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Santiago To Rome

Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#1
Hi, has anyone here done this?

I am pretty sure I can walk backwards along the Camino Francés with no directional problems, having walked it to Santiago several times.

And I am pretty sure I would be OK to Arles along the GR653, as the French GR routes are marked in both directions. (It would help if I can download the track onto MapsMe – does anyone know?)

Once on the Via Francigena there will be signposts to Rome.

But what about between Arles and joining up with the Via Francigena? Is there a GR route?

And what would be the best time of year?

Definitely not between Easter and All Saints on the Camino Francés; too many people looking for albergue beds, and those beds should probably go to the pilgrims walking to Santiago anyway. I do like to support the albergues that stay open all year round, so am happy to walk that section any time between November and March.

The hostels in France and Italy may not be open in the off season, and I can only afford pilgrim accommodation, so I will have to walk those sections sometime between Easter and All Saints, but definitely not during the heat of midsummer.

Would welcome any thoughts, or links to other posts or blogs. Many thanks!

By the way, I have a UK passport, so the 90-day Schengen issue is not a problem for me. I think this journey would take about 4 months. But I’m beginning to think that I may have to attempt this before Brexit, as who knows now what will happen then . . . .
Jill
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#2
Thoughts: adventurous lady! From the sounds of it, you will make your way easily. As for when, with your UK passport:- you have just reminded me of two things: I have to save up for an Irish passport just in case, and I have to fill in the form for donating my brain when it is no longer needed by me, and for sure will not be needed as a relic. And you know, who is to say whose finger gets paraded around the world for veneration?!! I am actually still thinking about another thread, but now that I am nearer to the age when I can wear all the purple I like, I don’t care.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#3
I have not walked that route myself. There is a pretty extensive list of French GR routes with some information on this site: http://www.gr-infos.com/gr-en.htm When walking in France I have found the government map agency IGN website invaluable - free highly detailed mapping including the GR and local waymarked paths. https://www.geoportail.gouv.fr/carte When you use the Geoportail site click "Cartes" at the top-left corner, then "Voir tous les fonds de carte" and you will then be able to choose either 'Carte topographique IGN' or 'Carte IGN classique' which both show the GR routes. There is also a free Geoportail app for Android - and probably iPhone though I have never had reason to look for one.
 

giorgio

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2000), Puy (03), VDLP(04), Arles(05), Paris/London(06), Norte(07),Vezelay(09), Levante(10),Madrid(13),CF(15),CF(16)
#4
Would say you have the option to continue from Arles onto the GR 653D (guide available from the French Federation of Hickers FFRP) to Montgenevre .
There you are on the Via Francigena branch coming from France that will join in Vercelli the other branch coming down from Switzerland St.Bernard Pass.
The other possibility would be to continue from Arles along the coast toward Italy.
Have no personal experience on the portion from Arles to Italian border along the coast but have been told in this portion the path goes inland with many ups and downs. Once in Italy you could follow Via della Costa to Genoa (some pilgrim accomodation there ,basically a walk along the side of busy roads ,but often beautiful scenery ) then still along the coast (quite a few ups and downs ) to Sarzana where you will be once again on Via Francigena.
Should you need more details just ask and i'll be glad to help
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#5
Wow, I am really impressed by even having the "idea" of planning to do this "customized" 4 month Camino! That's alot to bite off and chew! My hats off to you! Somehow I doubt you will be taking your local walking friends with you on this new journey!;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#6
Hi, many thanks for all your replies, especially for the links. It looks as though the GR653A is my best bet, from Arles to Menton, otherwise known as the Via Aurelia.

If anyone else is following this, I have found some fantastic info here:

http://www.compostelle-paca-corse.info/guides-chemins-paca-gr-653a-gr-653d-leurs-variantes

It has downloadable guides in both directions. Brilliant :). All in French :eek:, but if I load the pdfs onto my phone, it will give me something to do in the evenings: translating the next day’s route :rolleyes:.
Jill
 
#13
. . . unable to get my head around it all . . .
That doesn't surprise me, Jill. I find writing extremely difficult when out there on a trail. Writing a straight sentence can take me hours, even days when I am hiking day by day, months on end. Sometimes nouns, verbs, commas and everything else gets muddled in my head. It's probably a symptom of mineral or vitamin deficiency. The brain gets fatigued, I think. This is something to watch out for on a very long walk...

