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Running to train for the Camino???

godslamb

Member
Past OR future Camino
May (2014)
I have been reading a lot of how people are hiking 10+ miles several times a day weeks before their Camino, but I am not able to do that. Being a teacher, I don't have the schedule that allows me to do that. It's not easy to take off work in order to train my body to hike 10+ miles, several times a week. Therefore, I am hoping that if I spend my evenings training my body with running (right now I am close to 4 miles each time I run) for a 10k will be enough. What ya'll think??

The reality of this trip has just hit me hard (leaving at the end of May), and I want to make sure that I am prepared. Freak out mode...can't you tell?!?! Ha ha ha!
 
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Diogo92

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
C. Português 2013, 2014
C. de Fátima 2014
C. do Salnés 2015
I think that it's completely different. Even the majorities of the training are different from the Camiño. You should walk, off course, but I think that the majority of the people finds it easy, after walking 10 or 12 miles per day, because they don't walk with any considerable weight (4kg or plus) on their backs.

You say that you have a tight schedule, but what about weekends? I know that a teacher works even at weekends, but I think that you should use weekend time, to train a little bit harder, on a Camiño pace.

This is my opinion, others may differ.

Best Regards
Diogo
 

godslamb

Member
Past OR future Camino
May (2014)
The only day that I have is on Saturdays. Well....Saturdays it is then...need to get my butt moving.

I was afraid that it wouldn't be enough. RATS!

I do have to say that where I run is full of huge hills. Something is better than noting right??
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
2012
When I was training I walked 4mls each day, 2mls out and 2 back every day and the 8mls at the weekend. I walked at a smart pace, approx 4 mph, so that is an hour every evening or morning then two hours at the weekend, if you can do that then you will have no trouble with the Camino as you will be walking at a much slower pace.
Buen Camino.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
My view is similar to @wayfarer's. Get 45-60 minutes walking in on weekdays, then do longer distances on the weekends. If you are walking in May, about now I would start extending the weekend distances and walking with a pack, so that you build up to the distances you are going to do on the Camino.

If you can, on the last two weekends before you depart, do two long walks on consecutive days with your pack at about the load you will carry on the Camino.

BTW, I don't know many people who would be walking 16+ km several times a day.

Regards.
 
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Dutch

Straightforward
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You should run. Running is perfect for your physical fitness and helps you build endurence and leg muscles, BUT running and hiking are two different things. Don't even start comparing them.

Your area is full of huge hills? How about making some some of combination. Run the flat parts. Maybe you can run these flat parts as sort of an interval training. Then walk, not run, the hill parts up AND down. Especially the walking down parts you want your legs to get used to. Walking down is much much harder and stressfull for the legs then walking up.

Food for thought
 

godslamb

Member
Past OR future Camino
May (2014)
Thanks for the tips! They are very helpful and encouraging. I can do this...ha ha ha.

I am going to spend my Saturdays doing some major hiking with my pack.

There route I using take running has a great spot for walking up and down hills. I can run one way and then walk/hike my way back.
 

Tixunau

New Member
IMO, it is all about consistency. When training for a run event (marathon, half-marathon, 10k, 5k, etc..), the more consistent you run the better your body will react to the stress it goes through. My belief is that if you can run 5-6 days a week, it will pretty much train your body for it along with giving you a good fitness base. Once your body learn to keep moving on those sore muscles, you will be fine. Also when you run mostly everyday, you get to learn a lot about how your body react depending on pace. From there you will gain knowledge on the most important aspect of any physicl activity: how to listen to your body.

Hiking usually have more elevation gain. You need to be able to adapt to the steady climbing and also adjust to the elevation depending on your route. The misconception about hiking is that going 'up' the hill is the most difficult thing but in fact, going 'down' is where things are the most difficult. Therefore as suggested by @Dutch, I would add some hill repeats. (once or max twice a week) Run/jog up the hill with a consistent pace from bottom to top and walk back down. Do this 6-10 times but stop as soon as your pace start to slow down. Choose another day and try to equal the amount of time uphill and slowly improve. Not only you will gain some running speed but you will also get to 'train' how to 'attack' the hills on the Camino at a good walking pace. Make sure to choose a hill that is at least more than 1/2 mile to a maximum of 1 mile. Hill grade is your choice but remember; your pace must be the same from bottom to top.

