for the review

Blister prevention is a primary interest to Forum members, as it is to the general backpacking community. I wanted to know for myself if Engo Blister Prevention Patches effectively implements blister prevention. I also wanted to provide increased knowledge to Forum members about this product, especially if the Patches perform as marketed.

A second aspect of Engo Blister Prevention Patches grabbed my attention: They act in a manner that, if they ARE effective, replaces the need to incorporate liner or dual socks as a strategy for blister prevention. Engo Patches would perform the same function. This would be good because dual sock systems add extra heat retention to the foot which can be largely eliminated. It also removes the need of keeping track of the increased blister risk of having more sock material which can ruck and rub against the skin of the foot, sometimes undetected until it is too late.

The Manufacturers Explanation of How the Engo Blister Patch Works

On its website, Engo’s explanations of how and why the Blister Patch works appears consistent with my understanding of the known facts of how blister formation occurs, and how the risk for blistering can be reduced. In looking at the published opinions of training specialists and blister prevention experts, there is much positive regard for the Engo Blister Patch products.

There is no specific mention of how Engo manufactures the Blister Patch, or the formula for producing the product’s slick top coating. I did not research whether the Engo Blister Patch ‘ingredients’ are proprietary and patented, or whether this a new use for an existing formula.

How does Engo claim that its Blister Patches prevent blistering?


It provides a surface which is slippery to sock material. This is attached to individual problem areas of a shoe. Some people may find that they only need to apply them to one area in the shoe; others may find that they need several of the Patches installed.

The slippery surface of the Patch allows the sock to slide over the surface of that Patch. This keeps the sock in place against the foot, thereby keeping it from sliding against the skin. This eliminates the shear friction from the sock that creates a blister.


Engo Blister Patch: Testing

Note
: I do not usually blister. The appearance or absence of blisters is not important for the purposes of this testing. What is important is the ability to determine if the Engo Blister Patches function to reduce shear force friction, and the long-term durability of that effectiveness.

The test began September 2018 during training hikes then continued during a pilgrimage on Camino Frances. The testing continued after returning back home and was completed on June 5, 2019. Now, in June 2021, I have spent the last 17 days reviewing this review by testing a new batch of Engo Stuff, looking for any significant changes outside of some new sizes, and determining if the 2019 review needs any 'freshening'.

Not so surprisingly, very little has changed as to the functionality of Engo Patches and as to how they work to help prevent blisters. I feel that the first posted review is still valid as to my findings, and so is posted as it was initially written.

There were three primary reasons for my deciding to conduct this length of testing:
  • To allow me adequate time to make direct comparisons using identical insoles in the same shoes – one insole with an Engo Patch, the other without a Patch. The insoles would be swapped out every third day.
  • To allow adequate time to determine the durability of the Patches.
  • To find and test an easy and effective method for extending both the effectiveness and the longevity of the Engo Blister Patches.
The shoe I used throughout the testing period was the Hoka One One Bondi v6. I consider the materials used in the construction of the ‘upper’ part of these shoes to be like that of most trail or running-style shoes.

The insoles I used were the Timberland Pro Men's Anti-Fatigue Technology Replacement Insole. I would expect that any shoe or insole combination would have produced similar results.

The socks I wore were primarily Smartwool’s PhD light padded crew socks. I also tried socks made of various synthetics, and cotton (I do NOT advocate or recommend cotton socks for distance walking) for brief periods in order to compare their performance with the Engo Blister Patches to my Smartwool socks.

Note: Although I found that all the sock materials that I wore for the test performed as intended with the Engo Blister Patches, cotton-heavy sock fabrics would become a bit ‘grabbier’ when they became wet with either sweat or water. Wool socks and synthetic blend socks performed the best under wet conditions.

Normally, the socks I purchase and use fit snug, but not horribly tight, on my feet. This keeps the socks in place, reducing or eliminating their movement on my feet, which dramatically reduces a sock’s ability to create the shear force friction which causes blisters. As part of the test I purchased socks which were purposefully much larger than what I like to wear. I wanted socks that were very loose on my foot and would be noticeable if they slid around while walking. Why?

To help me determine the limits of the Engo Blister Patch’s effectiveness, wearing the baggy socks for a period of time during the testing was an important evaluation tool. I had to observe IF the Engo Blister Patch could prevent poorly fitting socks from sliding around over the skin on the foot and therefore still prevent blistering.

Placement of the Engo Blister Patches was just below where the tips of my toes sit at the front of the insole, to the point on the insole where the arch of the foot begins. In other words, a large portion of the forefoot area.

The Engo Blister Patches were installed about two weeks prior to leaving for Camino. I began using them on training and workout and recreation day hikes and backpacking. Conditions included dry and dusty trails, rain and wet shoes, steep uphill grades and downhill grades, rocky and rutted trails, pavement, sand, and grassy paths.

On Camino Frances, I began in St. Jean Pied de Port and ended in Santiago de Compostela. My son, Caleb, joined me in Leon and brought me a new pair of Hoka One One Bondi v6 shoes. I mailed the old pair back home. (The old shoes are far from worn out, and I am currently wearing them when I go out on day hikes).

I kept the same insoles, with the attached Engo Blister Patches, and continue to wear them the rest of the Camino. I began daily training day hikes again in March, using the same insoles with the same Patches, until just a few days ago.


Findings

Installation


Installing the Engo Patches was straight forward. I found it easy to refine the shape of the Patch for the proper fit by using scissors. The backing that covers the adhesive on the Patch was easy to remove.

I did add one additional step to the Engo instructions. I used a rag, lightly dampened with alcohol, to wipe the area of the new insoles where I would apply a Patch. I wanted to make sure that any left-over oily residue from manufacturing and handling was removed. The area was then allowed to thoroughly dry, which did not take long.

Once I positioned the Patch and pressed it into place, I made sure that I applied firm pressure to the installed Patch from the center to the outside to reduce any trapped air bubbles. Then I applied additional pressure all around the edges, as well as the center.

I choose to forgo the hair dryer option, as accidentally over-doing the heat with the dryer can harm or degrade the material of the Patch, as well as the adhesive’s holding power. I used the friction of rubbing the material with my fingers to do the job of heating the adhesive, instead.

END OF PART ONE
Thank you for doing and sharing this and the next installment 🙏
 

Glamgrrl

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Travel318
The Engo patch worked for me over two Caminos. I also shared one with another pilgrim. Thanks for reviewing this product. I’ll be taking a package on my next Camino too
 

tjb1013

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2017)
Portugués (2019)
I was plagued by blisters on both my caminos. Thanks for sharing your findings/observations.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Wow, I just learned a lot! Muchas gracias, Dave, for your efforts and careful observations, then this report. It never occurred to me that the Engo patches would wear out before my insoles did (and do). I will be adding 2Toms to my foot kit.
 

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