Cheers
 
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Ernesto.IT

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
#14
Hi, has anyone here done this?

I am pretty sure I can walk backwards along the Camino Francés with no directional problems, having walked it to Santiago several times.

And I am pretty sure I would be OK to Arles along the GR653, as the French GR routes are marked in both directions. (It would help if I can download the track onto MapsMe – does anyone know?)

Once on the Via Francigena there will be signposts to Rome.

But what about between Arles and joining up with the Via Francigena? Is there a GR route?

And what would be the best time of year?

Definitely not between Easter and All Saints on the Camino Francés; too many people looking for albergue beds, and those beds should probably go to the pilgrims walking to Santiago anyway. I do like to support the albergues that stay open all year round, so am happy to walk that section any time between November and March.

The hostels in France and Italy may not be open in the off season, and I can only afford pilgrim accommodation, so I will have to walk those sections sometime between Easter and All Saints, but definitely not during the heat of midsummer.

Would welcome any thoughts, or links to other posts or blogs. Many thanks!

By the way, I have a UK passport, so the 90-day Schengen issue is not a problem for me. I think this journey would take about 4 months. But I’m beginning to think that I may have to attempt this before Brexit, as who knows now what will happen then . . . .
Jill
Hi Jill, I was worried when I read " I can only afford pilgrim accommodation" It doesn't go
well if you go through France and Italy, they can be very expensive and is not advise togo with a limited cash amount.
Ultreia

through

through
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#15
France and Italy, they can be very expensive
Hi Ernesto, very many thanks for that.

Yes, I do know France and Italy are expensive. I have walked Le Puy route, and stayed in some fabulous gites, which are just affordable for someone exchanging South African Rands to Euros.

But after the Voie Littorale (from Soulac to Hendaye) I swore never to walk in France again because of the cost.

However, I have been informed that the Arles route also has plenty of pilgrim gites along it. I ordered the “Miam Miam Dodo” for the Arles route earlier this year, but in typical South African style it has never arrived, and I would really like a copy for planning purposes.

Once I get onto the Via Francigena, surely there will be pilgrims hostels to stay at?

I think the biggest expense will be between Arles and Lucca, so I really need to look at that section.

I travelled around Italy with my husband in May this year (to celebrate his retirement, and we loved it!), and we walked a couple of days of the Via Francigena between San Gimignano and Siena, but staying in hotels.

The money is available for the occasional night in an hotel, but for a long trip like this, I’ve got to go for the cheapest option wherever possible.

I am thinking that once into France I could buy a good quality lightweight one-man tent, that I can erect with hiking poles, and then stay in campsites. There must be lots of those along the French and Italian Rivieras!

Many thanks for your input.
Jill
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#16
I am thinking that once into France I could buy a good quality lightweight one-man tent, that I can erect with hiking poles, and then stay in campsites. There must be lots of those along the French and Italian Rivieras!

Many thanks for your input.
Jill
Do you know, Jill, I was about to suggest that! Not so much for the Italian Riviera, (I found there were plenty of ostellos for 10 euros in Italy) but certainly in France or Switzerland, for instance. Then you are free! You could always sell the tent afterwards?

Mine wasn't cheap but bought it in the sale when the new super-duper-extra light came out. It has come down in price since.
https://www.outdoorgear.co.uk/Terra...MIiemQ_Ifs1wIVZZPtCh3X4gw2EAQYAyABEgL8tPD_BwE

Even with extra pegs (I think are needed if the weather is bad), it weighed barely 1kg. The poles are included. Allowed me to stay in campsites (even when they are full there is always room for such a small tent for one night) and gîtes' gardens.

Bought mine in the UK but I am sure there is a similar one in France...

Happy planning :)
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#17
I am thinking that once into France I could buy a good quality lightweight one-man tent, that I can erect with hiking poles, and then stay in campsites. There must be lots of those along the French and Italian Rivieras!
After a couple of painful episodes on caminos this year I have recently been diagnosed with osteoarthritis in my left knee :( Probably the most practical thing I can do to ensure I am able to continue walking is to reduce the weight I carry: both in my pack and around my waist. I would still like to be able to carry lightweight camping gear from time to time and for me walking from Canterbury to Rome in 2015 would have been too expensive if I had not done so. I have been considering buying an ultralight tent for such use in future. There is a Chinese-made model which uses a single trekking pole for support and which has been very favourably reviewed. About 700g and available by mail-order direct from China for well under 100 euros - though I do not know what postage to South Africa might be :) A Christmas present to myself I think!

