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Secondary roads

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Walkerbabe

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese 2018
Hello
I'm in very early stages of research, a complete newbie, so please bear with me I have 2-3 weeks to walk, starting from Lisbon. I refuse to walk any busy main roads and plan to bus or train these sections. Is this realistic? any tips I. This regard would be helpful. So far I plan on taking train to Santarem a d begin walking. I have noticed that about 50% of walking is on secondary roads? What are these like? How busy? How safe?
My destination is somewhere north of Porto
Looking forward to replies
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Welcome on the forum .happy newyear
Your plan is perfect.

It is a good idea starting in Santarèm. It is easy accesable by commuter trainn from Lisbon. You are not walking on main roads but a lot on secondairy asphalt roads and (antique Roman ) cobblestone paved roads. And dirt paths too.
There is allways a manner to avoid some bussier or unatractive roads by public transport but you will find out that it will be pretty good to walk the complete route..
For your safety except good shoes ,wear a fluorescent safetyvest and walk with walkingpoles.
we used them to attend drivers,specially in Portugal that we were walking aside the road.
Furthermore walk towards the upcoming traffic to be alert but keep in mind that sometimes the (particulairy Portuguese) drivers can come from behind you when they are overtaking.
Portuguese people are lovely and kind but once they are behind the steeringwheel they are like devils. Not specially directed to walkers or bikers but it is their"style" to drive fast and "aggresive" . But you'll find out that commonly spoken it is a nice caminho to walk.
Portugal is a rather big country ,anyway compared to the country I live-the Netherlands- and live only few people so really busy it is not except for some big cities and towns like Lisbon ,Coimbra and Porto.
But in these places there will be no other traffic danger than in bigger places in your country, whereever you come from.
You do not tell what is your average pace per day will be so I cannot predict how far you will come in two or three weeks but likely you will arrive somewhere around the Portuguese -Spanish border.Redondela-Vigo-Pontevedra maybe !?
We walked the entire route from Lisbon at a 20kms a day pace and included some restdays in Coimbra, Porto and Barcelos in 32 days , nice and easy.
well maybe this information gives you a first impression of what could be possible.

Advice .download Johnny Walkers guide here at the resources part on the forum to see the different stages and experiences from them who went before you.
More usefull information you'll find by reading back for some time on this great forum.
Happy planning.
Bom caminho
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, walkerbabe, welcome to the forum,

I've moved the thread to the right place -- the name "Caminho Portugues Interior" is a bit confusing, but it follows the route that Albertinho describes and is very very solitary (but beautiful!).

I have walked from Lisbon and agree that there is a lot of asphalt, but I think the Via Lusitana friends group is doing a great job of moving the caminho where possible. As far as "busy" versus "secondary" roads, some of this depends on the time and the day. I walked on a stretch that many describe as very busy, but it was Sunday so there were no cars. I think that by starting in Santarem, you will avoid the sections that get the most criticism. But you will also miss the chance to stay in the new Via Lusitana albergue in Alpriate, just 20 km from the cathedral. If it were me, I'd consider walking that first day (it takes you all through the old part of Lisbon, out to the Parque das Nacoes along the Tejo River, all very interesting IMO). Then from there, get help from the hospitaleros about how to skip the busy parts.

Calling all who have walked from Lisbon -- am I remembering correctly that the first 20 kms would not be on anything that we would describe as a busy road? Isn't that mostly near Alverca and Alhandra??????

Bom caminho, Laurie
 
Last edited:

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Hi, walkerbabe, welcome to the forum,

I've moved the thread to the right place -- the name "Caminho Portugues Interior" is a bit confusing, but it follows the route that Albertinho describes and is very very solitary (but beautiful!).

I have walked from Lisbon and agree that there is a lot of asphalt, but I think the Via Lusitana friends group is doing a great job of moving the caminho where possible. As far as "busy" versus "secondary" roads, some of this depends on the time and the day. I walked on a stretch that many describe as very busy, but it was Sunday so there were no cars. I think that by starting in Santarem, you will avoid the sections that get the most criticism. But you will also miss the chance to stay in the new Via Lusitana albergue in Alpriate, just 20 km from the cathedral. If it were me, I'd consider walking that first day (it takes you all through the old part of Lisbon, out to the Parque das Nacoes along the Tejo River, all very interesting IMO). Then from there, get help from the hospitaleros about how to skip the busy parts.

