A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Securing backpack for plane?

Jerome74

Active Member
#1
I tried to look this up but didn't find anything ... ?

So, any tips as to how to best secure the backpack for the plane? They don't always handle luggage carefully ... And I'd hate to see something brake off afterwards, especially the 'buckle'!

Thanks.
 

Advertisment

A

Anonymous

Guest
#3
Based on previous experience of lost luggage: I put all I'll be taking on my Caminos inside my backpack and take it with me aboard. I check in all else I will not be using on the Roads. Best, xm 8)
 

Jerome74

Active Member
#4
Minkey: Ok, but I had this once before ...

XM: You take your whole backpack with you on the plane?? As hand luggage? Mine is too big for that ...
 

Advertisment

A

Anonymous

Guest
#8
Jerome, don't worry, as u walk u'll very probably get rid of things, and next time around u'll know exactly what to take and bring weight down as much as poss. Walk a step at a time. Best, xm 8)
 
#9
Luggage suggestion

A friend of mine suggested that you put "dangerous cargo" (pocket knives, poles, liquid toiletries (if you come from the U.S.) in a disposible packing box, and use that as your checked baggage. I'm going to put extra stuff in there, and carry on my pack with all of the vitals in it so the airline doesn't screw up my trip. I have had luggage permanently lost twice on Lufthansa, once on Spanair, and delayed for over 24 hrs many times in many places. IT's not worth taking a chance- and I'm not a pessimist; the industry made me this way! :?
 
#10
It's touch-and-go whether you need to check anything: I don't see why people feel the need to bring pocket knives as if they are boy scouts (and you could always buy an ordinary knife for cutting food in France/Spain); you can carry small enough quantities of liquid in your hand luggage (as long as each container has no more than 4oz/100ml) and walking poles are not essential (no really steep climbs, paths sometimes muddy after rain but lots of flat walking at side of road)
 
#11
spursfan said:
It's touch-and-go whether you need to check anything: I don't see why people feel the need to bring pocket knives as if they are boy scouts (and you could always buy an ordinary knife for cutting food in France/Spain); you can carry small enough quantities of liquid in your hand luggage (as long as each container has no more than 4oz/100ml) and walking poles are not essential (no really steep climbs, paths sometimes muddy after rain but lots of flat walking at side of road)

Hmm, maybe it sounds ridiculous :oops: but I am in constant need of both cork screws and nail files. Hang nails are horrible! Those little scissors help, too, for string and toenails. I was a girl scout, but we weren't permitted to carry knives! :roll:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#12
All valid, a matter of personal needs, preferences, etc...to then perhaps realize that we don't need half of the things we take... Best, xm 8)
 
#14
Jerome74 said:
I tried to look this up but didn't find anything ... ?

So, any tips as to how to best secure the backpack for the plane? They don't always handle luggage carefully ... And I'd hate to see something brake off afterwards, especially the 'buckle'!

Thanks.
The best solution I have found for traveling with my pack and checking it as luggage, protecting all dangling belts, buckles, pockets, etc., upon my airline is to first pack it, but without any of the prohibited flammable liquids. Then, put it all inside a cheap, plastic garbage bag, large enough to hold it. Tape it with a few turns in all directions around it with duct tape so as to stop the fragile plastic garbage from ripping. Then wrap it with a few turns of parachute cord, much as you would a package for mailing. The para cord is to act as a handle to carry it to the airport and lend a spot to dangle both your name and address tag as well as the destination tape the airline will use to route it to your plane.

Once at your destination, carefully untie the para cord and save it. Then toss the plastic bag and duct tape which covered your pack into the nearest trash, throw your pack upon your back and you are off. The saved cord you will need upon your return flight and will come in handy as a clothes line if needed!
 
#16
Just be aware that trussing your pack up too much is a good way to get extra attention from customs -- at least entering the US. They sometimes seem to view a bag that's too difficult to open as a challenge. :?

I'd suggest carrying your bag on the plane and buying a knife in Spain or France before you start walking. That way you don't have to worry. Two years ago, I carried everything -- including my walking stick -- on the plane with no problems. The liquid thing might be a little trickier now, but it should still be manageable.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#17
Based on the age of this post, you've probably already finished...but just in case:

I used an Osprey Airporter duffel bag. It's designed to contain your backpack so nothing gets loose and your buckles/straps don't get caught in the baggage claim treadmill. The Airporter can swallow all but the hugest packs, has a shoulder strap, and an ID card holder. When not in use, it folds down to a little smaller and thicker than a frisbee. Price: about 30 bucks (US).

But, keep in mind that you'll either have to haul it around with you, or mail it on to Santiago for later pick-up (as I did with mine). And as others have said, you can get away with a heavy-duty garbage bag.
 
#18
We thought about using the transporter bags but the idea of lugging them around seemed to make it less attractive..not so much the weight as the space they take up.

We - and i think we got this idea from somewhere else on this forum but im not sure - did this:

Wrap the hip belt backwards round the pack - so it does up at the front of the pack; then put the rain cover on and do it up tightly (having secured all the front straps first - try not to leave things sticking out that can catch in conveyor belts)

Finally - get some duct tape (you can buy small rolls cheaply lots of places- or very expensively in outdoors shops..) and tape your shoulder straps together to make a single carrying handle - hey presto - one pack ready for the hold of a plane.

Ours got through completely unscathed like this and i remember reading abotu someone travelling for years like this with no problems.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I tried in 09, it went horribly. Gonna try again. Aug/Sept this year
#19
I bought a rain cover from REI... and it's large enough to completely cover my entire pack with all the straps... then the cord can be drawn down so it is tight.... and even you can use them for a handle. I have the Osprey Aura 65 backpack.... it's bigger then the cheap airlines (Ryanair- Iberia) allow for carry-on.... I'm just going to check it every flight and relax.
 

OLDER threads on this topic



A few items available from the Camino Forum Store



Pilgrims here right now

Advertisement

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 8 1.1%
  • February

    Votes: 4 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 32 4.6%
  • April

    Votes: 106 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 172 24.5%
  • June

    Votes: 51 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 14 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 10 1.4%
  • September

    Votes: 205 29.2%
  • October

    Votes: 86 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 10 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.7%
Top