 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#18
Impressive! Especially the price :cool:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#19
There is a Chinese-made model which uses a single trekking pole for support and which has been very favourably reviewed. About 700g and available by mail-order direct from China for well under 100 euros - though I do not know what postage to South Africa might be :)
Oh my, Bradypus! I was so tempted to order that 3F UL tent . . . my finger hovered over the BUY button :eek:. Only $21 post and packing to South Africa :p!!! But I still have to get this trip past the censor (aka husband :rolleyes:), so probably not a good idea for a one-man tent to arrive in the post before I do that :p. Besides, I don’t want to carry a tent all the way along the Camino Francés for a month first either ;). I need to have an address to post it to in France, so I can pick it up along the way . . . :cool:
Jill
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#20
Oh my, Bradypus! I was so tempted to order that 3F UL tent . . . my finger hovered over the BUY button :eek:.
I gave in to temptation and ordered one for myself this afternoon. Went for green though :) Will be interesting to see it in the flesh. And trying it out is a good excuse for another walk...
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
#21
However, I have been informed that the Arles route also has plenty of pilgrim gites along it. I ordered the “Miam Miam Dodo” for the Arles route earlier this year, but in typical South African style it has never arrived, and I would really like a copy for planning purposes.
Once I get onto the Via Francigena, surely there will be pilgrims hostels to stay at?
I think the biggest expense will be between Arles and Lucca, so I really need to look at that section.
my sis walked a week of via francigena this summer between San Miniato and Siena. if I remember correctly, she said that mostly she took half-pensions for abour €35-40, and once or twice only a bed, about €15.

the italian portion of the route along the coast has its own website: http://viadellacosta.it/?lang=en (also in english!), with the description in both directions and a list of pilgrim or pilgrim-friendly accommodation - for donativos you may need a sleeping bag and a mattress. and certainly call in advance. (sometimes a bit of persuasion was required to get that couch, too.)

this is where I stayed in 2012 and are still on the lis (listed west-east)t:

Sanctuaire de Notre Dame de Laghet, half-pension in a single room €36
Soeurs travailleuses Missionnaires in Menton, half-pension in a single room €41
in Bordighera Vecchia I slept in a tent in an olive terrace of a very friendly flower-shop girl who called to me across the road
in Lingueglietta I slept in a medieval tower-house of two very friendly German ladies who were on vacation here and asked me if I need a bed while I was having a snack on a bench nearby
chiesa parrochiale Sacra Famiglia in Imperia Oneglia, a bed in a small room off a bigger hall used for all sorts of meetings, donativo
chiesa parrochiale Cuore Immacolato di Maria in Andora in the town along the coast (2km off route), a bed in a room with a rainbow on the wall, lunch and a weird stove, very friendly, donativo
Suore Itineranti di Villa Galliera up on the hill in Voltri, a foldable bed in a chapel because the rooms were undergoing renovation, very friendly, with dinner and a cat, donativo
Ostello per Gioventu at the top of Genoa (required a bus ride but with a wonderful view), bunkbed in a small dorm, microwave, B&B €18
Monasterio di San Prospero of the Padri Olivetani in Camogli, a bed in a huge room filled with beds, donativo
Camping al Mare at the northern tip of Chiavari, a bed in a bungalow, €30

this is the link to my list of accommodations for via della costa which was updated after I returned: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8FAqCOf35zAd1lQSTUyVy1FMmc/view?usp=sharing

also link to my list of accommodations for via aurelia (GR 653A), not updated after the return: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8FAqCOf35zAcElvTE9jU3FrUGs/view?usp=sharing
always call in advance.

