A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

SJPP to Roncesvalles with Pulmonary Problems, Need Advice

2020 Camino Guides

JamesVT

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
I am starting the Camino from SJPP on April 27 and have a reservation at Orisson for the overnight. I am a very slow walker with two replaced knees and a replaced hip, but mainly I am mainly slowed down by a pulmonary condition that results in shortness of breath upon exertion, such as uphill walking. My strategy is to walk short stages each day, at a slow pace and with frequent breaks to catch my breath. I’m going to start early in the morning from SJPP walking to Orisson with the expectation that with the availability of a full day of slow walking I will get to the Refugio in time for checking in and dinner. I also expect that I will be “spent” from the first day’s walk up to Orisson and would like to reduce the length of my (uphill) walk on the second day to Roncesvalles. I am wondering whether on the second day if it would be possible to go by taxi or shuttle from the Refugio Orisson to a location at or near the Col de Lepoeder and from there walk down to Roncevalles on the road route? Is this possible? Alternatively, is there another spot where I could be dropped off by taxi before the Col that would shorten the uphill hike on the way to Roncesvalles? I thought I would ask the Forum for advice on this— I am starting my Camino in SJPP with the walk up to Orisson, where I have already reserved and paid, and want to be realistic about my ability to manage the demands of the second day’s walk to Roncevalles. Any thoughts or advice from other forum members would be much appreciated.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
I just read the title of this thread to Peg and she immediately said "NO." I have to agree with her based on the information you gave. Although you can taxi part way there is still a stretch where taxis can't go. Start your camino in Roncevalles.

I would like to give more objective advice but I just don't have enough information on your abilities and, for awhile, it will be difficult for me to get camino information.
 

Tollymore

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(CF June 2018)
Hi JamesVT.

I stayed at Orisson last year. The walk up to it is very steep but short, about 8km I think. It’s a quiet road so you can stop safely along the way. I think there are a few benches along the way too. From Orrison to peak is a much gentler uphill incline, steeper downhill in places.

A lady staying in Orisson on the same night as me arranged a lift to near the peak with the luggage transfer service. The Orrison staff helped her with this.

How have you found your practice walks? If you’ve managed to get hill training with a backpack on this will give you an idea of how you’ll do on Camino. I found this made all the difference for me. What advice are you getting from your health care providers?

I hope it goes well for you. Buen Camino!
 

JamesVT

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
I just read the title of this thread to Peg and she immediately said "NO." I have to agree with her based on the information you gave. Although you can taxi part way there is still a stretch where taxis can't go. Start your camino in Roncevalles.

I would like to give more objective advice but I just don't have enough information on your abilities and, for awhile, it will be difficult for me to get camino information.
Thanks for your thoughts. I’ll keep your advice in mind, though I’m still hoping I can do a work around so that I can begin with a (slow) hike up to Orisson.
Hi JamesVT.

I stayed at Orisson last year. The walk up to it is very steep but short, about 8km I think. It’s a quiet road so you can stop safely along the way. I think there are a few benches along the way too. From Orrison to peak is a much gentler uphill incline, steeper downhill in places.

A lady staying in Orisson on the same night as me arranged a lift to near the peak with the luggage transfer service. The Orrison staff helped her with this.

How have you found your practice walks? If you’ve managed to get hill training with a backpack on this will give you an idea of how you’ll do on Camino. I found this made all the difference for me. What advice are you getting from your health care providers?

I hope it goes well for you. Buen Camino!
I get winded whenever I’m on uphill walks. I recover quickly when I stop to catch my breath. My pulmonologist says that I’ll just have to take frequent pauses on the uphill parts of the Camino. That makes for slow average times when walking— I expect to take this into account by planning shorter stages. I’m not in a hurry and mainly want to avoid burning myself out at the beginning of the Camino by overdoing. Thanks for your response and thoughts.
 