Good lucn and Buen Camino!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Thanks for the tips! They are very helpful and encouraging. I can do this...ha ha ha.

I am going to spend my Saturdays doing some major hiking with my pack.

There route I using take running has a great spot for walking up and down hills. I can run one way and then walk/hike my way back.

Don't try running with your pack! Therein lies disaster as you are too likely to injure yourself.

I think running up and down your local hills (without pack) for 4 miles every day is FINE. And do a longer walk with your pack during the weekend - as much as anything to check out your gear - find if you have any rubbing spots with your pack or clothes, are your shoes OK, is there anything that you don't like.
 
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I think if you interviewed 100 pilgrims, the majority would say they did not train at all.
The training can be done on the road if you are careful and start slowly.
The key is not too much weight, good shoes, and plenty of time.
It is not a mountain climbing expedition.
It's a trek.
 

Olivares

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
May 1997 (Leon to Santiago); Sections Camino Frances: May 2011, May 2012, May 2013, October 2013, June-July 2014 (Sahagun to Santiago).
Running is high impact on your lower body joints as opposed to the type of hiking you will be doing on the Camino. Not sure the risk is worth it. Bad idea and it could hurt more than help, really. If you are not used to/have not done jogging/running for a while trying to undertake it as training for a walking trip is not really a good idea. A treadmill and/or ellyptical machines are a great substitute for long distance hiking training as it tones the same muscles. Do it carrying weights or the actual backpack and you should be training on a apretty close simulation of what your body will be experiencing on the Camino. I am a runner (all my life from a young age) and what really helped me on the Camino was training on an ellyptical machine with ramp functions. Walking uses the core muscles more than you think, so even abdominals and Pilates is better than running....
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
I think if you interviewed 100 pilgrims, the majority would say they did not train at all.
The training can be done on the road if you are careful and start slowly.
The key is not too much weight, good shoes, and plenty of time.
It is not a mountain climbing expedition.
It's a trek.

Or just a nice long walk.....;)
 

Olivares

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
May 1997 (Leon to Santiago); Sections Camino Frances: May 2011, May 2012, May 2013, October 2013, June-July 2014 (Sahagun to Santiago).
The reality of this trip has just hit me hard (leaving at the end of May), and I want to make sure that I am prepared. Freak out mode...can't you tell?!?! Ha ha ha!

DO NOT FREAK OUT AT ALL!! Anniesantiago worded perfectly-- thousands of people have walked the Camino without "training". If you do it in a smart way, you should be fine. Enjoy the anticipation, don't fret about this!
 

Dutch

Straightforward
Past OR future Camino
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
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Pamplona-Burgos march '15
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Running is high impact on your lower body joints as opposed to the type of hiking you will be doing on the Camino. Not sure the risk is worth it. Bad idea and it could hurt more than help, really. If you are not used to/have not done jogging/running for a while trying to undertake it as training for a walking trip is not really a good idea. A treadmill and/or ellyptical machines are a great substitute for long distance hiking training as it tones the same muscles. Do it carrying weights or the actual backpack and you should be training on a apretty close simulation of what your body will be experiencing on the Camino. I am a runner (all my life from a young age) and what really helped me on the Camino was training on an ellyptical machine with ramp functions. Walking uses the core muscles more than you think, so even abdominals and Pilates is better than running....

You are absolutely right. Abs and the whole core are essential when running and or walking. The core is the part of your body that keeps your upper body in place when your feet are placing all your weight from one foot to another over and over and over again, 1km after another. But saying that your better of not running? Thats, imo, not right. If you want to start, your gonna have to start some time. Any good runnerstore can set you up with a good starter program.
It is always best to combine muscle excersises with any form of cardio. Combinations are key, but if time is an issue, your going to have to make choices.