I stayed at this places in 2012 (listed west-east):

family in Arles, B&B €15
Vallon de la Leque about 5km north of Fontvieille, bed in a yourta, kitchen, half-pension with kittens (not for eating) €27
Chambres d'hôtes in Mouriés, a couch because of the crowd of pilgrims (4!), very friendly, half-pension €20
family in Salon de Provence, donativo (it was a really nice weekend and extremely hard to get a hold of someone who stayed at home and offered a bed to pilgrims)
paroisse saint Julien in Eguilles, a table with a shower and a toilet belonging to the parish, donativo
Chalet Amis de la Nature outside but within the walking distance of the centre of Aix-en-Provence, bunkbed in a small dorm, kitchen, €12
Gîte d'étape Puyloubier in Puyloubier, bunkbed in a small dorm, kitchen, €14 (was also possible to sleep in a chapel for donativo, ask the priest)
Hôtellerie de la sainte Baume, bed in a single room and dinner €30 (it took some negotionations, their gite is only for groups)
Domaine de Gayolle west of Brignoles, this was the mayor's home because all other pilgrim-friendly accommodation in Brignoles was closed, very friendly, donativo
Gite d'étape La Source de Vie outside Carcés, very nice, had my numerology read, bed in a small room, donativo
Monastere de Betlehem just north of the wonderful Abbaye du Thoronet, half-pension with bed in a small wooden cabin, donativo
Gîte de groupe Paradou in Le Muy, bed in a small dorm, dinner with the friendly chatty owner and his goats, half-pension €30
Auberge de Jeunesse 2km north-east of Fréjus, a bunkbed in a small dorm, kitchen, B&B €19.80 (breakfast was too late so I skipped it)
Camping Le Mas du Rastel north of Le Dramont but on route, the friendly owner took pity on a tired pilgrim who couldn't find another bed, a vacation tent with a bed, donativo
family in Roquette sur Siagne, very friendly, half-pension €35 (but bed only also possible, kitchen)
Foyer Maria Mater in Roquefort les Pins, very friendly, half-pension in a single room, donativo
a family in Vence, very nice, donativo
Monastere Notre Dame de la Paix about 3km north of Aspremont, half-pension in a single room, donativo
Sanctuaire de Notre Dame de Laghet, half-pension in a single room €36

hope that will help you somewhat!
 

Barbara06

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Pamplona (2011-14)
VDLP (2015)
Portuguese (2015)
Francigena (2016)
Primitivo (2017)
#23
Hello Caminka,
I am planning to walk on the via de la Costa beginning January, towards Rome.
Do you know where I can get (or order) a credential for this route ?
(the ones sold on this site are only for Santiago)
Thanks so much
Barbara
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#24
Hello Caminka,
I am planning to walk on the via de la Costa beginning January, towards Rome.
Do you know where I can get (or order) a credential for this route ?
(the ones sold on this site are only for Santiago)
Thanks so much
Barbara
Hi Barbara, I am not caminka, but hope this helps.
You can print your own credential for the Via Francigena:
Scroll down to the bottom of the page:
http://www.urcamino.com/via-francigena/credential-and-testimonium
I don’t know about a credencial especially for the Via Della Costa; you can probably use the Via Francigena one.
Jill
 

Barbara06

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Pamplona (2011-14)
VDLP (2015)
Portuguese (2015)
Francigena (2016)
Primitivo (2017)
#25
Hello Jill,
Thanks so much !! That's really great and useful.
Have you found all you needed for your journey ?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#26
Hello Jill,
Thanks so much !! That's really great and useful.
Have you found all you needed for your journey ?
Hi Barbara, I have established that the journey is feasible if I can find, and carry, a good lightweight tent that I can use in campsites through France and Italy where there is no pilgrim accommodation. I don’t think I can rely on being able to buy one in any of the small towns in southern France, so I will need to find an address to stay at, where I can get a tent delivered to. But will do that nearer the time.

I would love to know how the Via Della Costa goes for you, so please report back!

Jill
 
#27
Bonjour, Jsalt

On finding somewhere to sleep:

... Each day I walk as far as able then I introduce myself to the people in the village where I hope to overnight. I go to the municipal buildings, the church office, the police station, cafes and shops and engage in conversation. I am a chatter box. I enjoy meeting people and discovering how a country is organised village by village.

In most of the European countries where I have walked pilgrimage has been endorsed at government level. This implies that at regional and local level authorities have a responsibility to assist when a pilgrim asks for help.

I am a pilgrim. I carry a pilgrims passport. When in need I show it to the people I meet along the way and eventually some one comes to my aid.

