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Services Between Quiroga and Santiago

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Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
I have posted in other threads about services between Ponferrada and Quiroga, so here's the rest:

Bearing in mind that others have posted recently with beautiful descriptions of the architecture, flora and fauna I will just make some observations about services between Quiroga and Santiago de Compostela.

Excellent and cheap food in Pensión Pacita in Barxa do Lor. Trout is nearly always available. Others have stayed there, and it’s really peaceful. There is, by the way, another place, Hostal Restaurante Rio Lor, a couple of kilometres back down the road to Quiroga.

The family still live in Pensión As Viñas in A Pobra do Brollón, but they are not opening up the place for guests. If you don’t want to go to A Salanova in Salcedo, then there is the newish polideportivo in A Pobra.

The information in our guide about the wine tour in Monforte de Lemos is 100% accurate. Closed on Mondays, tours available in English, a wine sample after you’ve finished, and all for 2.50 euros! Well worth it.

If anyone takes the Escairón alternative, there is a small bar (open weekends, I think), Cantina do Mean, halfway between the turn-off at the Celega cheese factory and Diomondi (spelt Diamondi in a few places!).

The bar in Belesar is under new ownership, opens at 11, and is much more pilgrim friendly than before. You’ll get a free wine in the Adega Via Romana on the way up, and in the summer months the Meson Adega do Veiga only closes on Tuesdays and the 5th and 21st of each month (due to the big market in Chantada on those days).

In Chantada, I’m happy to report that Meson Lucus is alive and kicking! A fantastic menu del día, but you might want to reserve as it was packed when we were there.

Café Bar Parada opens at 7, perfect for breakfast.

It’s a good idea to phone the Taberna do Peto in Penasillás the evening before to let them know when you’ll be getting there in the morning.

Bar O Recanto in A Feira (also known as Rio!) is a great little place to stop. Meals are excellent and the quantities huge. The bread is the freshest you will have ever tasted (until you get to Rodeiro, that is!).

It looks as though the restaurant service in Meson O’Guerra is no longer going to be available. A great place in the evening is the Cervecería Quirós, at the edge of town: a lovely terrace overlooking the garden, and excellent cheap food.

If you’re staying in Lalín (smart new albergue) and fancy a real gastronomic splurge, go for the Cocido Gallego in Casa Currás. More food than you could imagine, and you won’t need to eat anything for a couple of days afterwards!

After you’ve walked up from Ponte Taboada a good place to stop is A Casa de Gerardo, just on the opposite side of the road to the church of Santiago. A very pretty garden and it’s very pilgrim friendly.

Leaving Silleda, just past the turn-off from the main road, is the Restaurante O Camiño. Always full, which is a good sign, and an amazing choice for the 10 euro menu del día.

Bandeira is still as sleepy as ever! They seem to have improved the showers (no weird contraptions this time) in the Hostal Conde Rey, but the WiFi is poor. Bar la Plazoleta is still a cheerful place to sit and have a wine or coffee, but if you want something to eat (burgers, sandwiches etc.) head back down to Café Arume, opposite the gasolinera as you walk up into town.

If you’re staying or stopping for a drink in the Albergue in Dornelas, it’s 50/50 whether you’ll find Andrea in a good mood. He’s charming one minute and downright rude the next!

The bar in San Miguel do Castro seems to be closed.

In Ponte Ulla you’ll be excellently treated in Bar Rios. Ilda (no ‘H’, she says!) is a wonderful lady and will go out of her way to make you feel at home. Comfortable rooms, some en-suite, and excellent food.

The Albergue Reina Lupa (on the highway 100 metres off the camino) is the perfect place to stop. It used to be just a pulperia, but the albergue is brand new (3 or 4 years) and the breakfasts are just what you need!

That’s all, folks!
 
Last edited:

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I have posted in other threads about services between Ponferrada and Quiroga, so here's the rest:

Bearing in mind that others have posted recently with beautiful descriptions of the architecture, flora and fauna I will just make some observations about services between Quiroga and Santiago de Compostela.

