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Smart Packing and Unexpected Backpack Items

smj6

Siempre hay que ver el positivo
Camino(s) past & future
Oct/Nov 2016 (Via Podensis/ Frances)
Oct 2018 (Via Francigena stage)
Nearly forgot. One item that was invaluable (but then it's also invaluable in my every day life) was my kanga (sarong). Can be used as a towel, skirt, sheet, pillowcase, privacy screen (if in bottom bank then hang from underneath top bunk), and many more uses.
Buen camino
Suzanne
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPDP-SDC (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017) , Norte 2018
Pilgrim Office 2018, Hospitalero Acebo 2019
Osprey backpacks and possibly others have a whistle built-in as part of the chest strap buckle. I think this often is overlooked.
Hey Mike!! I wish that I had a nickle for every time I showed the Osprey back pack whistle to a Florida Trail hiker on their own backpack! I guess I would have about $1.50 maybe? No one knows....
 
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smj6

Siempre hay que ver el positivo
Camino(s) past & future
Oct/Nov 2016 (Via Podensis/ Frances)
Oct 2018 (Via Francigena stage)
I never walked on the Frances in the dark per se, but there were times that I walked as the day was breaking or dusk falling. One of my sons walked with me for a long weekend & urged me to wrap fluorescent tape around my poles in the future so that I would be more visible to traffic. A wise suggestion I thought .... must remember to do it for my next Camino.
Suzanne :)
 

Sheesh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2009, 2013);
? (2020)
...One of my sons walked with me for a long weekend & urged me to wrap fluorescent tape around my poles in the future so that I would be more visible to traffic...
Suzanne :)
Yes, excellent advice for those times when road walking.

I've used reflective arm bands which affix with velcro, but wanted something for the back of my pack (even though one does walk facing traffic whenever possible). So I got this Safety Shield. It also affixes with velcro, so is removable as/if desired.




"Triangular-shaped reflective Reflexite® safety shield has a Velcro® attachment so you can easily attach it to most items, such as backpacks and bicycle seats.
  • Orange mesh with yellow Reflexite trim.
  • Dimensions are 17 x 17cm."
 
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Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I still have some of the FRED (Field Ration Eating Device) used by the Australian and New Zealand Armies. Similar to the P38/P51 but extended to form a spoon. Unfortunately the FR of FRED is given a slightly different meaning by those of us who had to use these devices.
Thanks @dougfitz for identifying the object - I have tried one of those myself and came to the same conclusion independently without ever knowing the acronym :)
 

shefollowsshells

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several alone and with children
I know this is an old thread, I'm rereading through it as I am taking two ladies on the Camino with me in the Spring who have never done it. I took gittiharre's advice of the muslin and it was one of the best decisions I made in packing. We all used scarves and took no towels on our last Camino. I also wore it around my waist if pack had too much pressure on back and dipped it in water and wore it around my neck when too hot.
For me it was a ecosack shopping bag, rolls up to finger size and weighs next to nothing, I had a reusable shopping bag first time, but found ecosack better, smaller.
1.5 metres of muslin, this is my towel, it weighs next to nothing, dries in minutes and does not smell.
A spork with serrated part on handle, found I did not need a knife at all.
A lightweight lavalava/sulu wrap. Slept in this, wore it to bathroom, used it a skirt/wrap with just my fleece over it when I washed everything at laundromat.Got dressed under it, it is my single favourite piece of gear. Most other things have been mentioned. Gitti
 

CaroleH

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2006, Portugues 2007;Madrid 2009, Finisterre 2009; Sur and VdlP 2011,2013; Manchego and Madrid 2014; VdlP (parts) 2016; Hospitalero plan 2017.
Ah yes, the muslin towels/squares... light as a feather... dry in 10mins... the best for light travel. Thanks Gitti.
 

tjb1013

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017)
Portugués (2019)
I had an inflatable pillow that I felt silly for taking but that came in handy in the parochials that used mats, and in places where the pillows were uncomfortable.

That said, it fell into the “used it but probably still not worth lugging 800 kilometers” category. The only things I took but didn’t use at all were rain pants and long johns. The list of things I used because I had them but shouldn’t have taken was slightly longer.
 

katesmash

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (?) (2018)
I keep thinking what my favorite item was... I have taken and will take again, both the spork, a kind of shopping bag and needle and thread without question.

I guess my favorite item would be my pair of crocks!

Weighing virtually nothing, they keep my feet clean in dirty showers, quick-dry and serve as shoes for walking after hours in the towns, so your feet can air out when not carrying a backpack.
Off course, the downside is they are butt-ugly, but then, who cares when you are a pilgrim? :mrgreen:


[Edit] PS Look, I just saw them in my picture after pressing 'Submit' :lol:
They make Crocs sandals that are slightly less heinous than the foot-boats that are typical crocs. Same spongy bottom!
 

Left Coaster

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014)
Camino Primitivo (2017)
I did the CF in 2014 and was amazed at how squeaky the doors were. Very disturbing during sleep time. In 2017 I took a small canister of penetrating oil (WD40). Breaks all the weight rules (100 grams) but it was nice to solve an annoyance for everyone.
 

AZ Hiker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
Falcon, I have this clothesline and it has been invaluable! I use a couple of carabiners to attach it to whatever I can

The sink stopper has been on my mind each camino, then it slips out, but once I'm in Spain, I sure wish I had it in many albergues and hostals. Washing clothes in running water is pretty inefficient alright, but also very wasteful.

To add to the list, one of my favorite items is the cooling neck tie. On 30+ days, this kept me going.

lynne
I stuffed a sock in the drain hole. Worked pretty well.
 

DeirdreFore

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019 (July)
A knowledge of Spanish is most useful and weighs nothing, and can be so enriching of the whole Camino.

I also bring a tiny booklet with the prayers and responses of the Mass in Spanish which enables me to participate more fully in the Mass each evening. If anyone wants a copy I will send it to them if they P.M. their email address to me.

Buen Camino,

Lydia
Thank-you for posting that Lydia, it will be nice to read along with the prayers at mass! 😇:)
Deirdre
 

Silverton

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003- CF ( various), Portugués (various), Aragonés, Inglés, Sanabrés
I do the same, Lydia, and was pleased to leave my homemade little 'missal' with a pilgrim who was walking on to Santiago this month, when I left from my shorter Camino. Another is reprinted and laminated for next time, I hope!
 

K Turner

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
August-October 2019 CF
I don't start for a few weeks but I am definitely taking a few safety pins. As a middle school teacher, I think I was the only person who ever kept them on hand. I forever had students (many not even my own but still knew I had pins!) come to me because of broken bra straps, snapped off zipper pulls on pants and backpacks, etc.

I'm also taking some dog doody bag rolls. They're small and light, and good for picking up any random trash I come across. Or another pilgrim may see and have a need, so there are some to share.
 

TatiLie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues Variante Espiritual July 2019
Finisterre next!
I'm also taking some dog doody bag rolls. They're small and light, and good for picking up any random trash I come across. Or another pilgrim may see and have a need, so there are some to share.
I brought a roll of small compostable (just in case) bags. Good for carrying trash, food leftovers, dirty clothing. Just after I've finished I realised I could have used them to make a cooling bag with water during the hottest part of the day
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
I think all my favorites have been mentioned, but I'm piping in anyway! You asked us to keep it to 1...that's hard! I'll try to pick the one I didn't think I saw mentioned (though I may have missed it). (safety pins, grocery bag, spork, knife were all mentioned!)

I brought a 'Day wallet' separate from my 'important stuff wallet' - day wallet was for petty cash and a few cards, 'important stuff wallet' was for rest of cash, passport, backup cards, etc. This was your 'important stuff wallet' is safe in your pack and you are not likely to accidentally leave it sitting on a table after paying, and you aren't flashing tons of cash around every time you pay for something.

My entire packing list is here. I go into detail about why I brought every item, how I used it, and what I loved or could have left behind. =)
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
I think all my favorites have been mentioned, but I'm piping in anyway! You asked us to keep it to 1...that's hard! I'll try to pick the one I didn't think I saw mentioned (though I may have missed it). (safety pins, grocery bag, spork, knife were all mentioned!)

I brought a 'Day wallet' separate from my 'important stuff wallet' - day wallet was for petty cash and a few cards, 'important stuff wallet' was for rest of cash, passport, backup cards, etc. This was your 'important stuff wallet' is safe in your pack and you are not likely to accidentally leave it sitting on a table after paying, and you aren't flashing tons of cash around every time you pay for something.

My entire packing list is here. I go into detail about why I brought every item, how I used it, and what I loved or could have left behind. =)
I also use a ‘day wallet’ - but my ‘important stuff wallet’ is in contact with my skin 24/7 except when I’m in the shower, when it’s In the shower with me. Clearly it’s waterproof.
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
I do the same, Lydia, and was pleased to leave my homemade little 'missal' with a pilgrim who was walking on to Santiago this month, when I left from my shorter Camino. Another is reprinted and laminated for next time, I hope!
There is a printable copy of the standard mass in English and Spanish in the ‘resources’ section of this forum under ‘miscellaneous’
 

Jeregrino

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Del Norte
Here's a left field idea, I am thinking of a taking a small chopping board. Not tried it before but I can imagine, if you want to eat al fresco, some sort of cutting surface being very useful. Bread, ham, cheese, tomatoes can get very messy if you cut them on a soft surface.

Seems extravagant but the more I think about it, the more it seems.... well nearly... almost sensible.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
For chopping I use the lid of the box I carry “squashables” in - the box is the hight of a fairsized tomato or nectarine. When the box is not in use for squashables you can stuff in your socks and/or underwear...
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
For chopping I use the lid of the box I carry “squashables” in - the box is the hight of a fairsized tomato or nectarine. When the box is not in use for squashables you can stuff in your socks and/or underwear...

Ahhh ... fragrant underwear .... 😇

(Edit/afterthought: I wonder if merino socks/underwear would pick up food odours ... or does it just apply to perspiration... 🤔)
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Here's a left field idea, I am thinking of a taking a small chopping board. Not tried it before but I can imagine, if you want to eat al fresco, some sort of cutting surface being very useful. Bread, ham, cheese, tomatoes can get very messy if you cut them on a soft surface.

Seems extravagant but the more I think about it, the more it seems.... well nearly... almost sensible.
Never have a problem using whatever is on hand to slice items. If it seems necessary, I might think of taking a small 3" x 3" square of flexible cutting board, which is a thin, tough plastic.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
A 1m or longer fast charging USB cable - so you can easily charge your phone a distance from the socket;
A good european USB socket plug - saves carrying an adaptor;
Hikers wool - the magic anti blister product.
I carry a 3 meter/10 foot charging cable.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Castile y Leon!
For a universal sink stopper my husband cut a 75mm diametre circle out of a piece of heavy duty innertube - in fact we took a few to share around. They weigh practically nothing and work a treat.
Jacki.
I use a similar sized circle of rubber intended to be used as a jar opener (we use them to pull arrows out of targets) - doesn't seal perfectly but slows the flow significantly . . . you can always open recalcitrant jar lids too!
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Castile y Leon!
Here's a left field idea, I am thinking of a taking a small chopping board. Not tried it before but I can imagine, if you want to eat al fresco, some sort of cutting surface being very useful. Bread, ham, cheese, tomatoes can get very messy if you cut them on a soft surface.

Seems extravagant but the more I think about it, the more it seems.... well nearly... almost sensible.
And achievable:

this chopping board chopping board.jpg becomes this plate plate.jpg

There's a guy selling them on eBay (UK) at the moment £1.99 + postage (each set contains two plates, two bowls, two mugs - but, as I've said before the mugs are rubbish) they're about 1mm thick and each piece weighs about 40g.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Castile y Leon!
I carry a thin 3 m prolongation(?) cable which can also be used for other things than charging such as my little immersion heating coil to make coffee or soup.
Ooh I like prolongation but the French is so much more elegant - la rallonge électrique ;)
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
That depends! When walking with kids/teens like two years ago we take "Monopoly Deal". And they take this everywhere. Quite small pack and light.

More important than for instance a hair dryer! 😊
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-FIN(09/2018)
PORTO-SANT(11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe(01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT(09/2019)
Madrid(7/2020)
playing cards
Great idea but how many cards are missing from the pack by the end and rules can be a little challenging unless its game of snap. Which card games do you cheat at 🤠
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-FIN(09/2018)
PORTO-SANT(11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe(01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT(09/2019)
Madrid(7/2020)
Haha, a catchy song, vaguely familiar...off to discover captain kangaroo 🤠
 

steve 217

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances planning via del la plata
A square of foam matting shoved down into the bladder pocket of my rucksack weighs nothing and every time i wanted a seat saved me from having to sit on wet or damp hard rocks or earth .
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
A square of foam matting shoved down into the bladder pocket of my rucksack weighs nothing and every time i wanted a seat saved me from having to sit on wet or damp hard rocks or earth .
Good idea and certainly cheap. The bladder pocket of my pack is occupied by the water thingy. But I carry the ultralight inflatable Thermarest cushion for the same purposes. It is very expensive, but oh, so comfortable. Folded in half it has doubled as a pillow for a siesta.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
I carry a thin 3 m prolongation(?) cable which can also be used for other things than charging such as my little immersion heating coil to make coffee or soup.
PS to my prolongation(!) cable post: since I have sometimes found that there was only one socket in the dorm I also carry a sort of triple plug which goes into the socket before I connect my cable. This makes it possible to "share" the socket. The device is not the usual bulky multiplug, but very small and therefore light.

You can of course say accumulating items to be shared with others who then do not have to carry such items you will in the end reach the famous straw which breaks the camels back! However this particular camel is still doing alright and has stopped accumulating things - hence no danger!
 

Attachments

steve 217

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances planning via del la plata
PS to my prolongation(!) cable post: since I have sometimes found that there was only one socket in the dorm I also carry a sort of triple plug which goes into the socket before I connect my cable. This makes it possible to "share" the socket. The device is not the usual bulky multiplug, but very small and therefore light.

You can of course say accumulating items to be shared with others who then do not have to carry such items you will in the end reach the famous straw which breaks the camels back! However this particular camel is still doing alright and has stopped accumulating things - hence no danger!
[/QUOTE

Now thats clever
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Great idea but how many cards are missing from the pack by the end and rules can be a little challenging unless its game of snap. Which card games do you cheat at 🤠
When I was much younger I backpacked for six months around Europe with a deck of playing cards and didn't lose any. I don't see that it would be much more of a risk on the Camino. And if you do, I imagine replacement decks would be available in Spain. As we are fond of saying in these "what to bring" threads, many things are.

In terms of rules, when I was travelling with playing cards I found that Crazy Eights (with variations) is the universal card game. I can't count the number of time I would meet locals or travellers from around the world who would claim to know no card games. So I would offer to teach them one and start teaching them Crazy Eights. It would never be long before I would be interrupted with the statement "We have a game just like this except...."

Not that I am necessarily advising bringing a deck of playing cards on a Camino. I haven't brought one myself on any of my recent Caminos. But if I was going to bring some sort of game along, it would be hard to beat playing cards as a combination of portability and flexibility in game play.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
When I was much younger I backpacked for six months around Europe with a deck of playing cards and didn't lose any.
On the long Jerusalem pilgrimage, I did buy a pack of cards, we mostly played cribbage (and I am useless at it!). Didn’t lose a single card over the six months even though I did throw them all on the floor at times 😝 The loser was the one who carried the cards until the next time 🙄😁
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPDP-SDC (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017) , Norte 2018
Pilgrim Office 2018, Hospitalero Acebo 2019
PS to my prolongation(!) cable post: since I have sometimes found that there was only one socket in the dorm I also carry a sort of triple plug which goes into the socket before I connect my cable. This makes it possible to "share" the socket. The device is not the usual bulky multiplug, but very small and therefore light.

You can of course say accumulating items to be shared with others who then do not have to carry such items you will in the end reach the famous straw which breaks the camels back! However this particular camel is still doing alright and has stopped accumulating things - hence no danger!
We had only three electric receptacles in the Albergue we volunteered in this past October and with 20 something Pilgrims every night charging cell phones became an issue for most of the Pilgrims. So we purchased a few of these 3-way plugs at the local Chino store in Ponferrada. It worked wonders for everyone!!!

That left the only problem in the Albergue being who controlled "when" the ceiling lights came on or off at night!!!!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
prolongation(!) cable
I think that here in Australia, we would call this an extension cord, or extension power cord. It is terminated on one end with the local standard power plug, and on the other with a standard power socket.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
That's OK Mike - I don't drink Glühwein so I wouldn't have used it at all for that!
But, we found it very useful to make a hot drink before we left in the morning, especially in albergues with no electricity or no kitchens. Also when the kitchens were busy with people waiting to use a pot on the stove to boil water. I often had other pilgrims cups lined up next to mine wanting a cup of coffee before they left.
As a vegetarian I often bought a box of soup and heated it for supper, with cheese and bread it made a nourishing meal. And so quick to prepare.
Very countries in Europe provide a kettle and cups in the Hotel rooms (as they do in England) and I have always used it to make my own hot drink when staying in a hotel.
I also carry a whistle - with a little led torch attached.
Don't the imm
You need to be careful on voltage. If your item is multi-voltage (110V to 240V) then you only need an adapter but if you have a 110V only item then you need a step-down voltage transformer and that will be too heavy. A standard US to Euro adapter will suffice for multi-voltage items. Check the power requirement for voltage.
Don't immersion coils require electricity? How did you use yours in an albergue that didn't have electricity, Sillydoll? ...a hot drink before we left in the morning, especially in albergues with no electricity or no kitchens.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
Not in my backpack, in my pocket: a whistle.
Weighs nearly nothing, hopefully will never be used.
But if you fall down a ravine, you might be able to shout for an hour or so, leaving you without a voice. A whistle goes on and on.
Or to attract attention in other nasty situations.

Ultreya,
Carli Di Bortolo
The locking clip of the chest strap on my backpack is a whistle. The other buckles on the backpack are black, but this part is orange.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
You need to be careful on voltage. If your item is multi-voltage (110V to 240V) then you only need an adapter but if you have a 110V only item then you need a step-down voltage transformer and that will be too heavy. A standard US to Euro adapter will suffice for multi-voltage items. Check the power requirement for voltage.
You've made my day with the picture of the Scottie dog!!!!!!! Thanks!
 

Mycroft

Active Member
Not to nit-pick, but air in your clothes doesn't *weigh* anything. It may increase the amount of space the clothes take up, which could cause weight distribution issues, but it doesn't increase the weight. So, ziplock bags are great for keeping things dry and organized but not for making them weigh less - unfortunately. ;)
I've used Spacebags for years. For the the travel size you roll it up to squeeze out the air (instead of the larger sizes that use the vacuum cleaner to suck out the air), and my clothing is flattened and so much easier to pack. And it's basically waterproof packing.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
Functionally, twist ties are completely different and become twisted wire and shredded paper after a few uses. They also will unravel quickly at the tug of a sneak thief, providing little security. The electrical ties require a toothpick or small screwdriver to release the clamp mechanism, but can be re-used hundreds of times. I agree that shorter ones can be daisy-chained to expand their uses.
Check out Nite Ize Gear Ties instead.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
OK peregrinos, this first-time pilgrim (leaving SJPdP on May 19) hopes to learn from your experience. What was the SINGLE smartest "unexpected" item you included in your backpack? Keep it to one item, please, and (may I suggest?) skip the basics. I hoping for examples of items I would NEVER have considered taking! Maybe even little "luxury" items that weigh essentially nothing but that greatly enhanced your Camino experience. Be creative, now!
I know someone who brings a plastic hook that has a suction cup lock so she can hang up her clothes, towel, shower gear, purse or whatever. She now uses ones that are not white because she's left so many behind--the hooks that have a color are so much easier to see on a white wall.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Don't the imm

Don't immersion coils require electricity? How did you use yours in an albergue that didn't have electricity, Sillydoll? ...a hot drink before we left in the morning, especially in albergues with no electricity or no kitchens.
Yes - you have to have electricity. I always take the heater, on the Camino and the Via francigena.21. Coffee queue - Martigny.JPG
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Last autumn I picked up an unexpected item for my pack, an orange nylon shopping bag.

I decided to take an old day pack that I already owned on my camino, probably 25 liters. I thought it a bit small for the colder weather but I could live with it if I combined it with a bum bag that I already also had. Usually that was strapped on to the top of the pack, sort of a removable "brain". Early on I picked up a flimsy bamboo pole from the trail when I heard dogs ahead (I didn't take trekking poles). Just a bit later I had to walk along the curve of a road so I held the pole out so I could be seen better. Then I noticed the bag on the side of the road. It went on the end of the pole. I decided that the bag could be useful so I washed it and attached it to the back of the pack. It held food and served to make me more visible from behind.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
... Don't immersion coils require electricity? How did you use yours in an albergue that didn't have electricity, ...
There are hardly any albergues left that don't have electricity! So, not an issue at all ...
BC SY
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
It’s an extension cord in Canada too.
Thank you, NorthermLight and dougfitz, extension cord it is! Have looked it up at last!

Don't immersion coils require electricity? How did you use yours in an albergue that didn't have electricity, Sillydoll? ...a hot drink before we left in the morning, especially in albergues with no electricity or no kitchens.
Are there any albergues without electricity? I have been to albergues without any beds, no showers, but without electricity? Which ones are you referring to, Microft?


Yes - you have to have electricity. I always take the heater, on the Camino and the Via francigena.View attachment 69454
So do I!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
I am impressed! Since it is a Refugio maye it just supplies a roof and walls, maybe emergency food like I have seen (small) container refugios in Iceland. Those did have antennas. Maybe electricity (solar powered) is more easily to be had nowadays than running water....
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
San Anton has no electricity.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
There are hardly any albergues left that don't have electricity! So, not an issue at all ...
BC SY

Well, it can be an issue after all. So you need to check beforehand and get your spare battery charged while you can!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
There are hardly any albergues left that don't have electricity! So, not an issue at all ...
BC SY
True, but there are some. San Nicolas comes to mind. And Sillydoll said that the immersion heater was useful "especially in albergues with no electricity or no kitchens". If it was especially useful in albergues with no electricity, where was it plugged in? Perhaps it was plugged in to some sort of battery pack.
 

markmcilroy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances August/Sept 2016
Camino Frances Sept/October 2017
Le Puy to Conques May 2018
A very small atomiser filled with rubbing alcohol or methylated spirts. Great for sterilising / cleaning, needles, blisters, hands, sunglasses. Virtually every grocery type store in Spain sells the rubbing alcohol for 2-3 euros, so easy and cheap to refill........also a couple of large safety pins to hang socks from to dry as you walk along.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
Are there any albergues without electricity? I have been to albergues without any beds, no showers, but without electricity? Which ones are you referring to, Microft?




So do I!
Pelerine, I am going by what Sillydoll wrote, which I copied in my post in italics:
Don't immersion coils require electricity? How did you use yours in an albergue that didn't have electricity, Sillydoll? ...a hot drink before we left in the morning, especially in albergues with no electricity or no kitchens.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
Pelerine, I am going by what Sillydoll wrote, which I copied in my post in italics:
Don't immersion coils require electricity? How did you use yours in an albergue that didn't have electricity, Sillydoll? ...a hot drink before we left in the morning, especially in albergues with no electricity or no kitchens.
In post #458 above, Sillydoll confirmed that electricity is needed for the immersion coil. (She probably just wrote the original sentence a bit carelessly.) As has been stated, there are very few albergues without electricity, but at many places there could be a shortage of outlets at times.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
In post #458 above, Sillydoll confirmed that electricity is needed for the immersion coil. (She probably just wrote the original sentence a bit carelessly.) As has been stated, there are very few albergues without electricity, but at many places there could be a shortage of outlets at times.
Enough, already! I was trying to make a joke and clearly I am a poor communicator. I was not asking about albergues with or without utilities!
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-FIN(09/2018)
PORTO-SANT(11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe(01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT(09/2019)
Madrid(7/2020)
When I was much younger I backpacked for six months around Europe with a deck of playing cards and didn't lose any. I don't see that it would be much more of a risk on the Camino. And if you do, I imagine replacement decks would be available in Spain.
Good on you, my backpacking has mostly involved agricultural work in Europe, like to earn whilst I travel. Did you include Ireland?

If we didn't lose items on the Camino then how would we be other's 'camino provides' moments🤠

The only problem with replacement decks in Espana for me would be my limited Spanglish might have some difficulty understanding the numbers on a Spainish deck🤠
[/QUOTE]


Crazy Eights (with variations) is the universal card game.
Never heard of this card game, expect pontoon or 21's might be more universally coherent or snap although can get very competitive 🤠

It would be hard to beat playing cards as a combination of portability and flexibility in game play.
I agree but variation in rules and different language playing cards makes it challenging, try playing a game of strip poker with an Irish deck. My magnetic travel draught set has served me well and I've had many nights and mornings of fun trying to locate the little black counters on the dark floor. Its never the red counter that goes missing. My board doubles as a chopping board 🤠
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Good on you, my backpacking has mostly involved agricultural work in Europe, like to earn whilst I travel. Did you include Ireland?

If we didn't lose items on the Camino then how would we be other's 'camino provides' moments🤠

The only problem with replacement decks in Espana for me would be my limited Spanglish might have some difficulty understanding the numbers on a Spainish deck🤠




Never heard of this card game, expect pontoon or 21's might be more universally coherent or snap although can get very competitive 🤠



I agree but variation in rules and different language playing cards makes it challenging, try playing a game of strip poker with an Irish deck. My magnetic travel draught set has served me well and I've had many nights and mornings of fun trying to locate the little black counters on the dark floor. Its never the red counter that goes missing. My board doubles as a chopping board 🤠
In that trip to Europe I didn't make it to Britain or Iberia. I still have yet to make it to Ireland, actually. Some day.

The main difference with Spanish playing cards, if I recall correctly, isn't the numbers but the suits. It isn't hard to get used to them or adapt games.

Crazy Eights is a pretty simple game and easy to teach even without a common language. Everyone starts with a hand of cards. There is a card face up on the table with a draw pile of the rest of the cards next to it. The goal of the game is to get rid of all of the cards in your hand. You do this by taking turns putting cards on the face up pile. The card you put there must be the same number or the same suit as the card on the top of the pile. Cards are added to players' hands when they can't put down a card. That's the basic game. Some cards have special powers when you play them (wild cards, cards that make players miss a turn or play again or make the next player draw additional cards). This is where the variation comes in that quickly becomes apparent when the game is taught.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
Crazy Eights is a pretty simple game and easy to teach even without a common language. Everyone starts with a hand of cards. There is a card face up on the table with a draw pile of the rest of the cards next to it. The goal of the game is to get rid of all of the cards in your hand. You do this by taking turns putting cards on the face up pile. The card you put there must be the same number or the same suit as the card on the top of the pile. Cards are added to players' hands when they can't put down a card. That's the basic game. Some cards have special powers when you play them (wild cards, cards that make players miss a turn or play again or make the next player draw additional cards). This is where the variation comes in that quickly becomes apparent when the game is taught.
Ah! Uno! Even I can play it. To the delight of the children I tend to forget to cry “Uno” when I am down to one card!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Ah! Uno! Even I can play it. To the delight of the children I tend to forget to cry “Uno” when I am down to one card!
Exactly. Uno is one variation that requires a special deck, but the game can be played with regular playing cards. The way I learned it, eights were wild (hence "crazy eights"), jacks cause the next player to miss their turn, fours allow you to play again immediately, queen of spades causes the next player to pick up 5 cards, and twos cause the next player to pick up 2 cards (unless they themself immediately play a two, in which case the next player must pick up 4 cards, unless they themself immediately play a two, in which case the next player must pick up 6 cards, and so on). We didn't have a card for reversing direction, although I've heard some have the ace do so. Some play that if you can't play a card you only draw one. Others play that you keep drawing until you can play a card.
 
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Poppy-Pete

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, leaving SJPDP from 10/11 May (2018)
Twisted elastic clothes line. No clips are necessary; clothes are slipped into the line gaps for drying. There is a lot of competition for drying lines at albergues, and the clothes clips provided are used up fast (and if you supply your own, they will be gone by the end of the trip). In the U.S., AAA stores have an excellent line with suction cups for attaching to windows.

A sink stopper would have been handy in all the places where they were gone. It is hard to wash clothes in running water. $8.50 at Amazon.com.
instead of sink stopper or plug, cut a round from a tyre tube to place over the drain hole, one size fits all :) , lightweight and flat to carry.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
I lost my sink stopper so I asked for a piece of tyre in one workshop....in Serbia. I still have it and I still use it😎 Love that man! for ever 🙂
 

Joyce Dunn Rogers

Cleveland Flats
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
Camino Portugal 2021
I do have a suggestion.
Take a small container of boot grease (if you are wearing leather boots) to reapply because after walking the dry Meseta you will find out how NOT water proof your boots are when in a downpour in Finisterre! Totally soaked through.😮. As an Oregonian, I should have known this.
I use Hubbard's Shoe Grease...the original pine tar & beeswax waterproof/conditioner for leather goods.
 

Joyce Dunn Rogers

Cleveland Flats
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
Camino Portugal 2021
Hey Mike!! I wish that I had a nickle for every time I showed the Osprey back pack whistle to a Florida Trail hiker on their own backpack! I guess I would have about $1.50 maybe? No one knows....
Exactly! Took me a while before I figured out I had a whistle on my backpack, too.
 

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