Hiking the camino can and will also be a strain on your lower body. Your feet will be put to the test and your shins are going to be put to the tets when walking downhill and all this with a backpack on your back.
It is not so much that the camino is a difficult hike, its not, but it is the fact that your walking day in, day out for 20+ km a day, on average. Maybe even more for some.

Lots of people dont train for the camino and it works for them, but that does not mean that its the best decision they could make. Asking your body to go from a zero active live to a camino life is a 180 degree turnaround. Some preperation is the smart thing to do.

Just doing core excersises is not going to help your fitness level or get your legs or feet used to walking, hiking, running long distances.
 
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ManyMiles2Go

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
Some training is always better than no training, in my opinion. But do not panic and try to train for a 500 mile walk. Like stated above, you will be "training" for the rest of the walk when you take your first step on the Camino. My pack was uncomfortable (heavy) the first couple days to a week, after that, I didn't even notice it was there :) You will be fine!! Have a Buen Camino !!!!
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
Exactly. Never think about your total km goal. You only walk one day at a time. Whatever it is. Can you walk 15 or 20 or 25 km? Do it. Then do it again the next day. Repeat. Don't burden yourself thinking about how far you have to go. And buen camino.
 

Olivares

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
May 1997 (Leon to Santiago); Sections Camino Frances: May 2011, May 2012, May 2013, October 2013, June-July 2014 (Sahagun to Santiago).
Just doing core excersises is not going to help your fitness level or get your legs or feet used to walking, hiking, running long distances.
By no means I am recommending JUST concentrating on the core. Walking requires effort from almost every muscle in your body be it in the mechanics, the balance, or the support. Also agree that walking 30+days in a row for 20+kms/day is a serious demand in stamina. Training is a good idea, but I also know for a fact that some people are natural athletes and their bodies will bounce back very quickly. Bottom line, prepare but also relax a bit; if you pace yourself you should be able to go the distance. Buen Camino!!!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Leaving aside mental and spiritual preparation, there are four main areas of physical preparation:
  • endurance - the Camino is not going to require intense cardio-vascular workouts. Some hills might cause your heart rate to rise, but the main requirement is going to be walking for hours at low intensity. Walking works better than running to achieve this.
  • weight - if obese, get into the overweight zone at least.
  • foot preparation - walking longer distances during preparation will harden up the skin, will identify where one's feet get hot-spots or blister, etc.
  • pack fit - wearing one's pack at its working load will allow you to figure out how to adjust it properly, load it and work out how to address any niggly issues.
A good preparation plan should address all of these things. Whether or not one can or should 'train' for the Camino might be moot, but preparing is a good idea!

Regards,
 
A

AJ

Guest
You should run. Running is perfect for your physical fitness and helps you build endurence and leg muscles, BUT running and hiking are two different things. Don't even start comparing them.

I met a young Italian in Arzua. He told me that he ran marathons at least once each week. He was very fit. He went on to say: "I have walked just 100km and my feet are destroyed!"
 
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Thomas1962

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2010/2011/2012/2013: Madrid -Salvador -Primitivo 2014: EPW 2015: Amsterdam - SdC
Everything depends on the actual shape of your body, combined with what you do with it or want from it on the camino.
Not trained at all and doing 10 k (or less of necessary) is fine. Very well trained (probably after 3 weeks of camino) and doing 30-40k is fine too. The average of people do around 22-27 k I think.

My own general shape is quite fine, I think. I bike 6-10k every day to my work. I didn't train at all for my first camino's and did about 20k a day when I started and about 30k after 2 weeks.
Last year I started running half a year before my camino, 3 to 6 miles for 2-3 times a week. To me it felt that it made walking the camino easier. After 2-3 weeks of camino 30-40 kms was easy to do. I actually did also run part of the camino (about 20-40 minutes a day). I used an Omm classic 32 with 5-6 kg of total weight, which is very suitable for running. That is also a possibility.

