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Luggage Transfer Correos

Shampoo/conditioner

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Cristinaa

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2016
Ok this seems simple enough to solve but its like i can't!
What do people do about shampoo and conditioner? I dont want to cart around two big bottles/extra weight. But i need it! (I dont do shampoo and cond in one)
Do i get smaller bottles and re-fill? Do i just buy extra along the way and refill and leave the rest behind? Maybe i just solved my own dilemma right there?
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
I only take shampoo and use it as shower gel, to wash clothes and as shampoo. I learned over time that what I need and what I think I need are not always the same things. When I need to buy new one, I buy the smallest size available, refill it into my screw top plastic bottle and share/donate the rest. Important: You really want to have a screw top bottle to transport shampoo and the like, not a flip-open style one. A little bit of shampoo can mess up a lot of backpack. Buen Camino, SY
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF x2, CPL
I don't know about the conditioner but I use shampoo for just about everything. Hair of course, then rest of body. And it's as good anything else for doing the laundry in a handbasin.
As as SYates says, get the screw top bottle!
Regards
Gerard
 

Peter Fransiscus

Be proud of who you are.
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
Ok this seems simple enough to solve but its like i can't!
What do people do about shampoo and conditioner? I dont want to cart around two big bottles/extra weight. But i need it! (I dont do shampoo and cond in one)
Do i get smaller bottles and re-fill? Do i just buy extra along the way and refill and leave the rest behind? Maybe i just solved my own dilemma right there?
Hi, only shampoo will do you can use it for everything.
Wish you well and a Buen Camino, Peter.
 

Phillypilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C F Sept.(2013) Camino de Madrid & Finisterre/Muxia Sept. (2014)
Finisterre/Muia June (2017).
I ended up buying a small conditioner and a body moisturizer too. My skin and hair became dryer than usual. You will figure out as you walk along. Enjoy!!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
I also use shampoo for everything. My hair also gets very dry so for conditioner I take o a small tube of Vitapoint - this stuff. It lasts the whole trip but is much more concentrated than normal conditioner.
image.jpeg
 
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Anemone del Camino

Guest
Had not heard if the Vitapointe, interesting, thank ypj Kanga. I have curly hair and so I have not used Shampoo in ages: conditionner actually does the job. It's a curly hair thing! The fist time I walked though I made my own mix of shampoo and conditioner, that worked well. I only walk 3 weeks at a time so never needed to carry that much, but buying n route would be a problem as grocery stores only have fairly low quality stuff, and in huge containers. Don't evem kmow what the farmacias sell....
 

BrienC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés, July 2015
Via de la Plata/Camino Sanabrés, Oct/Nov 2016
My hands-down, all-time favorite is Dr. Bronner’s Pure-Castile soap, in their 2 oz. bottle. Two ounces doesn’t sound like much, but during my 20 days on the Camino Frances last summer I still had a tiny bit left over when I returned home. Dr. Bronner’s advertises on their bottle all kinds of uses for the soap. I use it to sanitize hands and showering/shampooing and it’s great for washing clothes, but I draw the line at using it as my toothpaste, which they advise.
Also, Dr. Bronner’s soaps come in a wide variety of scents, from peppermint to hemp and lavender, or un-scented. Something for everyone.
Even reading the bottle is entertaining.
I always keep liquids in a re-closeable plastic bag (ziplock). As S Yates says, a little can make a real mess in your pack.
 

Devon Mike

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Finisterre & Muxia (2014, 2015, 2016, 2018 & 2019), Primitivo & Ingles (2017)
I carry a small bar of unscented soap in a little plastic box. It lasts well and works OK for showering, hairwashing and hand laundry.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
Haha i definitely need conditioner. Im a girl with a hell of a lot of hair on my head, it will be completely unmanageable and a knotted mess without it. Girl problems..!
Camino fact; "Definitely need" might just change in value when you are exposed to other problems walking the Camino. Expect the unexpected, be surprsed by everything.... after a wee while you might not bother.....
 

november_moon

Veteran Member
I understand the need for conditioner. You can see my hair in my profile pic. Its curly and there is a lot of it :) Some people can go bare bones with regard to personal care, others aren't comfortable with that. You just have to decide what your comfort level is and go with it. Like you say - Girl Problems. You may get there and decide you don't need conditioner as much as you thought you would, in which case you can leave it behind - people do leave a lot of stuff behind that they thought they'd need. Personally, I was not willing to sacrifice my hair to the Camino Gods, so I carried shampoo and conditioner ;)

My strategy was to take the best, most concentrated conditioner that I could find. I washed my hair a little more than once a week - every 5 days or so - which is a little less often than I do at home. This meant that I needed to bring less conditioner. It also helps not to wash your hair as often because it means you need to spend less time in the shower and use less hot water, which is important when there are others who need to use the showers too. I also took a really good facial moisturizer and body lotion - concentrated so a little went a long way - the weight of a few extra ounces of liquid was worth it to me to avoid dry, itchy skin.
 

Magnara

Maggie Ramsay
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago de Compostela (2005) Via Francigena (2010) Le Puy to St Jean (2014)
Three days in it will become clear to you if you really need it (and anything else in your pack). You can always take it and leave it behind if you decide it is something you can live without after all. I am interested to see the guys are the "soap for everything" people. But I will definitely investigate Vitapointe conditioner and Dr Bonners soap, they both sound very interesting. And about using Dr Bonners as toothpaste, when we did the Le Puys route last year with friends and stayed in a pension, my friend Nonie was so taken with the smell of the goat milk soap there that she licked it.
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF x2, CPL
You girls and your frizzy hair and your need for conditioner to 'tame' it.
Can I just say that I think you look beautiful with your frizzy hair.
I think you look 100% better that way.
Regards
Gerard
 

Dutch

Straightforward
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
I just wash my hair twice with shampoo. Second time has same effect as conditioner........for me anyway.

Oh, in case hour wondering, i have long hair as well :)
 

SeaHorse

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(May-June 2015)
Check Lush dry shampoo and dry conditioner. One "tablet" lasts 80 washes, my goes to gym atfer the Camino. There are matching containers too, I don't take them out of containers, use as handles. My desire for comfort and ability to carry was such that I had the dry shampoo, dry conditioner, soap for body, soap for clothes, small pieces. And definitely face cream, and sunscreen. And no, sunscreen doesn't work as moisturising cream.
 

LauraK

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon-Santiago (2004) Roncesvalles-Leon (2006) Camino Frances (2012) Kumano Kodo-Japan (2014) Camino Sanabres/Salamanca-Santiago (March 2015) Camino Del Salvador and Camino Primativo (Oct 2015)
I found my hair is difficult to comb with the very hard water in Spain. My hair was like straw after my first Camino. I now take a moisturizing shampoo and very concentrated conditioner in small squeeze travel bottles. It usually lasts 4 weeks. I cut a bar of regular bar soap in half to save weight...it's the soap I use at home and I like the smell:). It lasts for over a month. I have pared down my pack weight over several caminos but consider these my luxury items.
 