RumAndChupacabras

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Sept 2019: Six weeks in Northern Spain.
Apr 2018 Asturias
May 2016 CP: Portuguese
...My pulmonologist says that I’ll just have to take frequent pauses on the uphill parts of the Camino...
Since you seem to have the green light from your pulmonologist, I'd say do exactly as she/he advised.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019

Delphinoula

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C.Franconia 2019 C.Algeciras Sevillia 2019
Swabian C. (2020)
I don’t know your condition breath vice , where the problem is. Is it the lungs, the heart. Are you Asthmatic or your body has to take care of too much.
Keep in mind in altitude the air gets thinner. The most famous pulmonary clinics in Europe are in the Alps 1200 plus meters.
You need adjustment time so your body can make more red blood cells, so you do not become light headed.
Weight what’s more important.
If those mountains are your hearts desire and you have the means and time stay in that area and train there for a week or two it will do your good. Then you see if this for you. It will do you good to acclimate yourself and building up gives you a realistic assessment of what your body tells you.
Remember you can only use the body you have so treat it well for your Camino.
Best Bon Camino from an old Asthmatic.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
On my first Camino I was ready to give up on the first steep hill out of SJPdP. It is the makings of a heart attack, but I made it to Roncevalles that day. A couple of years later I walked to Orisson with friend, he is an active healhty walker but he gave up at the point you choose the muddy path to the left or continue on the longer paved road. The first day is not easy.
 

twh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May/June, 2018
Porto-Muxia-Finisterre Oct (2019)
James, I truly admire your ambition to tackle the Camino with the health challenges you have. There for sure is a way to do your Camino such that you have no additional health challenges when you reach Santiago. I hope you find that way.

It is really good news that your doctor says go ahead and do it at your own pace. Perhaps in doctor language you are at a certain level of pulmonary function that predicts 2,030 feet of vertical gain plus 5 miles horizontal gain (SJPDP to Orisson) will not be problematic for you lungs over the course of 8 hours with lots of rest stops during the walk.

For us lay people to offer opinions on whether this first stage to Orisson is doable for you, we need to talk a language that does not involve Oxygen levels in your blood. As others have asked, are you currently training on significant hills carrying your loaded pack? If yes how far are you going over what period of time with what elevation gain and how do you feel after that hike? How far can you hike on a hill with loaded pack (in time and distance) before you have to stop for a rest and how long of a rest do you need before you can go again? The better you can quantify these variables the better advice you will get from this community.

If you are not able to figure out objective performance data then try to estimate your stamina related to walking up stairs. How many levels/stories of a climate controlled office building could you walk up with your loaded backpack before you needed to stop for a rest…and how long of a stop would you need? Can you recover as quickly standing up as sitting down? Do your knees and hips limit you in sitting down on a low chair, step or the ground when it comes to getting back up on your feet again? Can you imagine yourself in one day climbing with your loaded backpack the 104 stories of the World Trade Center without using the hand rails, taking the elevator back down, then walking back up 65 stories, take the elevator down again, then walking 4.2 miles to Central park in rain or snow or heat? (all possible in late April). This scenario is roughly the equivalent exertion of SJPDP to Orisson in combined vertical and forward gain.

Traveling light is going to be important for you but traveling smart is going to be essential. Knowing when to stop and then actually stopping will be challenging. The pilgrim camaraderie will constantly be pulling your spirit forward long after your body is screaming to stop…listen to your body. There will always be a positive flip side when stopping (in addition to your health) that you would have missed had you kept walking be it a special view, feeling, thought or person you interact with while resting.

You may be exposed to the elements for longer periods of time each day due to your pace. Both the sun and rain can take a toll on you so be prepared with sun screen, a wide brimmed hat and good quality light weight rain gear. Before my Camino last year I thought hiking poles on the Camino were the Second silliest, gadgety, solution looking for a problem, gimmick I’d ever seen. I was wrong, I did use them on my hike, they were great, I will use them again. First place for useless, heavy, expensive, unnecessary equipment, in my uninformed mind was bringing an umbrella. I will be bringing one this fall of 2019. After some research I understand all the advantages I refused to consider in the past…just getting over the whole appearance/image thing seemed impossible but I am a function over form kind of guy so I’ll get used to it quickly. I would only consider a hands free version and the company euroschirm plus a few others make these trekking umbrellas. I still need to do more research before buying and if it turns out to be too fragile…fussy to use then I’ll admit it was a bad design but I really think this has a ton of potential for aiding in your comfort while hiking/walking in most conditions.

