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Senda Litoral or Coastal Route? How to choose?

#1
We have booked our accommodation in advance: Vila Do Conde, Esposende, Viana do Castelo, Caminha, Baiona, Vigo, Redondela then on the traditional route. For some reason we thought this WAS the coastal route but now it looks like we are actually on the Senda Litoral instead. Is there much of a difference - will we be visiting different towns on the Litoral compared to the other route? It looks like we are going to be taking a beautiful walk but I want to be sure we have chosen wisely. Any tips/suggestions? Also - I imagine the Litoral is not to complex in terms of following waymarkers etc - am I correct?
 

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#3
"Senda Litoral" means "Coastal Path" - it's the same thing :)
Ok - thanks. But, on any of the maps I am seeing now, there are actually two routes - one green route that sticks to the coast - along the beaches etc. and a red one that appears to go a little more inland. Its the distinction between these two that's causing me the confusion.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many more in the future (hopefully)
#4
There are actually two "coastal routes". The Senda Litoral and the Caminho da Costa. From my experience, the Caminho da Costa winds from the coast a bit inland in spots and then returns to the coast. It is well marked with yellow arrows. The Senda Litoral sticks to the coast, and is not fully marked.

This past July when I did the walk with a friend from Porto to SdC, we wandered back and forth between the two trails. As far as I could tell, they both go through the same coastal towns (the ones you mention above), so it does not really matter too much. We stuck to the coastline when it was convenient, and followed the yellow arrows when we were not sure what else to do. When all else fails, just keep the ocean on your left.
 

AdaR

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Camino Frances on bicycle; Planning August 2017 Portuguese Camino from Porto to SDC on foot.
#5
We have booked our accommodation in advance: Vila Do Conde, Esposende, Viana do Castelo, Caminha, Baiona, Vigo, Redondela then on the traditional route. For some reason we thought this WAS the coastal route but now it looks like we are actually on the Senda Litoral instead. Is there much of a difference - will we be visiting different towns on the Litoral compared to the other route? It looks like we are going to be taking a beautiful walk but I want to be sure we have chosen wisely. Any tips/suggestions? Also - I imagine the Litoral is not to complex in terms of following waymarkers etc - am I correct?
I too am looking at this same route, the Coastal / Senda Litoral.
My concern comes from Brierley's guide, wherein he indicates that the Senda Litoral is not well waymarked. It does seem easy enough to keep the ocean on your left, however, Brierley states "This is sometimes difficult in practise as pathways often peter out on some remote beach requiring a hard walk on soft sand or retracing steps."
This may well be the case between Viana do Castelo and Ancora. I don't need to plan this much detail, trusting that the path will make itself know when we arrive, but I am curious. Has anyone walked this particular section? Or experienced the situation that Brierley warns of along the Senda Litoral?
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Many more in the future (hopefully)
#6
It is hard to explain, but I think you are right when you say that the path will make itself known. I think you will likely end up doing as we did and using both routes.

For example, after crossing the river at Caminha into Spain, the locals advised us to follow the river to the mouth and turn north up the coast to A Guarda. The route was not marked, but we did that and it was one of the best sections of the walk. Had we followed the yellow arrows, it would have taken us up through some hills. That might have been nice as well, but the river/coast walk was fabulous.

On another section, on the way to Baiona, we were following yellow markers on a road right beside the ocean. The markers turned right up into some hills (which we later heard were somewhat difficult), but we stayed on the road (with no markers) because: (a) we were right beside the ocean, (b) there was a good sized pedestrian/bicycle path to walk on, so there was no danger, and (c) there was a hotel up ahead on a hill where we sat on the patio for a leisurely lunch overlooking the ocean. It was beautiful.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Invierno, June 2017
Portuguese Coastal Way x6
French Way Sarria x 5
Silver Way Ourense
#8
Yes I helped Johnie Walker with the update passing him my detailed notes as I know both caminos very well having done them both thanks to my mate, Luis Freixo. I like to call them the Shoreline Camino and the Coastal Camino to distinguish between the two. Doogman is spot on with his observations. I also downloaded Luis Freixo's maps onto my Smartphone and used them (often offline) especially to follow the Litoral route. See http://www.caminador.es/?page_id=1971
 

