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LIVE from the Camino September 2021 Camino Madrid

waubish

New Member
Past OR future Camino
1341
Hi I’m Kathy. We (Sydney and I) are beginning the Madrid Camino tomorrow morning (07.09.2021) from near the Plaza Santiago. Picked up our Camino passport yesterday from the church (Iglesias de Santiago) when it opened at 6pm. We arrived at the madrid airport 05September.
Anyone else out there on the Madrid?
We are from Washington State by the way and this is our first Camino.
Buen Camino.
 
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waubish

New Member
Past OR future Camino
1341
Oh how wonderful. We loved the Madrid Way. Don’t know if this is useful - but this was my blog from Camino de Madrid - so it shows our stages.
Let me know if you have any specific questions and I’ll try to help.

Buen camino

Camino Madrid and Salvador
Just read your Day 1 account. Very helpful. Leaning towards the Hotel Jardin for sure. Question: we are not sure about the whole getting stamps in the credential thing. Do we need more than 1 stamp per day? Conflicting reports.
eating dinner right now in Plaza Mayor and planning to head out quite early in the morning to get some miles before it gets too hot. Also with jet lag we are awake anyway.
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Question: we are not sure about the whole getting stamps in the credential thing. Do we need more than 1 stamp per day?
Since you will be eligible for a compostela if you have walked the last 100 kms, so long as you have two a day for the last 100 kms on a recognized route, you will be fine. Some pilgrims report that the office staff gives very little scrutiny to credentials that show a very distant starting point. But just to be sure you should get two a day for the last 100.

hope you enjoy the Madrid!
 
F

Former member 31048

Guest
Just read your Day 1 account. Very helpful. Leaning towards the Hotel Jardin for sure. Question: we are not sure about the whole getting stamps in the credential thing. Do we need more than 1 stamp per day? Conflicting reports.
eating dinner right now in Plaza Mayor and planning to head out quite early in the morning to get some miles before it gets too hot. Also with jet lag we are awake anyway.
Hi - how exciting! Regarding Stamps - usually only one stamp per day is all that’s required to receive your compostela in Santiago. Unless you are walking just the last 100 kms to Santiago in which case I believe it’s two stamps per day.

Are you going on from Sahagun?

pS. I just saw Peregrina2000 had already replied - so, what she said! 🤣
 
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F

Former member 31048

Guest
Just read your Day 1 account. Very helpful. Leaning towards the Hotel Jardin for sure. Question: we are not sure about the whole getting stamps in the credential thing. Do we need more than 1 stamp per day? Conflicting reports.
eating dinner right now in Plaza Mayor and planning to head out quite early in the morning to get some miles before it gets too hot. Also with jet lag we are awake anyway.
Also, take care as you lèave Très Cantos. If you read our Day 2 post you will see that we missed a turn early on which added some kms to the day.

The Madrid way is very well marked so I’m thinking it was ‘pilgrim error’ - we were probably chatting or looking at the views.

On our second night we stayed at Ray and Rosa’s which was a treat. 🙏
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
Hi - how exciting! Regarding Stamps - usually only one stamp per day is all that’s required to receive your compostela in Santiago. Unless you are walking just the last 100 kms to Santiago in which case I believe it’s two stamps per day.

Are you going on from the Aragones?

pS. I just saw Peregrina2000 had already replied - so, what she said! 🤣
I’m afraid that’s not correct.

For a compostella - no matter where you’ve walked from - if you’re on foot you need two sellos per day for the last 100km.

Everything prior to the 100km point is irrelevant for the purposes of a compostella, but if you want a distance certificate also you need a continuous record of one sello per day from your start point.
 
F

Former member 31048

Guest
I’m afraid that’s not correct.

For a compostella - no matter where you’ve walked from - if you’re on foot you need two sellos per day for the last 100km.