I asked earlier about recovery after exerting yourself. Is sitting much better than standing and if sitting in the wild, do you have problems getting back up. If sitting is very important then the last thing that might be useful to you is an “ultra-light chair” and yes, I realize this is an oxymoron. They are available in the 1 lb - 3 lbs range based on materials and seat height. Checkout Helinox. They are expensive but comfortable, they set-up/take down quickly (see videos), they are small & light…relatively speaking…but if you NEED a chair to rest in during your walk, then they are priceless. Pay close attention to the metric “seat height from ground” when shopping for one if squats are an issue for you.

There were many times on my Camino where I stopped at fantastic overlooks in the middle of nowhere. I would have loved to be sitting in my comfy Helinox camp chair with an umbrella blocking the cold rain or the heat of that raging sun while drinking a cold beer. Have you seen these new light weight, super efficient coolers that hold 2 beers and keep them cold all day? Just kidding…neither have I and I'm not looking. Even without bringing a cooler to keep your beer in, you might want to look into daily backpack deliver service for your Camino. Bring a second super light and small backpack for your day time hiking essentials and send the rest ahead to your accommodations for the evening. This will free up space and weight and be less wear and tear on your knees, hips, lungs and every other body part that tends to hurt at night.
 
Last edited:

JamesVT

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
Thank you. I’m not asthmatic, so less of a problem for me, though it slows me down!
Perhaps you can use Express Bouricott's Mountain Shuttle

https://www.expressbourricot.com/persons-transport/
thanks
Perhaps you can use Express Bouricott's Mountain Shuttle

https://www.expressbourricot.com/persons-transport/
thanks
Click on the picture to get it bigger. On the same page will be some comments you may find useful.
thanks
Since you seem to have the green light from your pulmonologist, I'd say do exactly as she/he advised.
thanks
Hi JamesVT.

I stayed at Orisson last year. The walk up to it is very steep but short, about 8km I think. It’s a quiet road so you can stop safely along the way. I think there are a few benches along the way too. From Orrison to peak is a much gentler uphill incline, steeper downhill in places.

A lady staying in Orisson on the same night as me arranged a lift to near the peak with the luggage transfer service. The Orrison staff helped her with this.

How have you found your practice walks? If you’ve managed to get hill training with a backpack on this will give you an idea of how you’ll do on Camino. I found this made all the difference for me. What advice are you getting from your health care providers?

I hope it goes well for you. Buen Camino!
thank you
Hi JamesVT.

I stayed at Orisson last year. The walk up to it is very steep but short, about 8km I think. It’s a quiet road so you can stop safely along the way. I think there are a few benches along the way too. From Orrison to peak is a much gentler uphill incline, steeper downhill in places.

A lady staying in Orisson on the same night as me arranged a lift to near the peak with the luggage transfer service. The Orrison staff helped her with this.

How have you found your practice walks? If you’ve managed to get hill training with a backpack on this will give you an idea of how you’ll do on Camino. I found this made all the difference for me. What advice are you getting from your health care providers?

I hope it goes well for you. Buen Camino!
thanks for
James, I truly admire your ambition to tackle the Camino with the health challenges you have. There for sure is a way to do your Camino such that you have no additional health challenges when you reach Santiago. I hope you find that way.

It is really good news that your doctor says go ahead and do it at your own pace. Perhaps in doctor language you are at a certain level of pulmonary function that predicts 2,030 feet of vertical gain plus 5 miles horizontal gain (SJPDP to Orisson) will not be problematic for you lungs over the course of 8 hours with lots of rest stops during the walk.

