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So how many Camino routes have you walked on in one single trip?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Topics' started by Donna Sch, Nov 14, 2017 at 4:35 AM.

  1. Donna Sch

    Donna Sch Active Member Donating Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    VdLP - Sanabres - Fisterra (Summer 2015); Future? Alicante-Astorga- SDC (2019);
    I'm busy planning a Camino Mixta from Alicante so that will take me on the Sureste, Levante, Ruta del Lana, VDLP, Frances, Invierno, Sanabres and Finisterre and possibly the Camino de la Santa Cruz. So somewhere between 7 and 9 depending on where you say various routes start and finish. I'd love to hear about the crazy camino combos others have done.
     
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  2. Camino Chris

    Camino Chris Veteran Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (April/May 2017)
    Your planning sounds like the extreme of ADD at its finest! :D
     
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  3. peregrina2000

    peregrina2000 Moderator Staff Member Donating Member Donating Member Donating Member

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    You could probably find a way to squeeze in the San Olav from the Lana into Burgos. ;) It's fabulous, btw.
     
  4. Camino Chris

    Camino Chris Veteran Member Donating Member

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    Hi Laurie, You've just mentioned another Camino route (or section) I've not heard of! I do have a few maps saved on my phone of the various routes, but somehow think they still are not all listed after seeing your many posts and comments over the past year.

    I'd like to ask you your very favorite of all the MANY Caminos you've walked, but somehow I think you'd say "All of them"! :)
     
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  5. Tincatinker

    Tincatinker Moderator Staff Member Donating Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Lots ;0)
    Go Donna!
    The best continuous trip I've managed so far is: Vasco del Interior; Frances; Salvador; Primitivo; Verde and Norte / Frances.
    Caused gentle confusion in the Pilgrims Office
     
  6. VNwalking

    VNwalking Veteran Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Francés (2014, 2015)
    St Olav and Francés (2016)
    Baztanés and Francés (May 2017)
    I bet. What box to put you in? As if that were possible.;)

    Quite the plan, Donna. Buen camino! (I'm envious...)
    Oh, and second Laurie's idea about the San Olav. It's super-special.
     
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  7. caminka

    caminka Active Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    SJPP - Frances - Fisterra (2005)
    Torino - Domitia - Tolosana - Frances - Fisterra (2009)
    Ljubljana - Aquileiense - Romea-Leona - Francigena - Aurelia - Pyrneen - Viejo - Invierno - Muxía - Francés - SJPP (2012)
    Lyon - Podiensis - Norte - Primitivo - Muxía (2016)
    I think many pilgrims from further east of europe starting at home could put together a pretty crazy combo to get to santiago.

    mine is quite a mouthful: višarska pot, passum tulmini, cammino celeste, via grado-aquileiense, via romea leona, via francigena, alta via del golfo, senderos in cinque terre, via della costa, via aurelia, via tolosana, chemin cathare, voie du piémont pyrenéen, voie d'ossau, camino aragonés, vuelta a la cuenca de pamplona, camino francés, viejo camino, ruta del tunél, camino natural del ebro, camino olvidado, camino invierno, camino sanabrés, camino fisterra, and camino francés back to france.

    I named passum tulmini after a medieval document, it's not an official route, but was an important road connection in the middle ages.
    there are gaps in between where I had to invent a route connecting different routes.
     
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  8. Camino Chris

    Camino Chris Veteran Member Donating Member

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    Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (April/May 2017)
    All I can say is WOW!
     
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  9. Kathar1na

    Kathar1na Member

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    Walked many miles towards Santiago.
    @caminka, this has really peeked my interest :) although I will never walk it. Do you still maintain a website about your walk to Santiago? I found earlier links but both of them don't work anymore.

    I also like your signature line! (I had to put it into Google which is a wonderful tool - I had no idea what it meant).
     
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  10. caminka

    caminka Active Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    SJPP - Frances - Fisterra (2005)
    Torino - Domitia - Tolosana - Frances - Fisterra (2009)
    Ljubljana - Aquileiense - Romea-Leona - Francigena - Aurelia - Pyrneen - Viejo - Invierno - Muxía - Francés - SJPP (2012)
    Lyon - Podiensis - Norte - Primitivo - Muxía (2016)
    unfortunately, my website has gone completely down the drain this year. first photobucket decided that it will no longer support third party sharing and my custom-made thumbnails went south. then panoramio took down the photos and all my photos went south. and then the web hosting site I was on decided that the domain I was using will no longer exist (and they don't have other free domains) so the whole website went south. :(
    I am looking for a new web hosting provider, but the big problem for my meagre budget are pictures which are big and very numerous, and take up a lot of storage. when I find that, I will have to link all the thumbs and all the photos once again. so, not in the very near future. but I will put it up again, I promise. :)

    thanks! I like it a lot, too. it's from a pastorela by a medieval trubadour from the south of france.
     