So, many possibilities, day by day. The camino is great! Most important is to fine-tune to your body, any moment, any day. I'm not an expert, but being able to run for 4 miles sounds very good to me. Just try a few hikes with your backpack before you leave, just to experience the (importance of not too much) weight.

One more thing: the pain of the day is always in the last few kms a day. Especially if you start the camino the trick is to stop if you still feel fine without doing the painful kms. There will be plenty of days to test your limmits. (if that is a thing you like anyway!)

You'll be fine, enjoy!
 

MeganG22

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPdP-->SdC
(Oct3-Nov3 2012)
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(Oct1-Oct29 2014)
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Pamplona-->SdC
May 1-? 2017
A couple people have mentioned it and I just want to reiterate: I think the most important training you can do is getting used to the weight of your pack and walking "extensively" (whatever you can manage, even just walking around for an hour) with it on. Like others have said- the Camino is more a trek/walk than anything else; yes you have to walk some big uphills the first couple days, but after that it's pretty smooth sailing most days. Your feet are going to be sore no matter what- mine took about two weeks to really adjust- but it's important to TRAIN WITH YOUR PACK so you don't shock yourself those first few days of walking.
Good luck!
 

Alyssa

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés (2014)
Norte, Finisterre, Salvador, Primitivo (2015)
I have been reading a lot of how people are hiking 10+ miles several times a day weeks before their Camino, but I am not able to do that. Being a teacher, I don't have the schedule that allows me to do that. It's not easy to take off work in order to train my body to hike 10+ miles, several times a week. Therefore, I am hoping that if I spend my evenings training my body with running (right now I am close to 4 miles each time I run) for a 10k will be enough. What ya'll think??

The reality of this trip has just hit me hard (leaving at the end of May), and I want to make sure that I am prepared. Freak out mode...can't you tell?!?! Ha ha ha!

I'm so excited for you! I, too, am a teacher and am single with no children, which means that outside of work I have a flexible schedule. If you have a family, I'm sure that makes it much more difficult to find time to train.

Monday nights I've started meeting a friend in a town between work and home at 5:15p.m. to walk/run stairs for half an hour. Tuesdays and Thursdays, one of my colleagues and I leave at 3:45 (our students are out at 3) for a 4.75 mile hike on the trails behind our school (618 foot total elevation gain) or in the neighborhoods around school and then I return to my classroom to finish up before heading home. I've started getting in a 10 to 12 mile hike on Saturday or Sunday and then a shorter hike the other weekend day.

I haven't yet started training with a pack, however (still need to buy it!) as is wisely suggested by Vagando, above. Maybe I'll ease into it by loading up one of my day hike packs as much as possible to practice. Hmmm.
 

NicoZ

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2013
You're walking. Walking.

My almost ninety year old mother could walk all day long. Look around you there are likely plenty of older people who walk for hours. How many of you have walked around the mall for hours?

Pace. It's not a race. It's not a sprint. Don't be afraid to stop. Smell the flowers. Take a photo. Chat up the shop girl. The rest will help your over all pace. Even if all you do is 2km/h a five hour day is 10km. That's the length of a football field every three minutes.

Don't starve yourself. Keep yourself hydrated.
 

Dutch

Straightforward
Past OR future Camino
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
I met a young Italian in Arzua. He told me that he ran marathons at least once each week. He was very fit. He went on to say: "I have walked just 100km and my feet are destroyed!"

Sounds like my story.
Thats why i said, dont even start comparing hiking and running. I have had every bad thing happen to my feet and shins. The only thing i did not have, was bloodblisters, but that is the ONLY thing....:)

But running is excellent to "up" your fitness level.
 