Carol06

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (May 2012)
Frances (May 2015) all going well and with my husband this time.
#9
I have also found this very confusing so it is great to get some answers. Thank you.
 

mgnswaus

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Muxia 2012. Arles to Puente la Reina 2013. Puente la Reina to SdC 2014 European Peace Walk 2016 Portuguese 2017 Ingles 2017
#10
It is hard to explain, but I think you are right when you say that the path will make itself known. I think you will likely end up doing as we did and using both routes.

For example, after crossing the river at Caminha into Spain, the locals advised us to follow the river to the mouth and turn north up the coast to A Guarda. The route was not marked, but we did that and it was one of the best sections of the walk. Had we followed the yellow arrows, it would have taken us up through some hills. That might have been nice as well, but the river/coast walk was fabulous.

On another section, on the way to Baiona, we were following yellow markers on a road right beside the ocean. The markers turned right up into some hills (which we later heard were somewhat difficult), but we stayed on the road (with no markers) because: (a) we were right beside the ocean, (b) there was a good sized pedestrian/bicycle path to walk on, so there was no danger, and (c) there was a hotel up ahead on a hill where we sat on the patio for a leisurely lunch overlooking the ocean. It was beautiful.
These two hints are perfect, thank you. Happy to hear anymore that you'd care to share.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many more in the future (hopefully)
#11
These two hints are perfect, thank you. Happy to hear anymore that you'd care to share.
Since you have asked, here are a few more thoughts:

1. When leaving Porto the first time, I simply walked through the city. Not a bad walk, but not everyone's idea of a good time. The second time I left Porto, I took the metro up to Matosinhos and started walking from there. If I ever do it again, I would start at the Cathedral, walk down to the river, and then follow the river to the ocean. Once at the ocean, turn north and continue up to Matosinhos. It would be something like 12-13 kms, so it would make for a good warm up on the first day. I have covered parts of this on the tram and on foot, and I think it would make a really pleasant walk on a nice day. Once in Matosinhos, you can find accommodation there, or take the metro back to central Porto, and then back out again the next morning to continue up the coast.

2. When arriving at the ferry dock at Caminha to cross the river to Spain, we were told that there was a 5 hour wait because of the low tides. So as we were sitting there wondering how to kill the next 5 hours, someone driving by stopped and suggested that we walk up to the beach near the mouth of the river (about 3 kms) and ask for Mario. If we could find Mario, he would take us across. We did that, easily found Mario by asking at a nearby restaurant, and he took us across to Spain in his little fishing boat for 5 euros each.

3. In walking from Baiona to Vigo, we followed the yellow arrows. It was long and tiring - not a bad walk, but a bit of a grind. One of the other Forum members @Albertinho has posted this in a different thread:

"Another nice one is leaving Baiona. Once arriving at the bridge of Nigrán/ Ramalosa you can turn left and will find green arrows instead of yellow. The green ones lead you direction Vigo alongside the waterline and has beautifull views. The yellow ones lead you onto the albergue ,about 400 meters further on and into the hills to Vigo. I followed the green waymarkers and enjoyed it. The green waymarked path was pointed out by the hospitalero of the albergue by the way."

I have not tried this myself, but I certainly would if I ever do it again. I looked at this route on Google Maps, and it looks like it would be much nicer.

