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Sept 2021 - Trails of the unexpected ! Camping

Barrym81

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francais, Camino Fisterra
Hi.

I'm hoping to do Camino Frances in Sept 2021. I'm thinking of bringing a tent and camping in hostel gardens/ near the villages along the route.

For food, I'm thinking of stocking up in supermarkets and small shops as I go along to try avoid any covid as much as possible. Just wondering if people see many negatives to my plan, for example will the nights be too cold in sept for camping?

Just to caveat, if Covid in Sept is like the current situation I obviously will not go and leave it off until 2022 and use the hostels etc along the route then.

Any thoughts much appreciated?!?
 
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Arn

Veteran Member
Hi.

I'm hoping to do Camino Frances in Sept 2021. I'm thinking of bringing a tent and camping in hostel gardens/ near the villages along the route.

For food, I'm thinking of stocking up in supermarkets and small shops as I go along to try avoid any covid as much as possible. Just wondering if people see many negatives to my plan, for example will the nights be too cold in sept for camping?

Just to caveat, if Covid in Sept is like the current situation I obviously will not go and leave it off until 2022 and use the hostels etc along the route then.

Any thoughts much appreciated?!?
Barry, welcome to the Forum.
Tent camping is possible with much to consider.
There are several good threads.
Go to the search tab and put in “tent camping.”
You'll see the latest information. .
Buen Camino
Arn
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2015, 2017, 2019) and plans for 2021 (Sept, Oct)
Barry, my wife and I have walked Camino Frances three times, always starting in mid-September and arriving in Santiago in late October. This is a great time of year to hike. We're planning on hiking our fourth CF this fall. We've had mostly good weather, but have also hiked several hours in a drenching downpour. Even with goretex jackets, rain pants and gaiters, we've were soaked to the bone. So you might develop contingency plans to stay at a donativo municipal albergue when it is very cold or rainy outside.

For our past caminos, we've seen just a few pilgrims camping out along the way (no more than a few the entire camino). One issue to consider is whether you expect to use any facilities or services from the albergues that you camp at. For example, do you plan to use their bathrooms, showers, laundry facilities? The albergues may or may not allow.

Will you mostly be self sufficient on your own meals, or plan to eat inside with other pilgrims? There is a wide range of different practices at albergues. I recall one that we were not staying at that had a mini food section in their lobby. I was told that only pilgrims staying there were permitted to purchase food. Some albergues have a restaurant and bar attached. We experienced a few that did not allow a pilgrim to dine there if they were not staying there overnight.

With regards to stocking up on food items, you may need to purchase and carry extra provisions. More than once, we were planning to buy snacks or a bite to eat, then find out that smaller towns didn't have even a small snack shop.

Hope to say "Buen Camino" to you along the Camino Frances this fall.

Bob
 

Barrym81

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francais, Camino Fisterra
Hi Bob

Thanks for the advice. You mentioned many things I didn't even think of. I didn't factor in there could be downpours of rain and the impact that may have if camping the CF.

I'm now thinking a combination of hostels and camping might be suitable as needs dictate.

Many thanks again for the advice. Buen Camino for September!

Barry
 
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C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Hi Barry,

There are two good ways to get information on camping here on the forum.
  1. There is a "Camping on the Camino" section that you can find by starting on the forum list on the main forum page (click on the Casa Ivar image at the top), and scrolling way down. Or you can just click on this.
  2. When people post camping threads on another section of the forum, as you have done here on the Camino Frances, they can be tagged with "camping." I have done that for your thread, so click on "camping" at top under the title of your thread. By the way, putting the word "camping" in your thread title will help other users find this new thread with the Search function.
 

Sansthing

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
French Camino (2009), French Camino (2011), Via de la Plata (2012), Camino Inglês (2014),
It may be worth considering that there could be even fewer shops for provisions than usual in the smaller places as many businesses are closing down due to the pandemic.
 

RobinK*

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francés (2012), incl. Muxia and Fisterra, Camino Portugues (2016), Camino Primitivo (2018)
Hi Barry,
We've walked the CF in September/October 2012. See our blog http://ronine2012.blogspot.com/

Bought a second hand light weight tent, a small stove and a pan, and practiced on packing the gear in our packs during some multi-day hikes in the Netherlands and Luxemburg. Then we walked for approx 40 days on the CF and to Muxia/Finisterre. During 20 nights we stayed in the tent and the other half we stayed at the albergues. A very nice combi if you ask me (and my wife, who hates bathing in a river and prefers a regular shower every now and then ;-)).

You can pitch the tent in between the villages (wild camping is tolerated in most regions, check on the web though), on official camping grounds, in the albergue's yard, or in private yards. Always ask locals and owners if you're allowed to. We never got a 'no', but always friendly coorporation and lots of kindness. When camping in the albergue's garden we just payed for a bed, so we were allowed to use the facilities also (kitchen, shower, swimming pool, even including dinner if applicable). By the time we reached Galicia it got colder during the nights, so mostly we stayed in the albergues as of then. The first camp ground used was in Saint Jean Pied de Port (September 1st) and the last camp ground used in Portomarin (September 30th).

Buen Camino!
Regards, Robin

PS: Don't forget to check the inside of your gear (including shoes) in the morning before putting them on!

Saint Jean Pied de Port (official camp ground):
P1000661.JPG

Puente la Reina (albergue's yard):
P1000794.JPG

Somewhere on the Meseta (wild camping, with a bottle of red wine, a baguette and a starry starry night :) ):
P1010193.JPG
 
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