Cheers

ps I have edited this reply. I clicked the post button by mistake before I had finished writing...
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#29
OK I am going to do this.
Starting from Santiago in February 2019, so I have a year to talk myself out of it :p.
Santiago to Puente la Reina solo, but after that some company for a few days at a time along uncharted territory would be nice.
After the Camino Francés (in reverse), I’m thinking of the Camino Aragonés, the Arles Route, the Via Aurelia (GR653A), the Via Della Costa, and the Via Francigena.
My husband says if I do all that he’ll meet me in Rome :) :).
Plan B is to buy a return ticket that is easily date-changeable, so if it doesn’t work out, for whatever reason, I can get a flight home at any time.
Jill
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#30
Wow! So envious! :cool::cool::cool::)
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#31
To answer some questions, the southern French route via Aix, St Maximin, Fréjus, Menton was waymarked some years ago, as has been the Way on the Italian side.

I don't know at all about the quality of the Italian waymarking, but OTOH the French GR makes many detours that might be fun for a shorter distance hiker, but might unnecessarily lengthen the journey for a pilgrim.

Especially, I'd actually advise leaving the path just as you get near to the Var river at Nice, then get down to the bridge there and cross the city on foot ; then try and find your way up roughly north from the old city/port area up towards l'Ariane and Laghet -- this would cut about 2-3 days (!!!) off the journey time.

Depending which route you take, you'll have little problem with pilgrim hostels as far as Arles, and if you can manage to get in touch with the lovely people from the Provençal pilgrims association there, at Arles, they will be able to help you get in touch with the pilgrim support network from there to Menton, which has become fairly extensive in the years since I walked a variant of that route.

As for Italy, well the support for pilgrims there is surprisingly good, and similar in some respects to what I found in both France and Spain back in the 90s, but has been cracked down upon since then in both countries -- there's still decent support for pilgrims from parishes and monasteries and whatnot.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#32
the French GR makes many detours that might be fun for a shorter distance hiker, but might unnecessarily lengthen the journey for a pilgrim.

Especially, I'd actually advise leaving the path just as you get near to the Var river at Nice, then get down to the bridge there and cross the city on foot
Mmm, I do remember taking a few short cuts on Le Chemin du Puy :).

It has crossed my mind to stay next to the coast from Cannes to Nice.
It looks doable.
And it may make a change from the up and down, up and down further inland.
But I’ll need to check out the budget accommodation (ha,ha!) along those few days.
Will decide when I get there.

My husband and I stayed in Nice last year for a couple of nights.
It was just before the Grand Prix in Monaco (his passion).
We caught a bus (2 euros) from Nice to Monaco, and thoroughly explored Monte Carlo on foot for the day. It was the most amazing day.

Back in Nice we passed a restaurant on the Promenade Anglais that had a bottle of wine on its menu for 4,800 euros. No kidding!

20170514_140023c.jpg

Jill
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#33
eh, never tasted La Tâche sorry, so no report -- and crikey corblimey, but their "Les Charmes" stuff is at least 4 times max conscionable price even when overpriced !!! (it's very snobbish & dodgy)

Actually, that very dodgy wine list from my POV would be an excellent reason to just go looking for a pizza and a beer instead ...

The 1989 Pauillac is probably the only wine on that list with a justifiable price.

The bloody Bandol should be about 15-25 max -- NOT 84 !!! Bandol is OK, but it's still just one more regional vine.

Both the Condrieu and the Bâtard-Montrachet are too young and overpriced.

The Bellet should be fun, but at 157€ no thanks, that's about 10 pilgrim menus ...

Clos de l'Ours is crap, as is any Châteauneuf-du-Pape..

hmmmm the Mercurey is very young too, but there's nothing intrinsically wrong with it, and it **does** have one of the lowest prices.

aaaaaand the bloody Saint-Emilion being sold like it's some sort of good wine, instead of being an indifferent bourgeois prêt-à-penser ...
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
#35
Hello Caminka,
I am planning to walk on the via de la Costa beginning January, towards Rome.
Do you know where I can get (or order) a credential for this route ?
(the ones sold on this site are only for Santiago)
Thanks so much
Barbara
the credencial for via della costa you can get form their associations, including paca-corse in france which manage GR 653A via aurelia.
http://viadellacosta.it/01-da-sapere/la-credenziale/?lang=en

on the via francigena site it's explained where you can get their credencial. also in their on-line shop.
http://www.viefrancigene.org/it/credenziali/
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#36
t has crossed my mind to stay next to the coast from Cannes to Nice.
hmmm, with all of the wine off-topic stuff, I missed this -- actually, as far as I can tell, and I'm just checking this right now BTW, the GR from Cannes is mostly OK -- and it goes up to the beautiful Vence, which would be silly to avoid IMO, and is definitely on the traditional Camino.