I hope this helps.
 

mgnswaus

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Muxia 2012. Arles to Puente la Reina 2013. Puente la Reina to SdC 2014 European Peace Walk 2016 Portuguese 2017 Ingles 2017
#12
Since you have asked, here are a few more thoughts:

1. When leaving Porto the first time, I simply walked through the city. Not a bad walk, but not everyone's idea of a good time. The second time I left Porto, I took the metro up to Matosinhos and started walking from there. If I ever do it again, I would start at the Cathedral, walk down to the river, and then follow the river to the ocean. Once at the ocean, turn north and continue up to Matosinhos. It would be something like 12-13 kms, so it would make for a good warm up on the first day. I have covered parts of this on the tram and on foot, and I think it would make a really pleasant walk on a nice day. Once in Matosinhos, you can find accommodation there, or take the metro back to central Porto, and then back out again the next morning to continue up the coast.

2. When arriving at the ferry dock at Caminha to cross the river to Spain, we were told that there was a 5 hour wait because of the low tides. So as we were sitting there wondering how to kill the next 5 hours, someone driving by stopped and suggested that we walk up to the beach near the mouth of the river (about 3 kms) and ask for Mario. If we could find Mario, he would take us across. We did that, easily found Mario by asking at a nearby restaurant, and he took us across to Spain in his little fishing boat for 5 euros each.

3. In walking from Baiona to Vigo, we followed the yellow arrows. It was long and tiring - not a bad walk, but a bit of a grind. One of the other Forum members @Albertinho has posted this in a different thread:

"Another nice one is leaving Baiona. Once arriving at the bridge of Nigrán/ Ramalosa you can turn left and will find green arrows instead of yellow. The green ones lead you direction Vigo alongside the waterline and has beautifull views. The yellow ones lead you onto the albergue ,about 400 meters further on and into the hills to Vigo. I followed the green waymarkers and enjoyed it. The green waymarked path was pointed out by the hospitalero of the albergue by the way."

I have not tried this myself, but I certainly would if I ever do it again. I looked at this route on Google Maps, and it looks like it would be much nicer.

I hope this helps.
Wonderful, thank you. From experience, these extra tips can take the jpirney to another level. I really appreciate your time and suggestions.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#13
Since you have asked, here are a few more thoughts:

1. When leaving Porto the first time, I simply walked through the city. Not a bad walk, but not everyone's idea of a good time. The second time I left Porto, I took the metro up to Matosinhos and started walking from there. If I ever do it again, I would start at the Cathedral, walk down to the river, and then follow the river to the ocean. Once at the ocean, turn north and continue up to Matosinhos.
I would second this advice. I saw suggestions of various ways to get out or Porto, including taking the Metro part of the way but in fact I found the walk from the Cathedral, down to the riverfront and then along to the ocean, and then along the ocean really extremely pleaseant! I walked on a Sunday which even in November (a very sunny November) was VERY busy with locals and their children, dogs, skateboards and bicycles. But there really is room for everybody. A pleasant days walk to Angeiras, passing increasingly attractive beachside fish restaurants. The campsite in Angeiras is extremely pilgrim friendly and will give you a little chalet for a very good price.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#14
Yes I helped Johnie Walker with the update passing him my detailed notes as I know both caminos very well having done them both thanks to my mate, Luis Freixo. I like to call them the Shoreline Camino and the Coastal Camino to distinguish between the two. Doogman is spot on with his observations. I also downloaded Luis Freixo's maps onto my Smartphone and used them (often offline) especially to follow the Litoral route. See http://www.caminador.es/?page_id=1971
I walked from Porto in November and took the beachside route for the first two days and then the coastal route (I think!!!!!) for the rest of the way. I find the naming VERY confusing. I think Shoreline Camino and Coastal Camino is quite helpful!!
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
#15
I took the metro out to Matosinhos last time also to save a day. I had just finished the Primitivo a couple of days before and din not feel a need to get in another 12 -13 km along the river.
Like @timr I find the naming of the two alternatives very confusing. I am not sure what I walked. I did stay by the water most of the time and the marking seemed adequate...even very fresh in some areas. I had no idea about the two similar routes.
I will probably walk it again this year...with my wife this time.
I kind of hope everyone else stays on the interior/central route.
 