Calling all who have walked from Lisbon -- am I remembering correctly that the first 20 kms would not be on anything that we would describe as a busy road? Isn't that mostly near Alverca and Alhandra??????

Bom caminho, Laurie
An excellent idea Laurie. Happy new year by the way !
The walk from the Lisbon Sé cathedral through Alfáma to the parque das Nações is great.
At the parque das Naçoes you can take the commutertrain -there is a big trainstation..you even can take the train from there to Sintra to visit one of the most famous places in Portugal. fairytale castles of the ancient Portuguese king(s) .very important historical place.
You can take the train to Azambuja and walk from there through an agricultural landscape alongside the the Tejo river or train directly to Santarèm and continue from there. Indeed the walk between Parque das Naçoes and Azambuja is not that interesting.

Bom caminho
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Indeed the walk between Parque das Naçoes and Azambuja is not that interesting.
But the opportunity to stay in the new albergue in Alpriate is, IMO, a good reason to walk beyond Parque das Naçoes and do the first 20 km from the Cathedral. It's unlikely that many people starting in Lisbon will meet others in the city since there is no albergue, so Alpriate is a good first chance to meet up. And there is a great little cafe service cheap honest food.

But Albertinho, is there a lot of busy road walking between Parque das Naçoes and that walk along the off-road stretch that takes you into Alpriate? I don't think there is, but I'm trying to jog my memory by looking at my pictures.

https://get.google.com/albumarchive/104105778729242194944/album/AF1QipNyHzSF2YALihx5gSqaC8iQVDMUFSupWWrOcYOr?authKey=CNq6p72psbzYFw
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
But the opportunity to stay in the new albergue in Alpriate is, IMO, a good reason to walk beyond Parque das Naçoes and do the first 20 km from the Cathedral. It's unlikely that many people starting in Lisbon will meet others in the city since there is no albergue, so Alpriate is a good first chance to meet up. And there is a great little cafe service cheap honest food.

But Albertinho, is there a lot of busy road walking between Parque das Naçoes and that walk along the off-road stretch that takes you into Alpriate? I don't think there is, but I'm trying to jog my memory by looking at my pictures.

https://get.google.com/albumarchive/104105778729242194944/album/AF1QipNyHzSF2YALihx5gSqaC8iQVDMUFSupWWrOcYOr?authKey=CNq6p72psbzYFw
From Parque das Naçoes you follow a nice boardwalk along the riverbank and underneath the very long Vasco da Gama bridge and along the statue of Catharina de Bragança, queen of England from 1662 to 1685 ,who introduced tea in Europe . Interesting. The translation of the word "tea" in Portugal is "chá" and is the same word -or pronounciation as in Chinese !
Okay. The boardwalk goes on almost to Sacavèm . The caminho leads around Sacavèm by a rural path to Unhos and Granja and then goes over on hard surface and you'll arrive in Alpriate. Only entering Sacavèm there is a busy roundabout and a bridge you have to cross Brierley give a warning there to take care because of the traffic going to the N10 national road leading northwards.
 

frida1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 11-May 11 2014
From Parque das Naçoes you follow a nice boardwalk along the riverbank and underneath the very long Vasco da Gama bridge and along the statue of Catharina de Bragança, queen of England from 1662 to 1685 ,who introduced tea in Europe . Interesting. The translation of the word "tea" in Portugal is "chá" and is the same word -or pronounciation as in Chinese !
Okay. The boardwalk goes on almost to Sacavèm . The caminho leads around Sacavèm by a rural path to Unhos and Granja and then goes over on hard surface and you'll arrive in Alpriate. Only entering Sacavèm there is a busy roundabout and a bridge you have to cross Brierley give a warning there to take care because of the traffic going to the N10 national road leading northwards.
 

frida1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 11-May 11 2014
I walked from santarem to Santiago. There are not many busy roads, but there are a few. It might be practicable to take taxis over those short stretches. Via Lusitania can help with this. I met several people who organized taxi rides for certain parts, although I didn't myself.
 

jsalt

Jill
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, Soulac, Norte, Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés
Hello
I'm in very early stages of research, a complete newbie, so please bear with me I have 2-3 weeks to walk, starting from Lisbon. I refuse to walk any busy main roads and plan to bus or train these sections. Is this realistic? any tips I. This regard would be helpful. So far I plan on taking train to Santarem a d begin walking. I have noticed that about 50% of walking is on secondary roads? What are these like? How busy? How safe?
My destination is somewhere north of Porto
Looking forward to replies
Hi, I posted the following on another thread, but you might also find it helpful:
Some suggestions:

Day 1: Cathedral to Oriente; stop for a couple of hours at the Tile Museum (Museo Azulejo); it is absolutely fascinating. Book a bed at the youth hostel in Moscavide.