It does make a lengthy detour around La Colle sur Loup that personally I'd not follow, but instead head straight and more simply through town towards Vence.

Some hill-climbing before Vence is unavoidable though.

It's at La Gaude or just after that I'd personally leave it, to take some DIY alternative path down to the river (many exist), find the handiest place to cross (either a bit upstream or down depending where you come out), then through Nice.

The coastal route between Cannes and Nice is really really not recommendable, though ... some parts of that might even be a bit dangerous for non-locals.

Up from Nice through La Trinité up to Laghet, and then from La Turbie, well really both variants of the GR down to Menton are fine beautiful walks, as is the historic but tarmacked Aurelia route (though this small tarmacked road is dead easy, and usually has no traffic whatsoever 'til Roquebrune, apart from one small section of main road, it's pretty darn fiddly to find if you don't know the area).

Straightforward in any case from Carnolès onwards to Italy.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#38
I gave in to temptation and ordered one for myself this afternoon. Went for green though :) Will be interesting to see it in the flesh. And trying it out is a good excuse for another walk...
Hi Bradypus, how is the tent? Have you used it much yet? I am still trying to talk myself out of this mad adventure, but not succeeding. I will need a tent between Arles and Sarzana, where there is little chance of finding budget accommodation.
Jill
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016)
Future (God-willing): Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo (2018)
#39
@jsalt please do it! Don’t listen to that evil voice in your head!!!
With having to carry a tent (and presumably mattress and maybe cooking gear) have you considered using a trailer?
BTW i’ll Be watching your tent updates carefully. So much cheaper than Zpack tents.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#40
Hi Bradypus, how is the tent? Have you used it much yet? I am still trying to talk myself out of this mad adventure, but not succeeding. I will need a tent between Arles and Sarzana, where there is little chance of finding budget accommodation.
Jill
Not used it yet but I have set it up to check it out. Looks good and quite well made. Very straightforward to pitch. So far it looks like a good deal.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#41
With having to carry a tent (and presumably mattress and maybe cooking gear) have you considered using a trailer?
I think I could get away without the mattress or cooking gear. The mattresses in the hiking huts in South Africa are so hard, yet I have no problem sleeping on them. A fleece blanket under me might work (and to prevent the cold rising), and if not, it should be fairly easy to pick up a cheap roll-up foam pad somewhere. Definitely no cooking equipment. Bread, camembert and wine is all good in France :D.
Jill
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#42
Absolutely, don’t bother carrying cooking equipment. If camping in France, you may not even find food to cook with lol
Joke apart, I do think some sort of mattress is in order though.... I carried a ‘half’one tokeep the weight down (head on clothes bag, legs on rucksack) but I’m not sure I would have slept alright without it... But you may be younger and fitter than I am :cool:
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016)
Future (God-willing): Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo (2018)
#44
In my research of lightweight tents I have seen lots of people recommend leaving your pack outside the tent overnight. To me (admittedly a novice) that seems like a dumb idea on many levels! @domigee that tent you linked to certainly looks big enough to have the pack inside - would that be right?
@jsalt you're obviously not part of Laurie's electric coil club, those who need caffeine every morning and random times through out the day! I could last on French bread and camembert for longer than should be possible!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#45
@jsalt you're obviously not part of Laurie's electric coil club
I am actually! But it depends on which trip I’m on as to whether to take it or not. Albergues every night? - no need. Hotels every night? - definitely needed! Camping? – no power sockets, so I wouldn’t be able to use it.
Jill
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#46
In my research of lightweight tents I have seen lots of people recommend leaving your pack outside the tent overnight. To me (admittedly a novice) that seems like a dumb idea on many levels! @domigee that tent you linked to certainly looks big enough to have the pack inside - would that be right?
@jsalt you're obviously not part of Laurie's electric coil club, those who need caffeine every morning and random times through out the day! I could last on French bread and camembert for longer than should be possible!
No, I would never leave my pack outside, besides as luck would have it, it ALWAYS rained when I camped ! Lol
The pack does fit in the tent, so do my boots. In fact they say two people can sleep in it but you’d have to be very friendly ;-)
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#47
If you camp in campsites, there are power sockets....
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#48
I could last on French bread and camembert for longer than should be possible!
Me too! But...if you are on the Via Francigena - the French part - there were many days (too many!) when not one shop was in sight. Nothing! Nada.
I was so hungry I used to fantasize about killing a bunny rabbit when I saw them in the morning... Only I didn’t have a clue about how to catch one lol.
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
#49
I don't know at all about the quality of the Italian waymarking, but OTOH the French GR makes many detours that might be fun for a shorter distance hiker, but might unnecessarily lengthen the journey for a pilgrim.
via della costa has been so-so waymarked in 2012, but the arrows were in both directions. a good description or a good map to help you along would be cool. you can check my wikiloc tracks under caminka, they go from sarzana to arles. I didn't always stick to the route, sometimes because of the rain in the hills, on one or two occasions because the route was closed/blocked, I regularly detour if I want to see something, and I wanted to see more of cinque terre. but it will get you there. :)