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Maggie Arundell

maggiea
Past OR future Camino
April (2014) starting in Roncesvalles
Hi Godslamb.
I am a teacher too (in Oz) I've been walking to work, 8 km with my pack and poles a couple of times a week. I don't know if that would work for you. I have to leave at 6am as I start at 8. I agree that work interferes with your life! Happy training . Buen Camino.


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godslamb

Member
Past OR future Camino
May (2014)
I'm so excited for you! I, too, am a teacher and am single with no children, which means that outside of work I have a flexible schedule. If you have a family, I'm sure that makes it much more difficult to find time to train.

Monday nights I've started meeting a friend in a town between work and home at 5:15p.m. to walk/run stairs for half an hour. Tuesdays and Thursdays, one of my colleagues and I leave at 3:45 (our students are out at 3) for a 4.75 mile hike on the trails behind our school (618 foot total elevation gain) or in the neighborhoods around school and then I return to my classroom to finish up before heading home. I've started getting in a 10 to 12 mile hike on Saturday or Sunday and then a shorter hike the other weekend day.

I haven't yet started training with a pack, however (still need to buy it!) as is wisely suggested by Vagando, above. Maybe I'll ease into it by loading up one of my day hike packs as much as possible to practice. Hmmm.


I wish that I had a good place to hike during the week! The closest place is at 40 minutes from my house and school. And when you have to get up at 4:30 to get work, an early bedtime is a must! All well....I will make the best of it and use my Saturdays to hike with my pack.

Everyone has had some great suggestion! From the sounds of it...I'll be just fine as long as I take out my Saturdays to do my major hiking (with my pack of course).
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
@ godslamb - I don't think you need a "place" to hike. Walk right from your front door. Stop driving your car/taking public transport. Walk to the grocery store, and to your other errands. Just walk around your neighborhood. After awhile, wear your pack to the grocery store and walk back with it full. All walking is good training, no matter where you do it.
 
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Rambler

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
Godslamb:
Being a fellow Southerner (I saw your ya'll in the first post) ;) I think you will be fine. You have gotten lots of good input here from everyone; I know it may be overwhelming. But run when you can, or climb steps, or do lunges to strengthen your knee joints when you have a few spare minutes. Are you still in Alabama or elsewhere teaching? My daughter and I did a 20 prep hike on the AT (Appalachian Trail) at Blood Mountain two weeks before leaving for the Camino. It about killed us. But we did not experience anything like that in Spain once we got there, so you are probably fine. Take a long walk on the weekend.
Also wear your boots/shoes everywhere to see if you have any hot spots and do make sure to carry the pack with your expected load to make sure it feels comfortable. A couple of hours of each is not enough. You will basically be living in them for over a month, so go ahead and become good friends before you leave. You won't wear them out.

My son and I may be getting to Santiago about the same time as you, so hopefully we can meet and we will hear about your great experience.
Rambler
 

Alyssa

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés (2014)
Norte, Finisterre, Salvador, Primitivo (2015)
Hi Godslamb.
I am a teacher too (in Oz) I've been walking to work, 8 km with my pack and poles a couple of times a week. I don't know if that would work for you. I have to leave at 6am as I start at 8. I agree that work interferes with your life! Happy training . Buen Camino.


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Maggie, I am so impressed. I was considering walking to work as well but as it would take almost three hours, I just can't bring myself to do it. I'd have to leave at 4:30 (as poor Godslamb already does). Ugh.
 
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godslamb

Member
Past OR future Camino
May (2014)
Godslamb:
Being a fellow Southerner (I saw your ya'll in the first post) ;) I think you will be fine. You have gotten lots of good input here from everyone; I know it may be overwhelming. But run when you can, or climb steps, or do lunges to strengthen your knee joints when you have a few spare minutes. Are you still in Alabama or elsewhere teaching? My daughter and I did a 20 prep hike on the AT (Appalachian Trail) at Blood Mountain two weeks before leaving for the Camino. It about killed us. But we did not experience anything like that in Spain once we got there, so you are probably fine. Take a long walk on the weekend.
Also wear your boots/shoes everywhere to see if you have any hot spots and do make sure to carry the pack with your expected load to make sure it feels comfortable. A couple of hours of each is not enough. You will basically be living in them for over a month, so go ahead and become good friends before you leave. You won't wear them out.