Everything prior to the 100km point is irrelevant for the purposes of a compostella, but if you want a distance certificate also you need a continuous record of one sello per day from your start point.
That’s interesting. I didn’t know that. I’ve rarely had more than one stamp per day and I have three compostelas from Santiago, but the last was in 2014 and I haven’t sought a compostela since then. Maybe the ‘rule’ changed or maybe, as Peregrina2000 observed, if you come a long distance , the pilgrims’ office doesn’t worry too much about it?

anyway, I think others know the rules better than me. 😌
 
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gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CFx2, CPx1
Question: we are not sure about the whole getting stamps in the credential thing. Do we need more than 1 stamp per day? Conflicting reports.
Getting stamps daily is not onerous, or a big deal.
Most accommodation house carry a stamp and are ready to bang one on upon your arrival. Bars, restaurants, churches and tourist offices also carry them.
For many it is a treasured record of every place they stay in along the Way, as well as being a pre-requisite for the compostela.
Regards and Buen Camino!
Gerarf
 
F

Former member 31048

Guest
Getting stamps daily is not onerous, or a big deal.
Most accommodation house carry a stamp and are ready to bang one on upon your arrival. Bars, restaurants, churches and tourist offices also carry them.
For many it is a treasured record of every place they stay in along the Way, as well as being a pre-requisite for the compostela.
Regards and Buen Camino!
Gerarf
I agree with Gerard - it’s easy. Most accommodations will stamp your credenciale on arrival. Even on the Madrid Way where some albergues are unattended, the person who has the key will usually also have the stamp.

I treasure all my ‘pilgrim passports’ with all the albergue and casa stamps, or gites and chambre d’hôtes in France. They are more ‘special’ for me than the compostela as they tell something of my experience along The Way.
 

waubish

New Member
Past OR future Camino
1341
Getting stamps daily is not onerous, or a big deal.
Most accommodation house carry a stamp and are ready to bang one on upon your arrival. Bars, restaurants, churches and tourist offices also carry them.
For many it is a treasured record of every place they stay in along the Way, as well as being a pre-requisite for the compostela.
Regards and Buen Camino!
Gerarf
I see now that my questions about stamps are answered here. Thank you!
 
F

Former member 31048

Guest
Getting stamps daily is not onerous, or a big deal.
Most accommodation house carry a stamp and are ready to bang one on upon your arrival. Bars, restaurants, churches and tourist offices also carry them.
For many it is a treasured record of every place they stay in along the Way, as well as being a pre-requisite for the compostela.
Regards and Buen Camino!
Gerarf
Hola Gerard - while you're here on the forum. We are 'cautiously optimistic' about being able to travel early next year - we are in Australia where we had few Covid cases but our vax program has been slow so we are behind now. We are currently in lockdwon (week 9) due to a delta outbreak and international borders are set to be open when our vax rate is 80% of eligible population. We are jabbed and ready.

Via de la Plata is our next Camino. It's been on our radar for many years and for whatever reason has managed to be nudged aside for something else. I think I have a very old guidebook of yours. But you have a 2020 edition - so I'll be shopping for that soon. Thank you.
 
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Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
That’s interesting. I didn’t know that. I’ve rarely had more than one stamp per day and I have three compostelas from Santiago, but the last was in 2014 and I haven’t sought a compostela since then. Maybe the ‘rule’ changed or maybe, as Peregrina2000 observed, if you come a long distance , the pilgrims’ office doesn’t worry too much about it?

anyway, I think others know the rules better than me. 😌
2 per day for the last 100 was the rule for the compostella when I walked in 2012. The pilgrims office doesn’t care if you walked more than 100km (my volunteer didn’t even glance at my three filled credentials other than to find the one with the last 100 km) edit: this was before the distance certificate, for that I imagine they would look at all of them
 
F

Former member 31048

Guest
Getting stamps daily is not onerous, or a big deal.
Most accommodation house carry a stamp and are ready to bang one on upon your arrival. Bars, restaurants, churches and tourist offices also carry them.
For many it is a treasured record of every place they stay in along the Way, as well as being a pre-requisite for the compostela.
Regards and Buen Camino!
Gerarf
Gerard - please excuse / ignore my post below regarding YOUR guide to the Via de la Plata! That's Gerald Kelly!!! I'm going mad ... must be 9 or is 10 weeks of lockdown messing with my head!
 