whiteduke

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to go in September from Porto
#16
I took the metro out to Matosinhos last time also to save a day. I had just finished the Primitivo a couple of days before and din not feel a need to get in another 12 -13 km along the river.
Like @timr I find the naming of the two alternatives very confusing. I am not sure what I walked. I did stay by the water most of the time and the marking seemed adequate...even very fresh in some areas. I had no idea about the two similar routes.
I will probably walk it again this year...with my wife this time.
I kind of hope everyone else stays on the interior/central route.
How many days did it take you to get to Santiago?
 

whiteduke

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to go in September from Porto
#17
We have booked our accommodation in advance: Vila Do Conde, Esposende, Viana do Castelo, Caminha, Baiona, Vigo, Redondela then on the traditional route. For some reason we thought this WAS the coastal route but now it looks like we are actually on the Senda Litoral instead. Is there much of a difference - will we be visiting different towns on the Litoral compared to the other route? It looks like we are going to be taking a beautiful walk but I want to be sure we have chosen wisely. Any tips/suggestions? Also - I imagine the Litoral is not to complex in terms of following waymarkers etc - am I correct?
When are you going?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2013
#18
A little more information on the route, thank you for the help. Mario trip by boat might be interesting even if the ferry is in,
 

Sheena

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de France (2015), Portuguese Coastal (2016), Ingles (2017), Senda Littoral (2018)
#19
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...rly-all-portuguese-caminos-in-one-file.42296/

Might this be of use to you on your planning?

Once you’ve got the maps.me app, download the above into it.

You can then personalise the tracks and add you own info, bookings, accommodation etc.

The maps.me app is superb because it works offline by GPS.

If you’re like me and prefer not to misplace yourself, it’s very easy for the app to pinpoint your position and for you to find your way back to the Camino.

Good luck with your planning.
Sheena
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2013 to Finisterra
Camino Portuguese (Monacal) from Lisbon 2016
#20
There are actually two "coastal routes". The Senda Litoral and the Caminho da Costa. From my experience, the Caminho da Costa winds from the coast a bit inland in spots and then returns to the coast. It is well marked with yellow arrows. The Senda Litoral sticks to the coast, and is not fully marked.

This past July when I did the walk with a friend from Porto to SdC, we wandered back and forth between the two trails. As far as I could tell, they both go through the same coastal towns (the ones you mention above), so it does not really matter too much. We stuck to the coastline when it was convenient, and followed the yellow arrows when we were not sure what else to do. When all else fails, just keep the ocean on your left.
It is hard to explain, but I think you are right when you say that the path will make itself known. I think you will likely end up doing as we did and using both routes.
Precisely my experience too :)

We followed the route described here https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...df-route-portugues-route-monacal-coastal.404/
 

Flory

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
New
#21
Well perhaps not a big help but i plannend to walk the coastal routte ( for over a year) but met some great people in Porto and ended on the centraal routte. You never know what the camino trows at you i have learned
 

Sheena

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de France (2015), Portuguese Coastal (2016), Ingles (2017), Senda Littoral (2018)
#22
You’re right there!
Our second Camino was marred by my husband arrived injured and unable to walk for three weeks!

This year on day two of our Camino Ingles, I was diagnosed with shingles!

I do hope next year is totally uneventful!

I can’t remember if I’ve posted this already, but this our planned route for next May.

We are walking mostly along the beautiful Portuguese Coast – Senda Littoral, linking in with the Coastal Route, (which unlike its name is not always on the coast), where appropriate for our route and the distances we prefer to walk.

We are staying in small hotels because the pilgrim accommodation on our route are at longer distances than we can walk.

Day 1. Porto – Matoshinos – 12kms
Day 2. Matoshinos – Vila Cha/Angeiras- 10kms
Day 3. Vila Cha – Povoa de Varzim – 15kms
Day 4. P do V – Estella/Criaz – 15kms
Day 5. Estella – Esposende- 12kms
Day 6. Esposende – O. Castelo do Neiva - 13kms
Day 7. C do N – Viana do Castelo – 12kms
Day 8. V do C – Vila Praia de Ancora – 18k s
Day 9. VP do A – Caminha – 6kms, then ferry. Cross river then walk to A Guarda – depends on route taken.
Day 10. A Guarda – Viladeuso – 15kms
Day 11. Viladeuso – Baiona – 15kms
Day 12. Baiona – Playa de Samil – 18kms
Day 13. P de S – Vigo – 12kms
Day 14. Vigo – Cessantes – 16kms

We are then taking the train to Santiago as we have already walked there in previous years.