My son and I may be getting to Santiago about the same time as you, so hopefully we can meet and we will hear about your great experience.
Rambler

I'm in "Sweet home Alabama" ;) I have done some of the trails at Oak Mountain (another part of the Appalachians). There is a 20 mike trail that's like the one you have done.

I have had my boots for a while....we have became close friends last summer, ha ha. Now it's time to get reacquainted.

I would love be able to walk with some southern folks :)
 
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jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Madrid/San Salvador/Primitivo-2021
There are three keys to walking the Camino, imo.

Start slowly, do not get caught up in the excitement and over extend your self the first few days. Ease your body into the walk. I recommend you only walk to Orrison the first day. Eight km's but a steep climb. This will allow you to also get to know other Pilgrims.

Pack as light as possible. Everyone brings to much stuff. My first pack weighed 11kg or 24lbs. This years pack weighs in at 8kgs or 17.5lbs. If you find you need something it can be bought in Spain. You will be surprised at how little you need. Go to a reputable sorting good store and get fitted for a pack. load it up and walk around the store with it while you shop. Most stores have knowledgeable employees who can be helpful.

Pay attention to your feet. Before leaving get a good pair of boots, shoes, sandals etc. Break them in and take at least one long walk to see how they treat your feet. While walking, if you develop hot spots or discomfort, stop and take care of this issue then. Do not wait until the discomfort develops into a bigger problem. Nothing can ruin a Camino faster than injured feet. Cut your toe nails back. The down hills can cause bruising under your toe nails.

The Camino will take care of the rest.

Ultreya,
Joe
 

ericdouglas

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Future Camino de Santiago (April 2014)
I have been reading a lot of how people are hiking 10+ miles several times a day weeks before their Camino, but I am not able to do that. Being a teacher, I don't have the schedule that allows me to do that. It's not easy to take off work in order to train my body to hike 10+ miles, several times a week. Therefore, I am hoping that if I spend my evenings training my body with running (right now I am close to 4 miles each time I run) for a 10k will be enough. What ya'll think??

The reality of this trip has just hit me hard (leaving at the end of May), and I want to make sure that I am prepared. Freak out mode...can't you tell?!?! Ha ha ha!
I am training by walking about seven kms three times each week. I figure that will be enough and if I have problems on my camino (commencing May 1st) then I'll just take my time each day slowly. After all, it is about the walk and if I have to walk 30 km in a day then I'll just leave early and take my time.
 
I think that consistency throughout the week is the key, if possible.

Training for my Camino in 2012, I didnt walk during the week (same reason; too tired from work), only at weekends building up to around 17-19kms Sat/Sun and also walking with a pack. Once I started the Camino, I really regretted not doing the daily walking during training as my overall fitness still wasn't up to it.

For my return, Ill be training daily as much as possible and then doing the longer walks with pack on the weekend. I also have pretty severe bone malformation issues (Osteochromatosis) so know now (learnt the hard way in Spain), to walk fewer KMs daily, get my pack carried when my feet/legs are sprained/swollen, and pack as light as possible! But best advice, is relax and enjoy the walk (and as Eric says above), take your time slowly each day - and enjoy :)
 

koknesis

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014
CA&CS 2015
VdlP 2017
CP 2018
CM 2019
it is rather individual thing, which part of body needs more attendance before this great 800km walk (if you consider whole CF). depending on age, current fitness etc. for instance for me when carrying a load for long distance the first alarm will be sent by knee, ankle and hip joints. a proper use of walking poles can greatly reduce the impact on lower joints. so my advice would be instead of running first adopt a proper pole walking technique, like Nordic walking and then put a backpack with some 10kg load on, and walk the distances you can afford.
 
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