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Risk of Injury?? - Conques to St. Jean

ziggy007

New Member
Hi All!

I was wanting to know a little more about the terrain between Conques and St. Jean. Are there parts where the risk of injury, ie falling or slipping is quite high? I have done most of the Camino Frances and really never felt that there were parts that were too difficult, except maybe St. Jean to Zubiri and going into Puenta la Reina.

How is the Le Puy terrain comparable to the Camino Frances and are there parts that you would skip because of the risk of injury or felt unsafe?. I am planning on going from Conques to Santiago and have about 8 weeks, but safety first as I would like to get as far as I can . . .

Thank you!!
 
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I use trekking poles for every step, and there was nothing treacherous from Conques onward from my perspective. Repetitive stress injury is possible at any time, though, as is an inadvertent twisted ankle or knee (hence the trekking poles).
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
I think the hardest part of the route is from Le Puy to Conques, and after the climb out of Conques it becomes simpler. But you could slip or twist an ankle anywhere as Falcon says. In my opinion there is no need to skip a section of the route because of fear of injury. Some people find the climb up the cliff out of Cahors quite scary, but there are alternative routes to this.
Margaret
 

robertt

Active Member
The footing on the Le Puy route is often less secure than on the Frances, but I wouldn't worry too much. For some reason, I don't have a prob with uphills, and can even speed up slightly (coming off a staggeringly low base!). The descent to the Allier was tedious for me, but that's not on your itinerary. I seem to remember the most awkward downhill was a short section of erosion on the way to Lauzerte. The Nomad might remember.(No sense asking Kiwis about mud problems, They love the stuff.)

You'll be fine, Zig. I found that by never worrying how far I got I was able to stay in one piece. In fact, I got as far as Pamplona, then went back the next year to complete. More fun, less clock-watching.

Rob
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
robertt said:
I seem to remember the most awkward downhill was a short section of erosion on the way to Lauzerte. The Nomad might remember.(No sense asking Kiwis about mud problems, They love the stuff.)Rob
I don't remember that bit Robert. I do remember some Extreme Mud on the 9km or so across farmland before Montcuq- and I thought it was never going to end- and I didn't really like it at all, despite being a Kiwi!
It's funny, having just 're-done' some sections of the Camino, I find that my memory of places was heavily influenced by the weather I encountered there, and also by the people I met. Sometimes I had completely forgotten tricky aspects of the terrain, but I could tell you all about what the weather was like, or who I shared an evening with!
Margaret
 
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robertt

Active Member
Maybe they fixed the area I'm talking about, Margaret. It was a mess, so I'm guessing they attended to it before peak season.

That April day approaching Lauzerte was the only very hot day I experienced on the whole Camino.The Big Late Spring Freeze of 2010 closed the pass at Roncesvaux. My birthday on May 9 was freezing rain, as bad as winter walking.

So, Ziggy, count on any weather!

Rob
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Actually, having done the route for the second time, it seemed so much easier, my husband aged 80 had no problems at all, we had been advised to avoid the marked route down into Roncesvalles and to take the road instead, but we took the marked chemin and it was pretty easy as long as you went slowly and gave your knees a bit of a wobble around. In New Zealand we call it a "doddle".
We had some shocking weather part of the way and trapsed through heaps of mud and water, but if you just surrender and go with the flow it is not so bad really. You do have to watch your footing at times and make sure you don't over do it. We slowed down for a couple of days and then picked up the pace again and completed 800 plus km feeling fantastic with no injuries or lasting problems. Cheers, Gitti
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
Yes I recall that tricky bit near Lauzert. Some very short stretches were quite steep there, but the Chemin crews have installed some steps and a few sturdy handholds, so it wasn't bad at all.

Definitely, the steepest bit from Conques to SJPP is the climb up out of Conques. So you'll be fine!
 

robertt

Active Member
Kitsambler, I loved that walk up from Conques. Crossed a pilgrim bridge, then got to look back at Conques from on high, jewel in the mist and all that.

By the end of the day I was in Decazeville, which was nineteenth century grunge, old coal town with some Aussie suburban touches, Rugby grounds, mall, supermarkets. Next day was that great rural gite at Montredon. That's why I loved the Chemin du Puy: no two places alike, every day was a change.

Memories!

Rob
 
Hi all
just to add my memories of the bit before Lauzerte. It was very very steep but dry when I walked it in 2008, difficult even in those conditions because of the steepness and lack of foothold but not in any way dangerous from a height point of view and its only a very short stretch. (They may have improved it since then.) In general I would say that there is no place on the route that I found frightening. Just be sure to use some kind of stick or poles(s). I would hate to put anyone off this lovely route. I'm well over 60 as is my husband and we managed fine. Enjoy.
Anna
 
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ziggy007

New Member
Thank you everyone for your replies, I feel much better!! They are very helpful and I will definitely be sure to bring walking sticks!!!
 

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