Day 2: Walk the section along the river to Sacavem, then get on a train to Vila Franca de Xira. Stay at the Ribatejana, on the left as you exit the station.

Day 3: Get the train to Santarem, explore the town, and stay at the Santarem Hostel, not far from the Tourist Office.

Day 4: Get the train to Tomar, via Entroncamento. OR:

Be adventurous! Get the train to Entroncamento. Download a google map for how to walk to Quinta Cardiga (look it up), then walk from there to Vila Nova Barquina. I can recommend Pensao Soltejo for accommodation and food. Then see if you can get a boat to Almourol Castle in the afternoon, otherwise there’s a nice riverside park here at Barquina. There’s a bit about it in Brierley.

Day 5: From Tomar (or Entroncamento) take a day trip to Fatima.

Day 6: Spend the day at the castle in Tomar, and take the late afternoon bus to Alvaiazere. Stay at the Albergaria Pinheiro.

Day 7: Walk to Ansiao. I can recommend Adega Tipica for accommodation and food.

Day 8: Walk to Rabacal and stay at the Casa de Turismo in the centre of the village, next to the museum.

Day 9: Walk to Conimbriga and visit the ruins; not to be missed! There are places to stay a bit further on in Condeixa-a-Nova.

Day 10: Get the bus to Coimbra, lots of places to stay (I can recommend Pensao Domus), and explore this lovely city.

Day 11: Walk to Mealhada and stay at Residential Oasis, or at the albergue further out of town.

Day 12: Walk to Agueda and stay at the Ribeirinho, also great food here.

Day 13: Walk to Albergaria-a-Velha. Both Casa Alameda and Pensao Parente offer good budget accommodation and food. Or stay at Casa Diocesana further on (you need to phone them first).

Day 14: Walk to Oliveira de Azemeis, ask locals how to get to the bus station, and get a bus to Porto. You have to change buses in Sao Joao da Madeira, but your ticket is valid right through.

Bom Caminho! Jill
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Hi, I posted the following on another thread, but you might also find it helpful:
Some suggestions:

Day 1: Cathedral to Oriente; stop for a couple of hours at the Tile Museum (Museo Azulejo); it is absolutely fascinating. Book a bed at the youth hostel in Moscavide.

Day 2: Walk the section along the river to Sacavem, then get on a train to Vila Franca de Xira. Stay at the Ribatejana, on the left as you exit the station.

Day 3: Get the train to Santarem, explore the town, and stay at the Santarem Hostel, not far from the Tourist Office.

Day 4: Get the train to Tomar, via Entroncamento. OR:

Be adventurous! Get the train to Entroncamento. Download a google map for how to walk to Quinta Cardiga (look it up), then walk from there to Vila Nova Barquina. I can recommend Pensao Soltejo for accommodation and food. Then see if you can get a boat to Almourol Castle in the afternoon, otherwise there’s a nice riverside park here at Barquina. There’s a bit about it in Brierley.

Day 5: From Tomar (or Entroncamento) take a day trip to Fatima.

Tomar: a special experience is to stay one night at the Bombeiros Volontarios, the fire brigade. You'll sleep on a matrass on the floor in a big hall. Hot showers, toilets.


Day 6: Spend the day at the castle in Tomar, and take the late afternoon bus to Alvaiazere. Stay at the Albergaria Pinheiro.

Day 7: Walk to Ansiao. I can recommend Adega Tipica for accommodation and food.

Day 8: Walk to Rabacal and stay at the Casa de Turismo in the centre of the village, next to the museum.

Day 9: Walk to Conimbriga and visit the ruins; not to be missed! There are places to stay a bit further on in Condeixa-a-Nova.

Day 10: Get the bus to Coimbra, lots of places to stay (I can recommend Pensao Domus), and explore this lovely city.

Day 11: Walk to Mealhada and stay at Residential Oasis, or at the albergue further out of town.

Day 12: Walk to Agueda and stay at the Ribeirinho, also great food here.

Day 13: Walk to Albergaria-a-Velha. Both Casa Alameda and Pensao Parente offer good budget accommodation and food. Or stay at Casa Diocesana further on (you need to phone them first).

Day 14: Walk to Oliveira de Azemeis, ask locals how to get to the bus station, and get a bus to Porto. You have to change buses in Sao Joao da Madeira, but your ticket is valid right through.

Bom Caminho! Jill
Good tips Jill !
Addition: the youth hotel in Moscavide is the Poussada da Juventude at the Parque das Naçoes ,I talked about . You find it a couple of hundreds meters from the yellow caminho waymarkers. We booked it by internet on beforehand because it can be busy there at some periods.anyway it was in the month of May.http://www.pousadasjuventude.pt/pt/pousadas/parquenacoes/

It is adviseble to book the Santarèm hostal when you will walk in May . There will be a lot of pilgrims , going to Fátima so it can be fully booked. The phonenumber you'll find in Johnny Walkers guide Lisbon to Porto, to be downloaded here on the forum (donative) in the resources section. The hostal is in the street behind the tourist office.
From Santarèm it is easy to get to Fátima by bus.

Tomar : the castle is not only a castle of one in a dozen but the world heritage famous Templars castle. A must to see when you are in Tomar

Mealhada : walk further outside the village by following the waymarkers to Serdanella (2kms) where is Hilário's hotel and albergue . Here the camiho follows the busy IC2 national road.
Hilario's is situated at the other side of the road so be carefull crossing.
Hilário's serves a common pilgrim diner . So a nice caminho experience to stay there.
The only other place where was a common diner too was between Barcelos and Ponte de Lima in Vitorino dos Piães at Casa da Fernanda . The place to be if you walk the Portuguese !

I second Jills advice to stay at Casa Dioscesana just outside and past Albergaría -a-Velha which is a retraîte house ,lead by nuns. For a couple of euros yiu will have a bunk bed, hot shower, a lunch ,diner and breakfast and is a great experience to be there.
Leaving Albergaría follow the waymarkers untill you'll see a big statue of the Virgin Maria and ascend a steep hill to the right to access the convent.
Beautifull views from there over the area too as a bonus !
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese
Hi, walkerbabe, welcome to the forum,

I've moved the thread to the right place -- the name "Caminho Portugues Interior" is a bit confusing, but it follows the route that Albertinho describes and is very very solitary (but beautiful!).

I have walked from Lisbon and agree that there is a lot of asphalt, but I think the Via Lusitana friends group is doing a great job of moving the caminho where possible. As far as "busy" versus "secondary" roads, some of this depends on the time and the day. I walked on a stretch that many describe as very busy, but it was Sunday so there were no cars. I think that by starting in Santarem, you will avoid the sections that get the most criticism. But you will also miss the chance to stay in the new Via Lusitana albergue in Alpriate, just 20 km from the cathedral. If it were me, I'd consider walking that first day (it takes you all through the old part of Lisbon, out to the Parque das Nacoes along the Tejo River, all very interesting IMO). Then from there, get help from the hospitaleros about how to skip the busy parts.

Calling all who have walked from Lisbon -- am I remembering correctly that the first 20 kms would not be on anything that we would describe as a busy road? Isn't that mostly near Alverca and Alhandra??????

Bom caminho, Laurie
Absolutely must not miss the first walk out of Lisbon. Beautiful and interesting. This worry about busy roads is so over rated. There are roads and tarmac but always there is a little worn path running alongside. On the whole walk from Lisbon to Santiago there were only three short stretches that I felt tired of. I was cautious coming into the villages and towns which was invariably at the end of the day when commenters and pilgrims alike are wanting to get to the end of the day. My most stressful times were coming into Tomar and into Vigo (coastal route). A couple of rough bits through some forestry areas, one section of cobble that I was pleased to see come to an end but otherwise I found the path really pleasant. A little peek at the edge of the original Roman road, how amazing! I also very rarely felt intimidated by the driving style of Portuguese drivers and only on one occasion in Spain. I was not walking with earpieces in my ears. Catch a train or bus by all means to enable you to get along a bit faster but not because you are reluctant to walk on roads. They are not a problem! Have fun too it is such a wonderful route!
 
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