Hopefully this might help with someone’s planning.

Bom Caminho/buen Camino!
Sheena
 
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Camino(s) past & future
none
#23
We have booked our accommodation in advance: Vila Do Conde, Esposende, Viana do Castelo, Caminha, Baiona, Vigo, Redondela then on the traditional route. For some reason we thought this WAS the coastal route but now it looks like we are actually on the Senda Litoral instead. Is there much of a difference - will we be visiting different towns on the Litoral compared to the other route? It looks like we are going to be taking a beautiful walk but I want to be sure we have chosen wisely. Any tips/suggestions? Also - I imagine the Litoral is not to complex in terms of following waymarkers etc - am I correct?
Hi Peter obviously you are finished your Camino Literol by now - we plan to do it next Easter-did you stay in the above mentioned towns? any advice on if you should have stayed somewhere else? Any advice on hotels etc?
 

Rainerbernd

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
On St James ways since 1971
#25
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012
Camino Portugues May 2018
#26
hi folks.
I'm planning to start in Porto on May 20. From reading all of the very useful tips & opinions above, I've decided to go from Porto to Vila do Conde on the first day and then cut back onto the Senda Litoral & finish in Barcelos at the end of day 2.
Does anyone know if there is a recognised or recommended route to get from Vila do Conde on to the Senda Litoral?
Thanks,
Shane
 

p_mci

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, Inglés, Portugués (2014) Norte, Primitivo (2015) Vía de la Plata (2017) Mozárabe (2018)
#28
Hi Shane, i've just finished this walk. I'm not sure - maybe I'm reading it wrong - but when you say Senda Litoral, I think you mean Central? Because Vila so Conde is on the Litoral/Coast route. Are you looking for a way to leave the coast in order to join the Central route in Barcelos on your second day?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012
Camino Portugues May 2018
#29
Hi Shane, i've just finished this walk. I'm not sure - maybe I'm reading it wrong - but when you say Senda Litoral, I think you mean Central? Because Vila so Conde is on the Litoral/Coast route. Are you looking for a way to leave the coast in order to join the Central route in Barcelos on your second day?
Yes P_mci - that's what I'm trying to do - I guess I was confused between the naming of the routes!
So I guess I'll take my question over to the Central forum.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF15, CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF17, CP17, CdN, CM, CF18, LePuy19
#31
hi folks.
I'm planning to start in Porto on May 20. From reading all of the very useful tips & opinions above, I've decided to go from Porto to Vila do Conde on the first day and then cut back onto the Senda Litoral & finish in Barcelos at the end of day 2.
Does anyone know if there is a recognised or recommended route to get from Vila do Conde on to the Senda Litoral?
Thanks,
Shane
Senda Littoral is the Coastal Route. Barcelos is on the Central Route. Those are the two routes. So do you want to stay on the beach or walk the central route through Barcelos? There are cross overs but they are mainly on unmarked paved roads. I took one several years ago to Sao Miguel de Arcos and found the Central Route.
 

Rainerbernd

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
On St James ways since 1971
#32
From Vila do Conde to the Central way (Rates) is very easy. Right after the bridge entering Vilo do Conde take the yellow arrows to the right into Av. Figuereido Faria. The river is to your right. After 15o m slightly left uphills, still the same Avenue. On the top there is a big roundabout with Metro tracks in the middle. Metro station Santa Clara is to the left. At the roundabout straight ahead into Av. Bernardino Machado. Point of orientation is a big warehouse in the distance.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF15, CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF17, CP17, CdN, CM, CF18, LePuy19
#33
Exactly, I was trying to remember Santa Clara as the place to turn east. From what I remember the route from there to the Central was not very remarkable or well marked as of 2013.
 