For us lay people to offer opinions on whether this first stage to Orisson is doable for you, we need to talk a language that does not involve Oxygen levels in your blood. As others have asked, are you currently training on significant hills carrying your loaded pack? If yes how far are you going over what period of time with what elevation gain and how do you feel after that hike? How far can you hike on a hill with loaded pack (in time and distance) before you have to stop for a rest and how long of a rest do you need before you can go again? The better you can quantify these variables the better advice you will get from this community.

If you are not able to figure out objective performance data then try to estimate your stamina related to walking up stairs. How many levels/stories of a climate controlled office building could you walk up with your loaded backpack before you needed to stop for a rest…and how long of a stop would you need? Can you recover as quickly standing up as sitting down? Do your knees and hips limit you in sitting down on a low chair, step or the ground when it comes to getting back up on your feet again? Can you imagine yourself in one day climbing with your loaded backpack the 104 stories of the World Trade Center without using the hand rails, taking the elevator back down, then walking back up 65 stories, take the elevator down again, then walking 4.2 miles to Central park in rain or snow or heat? (all possible in late April). This scenario is roughly the equivalent exertion of SJPDP to Orisson in combined vertical and forward gain.

Traveling light is going to be important for you but traveling smart is going to be essential. Knowing when to stop and then actually stopping will be challenging. The pilgrim camaraderie will constantly be pulling your spirit forward long after your body is screaming to stop…listen to your body. There will always be a positive flip side when stopping (in addition to your health) that you would have missed had you kept walking be it a special view, feeling, thought or person you interact with while resting.

You may be exposed to the elements for longer periods of time each day due to your pace. Both the sun and rain can take a toll on you so be prepared with sun screen, a wide brimmed hat and good quality light weight rain gear. Before my Camino last year I thought hiking poles on the Camino were the Second silliest, gadgety, solution looking for a problem, gimmick I’d ever seen. I was wrong, I did use them on my hike, they were great, I will use them again. First place for useless, heavy, expensive, unnecessary equipment, in my uninformed mind was bringing an umbrella. I will be bringing one this fall of 2019. After some research I understand all the advantages I refused to consider in the past…just getting over the whole appearance/image thing seemed impossible but I am a function over form kind of guy so I’ll get used to it quickly. I would only consider a hands free version and the company euroschirm plus a few others make these trekking umbrellas. I still need to do more research before buying and if it turns out to be too fragile…fussy to use then I’ll admit it was a bad design but I really think this has a ton of potential for aiding in your comfort while hiking/walking in most conditions.

I asked earlier about recovery after exerting yourself. Is sitting much better than standing and if sitting in the wild, do you have problems getting back up. If sitting is very important then the last thing that might be useful to you is an “ultra-light chair” and yes, I realize this is an oxymoron. They are available in the 1 lb - 3 lbs range based on materials and seat height. Checkout Helinox. They are expensive but comfortable, they set-up/take down quickly (see videos), they are small & light…relatively speaking…but if you NEED a chair to rest in during your walk, then they are priceless. Pay close attention to the metric “seat height from ground” when shopping for one if squats are an issue for you.

There were many times on my Camino where I stopped at fantastic overlooks in the middle of nowhere. I would have loved to be sitting in my comfy Helinox camp chair with an umbrella blocking the cold rain or the heat of that raging sun while drinking a cold beer. Have you seen these new light weight, super efficient coolers that hold 2 beers and keep them cold all day? Just kidding…neither have I. Even without bringing a cooler to keep your beer in, you might want to look into daily backpack deliver service for your Camino. Bring a second super light and small backpack for your day time hiking essentials and send the rest ahead to your accommodations for the evening. This will free up space and weight and be less wear and tear on your knees, hips, lungs and every other body part that tends to hurt at night.
Thanks for your response— much to digest here. I’m definitely going to use a bag transport service, at least in the beginning stages. My pack weight is reasonable I think, around 12 or 13 pounds, but I don’t plan to carry that over the Pyrenees. I’m going to assume that my hiking poles will help get me up and down when necessary.
 