F

Former member 31048

Guest
After about a dozen or so Caminos in the past 10 years, I'm only just now understanding the 'stamp' rule for a Compostela. And I didn't even know until today that there was such a thing as a distance certificate! I need to just stick to one foot in front of the other!
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
My first Camino Frances was in 2015 and I had no clue about needing two stamps per day after Sarria. I was still given a compostela at the Pilgrim's office when I arrived. In 2017 when I walked it again I was aware of needing the two stamps per day, so I complied. I also found out about the distance certificate, so purchased one. I thought it rather humorous that it stated I walked 799 kilometers.
 
F

Former member 31048

Guest
My first Camino Frances was in 2015 and I had no clue about needing two stamps per day after Sarria. I was still given a compostela at the Pilgrim's office when I arrived. In 2017 when I walked it again I was aware of needing the two stamps per day, so I complied. I also found out about the distance certificate, so purchased one. I thought it rather humorous that it stated I walked 799
That’s very funny Chrissy. 🤣 And I’m assuming then they wouldn’t take into account the extra kms due to the times we went ‘off piste’ intentional or otherwise. 🎒
 
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Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
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That’s very funny Chrissy. 🤣 And I’m assuming then they wouldn’t take into account the extra kms due to the times we went ‘off piste’ intentional or otherwise. 🎒
Apparently they did not take anything else into consideration Jenny. I wandered around many a village and city, and I also walked at least 1 kilometer up and down the hill in Castrojerez to visit the castle ruins.😅
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
This is what the Pilgrim's Office website says:

To get the “Compostela” you must:

  • Make the pilgrimage for religious or spiritual reasons, or at least an attitude of search.
  • Do the last 100 km on foot or horseback, or the last 200 km by bicycle. It is understood that the pilgrimage starts at one point and from there you come to visit the Tomb of St. James.
  • You must collect the stamps on the “Credencial del Peregrino” from the places you pass through to certify that you have been there. Stamps from churches, hostels, monasteries, cathedrals and all places related to the Way are preferred, but if not they can also be stamped in other institutions: town halls, cafés, etc. You have to stamp the Credencial twice a day at least on the last 100 km (for pilgrims on foot or on horseback) or on the last 200 km (for cyclists pilgrims).
 

MikeJS

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Francis (2011), Norte (12), VdlP (16). Sureste/Invierno (17). Olvidado/San Salvador/Primitivo (19)
That’s interesting. I didn’t know that. I’ve rarely had more than one stamp per day and I have three compostelas from Santiago, but the last was in 2014 and I haven’t sought a compostela since then. Maybe the ‘rule’ changed or maybe, as Peregrina2000 observed, if you come a long distance , the pilgrims’ office doesn’t worry too much about it?

anyway, I think others know the rules better than me. 😌
In all my Caminos I have never had more than 1 stamp a day and have a Compostela for every trip.
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
In all my Caminos I have never had more than 1 stamp a day and have a Compostela for every trip.
All the various posters above are doing are citing the ‘rules’ as they are written - the application of the rules is a matter for the team in Santiago.

cf the interminable debates about walking poles and penknives
 
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F

Former member 31048

Guest
All the various posters above are doing are citing the ‘rules’ as they are written - the application of the rules is a matter for the team in Santiago.

cf the interminable debates about walking poles and penknives
Hasn’t seemed like a debate (interminable or otherwise) to me - more like a light hearted conversation about our diverse understanding of the rules (in my case, incorrect) and our experiences of obtaining our compostelas with or without the ‘required’ stamps. I found it enjoyable to hear others’ experiences. 🙂

A fun diversion in lockdown so thank you @waubish for asking about how many stamps you need - and hopefully amid the frivolity you found the answer!

More importantly - hope you have a wondeful Day 1 on the Camino de Madrid 🎒🎒
 
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Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
All the various posters above are doing are citing the ‘rules’ as they are written - the application of the rules is a matter for the team in Santiago.

cf the interminable debates about walking poles and penknives
Yes, it often seems to depend on the mood of the one helping us; if they've had a good day, a bad day, or if it's possibly a personality issue.
 

waubish

New Member
Past OR future Camino
1341
Just read your Day 1 account. Very helpful. Leaning towards the Hotel Jardin for sure. Question: we are not sure about the whole getting stamps in the credential thing. Do we need more than 1 stamp per day? Conflicting reports.
eating dinner right now in Plaza Mayor and planning to head out quite early in the morning to get some miles before it gets too hot. Also with jet lag we are awake anyway.
Hi I’m Kathy. We (Sydney and I) are beginning the Madrid Camino tomorrow morning (07.09.2021) from near the Plaza Santiago. Picked up our Camino passport yesterday from the church (Iglesias de Santiago) when it opened at 6pm. We arrived at the madrid airport 05September.
Anyone else out there on the Madrid?
We are from Washington State by the way and this is our first Camino.
Buen Camino.
Just a check in from the Camino. Departed Madrid on the 7th. Was very excited to finally be on our way! Not much to say about days 1 through 3 other than: blisters; sore back;tired. We did see another pair of peregrenos doing the Madrid route…they didn’t speak English and we don’t speak much Spanish so interactions were limited.

Day 4 to Segovia was challenging but so amazing. I found it especially thrilling to be walking on remnants of a Roman road as we climbed the Guadarramas. Another thrill was coming down out of the mountains and seeing Segovia in the distance. It seemed so close but it was still miles away. Arg. There was so much to see in Segovia we have stayed an extra day, which is also good for my blistered toes and aching back. We had time to see the castle, the cathedral (and get a stamp in our credential) and of course the aquaduct.

Tomorrow morning we begin the 5th stage.
 
F

Former member 31048

Guest
Hola Kathy and Sidney.
Thanks for the update. Hope your day in fabulous Segovia has given your tired body and blistered feet a chance to recover.

I smiled (in empathy) when I read your comment about approaching Segovia. It was a long hot afternoon for us … it was in the distance for hour upon hour. I had read to expect this but it still seemed to go on forever. What a joy to arrive!

You have some wonderful stages ahead.

Buen Camino
Jenny
 

waubish

New Member
Past OR future Camino
1341
Lots to say about today (Segovia to Santa Maria la Real de Nieva ) but the main thing is that all albuerges are closed. There is no place that I know of to stay inside the town proper. People came outside to explain this to us and one man ultimately offered to drive us 3km to Hostal Avante where we got a room for €45. Pretty stoked about that as we were looking at sleeping outside in the town and I dumped my thermarest pad 3 days ago in Manzanares el Real to lighten my load. Instead we are in an air conditioned room with bathtub and on site restaurant. Dinner starts at 8 as is usual. Hanging out.

Almost 22 miles today. It is not easy to leave Segovia —the way is not well marked. We rambled around somewhat trying to find the arrows that would verify we were on our route. I suspect that the small blue and yellow medallions get swiped from the many concrete markers we saw. We eventually figured it out but it’s a long enough day that you don’t want to walk any extra steps.
At first the scenery, as you leave Segovia, is fields and hills of golden stubble, and the harvested hay in giant bales stacked 2 stories high. At 10 miles we hit Los Huertos—walked right by a cafe that was open, took a break and had our coffee fix. That was the last amenity for many hours. Actually that was the last amenity.
We walked a sandy trail with pine needles, startled several small deer (wildlife!) and saw fields of dried sunflowers. We saw a pine tree forest where all the trees were sliced so as to allow the sap to flow into buckets attached to the trees.
The day grew quite hot. We ran out of water but were able to refill from a fountain in Pinilla Ambroz, the town of cats. So many cats. Also there are fountains along the way in every town I think. This is just the first time I emptied my 3 liter camelback.
Really we were getting tired, just slogging it out, but we made it to the town and plopped down at a table at a bar on the Plaza Mayor. Stunned from the heat and the miles. You know the rest of the story.
Blisters (Ampolla in Spanish) somewhat better today and so is my back. Feeling tired. Tomorrow’s another day.
 