Excellent and cheap food in Pensión Pacita in Barxa do Lor. Trout is nearly always available. Others have stayed there, and it’s really peaceful. There is, by the way, another place, Hostal Restaurante Rio Lor, a couple of kilometres back down the road to Quiroga.

The family still live in Pensión As Viñas in A Pobra do Brollón, but they are not opening up the place for guests. If you don’t want to go to A Salanova in Salcedo, then there is the newish polideportivo in A Pobra.

The information in our guide about the wine tour in Monforte de Lemos is 100% accurate. Closed on Mondays, tours available in English, a wine sample after you’ve finished, and all for 2.50 euros! Well worth it.

If anyone takes the Escairón alternative, there is a small bar (open weekends, I think), Cantina do Mean, halfway between the turn-off at the Celega cheese factory and Diomondi (spelt Diamondi in a few places!).

The bar in Belesar is under new ownership, opens at 11, and is much more pilgrim friendly than before. You’ll get a free wine in the Adega Via Romana on the way up, and in the summer months the Meson Adega do Veiga only closes on Tuesdays and the 5th and 21st of each month (due to the big market in Chantada on those days).

In Chantada, I’m happy to report that Meson Lucus is alive and kicking! A fantastic menu del día, but you might want to reserve as it was packed when we were there.

Café Bar Parada opens at 7, perfect for breakfast.

It’s a good idea to phone the Taberna do Peto in Penasillás the evening before to let them know when you’ll be getting there in the morning.

Bar O Recanto in A Feira (also known as Rio!) is a great little place to stop. Meals are excellent and the quantities huge. The bread is the freshest you will have ever tasted (until you get to Rodeiro, that is!).

It looks as though the restaurant service in Meson O’Guerra is no longer going to be available. A great place in the evening is the Cervecería Quirós, at the edge of town: a lovely terrace overlooking the garden, and excellent cheap food.

If you’re staying in Lalín (smart new albergue) and fancy a real gastronomic splurge, go for the Cocido Gallego in Casa Currás. More food than you could imagine, and you won’t need to eat anything for a couple of days afterwards!

After you’ve walked up from Ponte Taboada a good place to stop is A Casa de Gerardo, just on the opposite side of the road to the church of Santiago. A very pretty garden and it’s very pilgrim friendly.

Leaving Silleda, just past the turn-off from the main road, is the Restaurante O Camiño. Always full, which is a good sign, and an amazing choice for the 10 euro menu del día.

Bandeira is still as sleepy as ever! They seem to have improved the showers (no weird contraptions this time) in the Hostal Conde Rey, but the WiFi is poor. Bar la Plazoleta is still a cheerful place to sit and have a wine or coffee, but if you want something to eat (burgers, sandwiches etc.) head back down to Café Arume, opposite the gasolinera as you walk up into town.

If you’re staying or stopping for a drink in the Albergue in Dornelas, it’s 50/50 whether you’ll find Andrea in a good mood. He’s charming one minute and downright rude the next!

The bar in San Miguel do Castro seems to be closed.

In Ponte Ulla you’ll be excellently treated in Bar Rios. Ilda (no ‘H’, she says!) is a wonderful lady and will go out of her way to make you feel at home. Comfortable rooms, some en-suite, and excellent food.

The Albergue Reina Lupa (on the highway 100 metres off the camino) is the perfect place to stop. It used to be just a pulperia, but the albergue is brand new (3 or 4 years) and the breakfasts are just what you need!

That’s all, folks!
That's very descriptive and Invierno-urban-myth about lack of infrastructure destroying ;)

I would add two more places:
- couple of kilometers before Rodeiro (forgot the name of the village) is also nice restaurante with huge garden and hammocks at the back,
- in Rodeiro there's new albergue privado in As Carpinteiras hostal. Very good food also.

And Reina Lupa is just 2 years old as I have been told last summer stopping there for the third time. Pulpo is still excellent!!! ;)

From Reina Lupa till Santiago there are plenty of bars. I can remember at least 7. Not that I was stopping in all of them. I usually walk from Puente Ulla to SdC in one day :D
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
KInkyOne: I didn't write this just to destroy this newly-created myth about the lack of services. Others seem to be putting potential caminantes off by claiming that the Invierno (and later the Via de Plata) involves mainly road walking!