Lance Chambers

Lance Chambers
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria (2015), SJPdP (2016), Burgos (2017), SJPdP (2018), Burgo (2019), SJPdP (2023?).
You can go to the tourist office in St Jean (you can get your Credential here as well) on the road where all the hostels are and they do a daily trip that will drop you very close to the Spanish border. Costs a few Euros. This will get you over the 'hump' of the hills.

54900

You get dropped very close to Roland's Fountain. See the map here: https://www.caminoadventures.com/camino-frances/st-jean-to-roncesvalles/

From there on it's flat until you start the rather steep section into Roncesvalles which from memory is about 2 kms.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (July 2016), Primitivo (July 2018), Portuguese (March 2019)
I am starting the Camino from SJPP on April 27 and have a reservation at Orisson for the overnight. I am a very slow walker with two replaced knees and a replaced hip, but mainly I am mainly slowed down by a pulmonary condition that results in shortness of breath upon exertion, such as uphill walking. My strategy is to walk short stages each day, at a slow pace and with frequent breaks to catch my breath. I’m going to start early in the morning from SJPP walking to Orisson with the expectation that with the availability of a full day of slow walking I will get to the Refugio in time for checking in and dinner. I also expect that I will be “spent” from the first day’s walk up to Orisson and would like to reduce the length of my (uphill) walk on the second day to Roncesvalles. I am wondering whether on the second day if it would be possible to go by taxi or shuttle from the Refugio Orisson to a location at or near the Col de Lepoeder and from there walk down to Roncevalles on the road route? Is this possible? Alternatively, is there another spot where I could be dropped off by taxi before the Col that would shorten the uphill hike on the way to Roncesvalles? I thought I would ask the Forum for advice on this— I am starting my Camino in SJPP with the walk up to Orisson, where I have already reserved and paid, and want to be realistic about my ability to manage the demands of the second day’s walk to Roncevalles. Any thoughts or advice from other forum members would be much appreciated.
The path to Orisson is _very_ steep and remains so for two or three hours. The descent into Roncesvalles is steep. As with most things in life determination tends to get you there eventually but only you can decide whether it’s worth the pain and possible risk to your health. Many start in Roncesvalles, others start in Pamplona. It’s worth thinking about both. There are two other particularly steep sections on the Camino, the descent at Alto de Perdon and the tail end of the ascent to O Cebreiro, but I remember being particularly surprised at the length and steepness of the ascent to Orisson so perhaps avoiding it would be sensible. That said I’ve invariably ignored sensible advice, gone for it and lived to tell the tale. Buen Camino.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
The descent into Roncesvalles is steep
There is a less steep descent into Roncesvalles. It's the dotted line on the Gronze map. The last thing you want to do is ruin your knees before you even reach Roncesvalles!
20190413_062636.jpg

Here's the description from my Buen Camino app

Screenshot_20190413-062337_Buen Camino.jpg
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
I am starting the Camino from SJPP on April 27 and have a reservation at Orisson for the overnight. I am a very slow walker with two replaced knees and a replaced hip, but mainly I am mainly slowed down by a pulmonary condition that results in shortness of breath upon exertion, such as uphill walking. My strategy is to walk short stages each day, at a slow pace and with frequent breaks to catch my breath. I’m going to start early in the morning from SJPP walking to Orisson with the expectation that with the availability of a full day of slow walking I will get to the Refugio in time for checking in and dinner. I also expect that I will be “spent” from the first day’s walk up to Orisson and would like to reduce the length of my (uphill) walk on the second day to Roncesvalles. I am wondering whether on the second day if it would be possible to go by taxi or shuttle from the Refugio Orisson to a location at or near the Col de Lepoeder and from there walk down to Roncevalles on the road route? Is this possible? Alternatively, is there another spot where I could be dropped off by taxi before the Col that would shorten the uphill hike on the way to Roncesvalles? I thought I would ask the Forum for advice on this— I am starting my Camino in SJPP with the walk up to Orisson, where I have already reserved and paid, and want to be realistic about my ability to manage the demands of the second day’s walk to Roncevalles. Any thoughts or advice from other forum members would be much appreciated.
I strongly advise you to skip the walk to Orisson. If you really want to see it. You can have Express Bourricot shuttle you from SJPdP to Orisson, and then to Cruz d’ Leopolder. The walk from that point, over the mountains to Roncesvalles is not too steep.

