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Running the Camino

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#1

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JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Donating Member
#2
WOW!!!!!!

And he did it carrying a pack - 5kgs - weight, weight, weight :)

Sahagun – Villadangos del Paramo 78km

the route goes through LeAfter the beautiful rural landscape on. This interesting city tempts to stop for some time, but Suunto t6 on my wrist is merciless and tells me that I don’t have yet enough kilometres for the day. So I shake off the devil of temptation and continue humbly towards a village called Villadangos. My backpack which was so light in the morning seems much heavier now.

All necessary things are carried in the backpack. It is essential that you only carry the most necessary gear with you; shoes, sleeping bag, one set of clothes to change into, and other equipment that is absolutely necessary. Nothing is carried with you ‘just in case’. Minimalism is the order of the day on running hikes. To keep the advancing as pleasant as possible, the weight of the backpack should be kept to around 5kg. For navigation you need a map and a wristop computer (I have a Suunto t6), and with the help of that you can estimate your running speed and distance to the next village. On the Santiago trail there are tiny villages about 5-15km apart, which is a suitable distance for ‘maintenance points’.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#4
sillydoll said:
running the camino
When I was on the Camino last year, I encountered a Scottish guy who had tried to run the Way. He'd get up around 5 and start chugging away, doing between 30 - 40K a day. Of course, that took a toll on his feet, and eventually they gave out on him. He had to stop for awhile to heal, and a female pilgrim caught up with him that he'd met early on. She got out her camera and went through various pictures, asking if he remembered meeting this person, or going inside that cathedral, and so on. He looked them over and declared that none of those people or sites were familiar - they were all a blur to him.

At that point, he told me, he decided he was wasting his time dashing through the Way. Indeed, he felt he might as well have stayed home and ran there. So, he slowed down. He tarted meeting people and talking to them, checking out the sights, and really experiencing things that can only be experienced on the Camino by taking the time to do so. When I left him, he was having a beer with a Canadian pilgrim at an outdoor cafe, laughing and enjoying himself.

My point? Well, I suppose it's all well and good to complete a feat like running the Camino. But then again, perhaps it's akin to sprinting through the Louvre - you can say you did it, but you miss out on the Mona Lisa moments that only come with slowness or stillness. :arrow:
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#5
All walkers, fast or slow, can take on board his advice about low weight

The Finnish runner appeared to take 12 days from SJPP to Santiago and, by my estimate, spent on average 8 hours a day running - about the same time that I spent walking each day - and that still leaves plenty of time to think, do nothing and talk to other pilgrims in the evenings - just reduces the amount of time available to be spent drinking coffee or in bars during the day time
 

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Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#6
We saw this guy go blasting through town and wondered what the heck he was about! What a nut!

Reb.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#8
spursfan said:
and that still leaves plenty of time to think, do nothing and talk to other pilgrims in the evenings - just reduces the amount of time available to be spent drinking coffee or in bars during the day time
Sorry, chief, but I ain't buying it. The vast majority of folks either walk or bike the Camino. A runner who takes
spursfan said:
12 days from SJPP to Santiago
1) isn't going to build the walking/biking relationships with other pilgrims that the majority of folks will have by default, and 2) isn't going to get the same perspective as the average walker who takes around a month or more to do the Way and can therefore soak up many more experiences.

But hey, if that's how the dude wants to experience the Camino, than so be it. Even so, I hope someday he'll go back and walk it to see exactly what he missed the first time around...:arrow:
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Donating Member
#9
Who knows why the chap is running the Camino Frances or what he is getting out of it - it sounds to me as if it is the finest penitential tradition! That's really a matter for him.

The reality is that many cyclists will also take 12 - 14 days or so so in terms of time he's not so extraordinary and I hope enjoys much fun and fellowship in the evenings as does everyone else.

To each their own
 
#10
I'm with vinotinto on that one, but I would not bet on that guy- going back and walking it again. As you have said- it's the way he wanted to experience it- so be it.
Still- I'm very impressed by his journey- I would probably throw up after running first five miles up the hill.
Have a great journey this year everyone!
Kuba.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#13
JohnnieWalker said:
The reality is that many cyclists will also take 12 - 14 days or so
True, but many of the bikers I saw were in groups of two or more, so they had that form of cameraderie. And lone bikers could always join up with other bikers, much like walking pilgrims do with each other. But runnin' pilgrims are pretty rare, so it seems to be a solitary endeavor, much like swimming the English channel.

Anyway, no big deal to me. Heck, he's welcome to do it backwards on a pogo-stick while smoking a bong if he so desires, as long as he doesn't bounce on a walking pilgrim's foot... :wink: :arrow:
 
#14
I plan to begin the Camino de Santiago on February 27, 2011 (following the Camino Frances route). I will average 47 miles a day in order to complete the trail in under eleven days. As far as I can tell, this will be a World Speed Record. Does anyone have any other information about people who have run this in under 12 days? I know the time of year will slow me down (snow and ice) but I will be trained for it. Any advice is certainly welcome. I will be running to raise money and awareness for the IRC and their amazing work to help refugees around the world. You can check out my blog and my purpose at the following sites:

http://diy.theirc.org/jennys_journey

http://jennyjourney.wordpress.com/about/
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#15
The Finnish ultra-distance runner Janne Kankaansyrj ran the camino from 10th May to 22nd May in 2008.
You can read about it here in English and Finnish:
http://jannekankaansyrja.blogspot.com/2 ... chive.html

The 12 days were - in reverse order taken from the blog:

• ”Grande Finale”Melide – Santiago de Compostela 53k...
• Barbadelo – Melide 56 kmGalicia is the last provin...
• Villafranca del Bierzo – Barbadelo 81kmToday we cr...
• Rabanal del Camino – Villaefranca del Bierzo 59kmA...
• Villadangos del Paramo – Rabanal del Camino 48kmTh...
• Sahagun – Villadangos del Paramo 78kmAfter the bea...
• .Fromista – Sahagun 59kmAfter the county of Burgos ...
• Burgos - Fromista 72kmAfter the city of Burgos the...
• Najera - Burgos 91kmLeg runs differ quite a lot fr..
• Estella – Najera 82kmAfter Estella the scenery cha...
• Pamplona – Estella 51kmMountain paths continue. Af...
• .St Jean Pied de Port – Pamplona 80kmEl Camino de S...
 

Caminando

Veteran Member
#16
sillydoll said:
The Finnish ultra-distance runner Janne Kankaansyrj ran the camino from 10th May to 22nd May in 2008.
You can read about it here in English and Finnish:
http://jannekankaansyrja.blogspot.com/2 ... chive.html

The 12 days were - in reverse order taken from the blog:

• ”Grande Finale”Melide – Santiago de Compostela 53k...
• Barbadelo – Melide 56 kmGalicia is the last provin...
• Villafranca del Bierzo – Barbadelo 81kmToday we cr...
• Rabanal del Camino – Villaefranca del Bierzo 59kmA...
• Villadangos del Paramo – Rabanal del Camino 48kmTh...
• Sahagun – Villadangos del Paramo 78kmAfter the bea...
• .Fromista – Sahagun 59kmAfter the county of Burgos ...
• Burgos - Fromista 72kmAfter the city of Burgos the...
• Najera - Burgos 91kmLeg runs differ quite a lot fr..
• Estella – Najera 82kmAfter Estella the scenery cha...
• Pamplona – Estella 51kmMountain paths continue. Af...
• .St Jean Pied de Port – Pamplona 80kmEl Camino de S...

So quickly! So...amazing! Did he also take part in the relay to SDC? Now that was ...well, equally interesting. It's a unique achievement which deserves to be publicised for reasons which are ..well, I'm not sure, actually, but probably great reasons.

Buen Camino, Bom Caminho :D
 

+@^^

Active Member
#17
i heard that the running guy actually started out as a walker, but heard the albergues might be full, so.......
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#18

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#20
Re: Running the Camino in under 10 days

Nine days, five hours and 29 minutes after embarking on the greatest adventure of her relatively short ultra-marathon running career, Jenny Anderson reached her destination.

The Virginia Episcopal School cross country coach and Spanish teacher completed the 506.8-mile Camino de Santiago, a pilgrimage trail in northern Spain in record time, smashing the fastest-known trek by more than three days.

"I was really happy with my time," Anderson said Monday night by cell phone. "These are under-the-radar records. There’s not a whole lot of documentation. A guy from Finland did it in 12½ days. Every person I talked to here, I was inquiring. They said, "Not even on bikes (had they heard of anyone completing the trail) as fast as you’re doing it."

Anderson was inspired to start running ultra-marathons by Liberty University professor and running guru David Hornton, who had his 1991 record-setting trek on the Appalachian Trail broken by Andrew Thompson, a former student of his LU, in 2005. She and Thompson are currently members of an ultra-marathon team started by LU professor Clark Zealand, another Horton protégé.

Anderson started her latest journey in St. Jean Pied de Port in southwestern France on Feb. 26, a day earlier than scheduled, to try to stay ahead of an incoming snowstorm. After crossing over the Pyranees Mountains into northeastern Spain, she finished her trek Monday morning, with a mere 26-mile marathon of a run — less than half her average over the previous nine days — through the Galicia Mountains into Santiago de Compostela.

Along the way, after three days in the Pyranees, four days on the Meseta Region plateau, and three days in the Galicias, Anderson battled sleep deprivation and braved snowy conditions and strong headwinds, but never lost her resolve. She raised more than $2,000 for the International Rescue Committee, raising awareness and supporting refugees world-wide.

"It was a hard journey, but well worth it," Anderson said. "It was awesome."

She didn’t have any crew support along the trail, but was met by her mother and step father, Tina and Dan Cosgrove, who flew to Spain with her five-year-old daughter Ryleigh to witness Anderson’s amazing feat after the third day.

"If I had a crew, I could have finished in under nine days, but I was mostly self-supported," Anderson said. "I had family here and they’d meet me for moral support, but I was on my own for most of the day."

While her husband, Cory, stayed at home with their other two children and updated her blog on http://jennyjourney.wordpress.com, she was thrilled to have her parents and daughter on hand to meet her after each day’s stage, especially in Santiago de Compostela,

"I really wanted my family to be there at the end," Anderson said. "It’s important to me that they’re there."

http://www2.newsadvance.com/sports/2011 ... ar-889848/
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#22
Re: Class of 2011

Postby Rasinj on 04 Jun 2011, 02:31
Hello everyone!

I am a student from Sweden and will take the camino from St. Jean to Santiago by unicycle starting 13 of June, something like a week from now. The thing is, I will begin my first of five years at university in Sweden this autumn, and I've already been studying for many years now. Before I go back to school, I really need to see something else. This will be really terrific! And yes, it really is unicycle. I felt like doing something different, and unicycling is perfect, a little faster than walking, little slower than biking. So if you are starting a couple of days earlier from St. Jean, don't be worried when you see a unicyclist passing by. :wink:.
 
#23
Dear all,

I've just come back from jogging the camino over a total 19 days. Before I went, I had difficulty finding information about what sort of distances were feasible etc. So I've written a few blog posts to give potential runners an idea of what was involved:

http://moireosullivan.com/2012/05/22/i- ... no-my-way/
http://moireosullivan.com/2012/05/28/th ... ago-trail/
http://moireosullivan.com/2012/06/04/wh ... -santiago/

By the way, if you're a walker reading this, please don't be too dismayed by the whole running thing. And if you're a runner, I'd really recommend this route, given that it is well catered for in terms of food, water, and accommodation to make rests in between runs very easy.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#24
A few years ago, we met a young German boy walking with his mother. I seem to remember that he was a footballer. He would walk the trail each day with his mother and then, once settled into the Albergue of the day, ran back down the trail (I don't know how far back he went) and then he would run back up again! Anne
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#26
We have an athletic Australian family of five staying with us tonight. Three of them, father, daughter, and son in law, are running the camino. The other two, mother and younger son, are handling logistics and walking large chunks of it.

They ran today to Moratinos from Vilamentero. At least 40 km. :shock:
The mom and dad walked the camino two years ago, so I guess they don´t feel they are missing anything.
 

mmm042

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VDLP 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014
#27
Hi.

Just a bit of perspective for non-runners on running the Camino -- which I always do due to time constraints, and because I love to run. When you're running 20 or 30 or 40 miles a day for a few weeks, you're running relatively slowly and typically walking some parts. Unless you're an international star, you're not going to be blazing 6-minute miles all day, every day, with no breaks. As another example, the average person who competes in a 100-mile race might be running at a 13-minute-per-mile pace and might end up walking 25 of those 100 miles.

So yes, it's very possible to run the Camino and enjoy the route, pray, talk with fellow pilgrims, etc. I've taken thousands of photos along the way when I run, plus copious notes. I stop and chat with everyone I meet. I pray when I'm alone. My pace might seem speedy to walkers, but to me it's a very slow running pace and I walk when there are steep hills or it's too rocky to run safely or just when I need/want to take a break.

One of the great things about the Camino is that it can be done in many different ways and still be enjoyable and meaningful.

Melanie
 

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