If you camp in campsites, there are power sockets....
there should be power sockets in french cemeteries as well. for the grass mowning. probably in italian cemeteries, too?
via aurelia in france stays enough away from the touristy coast that I think you shouldn't have a problem with bivouacing (camping for the night). several people I talked to when I walked it in 2012 said that it's not wise to camp nearer the coast or near the big cities because of the immigrants and non-employed.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#50
there should be power sockets in french cemeteries as well
I don’t think I’ll be looking for a power socket in a cemetery in order to boil some water with my electric coil, but the image in my mind makes me smile! I won’t be taking my electric coil with me on this trip, so no worries about power sockets in campsites or cemeteries. If I have to camp at night it will only be at proper campsites. I’ll do some research beforehand on where the campsites are. Thanks for everyone’s input.
Jill
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#51
via aurelia in france stays enough away from the touristy coast
The waymarked southern Camino in South East France doesn't really follow the actual Via Aurelia or if you prefer the Via Julia Augusta.

Even just locally down here, between the Italian border and Vence, the Camino probably follows the Aurelia for probably no more than a few hundred metres.

Even so, the French Aurelia is a coastal road basically in Menton alone (remember, the local Roman city was Cimiez, not Nice, so the roads into and out of it are not coastal) ; and nor are any of the Camino variants you could follow or make up reasonably for yourself until after Cannes, if you decided to walk via Fréjus.

But as for touristy, well, the whole region is touristy, and there's no hope of avoiding after you begin to get close to Arles. Yes there are many small local areas along the Way afterward that are devoid of tourists, but really those are just the exceptions that prove the rule.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2035 km of the way to Saint James in Galicia done.
#52
there should be power sockets in french cemeteries as well. for the grass mowning. probably in italian cemeteries, too?
I honestly can't decide whether you meant this as a joke or not ... While every electric coil known to man and woman needs a power socket to work, not all grass mowers do :cool:.
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
#53
I honestly can't decide whether you meant this as a joke or not ... While every electric coil known to man and woman needs a power socket to work, not all grass mowers do :cool:.
not a joke! I learnt that from dave of this forum who crossed the whole of france, often slept outdoors and was very grateful when he learnt this tidbit from a french pilgrim. :)
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
#54
The waymarked southern Camino in South East France doesn't really follow the actual Via Aurelia or if you prefer the Via Julia Augusta.

Even just locally down here, between the Italian border and Vence, the Camino probably follows the Aurelia for probably no more than a few hundred metres.

Even so, the French Aurelia is a coastal road basically in Menton alone (remember, the local Roman city was Cimiez, not Nice, so the roads into and out of it are not coastal) ; and nor are any of the Camino variants you could follow or make up reasonably for yourself until after Cannes, if you decided to walk via Fréjus.

But as for touristy, well, the whole region is touristy, and there's no hope of avoiding after you begin to get close to Arles. Yes there are many small local areas along the Way afterward that are devoid of tourists, but really those are just the exceptions that prove the rule.
I know. I meant it as in GR653D via aurelia. the modern route avoids the coast purposely, not the least as there are few non-paved possibilities. you could follow the sea as much as possible but that would involve a lot of asphalt and a big budget.
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
#56
if you decide to head inwards after fréjus. but if you stay on the coast, you need to be crafty.
I once did a bit of research for a route that would follow the sea as much as possible and got almost to nice. there were lots of pedestrian/promenade lanes, but unfortunately almost all paved.