I think that the other bar you're referring to before Rodeiro is if you go on the alternative route.

I knew about the albergue that they've added to Carpinteiras.

From Reina Lupa to Santiago there are certainly more bars, such as in Susana when you cross the main road.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
KInkyOne: I didn't write this just to destroy this newly-created myth about the lack of services. Others seem to be putting potential caminantes off by claiming that the Invierno (and later the Via de Plata) involves mainly road walking!

I think that the other bar you're referring to before Rodeiro is if you go on the alternative route.

I knew about the albergue that they've added to Carpinteiras.

From Reina Lupa to Santiago there are certainly more bars, such as in Susana when you cross the main road.
Having just walked the Invierno it is definitely heavy on road walking. All you have to do is look at the GPS tracks to confirm that. That's no myth, just facts. Sorry if you disagree but people need to have the full truth to make their decision. It doesn't mean it's a bad Camino. Food and services aren't an issue, they just aren't frequent like on the Frances.
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
Having just walked the Invierno it is definitely heavy on road walking. All you have to do is look at the GPS tracks to confirm that. That's no myth, just facts. Sorry if you disagree but people need to have the full truth to make their decision. It doesn't mean it's a bad Camino. Food and services aren't an issue, they just aren't frequent like on the Frances.
You make it sound as though you're walking along main roads, which is certainly not true at all! I really don't see the problem in walking at times along beautiful winding small country lanes, especially when some of the other parts are often impassable due to the mud and water that accumulate.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
Please, please. Its taken years of work to create a sufficiently effective urban myth about the privations and deprivations of the Invierno. And you two and the sainted @VNwalking go and dispel it all with a few casual posts.

I'll suppose you'll be refuting all the tales of Wolves on the Vasco and Bears on the Olvidado next. Not to mention the poison water on the Meseta and the bad monks of Moratinos....

Blessings upon both of you. I'll obviously not starve on my next venture into the badlands :) ;)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
KInkyOne: I didn't write this just to destroy this newly-created myth about the lack of services. Others seem to be putting potential caminantes off by claiming that the Invierno (and later the Via de Plata) involves mainly road walking!

I think that the other bar you're referring to before Rodeiro is if you go on the alternative route.

I knew about the albergue that they've added to Carpinteiras.

From Reina Lupa to Santiago there are certainly more bars, such as in Susana when you cross the main road.
I was only replying to your last thread which is this one about infrastructure from Q do S. And for that you could get new endorsment re "CI myth buster" :D

If I'll have enough time I'll calculate the tarmac/natural (gravel included) distances from my memory and GPS tracks. The results won't be exact but we will get approximate percentage. I'm interested in this too. But let's leave this for another CI discussion as this one is about services.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
You make it sound as though you're walking along main roads, which is certainly not true at all! I really don't see the problem in walking at times along beautiful winding small country lanes, especially when some of the other parts are often impassable due to the mud and water that accumulate.
Definitely not main roads. I should have stated asphalt paths and hard surfaces. Not dirt roads or soft paths. About half is hard surface walking. But god forbid I should mention anything that could be construed as "negative" about the sainted Invierno. This is the last I will say of it.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Wolves on the Vasco
!?! I missed them. Drat. I'll just have to go again. ;)
But I did see some massive canid prints crossing the road in yhe section before A Barxa...

I'll obviously not starve on my next venture into the badlands
You headed that way, Tinca?? Inquiring minds want to know...
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
KInkyOne: I didn't write this just to destroy this newly-created myth about the lack of services. Others seem to be putting potential caminantes off by claiming that the Invierno (and later the Via de Plata) involves mainly road walking!

I think that the other bar you're referring to before Rodeiro is if you go on the alternative route.

I knew about the albergue that they've added to Carpinteiras.

From Reina Lupa to Santiago there are certainly more bars, such as in Susana when you cross the main road.
The other place that you were talking about just before Rodeiro is Mesón Lamazares. If you walk down to the road - LU-P-1809 - after Bar O Recanto in A Feira (Rio) you'll come to it in two minutes.
 

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