Angie94

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - 2016 www.angie-carter.com/camino
https://youtu.be/PtE_hvREZc4
interesting that this topic came up today as I just purchased my first bar of LUSH soap and tried it out. (Someone had mentioned on here before and when I was at the Mall today - I looked across the way and there was a WHOLE store dedicated to Lush products. I didn't even know we had one! So I bought a shampoo bar (lemon scented - yum!) and have had my first "try out" The very first thing I noticed is it lathers up immediately! So I washed my hair and then used it as body soap and it worked out fine. I purposely did not use conditioner just to see how my hair did (long straight hair that get horribly tangled without conditioner) I am happy to report it did pretty good! I combed my hair out and not too many tangles. A little more than normal (if I had used conditioner) but it was okay. Once my hair dried it was nice and soft! :) I will just use this bar a few more times, without using conditioner and see how it goes. It would be great not to pack liquid shampoo, liquid conditioner and body soap and laundry soap and just be able to use this bar for all of it! It smells great. I bought this little round bar - about the size of a tobacco tin (it was around 10 bucks - pretty pricey but I like it and in the long run it will probably cost about the same) Anyway....just thought I'd throw my two cents in since this post just came up about shampoo and conditioner! :) Buen Camino!!
 

Attachments

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
My hands-down, all-time favorite is Dr. Bronner’s Pure-Castile soap, in their 2 oz. bottle. Two ounces doesn’t sound like much, but during my 20 days on the Camino Frances last summer I still had a tiny bit left over when I returned home. Dr. Bronner’s advertises on their bottle all kinds of uses for the soap. I use it to sanitize hands and showering/shampooing and it’s great for washing clothes, but I draw the line at using it as my toothpaste, which they advise.
Also, Dr. Bronner’s soaps come in a wide variety of scents, from peppermint to hemp and lavender, or un-scented. Something for everyone.
Even reading the bottle is entertaining.
I always keep liquids in a re-closeable plastic bag (ziplock). As S Yates says, a little can make a real mess in your pack.
Dr. Bronner's soap bars are good for everything body, hair and laundry. A bar has lasted me about 1 1/2 months traveling.
 

babylon2505

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2014)
Lush also has the conditioner bar to go that shampoo bar.
It is sold by weight so I bought a small piece.
I actually tried to dehydrate my own conditioner. I used a cookie sheet, Saran Wrap and a low oven. I used my conditioner for colour treated hair.
It took forever to dehydrate. It never really formed a bar as it was too soft. I tried to dry it to the consistency of the Lush bar but it didn't work.
Maybe I need more time.
 

Seabird

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF April/May (2016), starting in St. Palais, France
I've several options in my quest to find a good, less-weight solutions. The Dr. Bonner soap was horrible on my hair. I have straight, fine hair and it didn't even feel clean, much less appealing. I tried the Sea to Summit shampoo leaves and they were equally awful. Then I tried the Lush solid shampoo: BINGO! Loved it and my hair felt great without conditioner.
 

november_moon

Veteran Member
I like the Lush shampoo, but I can't stand the conditioner. I've tried a couple, but gave up. The bar is really soft such that I have to really work at using it without destroying it. It takes forever to get it into and out of my hair. Its a lot of work to save a bit of weight in the pack.

I'm a long time user of Dr Bonners Castille soap for household cleaning, but its never worked on my skin or hair. Its very drying.
 

GreatDane

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF to Burgos Sept/Oct 2014, Burgos to Astorga April 2016, Astorga to SdC 2017
Before my 2014 camino I tested using Dr Bronners soap as my bath soap, shampoo and laundry soap. For my hair it failed in the shampoo dept (but fine for bath and laundry), leaving my hair gummy after a week's worth of washing. I have found a solid conditioner that i LOVE and know that the "sample size" will last me 3 weeks. Still looking for a solid shampoo that I like for my hair. Hmmm, maybe I can just put my favorite shampoo in my dehydrator??
 
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Anemone del Camino

Guest
Before my 2014 camino I tested using Dr Bronners soap as my bath soap, shampoo and laundry soap. For my hair it failed in the shampoo dept (but fine for bath and laundry), leaving my hair gummy after a week's worth of washing. I have found a solid conditioner that i LOVE and know that the "sample size" will last me 3 weeks. Still looking for a solid shampoo that I like for my hair. Hmmm, maybe I can just put my favorite shampoo in my dehydrator??
Solid condtioner? Would love to learn more about it. Thank you'
 

volleyjanice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
08/2013 St. Jean Pied de Port-Belorado, 08/2015 Burgos- Santiago/Finisterre/Muxia, 08/18 Portugese
On our first camino I carried refillable liquid shampoo and separate conditioner for my long, very thick hair. Those bottles proved to be too small and I foolishly let my thrifty side win out and we replaced it with a rather large bottle of shampoo that was a pain to pack. This year I opted to return to Lush solid products which I had used and disliked on a trip a number of years ago. After a second go round with them I can say with confidence that I hate those products! I halved the pieces I had purchased and had them share a tin. Since there is rarely anywhere to place your products in the albergue showers the tin was always filling with water which was messy to drain off and left everything rather goopy. The conditioner required a lot of work to get minimal results - in fact one day I worked it so hard that a couple of hours later I realized I had a gross film on my hair and had to stick my head under an outside tap in an attempt to get it out. Not that it was really conditioning my hair in any meaningful way! Without conditioner I have a heck of a time getting a brush through my hair…especially the mini brush from the Body Shop that I carry to save space and pack weight, rather than the big paddle brush I have it home. Next time I will be back to regular conditioner and I'm just taking myself a normal size bottle of the darn stuff! Clearly it's not about vanity - for the first few days I brushed my hair and french braided it every morning. Then for a few days after that I brushed it and stuck it in a ponytail. One morning we were walking and I realized that it was in the ponytail from the night before and I hadn't done anything to it what so ever!
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
You girls and your frizzy hair and your need for conditioner to 'tame' it.
Can I just say that I think you look beautiful with your frizzy hair.
I think you look 100% better that way.
Regards
Gerard

My sister, a hairdresser, flew in from Arizona a few days ago . While giving me a hair cut, she asked me why I had three huge chunks of random short hair--I had cut tangles out while on Camino! My hair is past shoulder length, and I often just threw it into a pony tail without taking time. I stopped conditioner on Camino.

I don't miss my three big chunks of hair, but the sister was doing a lot of tsk tsk tsk'ing. I finally bought some really high quality conditioner while on the road, and at that point did not mind packing the extra weight, although I did get it out of its heavy French glass container and get it into plastic fast.

As an emergency measure, put some olive oil in your hair if its screaming for moisture. Don't abuse the bar's generosity; just a tablespoon is usually sufficient.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
I took this photo in October 2015 on the dining table at Orisson. Truth!!!! A pilgrim had arrived after the hike up from SJPP, totally exhausted from the weight of her backpack. She was a good sport and we laughed hysterically about her collection of beauty products in glass bottles. Needless to say, we helped her abandon a good part (she tried to give it away but nobody would accept) and arrange for a few kilos of stuff to be transported to Roncesvalles the next day. That was the beginning of several great friendships!
2015-10-14 17.44.52.png
 
Camino(s) past & future
See signature. Too many to list here.
My sister (a former Miss San Diego) told me this story...

She was in the shower at the municipal at O'Cebreiro. That shower is one of the more "revealing" experiences along the camino, more like locker room style.

Anyway, as she was cleansing, the girl next to her turned and asked if she would like to use her conditioner.

My sister had read my mom's advice from a previous camino experience and forgone conditioner as a weight saving measure (she brought lipstick however).

The girl who offered the conditioner (who was absolutely stunning and with beautiful hair, I know because I had a crush on her), insisted that the reason she brings conditioner is to preserve her hair because she was planning to chop it off and donate it to cancer patients.

My sister gladly accepted, (though in her mind's voice she was saying "whatever bitch you just want to look pretty").

The next day my sister looked much prettier. And she was happier. The next day in Triacastela we purchased a bottle of conditioner for her.

My point is, you know your hair, you know what is important to you... If your hair looking good requires conditioner and that will make you happier, then there are many options as far as bottles or products that will allow you to carry it along. Don't stress about the weight if you care about it.
 
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Anemone del Camino

Guest
I took this photo in October 2015 on the dining table at Orisson. Truth!!!! A pilgrim had arrived after the hike up from SJPP, totally exhausted from the weight of her backpack. She was a good sport and we laughed hysterically about her collection of beauty products in glass bottles. Needless to say, we helped her abandon a good part (she tried to give it away but nobody would accept) and arrange for a few kilos of stuff to be transported to Roncesvalles the next day. That was the beginning of several great friendships!
View attachment 23095
Well, she has good taste in perfume and products. I see Si by Armani, the excellent eye makeup remover by Lancome ;). Pity she didn't think of bringing sample sizes. @Anniesantiago will chastise me, but you will not find me without my perfume, but I pour it into 1ml 'bottles' which mist weigh 3 grams once filled.
 
Camino(s) past & future
See signature. Too many to list here.
@Damien Reynolds , what girl would not fall for a boy who understands her hair issues? Mind you, having a Miss San Diego as a sister in law might intimidate a few o_O.
Understanding hair issues requires more intimacy than is usually prescribed on a daily hike and nightly bedbunking. Works with sisters, but takes a while with the average camino acquaintance.
 
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Anemone del Camino

Guest
Understanding hair issues requires more intimacy than is usually prescribed on a daily hike and nightly bedbunking. Works with sisters, but takes a while with the average camino acquaintance.
Just make sure they hear you being so comprehensive with your sister. Less creepy, but effective I'm sure. :)
 

Terri B

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
1998 St Cuthberts Way, 1999 West Highland Way
2016 & 2019 Camino Frances SJPDP to Santiago
I am walking in September, now this year which is scary. Anyway I am planning to take both, but a small bottle of condition and ration it out. Instead of using every day like at home, i'll use it every third or fourth day. If I don't my hair ends up like straw. But based on the above will make sure they are screw top bottles.
 

kalliti

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part of Via de la Plata; and continuing in March 2016
What a great thread, I'm just testing different ways to handle the hair issue (long, thin hair, departure in March)! Now it seems that a no-conditioner but a TangleTeezer brush tactics would do it, but I'm still looking for some good concentrated conditioner stuff. I'll also try the Lush products. Thanks for great tips!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
So.. they sell conditioner in Spanish farmacias, verdad?
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
Yes, and my daughter found a great concentrated cream conditioner in a small pot at a hair dressing salon in Pamplona. Fabulous. I've looked for it since a few times but not found it.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Fascinating reading - I don't know anything about this sort of thing at all ... my bath has a bar of soap and a plastic bottle of some generic cheap supermarket shampoo next to it. I keep my hair clipper-No.2 short .. what is left of it). When my daughter visited from Los Angeles last year I counted, after just three days, 38 containers of various "necessary" items in there ....

So, stupid question, but, does it actually matter if it becomes 'dry'? I mean, hair is dead anyway isn't it? Can't one just plait it into pigtails or similar? Not trying to get a rise here, this is genuine curiosity -

and .. well, on the adverts they talk about various ingredients .. so cannot one just go direct? Buy a bottle of beer once a week and use that? Or an advocado .. or lubricate it with olive oil ? (the Romans did that) ... things like that? Or am I being really dumb here?

- or - what about cane-row braids? Then you don't even need to think about it at all? (and it looks seriously cool too). ;)

cane row braids.jpg
 
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Camino(s) past & future
April 2015
Ok this seems simple enough to solve but its like i can't!
What do people do about shampoo and conditioner? I dont want to cart around two big bottles/extra weight. But i need it! (I dont do shampoo and cond in one)
Do i get smaller bottles and re-fill? Do i just buy extra along the way and refill and leave the rest behind? Maybe i just solved my own dilemma right there?
Depending on your hair type: some have hair that can wash and wear; but my hair become drier and drier (bigger and bigger) as the trek went on. I couldn't find good conditioner, so I pulled back the "rag mop" and trekked on.
If you stay every once in a while at a hotel you might find conditioner. My next walk I will carry a small tube of conditioner. Shampoo is every where.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Just had a look at the Dr. Bronner uk website - didn't even know it existed (thanks for the heads-up above!) .. happy to go with good natural products so will buy some for my home and a soap bar for Camino .... it just occurred to me that as insects such as mosquitoes are supposedly repelled by citrus, and you guys Will be buying products .. would it be worth getting a citrus one? Such as Bronner's Citrus orange bar soap?

p.s. hhmmm .. Lavender is a bedbug repellent, works on Scorpions too, now ... I wonder if bedbugs are repelled by citrus too .......
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
@David
I never had much problems with mosquitos in Spain (and I am considered a first class buffet by them!) but the bad message is that bed bugs aren't interested in your smell, they orientate themselves towards their victims by the CO2 you exhale. So unless you stop breathing ...

Buen Camino sin insectos, SY
 

Linda Fantillo

RiverWalker
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 14, May 17, September 18
Hi all, I used JR Liggett soap (unscented as I am very sensitive to scents but there are many different fragrances) Very reasonably priced and found that with this product, a conditioner was not even necessary. Fine for the body also. There is a specific travel package that you can buy that has its own little drainer so it doesn't get all mucky.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
I have used the Lush solid shampoo bar several times and love them, but the problem is the container filling up with water in the shower unless there is somewhere to put it, and that the round tin plus round shampoo bar can leave the bar stuck in the tin - top tip: get the square one, or ask for a black plastic Lush cream container. Or place a piece of plastic wrap or a match in the bottom. I bring a toiletries/washbag with a hook to hang it over the shower door or any hooks, rails etc and that makes it easier to put the bar away without getting it soaked and dissolving. On my last couple of walks though I have brought a small refillable shampoo bottle and might also bring a tube of Nice & Easy conditioner cream. Or not. I travel hand luggage only, so it depends how much room I have in the liquid allowance bag. I am considering swapping it for the tooth paste and bring the Lush toothy tabs instead though!
 

pudgypilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
voie de tours 2015
I used the Liggett shampoo bars, too, but I found that the regular is pretty drying. The jojoba one works very well, though, for my thin dry hair.

EDIT Oh, and I tried washing my hair with Dr. Bronner's once. I use their soap at home all the time, but never again for hair. They do warn you that you probably won't like how your hair feels after washing with it, unless you have conditioner ready to slather on.
 

SeaHorse

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(May-June 2015)
Fascinating reading - I don't know anything about this sort of thing at all ... my bath has a bar of soap and a plastic bottle of some generic cheap supermarket shampoo next to it. I keep my hair clipper-No.2 short .. what is left of it). When my daughter visited from Los Angeles last year I counted, after just three days, 38 containers of various "necessary" items in there ....

So, stupid question, but, does it actually matter if it becomes 'dry'? I mean, hair is dead anyway isn't it? Can't one just plait it into pigtails or similar? Not trying to get a rise here, this is genuine curiosity -

and .. well, on the adverts they talk about various ingredients .. so cannot one just go direct? Buy a bottle of beer once a week and use that? Or an advocado .. or lubricate it with olive oil ? (the Romans did that) ... things like that? Or am I being really dumb here?

- or - what about cane-row braids? Then you don't even need to think about it at all? (and it looks seriously cool too). ;)

View attachment 23130
Real answer for real curiosity: if the hair has a tendency to get very dry and/or fizzy, it needs the conditioner to be able to comb it and manage whatever way, be it free, ponytail, bun, little braids. Or it will behave and look like straw hair of a scarecrow, all up in every direction, with tangles. And no, its not cute, thats the look of a fairytale witch. Plus it damages the hair, it splits and breaks off. Repairing long hair may take years - till its completely changed. Cutting it short may work for Camino, but growing back to considerable length may also take years or depending on age be impossible at all.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Real answer for real curiosity: if the hair has a tendency to get very dry and/or fizzy, it needs the conditioner to be able to comb it and manage whatever way, be it free, ponytail, bun, little braids. Or it will behave and look like straw hair of a scarecrow, all up in every direction, with tangles. And no, its not cute, thats the look of a fairytale witch. Plus it damages the hair, it splits and breaks off. Repairing long hair may take years - till its completely changed. Cutting it short may work for Camino, but growing back to considerable length may also take years or depending on age be impossible at all.
thanks for genuine answer - I was dreading what might have come up! I had long hair in the late 60's but used washing up liquid and anything else that was around - but that was the 60's!!

p.s. I like fairy tale witches ;)
p.p.s - those before and after adverts where the woman's hair is a bit frizzy and then it becomes all straight and smooth? All the men I have checked with, including me, find the "before" woman much more attractive - not that this matters of course.
 
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Anemone del Camino

Guest
p.p.s - those before and after adverts where the woman's hair is a bit frizzy and then it becomes all straight and smooth? All the men I have checked with, including me, find the "before" woman much more attractive - not that this matters of course.
David, you actually asked men about this? ;) And BYW, the sleek look is achieved by blowdrying and ironing the air, not thanks to the product on its own. It's amazing how smooth and shinny my hair can be when straightened when it is normally in tight ringlets like goldy locks.
 

ShaLaw

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, fall of 2015
I took a shampoo bar and a conditioner bar from LUSH. The shampoo was excellent but the conditioner?? Not so much. I ended up buying a 220ml bottle of conditioner at one of the supermarkets and it lasted me the whole way as one of the beauties of being on Camino and getting back to basics was washing my hair every second or even every third day and not having to blow it dry. I just washed it and threw a buff on my head and it was great!! I also took a tiny bottle of CHI oil for my hair to run through my hair after I towel dried it or when it was dry and was frizzy.
 

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David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
David, you actually asked men about this? ;) And BYW, the sleek look is achieved by blowdrying and ironing the air, not thanks to the product on its own. It's amazing how smooth and shinny my hair can be when straightened when it is normally in tight ringlets like goldy locks.

Hahaha! Regardless of current media stereotyping and propaganda we do actually talk to each other, not just simple stuff but deeper things; feelings, loss, bewilderment, women, how to love, how to be good, meaning of life, frizzy hair versus over-slicked and unsexual straight hair. We actually talk. Well, my tribe does. Not too sure about those Neanderthals into sport.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Hahaha! Regardless of current media stereotyping and propaganda we do actually talk to each other, not just simple stuff but deeper things; feelings, loss, bewilderment, women, how to love, how to be good, meaning of life, frizzy hair versus over-slicked and unsexual straight hair. We actually talk. Well, my tribe does. Not too sure about those Neanderthals into sport.
Not saying you don't talk, but surprised women's hair product adverts would come to mind. But a good suggestion to make to those neanderthals ;).
 

Phillypilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C F Sept.(2013) Camino de Madrid & Finisterre/Muxia Sept. (2014)
Finisterre/Muia June (2017).
Kanga, that product is like our USA's 1960's "Alberto VO5" leave in conditioner in a tube!!!!!
 

waynecarol

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 May
Ok this seems simple enough to solve but its like i can't!
What do people do about shampoo and conditioner? I dont want to cart around two big bottles/extra weight. But i need it! (I dont do shampoo and cond in one)
Do i get smaller bottles and re-fill? Do i just buy extra along the way and refill and leave the rest behind? Maybe i just solved my own dilemma right there?
You can buy a cake of shampoo/conditioner that you can use for washing and clothes, it is amazing and it really is a conditioner, you should try it. One cake of soap for everything, it is from LUSH. I have long thick hair and it worked well.
 

DebraK

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(Spring 2016)
I have used the Lush solid shampoo bar several times and love them, but the problem is the container filling up with water in the shower unless there is somewhere to put it, and that the round tin plus round shampoo bar can leave the bar stuck in the tin - top tip: get the square one, or ask for a black plastic Lush cream container. Or place a piece of plastic wrap or a match in the bottom. I bring a toiletries/washbag with a hook to hang it over the shower door or any hooks, rails etc and that makes it easier to put the bar away without getting it soaked and dissolving. On my last couple of walks though I have brought a small refillable shampoo bottle and might also bring a tube of Nice & Easy conditioner cream. Or not. I travel hand luggage only, so it depends how much room I have in the liquid allowance bag. I am considering swapping it for the tooth paste and bring the Lush toothy tabs instead though!

I plan to put my LUSH shampoo bar in a little mesh bag so it can "air dry", once it is dry I will pack it with the toiletries bag ...
 

DebraK

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(Spring 2016)
Wow, I am most fortunate with my long hair it seems. I never realized how much difficulty other women had with their hair. I simply shampoo mine every two days let it air dry, once it is almost dry I do a quick brush, no tangles. It comes out silky, shiny and slightly wavy .. then I forget about it ...
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Here is a thought: many albergues will have oil and vinegar in the kitchens for pilgims to use. Would a table spoon or so of these not do the job?
 

Kiwi-d

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sep/Oct 2014
As another one with naturally curly, frizzy hair I hated Lush conditioner too. I ended up not washing my hair at all, I just wore a buff over it and (rank heresy, I know) went to a hairdresser about once a week and had my hair professionally shampooed and conditioned. It was worth every cent!
 
Camino(s) past & future
I have visited the Cathedral in 2011, but not in a pilgrimage. I plan to go within the next 3 or 4 years by my 50th birthday.
I found my hair is difficult to comb with the very hard water in Spain. My hair was like straw after my first Camino. I now take a moisturizing shampoo and very concentrated conditioner in small squeeze travel bottles. It usually lasts 4 weeks. I cut a bar of regular bar soap in half to save weight...it's the soap I use at home and I like the smell:). It lasts for over a month. I have pared down my pack weight over several caminos but consider these my luxury items.
I thought I heard this idea before!
 
Camino(s) past & future
I have visited the Cathedral in 2011, but not in a pilgrimage. I plan to go within the next 3 or 4 years by my 50th birthday.
I plan to put my LUSH shampoo bar in a little mesh bag so it can "air dry", once it is dry I will pack it with the toiletries bag ...
good idea. I was thinking soak in a Ziploc bag would be wet and gross.
 

alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2005, 2007; Madrid/Frances 2011; 1/2 VdP 2012; Portugese Litoral2019; Finisterre/Muxia2019
I just drained the water out of my soap's plastic container after my shower, then left the container, open, by my backpack afterwards so the soap could air dry. I tried to remember to return after an hour or so to flip it over to dry the underside (easy to do when bustling about with laundry and tending t0 feet).
 

Dutchwalk53

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2015 with son #1, CF 2016 alone, CF 2017 with son #2 and husband , CF Sept 2018 with daughter
Don't stress about the weight if you care about it.
Totally agree :)
I simply filled 3 oz bottles at home with my own shampoo and conditioner. Then refilled in Spain. You have plenty cheap (2 or 3 euros ) and good choices in the supermarkets (and bazaars in bigger towns.) Whatever you have left over just share with another pilgrim or donate in an Albergue. I loved washing my hair every day after a long walk in the June heat and was actually surprised how long a tiny bottle of conditioner can last. I refilled the shampoo more often there I used it for washing my clothes. For me, the little extra weight of a few luxury items like some mascara , shampoo/conditioner and some body lotion was worth it. Once you are on the way you can always get rid of items you end up not using. (I got rid of 1 long sleeved T shirt there is was HOT all days during my walk).
 

good_old_shoes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('15)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
Oh my, I laughed a bit reading the title of this thread. Conditioner, really...? But oh well, we're all different and need different kinds of things!

(My hair is hip long, and I only carried half a bar of (cheap spanish) soap for body, hair and clothes... and survived! Even kept the last tiny bit of soap, still have it, seems like things you carried on the camino develope some kind of special status, and are not to be thrown away, however useful they are, or not...)


Anyway... this thread just reminded me of a funny misunderstanding in a small shop in Burgos which taught me some important vocabulary.

It had been a long day, and I was happy not having to walk to the supermarket, as a fellow pilgrim from Burgos I had met a couple of times before led me to a small shop near the albergue. I wanted to buy a few things for myself and had promised another pilgrim to bring him some soap.

I have to say I only speak very few words Spanish; my pilgrim friend from Burgos spoke much better English, so I was happy to have a translator in the shop. After I had bought what I needed, I remembered I wanted to buy soap. So I asked my friend to ask the shop owner if they had that, and my friend asked for „sopa“. No, sorry said the shop owner. Sorry said my friend, they don't have that, at least nothing that could be cooked well in the albergue microwave (by the way, why does that hyper modern albergue not have a kitchen...?).

It then dawned on me.
I had said „soap“, my friend had heard „soup“ which then got translated to „sopa“.


At least now I will never again forget the word „jabón“, as long as I live!:D


[Also, if I remember correctly, the only soap they had was the pink one smelling of roses, and the pilgrim I had promised to buy soap for, was a grown man. He at least pretended not to mind ... ]
 

momof34man

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
April -June 2016 Camino Frances, Camino Finesterre, Camino Muxia
2018 - Either Camino Portugues or Camino Primitivo
Before my 2014 camino I tested using Dr Bronners soap as my bath soap, shampoo and laundry soap. For my hair it failed in the shampoo dept (but fine for bath and laundry), leaving my hair gummy after a week's worth of washing. I have found a solid conditioner that i LOVE and know that the "sample size" will last me 3 weeks. Still looking for a solid shampoo that I like for my hair. Hmmm, maybe I can just put my favorite shampoo in my dehydrator??
I'd love to hear about this solid conditioner too. I love the Lush bar and have tried both types of shampoo bar styles. (The one with conditioner added and the one that is just shampoo.) I like the one with conditioner, but it isn't enough to condition my hair. I also tried the Lush conditioner bar and it is VERY difficult to work with. It wasn't worth the $ I spent.
 

GreatDane

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF to Burgos Sept/Oct 2014, Burgos to Astorga April 2016, Astorga to SdC 2017
I'd love to hear about this solid conditioner too. I love the Lush bar and have tried both types of shampoo bar styles. (The one with conditioner added and the one that is just shampoo.) I like the one with conditioner, but it isn't enough to condition my hair. I also tried the Lush conditioner bar and it is VERY difficult to work with. It wasn't worth the $ I spent.
I'll PM you the info. I am just a happy customer and have no relationship to the vendor. I tried to go into a Lush store in Madrid but it was so crowded I gave up. Plus I'd heard how $$$$ it was...
 

ShaLaw

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, fall of 2015
Why not share the info about this conditioner bar with all of us?? I'd like to know what it is too for my next Camino?! Please and thanks!!
 

LesBrass

Likes Walking
Camino(s) past & future
yes...
On my first camino another pilgrim let me use some of her leave-in, spray-in conditioner... oh what a fabulous treat it was! We were at Fromista so we had been a couple of weeks on the road. My hair felt so soft and smelt of citrus and general loveliness after. I wish I'd made a note of the brand because it was just a small bottle and it was fabulous.

Anyway - after this I was resolved to take some with me on my second walk... and will do the same in September. So I'm reading all you suggestions with interest.

p.s. I'm also a great fan of the Lush soap bar.
 

HeidiL

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004-), Portugués, Madrid, 4/5 Plata, 1/8 Levante, 1/8 Lana, Augusta, hospitalera Grado.
I've found that washing my hair every five days or so, and only washing the hair near my scalp, is enough. I always wear my hair tightly braided on the Camino, after the time when I just wore it in a ponytail and got the most amazing tangles. I once happened to get olive oil on the tip of my braid (thanks, kiddo!). Over the next few days, as I brushed my hair (<3 Tangleteezer), it spread over the rest of my hair, which was nice and soft. I did smell like a salad, but that's not necessarily a bad thing, considering how hungry people get when they walk a long distance every day...
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
[So, stupid question, but, does it actually matter if it becomes 'dry'? I mean, hair is dead anyway isn't it? Can't one just plait it into pigtails or similar? Not trying to get a rise here, this is genuine curiosity -

and .. well, on the adverts they talk about various ingredients .. so cannot one just go direct? Buy a bottle of beer once a week and use that? Or an advocado .. or lubricate it with olive oil ? (the Romans did that) ... things like that? Or am I being really dumb here?

- or - what about cane-row braids? Then you don't even need to think about it at all? (and it looks seriously cool too). ;)

[


The other alternative is to let your hair grow into dreadlocks... many years ago I had dreads and all you needed was to swoosh them in water. You never got sunstroke either!! A friend of mine with really frizzy hair was able to plait hers into 'dreadlocks' overnight and even after several months - she could just comb them out again - amazing!
How wonderful that the necessities of life are good for hair health too - avocado, olive oil, beer...
 

Margaret Butterworth

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 (Pamplona to Burgos)
2014 (Burgos to Villafranca del Bierzo)
2015 (Villafranca to Santiago)
2016 (Le Puy to Conques; SJPP To Pamplona)
Shampoo? Conditioner? For what?!?!?!



:D
Men should not respond to this thread. They can't possibly understand the agonies of bad hair days on the Camino! Let no female set off without their favourite conditioner. Ditto, handcream - essential with all the clothes washing every day!
 

Devon Mike

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Finisterre & Muxia (2014, 2015, 2016, 2018 & 2019), Primitivo & Ingles (2017)
Men should not respond to this thread. They can't possibly understand the agonies of bad hair days on the Camino! Let no female set off without their favourite conditioner. Ditto, handcream - essential with all the clothes washing every day!
What a load of rubbish!

Men have hair issues as well. You will understand MichaelSG's comment if you take a look at his photo. He has a shaved head!!
 

november_moon

Veteran Member
Maybe we should revise this to say that men with no hair shouldn't respond - haha ;)

Anyway - back to the frizzy vs. smooth hair discussion - conditioner will not make naturally curly hair smooth and straight. Conditioner makes curly hair manageable - that is to say, still curly and probably frizzy, but not nearly as tangled and dry. When hair is dry, it breaks. Straight hair isn't nearly as prone to dryness as curly hair for several reasons - one is simply that the oil from the scalp can travel down the strands of hair much more easily with straight hair than with curly, so the natural scalp oils protect straight hair much better. To deal with frizz, we usually need additional products like hair gel - keep the curl, but combat some of the frizz. To make hair smooth and straight requires a hot iron.
 

KiwiBrownz

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Spring (2016)
Camino Frances Spring (2017)
Camino Frances Autumn (2018)
Ok this seems simple enough to solve but its like i can't!
What do people do about shampoo and conditioner? I dont want to cart around two big bottles/extra weight. But i need it! (I dont do shampoo and cond in one)
Do i get smaller bottles and re-fill? Do i just buy extra along the way and refill and leave the rest behind? Maybe i just solved my own dilemma right there?
Hi, I have to use conditioner and have looked at the problem. I have decided to take two 100ml screw top containers of conditioner and one of shampoo and see how long this lasts. then like previous posts refil and share surplus :) the extra 200gms of weight are worth controllable hair and no mushroomhead of exploding hair :)
 

volleyjanice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
08/2013 St. Jean Pied de Port-Belorado, 08/2015 Burgos- Santiago/Finisterre/Muxia, 08/18 Portugese
I plan to put my LUSH shampoo bar in a little mesh bag so it can "air dry", once it is dry I will pack it with the toiletries bag ...
The unfortunate thing is that you will likely be hard pressed to find somewhere to air dry it I think. There isn't always a lot of options for all the extra bits and bobbles we would like to hang up somewhere.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I have visited the Cathedral in 2011, but not in a pilgrimage. I plan to go within the next 3 or 4 years by my 50th birthday.
I just tried the Lush shampoo bar. I have used the Seanik and it doesn't have much smell. Just tried the "honey, I washed my hair" and it smells wonderful like honey and vanilla. Tried the Lush conditioner bar and have to agree with everyone else. Hard to get it working and my hair was so dry after, I have to have conditioner. Probably will take a Lush shampoo bar for hair, clothes, shaving, and body, but bring along either a small bottle of conditioner or a spray bottle of leave in Infusium. Have to try that combo. Do you think one lush bar will last about 40 days with using it for cleaning everything?
 
Camino(s) past & future
I have visited the Cathedral in 2011, but not in a pilgrimage. I plan to go within the next 3 or 4 years by my 50th birthday.
I just drained the water out of my soap's plastic container after my shower, then left the container, open, by my backpack afterwards so the soap could air dry. I tried to remember to return after an hour or so to flip it over to dry the underside (easy to do when bustling about with laundry and tending t0 feet).

I did that last time I went to spain. just let it dry overnight
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Men do have issues - women think they have problems but we have to carry four different and specialised shampoos and conditioners

Each area of the body that grows hair on a man is of a slightly different type - beard hair, for instance, is triangular in section, unlike the round in section head hair.

So we have to carry quite a lot ...
1) shampoo and conditioner for the head hair (if we still have any)
2) shampoo and conditioner for the beard and eyebrows (and ears and noses in older men)
3) shampoo and conditioner for the armpits and chest hair (and lower legs)
4) shampoo and conditioner for the pubic hair (to keep its natural and attractive curl and shock-absorbing springiness)

Of course we hide all this inside a hollowed out and stale Cornish pasty or pork pie (you always wondered why we carried them???) and keep it absolutely secret from women .... oopppss!!
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
One more vote for lush shampoo bar. I used it last Camino for hair, body and clothes - until I realised it was running low. In reality you only need to run the lush bar over your hair a couple of times and you can get a really good lather, and after your hair is good and clean you can use all the suds for washing your body. I am also definitely in the separate conditioner camp and absolutely not the lush type that is sold by weight - I too found it awful. I took separate conditioner and even a small phial of serum - worth its weight in gold!

Once I realised that my lush bar was running low I bought a separate bar of soap for washing clothes. But in fact I discovered by chance that laundry powder is so very much better for getting clothes to look, feel and smell clean that for my next Camino I shall be taking a small bag of powder with me and replenishing en route.

I also found a toothpick under the lush bar in the purpose built tin kept it from sticking. However as someone else mentioned, it works quite well if it sticks to the lid and you can hold the lid with soap stuck to it to apply to hair and body.

I have to say I only tried the lush shampoo after reading a past thread on the subject. I had always avoided the lush shop because of the overpowering smell that emanates from the door. I use the 'honey I did something or other' bar and it has a very pleasant perfume.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 was Camino #14
I just tried the Lush shampoo bar. I have used the Seanik and it doesn't have much smell. Just tried the "honey, I washed my hair" and it smells wonderful like honey and vanilla. Tried the Lush conditioner bar and have to agree with everyone else. Hard to get it working and my hair was so dry after, I have to have conditioner. Probably will take a Lush shampoo bar for hair, clothes, shaving, and body, but bring along either a small bottle of conditioner or a spray bottle of leave in Infusium. Have to try that combo. Do you think one lush bar will last about 40 days with using it for cleaning everything?
Might I suggest you try what we did in the 50's before everyone used hair conditioner?
Put a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in a glass with warm water.
Pour it through your washed hair, squish it in really good.
Then rinse.
You won't have to carry vinegar on the Camino - it's pretty much in every albergue.
Pilgrims leave it and you can easily grab a tablespoon in a glass before your hair washing.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
A few years ago one of our local radio presenters stopped using shampoo on the basis of science that shampoo only causes the scalp to produce more oil and upsets the natural balance. He washes it, but just with water. Masses of people followed his example. The first four or five weeks are horrible, with the hair getting greasy and lank, but after that the scalp adjusts and the hair becomes beautiful, soft and fluffy and not at all smelly. Last week the radio station did a follow-up, to see how many people had continued the routine. A surprising number have kept it up and all claim their hair is much better than when they used shampoo.
I tried it but could not get through the yucky stage - after three weeks I gave in and reached for the shampoo. I am thinking that walking the camino from SJPDP to Santiago is just about the right amount of time, if you have the nerve.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
@Kanga , I have not used shampoo is over 2 years. But I do use conditionner, and use it to clean my scalp. The products in shampoo are very harsh, especially for curly hair. And just this week I was listening to a radio show "The Age of Persuasion", it's on the CBC and is about Marketing, and it told the story of the importance of bubbles that were added to give consumer the illusion of getting a better clean.

There's a book called the Curly Hair Handbook, by the Devashan salon people (specialises in curly hair), it explains what products to look for, gives ideas for alternatives for shampoo. etc . When it's time for my henna treatment I first wash my hair with good old vinegar to get rid of any residue so the henna gets a good hold.

Why not use the Camino as an excuse to try this: one less bottle of liquids to bring along!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 was Camino #14
A few years ago one of our local radio presenters stopped using shampoo on the basis of science that shampoo only causes the scalp to produce more oil and upsets the natural balance. He washes it, but just with water. Masses of people followed his example. The first four or five weeks are horrible, with the hair getting greasy and lank, but after that the scalp adjusts and the hair becomes beautiful, soft and fluffy and not at all smelly. Last week the radio station did a follow-up, to see how many people had continued the routine. A surprising number have kept it up and all claim their hair is much better than when they used shampoo.
I tried it but could not get through the yucky stage - after three weeks I gave in and reached for the shampoo. I am thinking that walking the camino from SJPDP to Santiago is just about the right amount of time, if you have the nerve.
I actually went shampoo-less for 2 years when I first was diagnosed with MCS.
I washed my head with hot water and occasionally baking soda/water.
Then I rinsed with the vinegar/water.
My hair was a little oily for about 3 days - that's all the time it took to adjust.
I rarely use shampoo now, but when I do on the Camino, I use Liggets.
 
M

Mike Trebert

Guest
Ok this seems simple enough to solve but its like i can't!
What do people do about shampoo and conditioner? I dont want to cart around two big bottles/extra weight. But i need it! (I dont do shampoo and cond in one)
Do i get smaller bottles and re-fill? Do i just buy extra along the way and refill and leave the rest behind? Maybe i just solved my own dilemma right there?
WOW! What a long thread. I didn't know who to answer, there were so many interesting comments. I see a lot of the same monikers across many threads - you folks must be research freaks like me! I'm heading out on my first Camino in 4 weeks time. I've discovered LUSH toiletries and have road tested them. Shampoo is great, and the conditioner works for me (I have very fine hair and a beard and eyebrows and, well you guys know about the body-hair thing) but very soft and tricky to use - use the flat side and work it in after you put the bar aside - be careful or it will squish into your hair and leave chunks behind. For 30 years and more I've used a soft plastic 'scalp massager' gizmo to wash my hair - it moves the goo-lovely down to scalp level then when rinsing gets every last bit of residue out so you look like one of those glamorous Camino commercials!! Women with a lot of hair would maybe get Lush conditioner tangled and jammed (oops, sexist, I'm working on a barista-bun myself, so us guys have long hair too sometimes). Use the Lush tins for shampoo and conditioner - the shampoo is a tight fit until after a couple of uses. Shampoo bars are pretty small but lather up FAST so you won't use much. I'm taking 2 bars each S+C for 12 weeks - will stock up in Paris if I run out. The reason for choosing Lush was to save baggage weight and space AND MONEY as I'll be travelling before and after The Camino and I don't want to buy bottles of stuff only to throw away half full bottles multiple times. TOOTHPASTE is bulky and heavy, Lush "toothpaste" is their cleverest trick - it's tiny tablets that you crush between yr teeth and mix with yr saliva + brush and hey presto! - talk about saving weight and space! AND: No bottles/tubes, no leaks. Yikes! - Sorry I'm so long-winded. Buen Camino Y'all.
 
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JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
Men do have issues - women think they have problems but we have to carry four different and specialised shampoos and conditioners

Each area of the body that grows hair on a man is of a slightly different type - beard hair, for instance, is triangular in section, unlike the round in section head hair.

So we have to carry quite a lot ...
1) shampoo and conditioner for the head hair (if we still have any)
2) shampoo and conditioner for the beard and eyebrows (and ears and noses in older men)
3) shampoo and conditioner for the armpits and chest hair (and lower legs)
4) shampoo and conditioner for the pubic hair (to keep its natural and attractive curl and shock-absorbing springiness)

Of course we hide all this inside a hollowed out and stale Cornish pasty or pork pie (you always wondered why we carried them???) and keep it absolutely secret from women .... oopppss!!
David! Get your tongue out of your cheek and go straight to the top of Ivar's Naughty List! Do not pass GO! :);)
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
WOW! What a long thread. I didn't know who to answer, there were so many interesting comments. I see a lot of the same monikers across many threads - you folks must be research freaks like me! I'm heading out on my first Camino in 4 weeks time. I've discovered LUSH toiletries and have road tested them. Shampoo is great, and the conditioner works for me (I have very fine hair and a beard and eyebrows and, well you guys know about the body-hair thing) but very soft and tricky to use - use the flat side and work it in after you put the bar aside - be careful or it will squish into your hair and leave chunks behind. For 30 years and more I've used a soft plastic 'scalp massager' gizmo to wash my hair - it moves the goo-lovely down to scalp level then when rinsing gets every last bit of residue out so you look like one of those glamorous Camino commercials!! Women with a lot of hair would maybe get Lush conditioner tangled and jammed (oops, sexist, I'm working on a barista-bun myself, so us guys have long hair too sometimes). Use the Lush tins for shampoo and conditioner - the shampoo is a tight fit until after a couple of uses. Shampoo bars are pretty small but lather up FAST so you won't use much. I'm taking 2 bars each S+C for 12 weeks - will stock up in Paris if I run out. The reason for choosing Lush was to save baggage weight and space AND MONEY as I'll be travelling before and after The Camino and I don't want to buy bottles of stuff only to throw away half full bottles multiple times. TOOTHPASTE is bulky and heavy, Lush "toothpaste" is their cleverest trick - it's tiny tablets that you crush between yr teeth and mix with yr saliva + brush and hey presto! - talk about saving weight and space! AND: No bottles/tubes, no leaks. Yikes! - Sorry I'm so long-winded. Buen Camino Y'all.
Hi Mike - Great info on the Lush products - thanks. I knew about the shampoo and conditioner bars but not about the toothpaste tablets - how do you rate them? I'd be interested to hear what you think about them as opposed to regular toothpaste.
Cheers - Jenny
 
M

Mike Trebert

Guest
Hi Mike - Great info on the Lush products - thanks. I knew about the shampoo and conditioner bars but not about the toothpaste tablets - how do you rate them? I'd be interested to hear what you think about them as opposed to regular toothpaste.
Cheers - Jenny
Hi Jenny, I think of the toothpaste tablets as a travel item. But considered environmentally there is so much less packaging and the tablets themselves are amazingly low-volume. It works perfectly well, comes in a few flavours, is a tiny bit gritty but I read somewhere that there are abrasives in 'normal' toothpaste. I bought the minty one. It works just as well as toothpaste, especially when you consider that we waste an enormous amount of the stuff by dumping so much on our toothbrushes! The best thing about Lush 'toothpaste' tablets is that they're so ridiculously compact and lightweight. I'll probably transfer them from their tiny boxes into a small ziplock bag which I can wheedle into a corner of my bag somewhere (your bank will give you a handful of tiny ziplocks for depositing change). I find it fun to use because it seems like such a good idea and the novelty doesn't wear off. Perfect for travel.
 
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GettingThere

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles-SdC Apr-Jun 2015
Roncesvalles-Sarria Sep-Oct 2017
C. Frances sections Apr-Jun 2019
A few years ago one of our local radio presenters stopped using shampoo on the basis of science that shampoo only causes the scalp to produce more oil and upsets the natural balance. He washes it, but just with water. Masses of people followed his example. The first four or five weeks are horrible, with the hair getting greasy and lank, but after that the scalp adjusts and the hair becomes beautiful, soft and fluffy and not at all smelly. Last week the radio station did a follow-up, to see how many people had continued the routine. A surprising number have kept it up and all claim their hair is much better than when they used shampoo.
I tried it but could not get through the yucky stage - after three weeks I gave in and reached for the shampoo. I am thinking that walking the camino from SJPDP to Santiago is just about the right amount of time, if you have the nerve.
@Kanga I've been waiting for someone to mention this alternative, hoping someone would do I didn't have to be the first! I've been interested in this idea since a friend tried the experiment years ago and never went back. I wasn't quite brave enough to go cold turkey, but it is possible to do gradually and so not Jane the nasty greasy stage at all. When I was preparing for the Camino and several months out I started to slowly increase the interval between washing with shampoo. Very slowly, so by the time I left I was washing my hair about every 3 weeks. I could have taken it further but decided that was enough, so off I went with one tiny travel bottle of shampoo. And it was fine - we were on the Camino for nearly 8 weeks and I washed my hair about 3 times! It didn't get greasy or smelly, and because I had already "trained" my hair to need washing infrequently I didn't even notice a difference.

All that said, I have short hair, very thick but not very curly, so this solution may not be for everyone. But I would recommend, while training the body for walking, to try (slowly) training the hair not to need such frequent shampooing!
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
Hi Jenny, I think of the toothpaste tablets as a travel item. But considered environmentally there is so much less packaging and the tablets themselves are amazingly low-volume. It works perfectly well, comes in a few flavours, is a tiny bit gritty but I read somewhere that there are abrasives in 'normal' toothpaste. I bought the minty one. It works just as well as toothpaste, especially when you consider that we waste an enormous amount of the stuff by dumping so much on our toothbrushes! The best thing about Lush 'toothpaste' tablets is that they're so ridiculously compact and lightweight. I'll probably transfer them from their tiny boxes into a small ziplock bag which I can wheedle into a corner of my bag somewhere (your bank will give you a handful of tiny ziplocks for depositing change). I find it fun to use because it seems like such a good idea and the novelty doesn't wear off. Perfect for travel.
Sold, Mike! I'll give them a go. They sound fantastic. Another great thing about them is that, as it's not a tube of toothpaste, you don't have to put them in the clear plastic bags to present when you go through Security at airports - a bonus.
Cheers - Jenny
 
M

Mike Trebert

Guest
Yup. LUSH shampoo bars are the best. If anyone wants any tips on how to choose one to suit your needs, feel free to ask. I work there (but just to be clear, I was recommending them long before I worked there.. I work there BECAUSE I love the products, not vice versa) :D

The solid conditioners tend to work if you have pretty straight, short manageable hair. Otherwise, they can be a bit of a hassle and don't last as long as the shampoo bars. But one shampoo bar is enough to see you through a whole Camino, because you really don't need to use that much each time you wash.
Hi lindseh, Thanks for offering to data dump. I use the yellow lemony shampoo bar. I have fine hair and lots of it. It's a bit oily and it's grey but at least it hasn't fallen out. Would you recommend another choice? Also, is there only one type of conditioner? Thanks and Buen Camino - Mike from Oztraylumate
 
M

Mike Trebert

Guest
Sold, Mike! I'll give them a go. They sound fantastic. Another great thing about them is that, as it's not a tube of toothpaste, you don't have to put them in the clear plastic bags to present when you go through Security at airports - a bonus.
Cheers - Jenny
Jenny, Yes a big initial attraction for me was that these are all dry products, so no security problems. I forgot to mention another item: their deodorant is a small plastic squeeze bottle of powder that weighs almost nothing. They make foot powder too and I think both products are interchangeable - labels only slightly different but bottles identical. The deodorant lasts so long I haven't used a whole bottle yet. These people are very clever. Using their stuff makes me feel smarter - urgent improvement superficially accomplished! - Mike
 

C3 to Camino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(Sept 2018 planned)
Hi Jenny, I think of the toothpaste tablets as a travel item. ... The best thing about Lush 'toothpaste' tablets is that they're so ridiculously compact and lightweight. I'll probably transfer them from their tiny boxes into a small ziplock bag which I can wheedle into a corner of my bag somewhere (your bank will give you a handful of tiny ziplocks for depositing change). I find it fun to use because it seems like such a good idea and the novelty doesn't wear off. Perfect for travel.
Unfortunately, they are very popular. Every time I try to get some, they're sold out! I'll have to keep trying.

I have tried the Lush soap and separate conditioner. They both worked great here, but when I got to Galicia I guess the water is different - my fine baby hair was like straw and breaking all the time. I may try the no-shampoo option. I've already reduced shampooing to once about every 3-4 days, and that works fine for me.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 was Camino #14
Yup. LUSH shampoo bars are the best. If anyone wants any tips on how to choose one to suit your needs, feel free to ask. I work there (but just to be clear, I was recommending them long before I worked there.. I work there BECAUSE I love the products, not vice versa) :D

The solid conditioners tend to work if you have pretty straight, short manageable hair. Otherwise, they can be a bit of a hassle and don't last as long as the shampoo bars. But one shampoo bar is enough to see you through a whole Camino, because you really don't need to use that much each time you wash.
Do they have a fragrance free shampoo option?
 

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