MrsGoGo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugués spring 2018.
#37
Senda Littoral is the Coastal Route. Barcelos is on the Central Route. Those are the two routes. So do you want to stay on the beach or walk the central route through Barcelos? There are cross overs but they are mainly on unmarked paved roads. I took one several years ago to Sao Miguel de Arcos and found the Central Route.
I'm sorry, but Senda Litoral and Coastal are not entirely the same thing.
Coastal route heads inland and you will see more varied terrain. Senda Litoral follows the sea all the time. We walked along the Coastal just in April. Fantastic.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Central Português: October 2017
Caminho Coastal: September 2018
#38
Since you have asked, here are a few more thoughts:

1. When leaving Porto the first time, I simply walked through the city. Not a bad walk, but not everyone's idea of a good time. The second time I left Porto, I took the metro up to Matosinhos and started walking from there. If I ever do it again, I would start at the Cathedral, walk down to the river, and then follow the river to the ocean. Once at the ocean, turn north and continue up to Matosinhos. It would be something like 12-13 kms, so it would make for a good warm up on the first day. I have covered parts of this on the tram and on foot, and I think it would make a really pleasant walk on a nice day. Once in Matosinhos, you can find accommodation there, or take the metro back to central Porto, and then back out again the next morning to continue up the coast.

2. When arriving at the ferry dock at Caminha to cross the river to Spain, we were told that there was a 5 hour wait because of the low tides. So as we were sitting there wondering how to kill the next 5 hours, someone driving by stopped and suggested that we walk up to the beach near the mouth of the river (about 3 kms) and ask for Mario. If we could find Mario, he would take us across. We did that, easily found Mario by asking at a nearby restaurant, and he took us across to Spain in his little fishing boat for 5 euros each.

3. In walking from Baiona to Vigo, we followed the yellow arrows. It was long and tiring - not a bad walk, but a bit of a grind. One of the other Forum members @Albertinho has posted this in a different thread:

"Another nice one is leaving Baiona. Once arriving at the bridge of Nigrán/ Ramalosa you can turn left and will find green arrows instead of yellow. The green ones lead you direction Vigo alongside the waterline and has beautifull views. The yellow ones lead you onto the albergue ,about 400 meters further on and into the hills to Vigo. I followed the green waymarkers and enjoyed it. The green waymarked path was pointed out by the hospitalero of the albergue by the way."

I have not tried this myself, but I certainly would if I ever do it again. I looked at this route on Google Maps, and it looks like it would be much nicer.

I hope this helps.
Thanks - I love the Mario Story !!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Central Português: October 2017
Caminho Coastal: September 2018
#39
Thanks to everybody for their amazing input here - It's helped me make up my mind this evening and book my flights to do a second Caminho !!

I only have about 6 to 7 days and my plan would be to walk a section from somewhere North of Porto to Vigo**
I would like to do a mix of both the:
"Senda Litoral" (Literally the Coastal Path) and the "Caminho Coastal" (Coast and Off Coast)^^
As I believe the paths crossover and intersect especially at stopover towns / villages I presume this should be relatively easy to plan and thus experience a little of each and if so does any body have any recommendations ?
Another question I have is that I've heard that the routes are not that busy, I look forward to a bit of solitude but I would not like to miss out on the camaraderie and great people I met on the brilliant Caminho Central Português I did last year - I plan to walk roughly between the 22nd and 29th September - does anybody know how busy this will be ?
I plan to use Brierly Guide along with the Simpicity of Gronze.com with in an emergency The Wise Pilgrim GPS App in case I get lost (which saved me once or twice last year)

Thanks In Advance
J x

** Not carrying on to SDC because of time constraints (got my Compostela after 160KM last year so I'm happy with that.
^^ Colour Coded as per the way markings.
 


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