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F

Former member 31048

Guest
Hola Kathy and Sidney

Sorry to know that your day out of Segovia was so tough, not helped by the albergue being closed and the hot weather. But you are courageous - I think this is your first Camino? Not many pilgrims tackle the Madrid Way as their first Camino - so bravo to you. As you are finding, it has sometimes long distances with no amenities, even water supplies (more so than most other Caminos) and that Spanish afternoon sun can be a killer.

The good news is that you are approaching Coca - it's a charming town (village?) with a fabulous 15th century castle. When we stopped in Coca, we stayed in the albergue municipale - Casa del Peregrinos - which was the former home of the school teacher. There was a phone number on the door to be called and a local lady, Charo, arrived with the key. I hope it is open for you.

Also, along The Way today you will pass through Nava de la Asuncion where there are sure to be shops open and a place to replenish your water. You will also pass through a forest today - providing cool shade from the Spanish sun!

Here is my blog entry from that part of the Madrid Way, in case it is useful.


Buen camino
Jenny
 
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dick bird

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Also, take care as you lèave Très Cantos. If you read our Day 2 post you will see that we missed a turn early on which added some kms to the day.

The Madrid way is very well marked so I’m thinking it was ‘pilgrim error’ - we were probably chatting or looking at the views.

On our second night we stayed at Ray and Rosa’s which was a treat. 🙏
We did that too, but it was a short stage so no harm done. Otherwise, good waymarks. Finding something to eat was sometimes a problem, especially evenings before 9 pm, so stock up when you can and carry something you can cook up yourself in the albergue, e.g. pasta or packet soup. Coming out of Plaza Castilla, keep on the right hand side of the main road. Locating the key to the albergue will challenge your communicative skills at times, Buen Camino.
 

Allee

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Primitivo (planned)
Lots to say about today (Segovia to Santa Maria la Real de Nieva ) but the main thing is that all albuerges are closed. There is no place that I know of to stay inside the town proper. People came outside to explain this to us and one man ultimately offered to drive us 3km to Hostal Avante where we got a room for €45. Pretty stoked about that as we were looking at sleeping outside in the town and I dumped my thermarest pad 3 days ago in Manzanares el Real to lighten my load. Instead we are in an air conditioned room with bathtub and on site restaurant. Dinner starts at 8 as is usual. Hanging out.

Almost 22 miles today. It is not easy to leave Segovia —the way is not well marked. We rambled around somewhat trying to find the arrows that would verify we were on our route. I suspect that the small blue and yellow medallions get swiped from the many concrete markers we saw. We eventually figured it out but it’s a long enough day that you don’t want to walk any extra steps.
At first the scenery, as you leave Segovia, is fields and hills of golden stubble, and the harvested hay in giant bales stacked 2 stories high. At 10 miles we hit Los Huertos—walked right by a cafe that was open, took a break and had our coffee fix. That was the last amenity for many hours. Actually that was the last amenity.
We walked a sandy trail with pine needles, startled several small deer (wildlife!) and saw fields of dried sunflowers. We saw a pine tree forest where all the trees were sliced so as to allow the sap to flow into buckets attached to the trees.
The day grew quite hot. We ran out of water but were able to refill from a fountain in Pinilla Ambroz, the town of cats. So many cats. Also there are fountains along the way in every town I think. This is just the first time I emptied my 3 liter camelback.
Really we were getting tired, just slogging it out, but we made it to the town and plopped down at a table at a bar on the Plaza Mayor. Stunned from the heat and the miles. You know the rest of the story.
Blisters (Ampolla in Spanish) somewhat better today and so is my back. Feeling tired. Tomorrow’s another day.
Are you using a gps/gpx files to navigate?
 

waubish

New Member
Past OR future Camino
1341
Are you using a gps/gpx files to navigate?
I am using Camino Tool as well as Burn Camino. I think the difficulty in Segovia is the elevation There are paths above you and below you. You can appear to be on the route but the actual route is above or below you. Also we encountered a locked gate, while following the arrows out of town that didn’t open until 11am on Sunday.
The apps work great but for some reason Segovia was a challenge.
 