I didn't find via aurelia touristy at all (except maybe menton, aix and les baux) but I was there in june when the summer season hasn't started yet.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#57
if you decide to head inwards after fréjus. but if you stay on the coast, you need to be crafty.
I once did a bit of research for a route that would follow the sea as much as possible and got almost to nice. there were lots of pedestrian/promenade lanes, but unfortunately almost all paved.
I've walked along possibly ALL of those seafront lanes, and they're just not pleasant, with the exception of one picturesque stretch between Fréjus and Cannes.

I will not change my mind, the advice that I gave as far as the route from before Cannes towards Nice is still good.

I didn't find via aurelia touristy at all (except maybe menton, aix and les baux) but I was there in june when the summer season hasn't started yet.
Compared to most of France, the whole region is extremely touristy.

MOST small villages down here have a middling to strong tourist presence (including French tourists from elsewhere in France), which is far less the case elsewhere.

Apart from my 2005 Camino, I've hitch-hiked all over the place down here.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#58
Hi Bradypus, how is the tent? Have you used it much yet?
I finally got round to using the tent this week walking through mid-Wales. Some heavy rain to test it with. I was very impressed with its performance: no leaks, a modest amount of condensation, and surprisingly roomy for such a small package. I was particularly pleased with the height giving good sitting headroom for me (a fairly short 5'9" / 1.75m) with several inches to spare. My only regret was in choosing the "green" model which is in reality a bright near-yellow colour. The grey would have been a more subtle choice!
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ) ,Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )
Camino Portugese (2018 )
#59
I commend you on what seems to be a wonderful marriage...a husband who survives your absence for 4 months. Well done, Jill, well done ! Looking forward to reading your upcoming plans :)
 

Dickwilbur

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2011, Primitivo, 2013, Via Francigena 2014, 2015 VDLP, 2016 Via de la Costa and Via San Francesco
#61
Hi, has anyone here done this?

I am pretty sure I can walk backwards along the Camino Francés with no directional problems, having walked it to Santiago several times.

And I am pretty sure I would be OK to Arles along the GR653, as the French GR routes are marked in both directions. (It would help if I can download the track onto MapsMe – does anyone know?)

Once on the Via Francigena there will be signposts to Rome.

But what about between Arles and joining up with the Via Francigena? Is there a GR route?

And what would be the best time of year?

Definitely not between Easter and All Saints on the Camino Francés; too many people looking for albergue beds, and those beds should probably go to the pilgrims walking to Santiago anyway. I do like to support the albergues that stay open all year round, so am happy to walk that section any time between November and March.

The hostels in France and Italy may not be open in the off season, and I can only afford pilgrim accommodation, so I will have to walk those sections sometime between Easter and All Saints, but definitely not during the heat of midsummer.

Would welcome any thoughts, or links to other posts or blogs. Many thanks!

By the way, I have a UK passport, so the 90-day Schengen issue is not a problem for me. I think this journey would take about 4 months. But I’m beginning to think that I may have to attempt this before Brexit, as who knows now what will happen then . . . .
Jill
When are you intending to leave Jill?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Finisterra-Muxia 2017; SK Camino Kosiče-Levoča Oct 2017; El Norte March 2018; Ingles Nov 2018
#64
OK I am going to do this.
Starting from Santiago in February 2019, so I have a year to talk myself out of it :p.
Santiago to Puente la Reina solo, but after that some company for a few days at a time along uncharted territory would be nice.
After the Camino Francés (in reverse), I’m thinking of the Camino Aragonés, the Arles Route, the Via Aurelia (GR653A), the Via Della Costa, and the Via Francigena.
My husband says if I do all that he’ll meet me in Rome :):).
Plan B is to buy a return ticket that is easily date-changeable, so if it doesn’t work out, for whatever reason, I can get a flight home at any time.
Jill
Wonderful, I’m dreaming of a mid Feb start with my dog from Slovakia towards Santiago keeps as far south as possible to avoid mountain snow. Buen camino.
 

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