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  11. caminka

    caminka Active Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    SJPP - Frances - Fisterra (2005)
    Torino - Domitia - Tolosana - Frances - Fisterra (2009)
    Ljubljana - Aquileiense - Romea-Leona - Francigena - Aurelia - Pyrneen - Viejo - Invierno - Muxía - Francés - SJPP (2012)
    Lyon - Podiensis - Norte - Primitivo - Muxía (2016)
    I forgot to mention: my back-up plan at the moment is wikiloc: https://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/map.do?lt=44.681606&ln=3.097221&z=5&k=1&act=&q=caminka&place= (or search for caminka). the whole of my last camino is up (2016) and I am (slowly) adding the previous ones (currently some of the 2012 days, not in any particular order. if a particular section interests you, I can certainly put it into priority uploading :)).
     
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  12. Kiwi-family

    Kiwi-family Veteran Member

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    Location:
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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Astorga to Santiago (2012); Baztan, Voie de la Nive, Frances to Leon, Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra and back (2014); Oxfam Trailwalkers NZ (2015); Portuguese from Porto (June 2015); Via de la Plata/Sanabres (May/June 2016)
    My cobbled-together camino is nowhere near as ambitious as some, but it was our first really long walk and we loved that it lasted ten weeks.
    We started in Pamplona and walked backwards to St Jean. From there took the Voie De la Nive to Bayonne. Back down the Baztan to Pamplona. Along the Frances to Leon. San Salvador. Primitivo. That last little stretch of the Frances from Melide. Fisterra. And back to Santiago.
     
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  13. Camino Chris

    Camino Chris Veteran Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
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    Peregrina 2000 used "findpenguins" this year to blog her Camino on the Norte. I enjoyed following along and I think she found it user friendly. Just an FYI to consider.
     
  14. intrepidtraveler

    intrepidtraveler Active Member Donating Member

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    Location:
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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Caminos Madrid, Frances and Finisterre (2015)
    Camino Norte-2017; Camino Ingles from A Coruna - 2017
    Just the other day on another Camino -related forum I saw a posting about there being 286 Camino routes in Europe. So much for my idea to walk them all in this lifetime....had no idea there were so many options.
     
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  15. Pathfinder075

    Pathfinder075 Member Donating Member

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    Location:
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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Frances (Villada to SdC) (2016)
    Primitivo (Ribadesella to SdC) (2017)
    This years camino turned into a bit of a crazy one, and all in all I walked on Frances, Invierno, De La Plata and Norte. I finished none of them. Someone, possibly Laurie, recommended the last 100km from Ourense a couple of years back. I agree, it was very much worth it, right up to the point I got bed bugs at the Castro de Dozon albergue. ;)

    The breakdown of my route was Sahagun to Bercianos Real Camino, followed by Leon to Virgen del Camino, Astorga to Ponferrada, Monforte de Lemos to Chantada, Ourense to Ponte Ulla and a week later, some of the section around San Vincente de la Barquera. I also saw a camino sign in a random town south of Laredo, but have no idea what route that might be.
     
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  16. alansykes

    alansykes Veteran Member Donating Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    VdlP (2010 & 2012), St Cuthbert's (2011), Madrid/Levante (2013),
    Sureste-Fisterra (2014), Deltebre-Padrón (2015), Mozárabe from Almería (2016)
    The only time I got a whistle of surprise from the person giving me my compostela was when I turned up from Deltebre. A week or so up the Camino del Ebro to Gallur, then the Camino Castellano-Aragonés to Santo Domingo de Silos, a day or so each of the Ruta de la Lana and the Camino de Sant Olav to Burgos (crossing the Camino Francés), a few days getting to the coast at Comillas on the Ruta de Los Faramontes (not a camino) and the Camino Olvidado, then the Camino del Norte to Ribadeo (deviating to Oviedo), then the Ruta do Mar to Ferrol, and finally the Camino Inglés "home".
     
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  17. VNwalking

    VNwalking Veteran Member Donating Member

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    Wherever I am...now in Burma
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Francés (2014, 2015)
    St Olav and Francés (2016)
    Baztanés and Francés (May 2017)
    Just curious, but does anyone know how the Pilgrim's Office deals with these convoluted itineraries? Would Alan have been put in the 'Ingles' column (the last 100K), or the Ebro column (where he started), or...?
     
  18. Kiwi-family

    Kiwi-family Veteran Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Astorga to Santiago (2012); Baztan, Voie de la Nive, Frances to Leon, Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra and back (2014); Oxfam Trailwalkers NZ (2015); Portuguese from Porto (June 2015); Via de la Plata/Sanabres (May/June 2016)
    I’ve always been asked, “Where did you start?” And in this occasion liberally translated that to mean “Where was the fartherest point away from Santiago?” So I answered Bayonne.
     
  19. VNwalking

    VNwalking Veteran Member Donating Member

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    St Olav and Francés (2016)
    Baztanés and Francés (May 2017)
    Yes, me too. But I wonder in such complicated cases, then what camino do they say you did when it comes to the statistics?
    (Sorry, don't want to derail this interesting thread...a bit off topic...)
     
  20. caminka

    caminka Active Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    SJPP - Frances - Fisterra (2005)
    Torino - Domitia - Tolosana - Frances - Fisterra (2009)
    Ljubljana - Aquileiense - Romea-Leona - Francigena - Aurelia - Pyrneen - Viejo - Invierno - Muxía - Francés - SJPP (2012)
    Lyon - Podiensis - Norte - Primitivo - Muxía (2016)
    thanks for the recommendation, camino chris! will try it out.

    wow, I know there are lots of caminos (and many more being researched and waymarked every year - tiny slovenia has three!) but I had no idea the number is that high!

    I also do the same. I remember slight confusion in the pilgrim office after I presented my four credenciales after that long camino described above. It took some consultation and some time sorting out, but I don't remember anymore what went on the compostela. it didn't really matter that much.

    that is an interesting question. perhaps someone who worked there will shed some light on it for us.
     
  21. t2andreo

    t2andreo Veteran Member Donating Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Frances: 2013, 2014
    Madrid: 2016
    Portuguese: 2015, 2017
    Voluntario: 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
    I was contacted separately by PM, and asked to weigh in on this thread. So, here I am to try to help ...

    In reply to those who asked for input from a Pilgrim Office volunteer, I will tell you what I know from four years as a volunteer, each summer. Please bear in mind that there is no fully accurate answer, so you will have to interpolate from my comments.

    FIRST - Church / Cathedral / Pilgrim Office rules are that a pilgrim must walk at least the FINAL 100 km on any Camino route to qualify for a Compostela. Bicyclists must ride a minimum of the final 200 km.

    That accomplishment must be documented in an authorized pilgrim credencial / passport by obtaining a rubber stamp / sello from each place you stop. This includes hostals, albergues, hotels, cafes, bars, city and town offices, wherever you can get a stamp that affixes a geolocation and a date.

    Again, rules state that the pilgrim must have two stamps / sellos per day starting at the 100 Km / 200 km threshold, inward to Santiago. (SEE ALSO POINT THREE, below)

    In practice. this requirement is rarely invoked by the staff on pilgrims who show continuous long-distance progress from distance starting places: SJPdP, Pamplona, Barcelona, Sevilla, Irun, Porto, Madrid, etc. The staff KNOW who presents correctly as a long walker, versus a short distance walker (Sarria, Tui, Ourense, etc.). They simply "look" the part, talk the talk, and give every evidence of having truthfully walled a great distance. Limping qualifies as an endurance indicator, as do plaster casts...;)

    Parenthetically, over the years. I have strolled in from Lisbon, SJPdP, Leon, etc. looking the part. Typically, I had at least one stamp per day, sometimes two, but I never worried too much about it. There was no problem.

    Conversely, they can also recognize the folks who do the barest minimum effort to qualify. The short-walkers REALLY do look and present differently in the office. They tend to be cleaner, neater, better groomed, full of energy, their gear is typically very clean, and usually over-kill for the short distance walked.

    Also, long-walker veterans have learned that a 50 or 60 liter rucksack with an external mounted sleeping bag, is typically over-the-top and way large for a July or August 118 km stroll from Sarria. The short-walk folks have not learned that lesson...yet.:eek:

    Also, in July and August, the short-walker groups usually self-identify by wearing bright & garish t-shirts with pithy graphics and logos, that I have come to view as being inversely proportional to the effort expended. The more garish the camiseta, the shorter the distance likely walked. ;)

    I am rarely wrong, in this regard. Although in August 2017 a large (very large) group of folks in bright yellow camisetas did walk from Sevilla to celebrate their 25th anniversary as a Camino organization, BRAVO!!! They arranged and paid for the Botafumeiro to fly at the TWO Masses they laid on to accommodate the walkers in the group and family members who traveled to join them on this special occasion. This was a clear exception to my observed general rule.:):)

    OTOH, long-walkers are grimy, stained, weary, in pain, sometimes limping, and their gear is equally worn and evidently used. I see lots of duck tape repairs. When I am working the queues, greeting and chatting with arriving pilgrims, I can almost always identify the long-walkers. I like to engage them in a conversation if I can (my Spanish is getting better but I am not there yet) if they have some English. Hearing their stories makes me mildly jealous.

    SECOND - The Pilgrim Office databases have the "official" distance tables to Santiago from any point on any Camino route. Every village and hamlet is named, and the distance has been established. HOWEVER, there is, as of August 2017, no capability to use the computer to cobble together a complex routing based on a pilgrim scoring a trifecta or a multitude of other multi-Camino routes to arrive at Santiago.

    In theory, it is possible to use a automated mapping program with a series of moveable position "dots," controlled my mouse clicks, like a mapping program might do to adjust a planned route to route you from point to point...but I digress. Because of this, some accommodation by the staff is necessary to handle this very rare but VERY time-consuming effort...

    THIRD - As a Compostela is earned once you walk or peddle the minimum distance, the maximum or total distance you walked does not matter. Someone who walks from Sarria gets the same Compostela as the pilgrim who walked from Le Puy or SJPdP.

    FOURTH - The total distance you walked DOES make a difference to issue the Certificado del Distancia / Distance Certificate. THAT document contains your starting point, as well as the total km travelled. The starting point is easy, and known.

    However, bear in mind that the Distance Certificate is offered for reasons of vanity only. In fact, most of us call at the P/O refer to it as the "bragging rights" certificate. The point being that this certificate carries no official standing. But, if asked how YOU spent YOUR summer, you can produce this certificate to prove your accomplishment. It also looks nice framed.

    When I encounter a family group doing one Camino together, I usually recommend to the parent in charge that they obtain individual Compostelas, but ask for one Distance Certificate to be done for the family, showing their family accomplishment, e.g. la familia Garcia-Perez.... This is a very popular notion. Also, it takes great group photo afterwards...one of my collateral duties as a volunteer...;)

    Back on point, the total distance is manually toted using the stamps in the passport to trace your progress along each Camino route. The staff references the table of the starting and ending points of each segment to obtain or calculate subtotals for each segment. They then add the subtotal distances to get at the total creditable km to place on the Distance Certificate. This is very time-consuming.

    As regards the starting point, it is customary to use the actual original starting point on the first segment / route.

    So, for example, if you walked the Aragones to the Frances, Somport might be the starting point and Santiago the end point. The Distance certificate would list Somport as your starting point.

    The total Km would be the km from Somport to Puente la Reina, PLUS the distance from Puente la Reina to Santiago. Easily understood I think.

    These distance rarely change. Oddly, they DID change in 2017, over 2016, getting slightly longer. I was told that GPS was finally used to verify actual distances and the databases were updated.

    The route followed on the Distance Certificate is a bit more problematic as the document is not designed to capture every nuance. There is space for one, maybe two routes but not for more. There are three variants I have seen over the years for handling this:

    1. The first segment is used...
    2. The last segment is used... or,
    3. The segment comprising the majority of your distance is used.

    Using the example above, the DC could state your route as Camino Aragones or Camino Frances, starting at Somport.

    It is an imperfect solution for a very rarely seen occurrence. Nearly all pilgrims do only one route, a portion of one route.

    Only a very small percentage like one or two percent, do a compound Camino comprised of segments from two or more routes. Usually this is the Primitivo and Frances, Oviedo and Frances, or Norte and Frances, or Aragones and Frances, etc.

    Finally, an über tiny number of pilgrims each year do the wacky, obsessive multiple segment Caminos as described above. I am NOT being critical. The number is so small as to be handled according to the basic rules I mentioned above. Whether you did two Camino routes or twenty, the office staff would still seek to apply the rules as I explained.

    This latter point about OCD made, I readily admit that I am in awe of those of you who do this. I would LOVE to be permitted to remain in Europe long enough to do this sort of thing for months on end. But, sigh, I am married, and have filial responsibilities to elderly parents.

    Also, being from the US, I would need a long-stay visa to be able to remain in the Schengen zone for more than 90 calendar days in any 180 day period, a sliding 6-month window...

    I hope this helps.
     
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  22. caminka

    caminka Active Member Donating Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    SJPP - Frances - Fisterra (2005)
    Torino - Domitia - Tolosana - Frances - Fisterra (2009)
    Ljubljana - Aquileiense - Romea-Leona - Francigena - Aurelia - Pyrneen - Viejo - Invierno - Muxía - Francés - SJPP (2012)
    Lyon - Podiensis - Norte - Primitivo - Muxía (2016)
    I love this sentence. :)
    thanks for the detailed clarification, t2andreo!
     
  23. t2andreo

    t2andreo Veteran Member Donating Member Donating Member

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    Madrid: 2016
    Portuguese: 2015, 2017
    Voluntario: 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
    From all available records, and anecdotal evidence, the number is really, REALLY small. But, it is nonetheless of interest, especially here in the Forum.
     
  24. VNwalking

    VNwalking Veteran Member Donating Member

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    St Olav and Francés (2016)
    Baztanés and Francés (May 2017)
    Uber wacky, sounds like my kind of folks. Love it. (Taking that out of context on purpose, as that's what we must seem like to most 'normal' people.:D)
    And I can commiserate with this part; me too:
     
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  25. Camino Chris

    Camino Chris Veteran Member Donating Member

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    @t2andreo, I love your comprehensive list of the (many) rules you have learned from being a volunteer in the Pilgrim's Office! Thank you for taking the time to write such a thorough reply to the PM you received. It was very interesting to read all the details.

    This past spring I walked every single step of the way from SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela. I only heard of the distance certificate while waiting in line for my Compostela and decided I wanted this additional momento of my accomplishment for my own personal satisfaction, not to brag or show it to others. Believe me when I say that in my circle of family and friends, no one would especially care to see it. o_O In 2015 I walked SJPdP to Santiago, but chose to bus from Burgos to Leon as I had not planned my flights well on that first Camino and wanted to spend my last week on the coast, so this certificate meant alot to me although it still sits rolled up in the tube after all these months.

    I said all of the above to say this. My distance certificate states I walked 799 kilometers. I found that quite humorous that they didn't round it up to an even 800 k. After all, I did hike all the way up to that castle on the big hill in Castrojeriz, and also walked all over every big city I stayed in along the way! :D
     
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  26. Magwood

    Magwood Veteran Member Donating Member

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    Camino Frances (15 April 2013)
    Camino Portuguese (1 May 2014)
    Camino Mozárabe from Málaga (8 April 2015)
    Camino del Norte & Camino Ingles (April 2016)
    This year I packed in a few...
    Madrid
    Frances
    Salvador
    Primitivo
    Via verde
    Norte
    Frances
    Fisterra
    Muxia
     
  27. t2andreo

    t2andreo Veteran Member Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Messages:
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    Location:
    South Florida, USA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Frances: 2013, 2014
    Madrid: 2016
    Portuguese: 2015, 2017
    Voluntario: 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
    Yeah, I find that funny too. The old distance was 775 km. At least that is what my 2014 Distance Certificate says.

    Also, the stone at the frontier between France and Spain, near the Fountain of Roland, states the old, historical distance as 765 km. It IS 10 Km from SJPdP to that stone. Any updates or changes are likely west of that marker.

    Moreover, Sarria was 111 km from Santiago, like FOREVER. Now the official distance is 118 km...go figure...

    That said, I suspect that over the years, with a multitude of route adjustments along the way, PLUS, the availability of inexpensive GPS measuring capability, they were able to revise the numbers.
     
    Camino Chris likes this.
  28. Kiwi-family

    Kiwi-family Veteran Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2012
    Messages:
    2,344
    Likes Received:
    3,421
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Astorga to Santiago (2012); Baztan, Voie de la Nive, Frances to Leon, Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra and back (2014); Oxfam Trailwalkers NZ (2015); Portuguese from Porto (June 2015); Via de la Plata/Sanabres (May/June 2016)
    90 days is PLENTY to do a few caminos at once;-)
     
    VNwalking likes this.
  29. t2andreo

    t2andreo Veteran Member Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Messages:
    2,237
    Likes Received:
    5,309
    Location:
    South Florida, USA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Frances: 2013, 2014
    Madrid: 2016
    Portuguese: 2015, 2017
    Voluntario: 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
    Would that I could...(sigh)
     
  30. Dinah Shaw

    Dinah Shaw New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2017
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    5
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino Norte and Frances Sept 6 - Oct 11, 2016
    WOW! Impressive
     
  31. Peter Fransiscus

    Peter Fransiscus Veteran Member Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2014
    Messages:
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    Location:
    Zwijndrecht , Netherlands
    Camino(s) past & future:
    All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
    My distance in 2015 was also 775km.

    Wish you well,Peter.
     

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