F

Former member 31048

Guest
Hola Kathy and Sidney.

Oh sorry you had such a time walking out of Segovia. I don’t recall we had any problem following The Way and we are not overly attentive 😀. Sounds like our easy exit was more good luck than good management 😀

Maybe you have arrived - or are close to the Camino Frances now. Hope you are travelling well.

Buen Camino
 
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dick bird

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Hola Kathy and Sidney.

Oh sorry you had such a time walking out of Segovia. I don’t recall we had any problem following The Way and we are not overly attentive 😀. Sounds like our easy exit was more good luck than good management 😀

Maybe you have arrived - or are close to the Camino Frances now. Hope you are travelling well.

Buen Camino
The same. We found the camino de Madrid generally well marked and don't recall ever having to use GPS to find our way. Finding the key to the albergue was a different matter. At least there were more of them after Segovia, but generally small and unstaffed. I'd be very interested to hear what the albergue situation is now.
 
F

Former member 31048

Guest
The same. We found the camino de Madrid generally well marked and don't recall ever having to use GPS to find our way. Finding the key to the albergue was a different matter. At least there were more of them after Segovia, but generally small and unstaffed. I'd be very interested to hear what the albergue situation is now.
Yes, but some how we didn’t have any problems (even with only Camino Spanish). All part of the fun whether it was calling Chara in Coca who arrived with the key, hair in rollers 😀, or another where we picked up the key in the local bar and took it back the next morning.

On the Mozarabe it was sometimes collecting the key from the local police station and finding ourselves the only pilgrims in v comfortable and well appointed albergues. Local people keen for the Camino to become more popular were always thrilled to see us 😎

Great memories 🙏
 
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Frances x5, Portuguese VdlP12, Sanabres, Aragones, Norte,Salvador,Primitivo, VdlP 17,Madrid18Norte
Yes, but some how we didn’t have any problems (even with only Camino Spanish). All part of the fun whether it was calling Chara in Coca who arrived with the key, hair in rollers 😀, or another where we picked up the key in the local bar and took it back the next morning.

On the Mozarabe it was sometimes collecting the key from the local police station and finding ourselves the only pilgrims in v comfortable and well appointed albergues. Local people keen for the Camino to become more popular were always thrilled to see us 😎

Great memories 🙏
That's funny, she had the rollers in when we arrived in September 2019 also :)
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
IIRC from Segovia one heads pretty much north passing the interesting Iglesia De la Vera Cruz very visible from the city walls.

Ever since cars started to be supplied with satnav I think I’ve lost my sense of direction when driving - I can travel a few hours and not reliably say what my route was because I was just taking direction from the machine.

If I navigate with a map, and perhaps a guidebook, I’ve some idea about the route and not just the next turning.
 

dick bird

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
That's funny, she had the rollers in when we arrived in September 2019 also :)
Hunt the albergue key was definitely part of the fun. We had Alfonso on his tractor, Juan in the park next to the football field and the old lady in the white house on the left as you enter the village, not to mention the smartly dressed ladies in the ayuntamiento, and a nice friendly chat with each and every one of them, but dammit we missed Chara with her rollers in in Coca. Guess we'll have to go back one day and do it again.

I think this might be the church henrythe dog is talking about.

DSC04369.JPG
 
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waubish

New Member
Past OR future Camino
1341
Hola Kathy and Sidney.

Oh sorry you had such a time walking out of Segovia. I don’t recall we had any problem following The Way and we are not overly attentive 😀. Sounds like our easy exit was more good luck than good management 😀

Maybe you have arrived - or are close to the Camino Frances now. Hope you are travelling well.

Buen Camino
We are on the Frances now. Got to Leon yesterday and are enjoying an extra day here. We’ve seen so many more pilgrims since we got to Sahagun…as well as there are so many more options on where to sleep. Will there be more lonely roads as we head west to Santiago?
To recap, in alcazaren the French couple beat us to the albergue—it had capacity constraints due to covid— so we took a taxi to Olmeda for a hotel and then back to Alcazaren the next day.
In Puente Duero ,the next stage, the albergue was awesome. The hospitalero welcomed us and cooked lunch (pasta!) as well as tended to blisters. He also provided dinner. This was because the kitchen was “closed” due to covid even though we sat IN the kitchen to eat:)
The next day was an extra long one because there was no albergue in Peñaflor de Hornija (covid) so it was necessary to walk to Castromonte which had a municipal albergue and a bar but not much else.
The next stage was to Medina de Rioseco—beautiful. Churches, museums, food, pharmacy,etc. We splurged on the Hotel Victoria Colonna.
Next stage to Cuencas de Campos—Hostal La Tata was the only game in town. Paper thin walls in our room above the bar with church bells outside the window. Sigh.
Then to Sandervàs—very cool but lonely place. The albergue was a real winner in all sincerity. It is the hospitaleros that make it so. Genuine, friendly individuals (always men?) who welcome the pilgrims and maintain the facilities. Albergue is in the building with the Ponce de Leon museum. The woman who opens the museum also opens the church to visitors. Both worth seeing and anyway there isnt much else to do.
From there to Sahagun, then 30km to Reliegos. Then Leon.
Tomorrow we continue on our way.
 
F

Former member 31048

Guest
Great to read your update. You probably have read about this but, if not, there are two routes after you leave Leon. One has more walking beside the road. The other is more rural. I’ve only walked the rural option (a lovely and peaceful path) so I cannot speak to the other. I recall that the paths merge again at Hospital del Orbigo. PS. My last experience on the CF was 2013, so things may have changed.

Buen Camino
 
Past OR future Camino
Frances x5, Portuguese VdlP12, Sanabres, Aragones, Norte,Salvador,Primitivo, VdlP 17,Madrid18Norte
We are on the Frances now. Got to Leon yesterday and are enjoying an extra day here. We’ve seen so many more pilgrims since we got to Sahagun…as well as there are so many more options on where to sleep. Will there be more lonely roads as we head west to Santiago?
To recap, in alcazaren the French couple beat us to the albergue—it had capacity constraints due to covid— so we took a taxi to Olmeda for a hotel and then back to Alcazaren the next day.
In Puente Duero ,the next stage, the albergue was awesome. The hospitalero welcomed us and cooked lunch (pasta!) as well as tended to blisters. He also provided dinner. This was because the kitchen was “closed” due to covid even though we sat IN the kitchen to eat:)
The next day was an extra long one because there was no albergue in Peñaflor de Hornija (covid) so it was necessary to walk to Castromonte which had a municipal albergue and a bar but not much else.
The next stage was to Medina de Rioseco—beautiful. Churches, museums, food, pharmacy,etc. We splurged on the Hotel Victoria Colonna.
Next stage to Cuencas de Campos—Hostal La Tata was the only game in town. Paper thin walls in our room above the bar with church bells outside the window. Sigh.
Then to Sandervàs—very cool but lonely place. The albergue was a real winner in all sincerity. It is the hospitaleros that make it so. Genuine, friendly individuals (always men?) who welcome the pilgrims and maintain the facilities. Albergue is in the building with the Ponce de Leon museum. The woman who opens the museum also opens the church to visitors. Both worth seeing and anyway there isnt much else to do.
From there to Sahagun, then 30km to Reliegos. Then Leon.
Tomorrow we continue on our way.
Hi, In Santervas was the friendly bar/café next door open?
 
2022 Camino Guides
The 2022 Camino guides will be coming out little by little, most of them by the end of 2021. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).

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