OTOH, and as others have said, there is nothing wrong with starting your Camino at Roncesvalles. Just remember to reserve a bed there.

If you change your mind about Orisson and will not need the bed, contact them and cancel the reservation. They will refund any monies you paid. Moreover, another pilgrim can use the bed.

Also, you need to reserve shuttle space with Express Bourricot.

Hope this helps.
 

Gogs

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese 2017, Ingles 2018, Frances May 2019
JamesVT, I would say the only person who can accurately answer your question is your doctor. We can all give opinions but we do not know how severe your medical condition is, so I'm certainly not in a position to give you advice. Good luck.
 

grumerz

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago April - June, 2016
Don't fool yourself...portions of this section are a tough slog; even for those in reasonable shape. In my 2016 journey, (at age 65,) with no joint issues, no diagnosed pulmonary/cardiac issues, within twenty pounds of an ideal weight and months of training, I could not make it over the Cruz d' Leopolder. Granted, I was carrying a somewhat heavy pack. Unsteadily backtracking back to Orrisson, I gratefully rested until a taxi from SJPdP delivered me to the Roncesvalles Monastery. Lesson learned. It was not the last time there were similar challenges. It is earnestly suggested you start from Roncesvalles, or Pamplona.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
The sooner you contact them, they more likely they will refund. It comes down to whether the bed will go to waste. I rather doubt it.

Either way, you never know until you ask.
 

Walton

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 Sjpp to Sdc. 2018 Lisbon to Sdc to Finisterre. Next up hopefully VDP or Del Norte.
JamesVT

I suffer from a cardiac issue in that if I exert myself too much my heart beats race away suddenly like there is no tomorrow for a minute or two before returning to normal. I also can become breathless and light headed, when this cardiac event occurs..

To overcome this , on the uphills, especially the steep uphills, I'd walk say thirty steps and then have a rest for a minute to allow my heart to have a rest and then do another thirty steps, rest and repeat over and over until the hill was conquered. Sometimes it would be fifty or sixty steps and once on the Portugeuse it was 20 steps on a particularly steep section.

I do generally find though, as the Camino progresses, after about 10 days or so anyway, that I become fitter and therefore am able to do the uphills better than at the beginning.

Sure, I was passed by lots of people and funnily enough I sometimes found myself passing people that had previously passed me racing away up the hills, only to find them broken down somewhere, suffering from some kind of medical issue, later on. It is your Camino so walk it at your pace. There is no medal for coming first or for beating anyone else.

It is important to not fall into the trap of walking with someone or a group and trying to keep up with them. I did this a couple of times and learnt that it is better for me to be upfront and let them go while I dawdle along.

It is important to listen to your doctors beforehand and to follow their advice, listen to your body, walk within the parameters of your biomechanical abilities, and then you can enjoy your Camino.

Cheers
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
If you change your mind about Orisson and will not need the bed, contact them and cancel the reservation. They will refund any monies you paid.
Nope, no refunds unless the route is closed.

This is from their email:

"The instalment will be not refunded. "

And in my case, booking for just one person the installment was the entire amount.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Oh well, at least someone checked...

Thanks for the assist...
 

Get on our Mailing list for new products on the Camino Store and news from the Camino Forum








Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter






Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 54 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 193 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 318 25.0%
  • June

    Votes: 92 7.2%
  • July

    Votes: 23 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 363 28.5%
  • October

    Votes: 154 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.5%
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock