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Solo Female Camino Safety

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Kbierstube

Member
Past OR future Camino
Aug 29 (2017)
What are your top 3 safety tips, for a person (female) traveling CF solo?

Has/does anyone bring personal safety devices? I.e. Mace, knife, gun? (My husband wants to know)

What else?

Tia!
 
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Anemone del Camino

Guest
"Mace, knife, gun"?! Really? I am pretty sure these are illegal in Spain, at the very least the last two, and quite certain if some hospies knew you would be carrying they would not give you a bed.
 

superleggera

Member
Past OR future Camino
CF [StJean-F'rre] (March 2017)
Hmmm, interesting.....which Mace do you mean....? Do you intend to do your own cooking? :)

images
Schwartz_Ground_Mace_29.jpg__63165_thumb.jpg
 
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
Frances: September - October 2016
Porto > Santiago - April 2018
Move to Astorga (2019)
I started almost a year to the day before your start date. There are no words to describe it.

I am an old guy, but found myself walking most of the way with young(er) women from all over the world and I asked many of them how comfortable they were walking alone. With the exception of one woman from Italy on her first morning, every one of them revealed in words and behavior that they felt comfortable. I think that you will find yourself being well supported in every physical and emotional and spiritual way by other pilgrims, local residents, and the Camino support system. The only threatening thing I encountered was arriving in Santiago and leaving the people that had become my Camino family. Each one has a part of my heart. No knives or mace involved.

Oh, and the woman from Italy joined our little family and was fine by noon. We had two fluent speakers of Italian in our group, she was right at home with us.

Also, tell your husband that he will really appreciate the heart you bring back to him.
 

Kbierstube

Member
Past OR future Camino
Aug 29 (2017)
Well, I'm glad that everyone is laughing at my expense! Please note, not offended in the least, because I believe the only bad question is the one unasked. So, again, I'm glad that I can reassure my husband that safety isn't an issue.
 
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superleggera

Member
Past OR future Camino
CF [StJean-F'rre] (March 2017)
Well, I'm glad that everyone is laughing at my expense! Please note, not offended in the least, because I believe the only bad question is the one unasked. So, again, I'm glad that I can reassure my husband that safety isn't an issue.

On a more serious note, there was a thread last week, the most viewed on here I think, which discussed this...loads of great tips on there, basically saying keep your wits about as you would at home or anywhere, don't be afraid to ask to walk with others, keep your AK locked and loaded, safety off ready to party...that kind of thing :)
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
Safety off, ready to party. That's me! ;)
I'm sure you are joking. However, some people go on the Camino thinking they are in a sacred bubble, and they become shocked and dismayed to find that the Camino is populated by human beings of all sorts. You should absolutely bring along a sensible safety attitude. And don't let your valuables ( passport, cash, bank cards and phone) out of sight.
 
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MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
I am assuming from the question you are also from the US like I am & have a husband who is concerned about you. Living in Montana we have a very strong gun culture, so let me assure you you will be safer on the Camino & in Spain generally than any state in the US. The only thing I would suggest is common sense, & remember it is for most of us a pilgrimage. I believe the biggest danger is from traffic so keep your wits about you when walking.
Buen Camino
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
I never met any ladies on the CF who were toting personal protection devices like OC (pepper spray) or anything similar. Overall it's a very safe walk. As far as crime is concerned, I would put more thought in keeping you passport, money and credit cards secure.
If you are there for the months of August and September, there will be lots of fellow pilgrims walking with you. That doesn't mean you absolutely have to walk with them, but if it eases any concerns, always walk within sight of fellow pilgrims.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
I'm sure you are joking. However, some people go on the Camino thinking they are in a sacred bubble, and they become shocked and dismayed to find that the Camino is populated by human beings of all sorts. You should absolutely bring along a sensible safety attitude. And don't let your valuables ( passport, cash, bank cards and phone) out of sight.
The "safety off, ready to party" was in reference to the firearm (photo of AK-47 in this thread) I think. That means the safety of the firearm is in the off position, ready to fire (the one in the photo is actually on safe). Anyway, it doesn't mean a sense of keeping oneself safe while travelling is on off, ha ha. At least I hope my assumptions are correct. :confused:
 

Kbierstube

Member
Past OR future Camino
Aug 29 (2017)
I am assuming from the question you are also from the US like I am & have a husband who is concerned about you. Living in Montana we have a very strong gun culture, so let me assure you you will be safer on the Camino & in Spain generally than any state in the US. The only thing I would suggest is common sense, & remember it is for most of us a pilgrimage. I believe the biggest danger is from traffic so keep your wits about you when walking.
Buen Camino

@MTtoCamino thank you for your understanding! I was born in MT (Butte), raised in Mn, and currently live in TX. I'm familiar with the 'gun culture'. Good to get your perspective to share with my father and husband.
 

Kbierstube

Member
Past OR future Camino
Aug 29 (2017)
I'm sure you are joking. However, some people go on the Camino thinking they are in a sacred bubble, and they become shocked and dismayed to find that the Camino is populated by human beings of all sorts. You should absolutely bring along a sensible safety attitude. And don't let your valuables ( passport, cash, bank cards and phone) out of sight.

Yes. I was speaking sarcastically. Please forgive.
 
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Kbierstube

Member
Past OR future Camino
Aug 29 (2017)
The "safety off, ready to party" was in reference to the firearm (photo of AK-47 in this thread) I think. That means the safety of the firearm is in the off position, ready to fire (the one in the photo is actually on safe). Anyway, it doesn't mean a sense of keeping oneself safe while travelling is on off, ha ha. At least I hope my assumptions are correct. :confused:

Yes. I was being sarcastic. I don't know anything about the gun pictured. Please accept my apologies.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Be aware of your surroundings, and if you are alone, have an idea of how far ahead and behind other pilgrims are. Or just keep other pilgrims in sight if you are feeling uneasy at all. And a good loud whistle.
 
D

Deleted member 56069

Guest
Well, this is more interesting than talking about boots or back packs. Keeping in mind that the original question was not meant to be taken totally seriously. ie, the guns and flame throwers part. I would not worry at all traveling as a single female. You will only walk alone if this is what you want. You will meet other walkers you will walk with for a few hours, days or possibly your whole Camino. If you want a more solitary experience, then just walk within a reasonable distance of a group that is more or less on your pace.
Without being paranoid, you need to keep a low level situational awareness as to what is going on around you. Check your '6' every now and then.
The only time of year you would need to be worried about being truly solitary is on a late fall, winter or very early spring Camino, the rest of the year there will be a lot of walkers, certainly in September as you plan.
Also, being that a Camino is a pilgrimage, you need to have a certain amount of trust in your fellow man and that the man upstairs are looking out for you.
Also, get your husband to go. I was dragging my feet on the whole Camino thing, sure glad I went, now going back for the forth time this year to do the Portuguese route.
 
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Past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
I'm a middle-aged British male so my perspective will be a little different. In 40 years of walking long-distance routes in a number of European countries I have never felt seriously threatened. By contrast a memorable highlight of my only visit to the USA - 6 days in Montana - was accidentally driving into a backwoods militia camp and being warned off by four men carrying rifles. A very different gun culture indeed.
 
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Mark Lee

Guest
I'm a middle-aged British male so my perspective will be a little different. In 40 years of walking long-distance routes in a number of European countries I have never felt seriously threatened. By contrast a memorable highlight of my only visit to the USA - 6 days in Montana - was accidentally driving into a backwoods militia camp and being warned off by four men carrying rifles. A very different gun culture indeed.
How on earth did you accidentally drive into one of those camps?
 
Past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
How on earth did you accidentally drive into one of those camps?
Driving back from Yellowstone to Alberta. I decided to take a gravel forest road marked on a state tourist map SW of Stanford. Took the wrong branch at a fork and ended up on a track that came to a dead-end in a clearing with a few cabins and a big unfriendly "stay out" sign. As I turned the car around 4 men came out of the cabins, picked up rifles and stood shoulder-to-shoulder in front of the cabins, rifles held across their chests. Back at the fork a logging truck driver stopped to help and told me who these guys were. He also added that the local sheriff kept out of their way. Not funny at the time.
 
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Mark Lee

Guest
Driving back from Yellowstone to Alberta. I decided to take a gravel forest road marked on a state tourist map SW of Stanford. Took the wrong branch at a fork and ended up on a track that came to a dead-end in a clearing with a few cabins and a big unfriendly "stay out" sign. As I turned the car around 4 men came out of the cabins, picked up rifles and stood shoulder-to-shoulder in front of the cabins, rifles held across their chests. Back at the fork a logging truck driver stopped to help and told me who these guys were. He also added that the local sheriff kept out of their way. Not funny at the time.
yikes....good thing it wasn't a meth lab or an illegal marijuana farm
 

CaptNoglos

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Well, I'm glad that everyone is laughing at my expense! Please note, not offended in the least, because I believe the only bad question is the one unasked. So, again, I'm glad that I can reassure my husband that safety isn't an issue.
Certainly sounds as if walking is different in the US.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
Certainly sounds as if walking is different in the US.
There's literally thousands of miles of hiking trails all over the lower 48 in the US and more in Alaska and Hawaii. Some of the more famous trails here are the Appalachian Trail and the Pacific Crest Trail. They attract millions of hikers annually. I believe that overall they are very safe and criminal activity on them is rare. A hiker on them is more than likely going to fall victim to poor judgement or the elements than a criminal incident.
I believe most of the concern about safety on the Camino (more specifically the Camino Frances) stems from the murder of a female pilgrim near Astorga two years ago.
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2015
Well, I'm glad that everyone is laughing at my expense! Please note, not offended in the least, because I believe the only bad question is the one unasked. So, again, I'm glad that I can reassure my husband that safety isn't an issue.
The Camino is probably one of the safest places you could be. M a n y solo women are out there. I walked alone for the 800km journey (often making beautiful friends along the way). I would not trade that journey for anything! Try to assuage those fears before you leave. The more fear you project, the more you will draw it to you. I'm sure you and your husband have agreed to a plan for when and how you are able to keep in touch. He must be a proud hubby. Wish you Buen Camino.
 
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Past OR future Camino
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
Well, I'm glad that everyone is laughing at my expense! Please note, not offended in the least, because I believe the only bad question is the one unasked. So, again, I'm glad that I can reassure my husband that safety isn't an issue.
Hi Kbie - despite the very very sad events on April 2015 the Caminos of Spain are probably the safest back-roads of any country in the world. You can bring a (small) knife - one that you can use to cut the bread & cheese & ham & tomatoes to make your picnic lunch. (BTW A knife like the one that Paul Hogan used in Crocodile Dundee would not be allowed.)
 

MCFearnley

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Ponferrada to Santiago (September 2016)
I'm female and I walked solo from Ponferrada to Santiago last fall. I felt extremely safe and minded my own business. I carried a whistle, but never needed it. My hiking poles served as a deterrent once when a dog approached me a little to fast. On my day to Palas de Rei an oldish man stopped his car next to me and asked if I wanted a lift, I graciously but firmly refused. Basic personal safety rules apply wherever you go, same holds for the Camino. Watch for speeding cars in blind turns when you are walking on the road. If you plan on walking before sunrise, wear a reflective vest and other reflective paraphenalia over and above using a headlamp or flashlight. Common sense should prevail. If you don't feel comfortable in a situation, quietly leave the situation and seek to be among other pilgrims. Avoid getting drunk beyond your faculties (anyhow the hangover would prevent you from walking the next day). I think that should cover it. The only guns you can have are your biceps; the only mace, used for cooking; the only knives, for slicing tomatoes or cheese.
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
Thank you all for bringing this back about the Camino. Nothing is more important than the brother/sisterhood that we experience along the Camino. The ugliness we find in our countries can stay there.
Keith
 

camino-david

RIP 2020
Past OR future Camino
Caminos Frances (x4), Finisterre, Aragon, Via de la Plata, Portuguese 2011 -2015. Hospitalero 2015
Hi Kiebstube
I have read four posts from you today regarding questions we have in our mind before before starting for the first time, and they are all legitimate concerns. However I do think you are being overly worried with a zillion things. Truthfully, all the Camino is, is a long walk in a safe country, and it's just eat, sleep and walk. Admittedly a few days are hard for some people, but you will make lots of wonderful friends to help you. Most people when starting only think of 800kms, but after only a couple of days you will find you only think of the day's walk of 20kms whatever. I am putting this very clumsily, but really stop worrying. If you forget to take something with you, do without or buy on the way. I walked from St Jean to Finisterre on my first Camino when I was 79, so it must be easy! Oh, and my pack weighs 6.2 kms (14lbs) and holds everything I need.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Litoral and Variant October 2021
Past OR future Camino
2016
My wife and I walked last year and several times single walkers both female and male chose to walk with us even though we walked slower than most pilgrims. walking alone or along with others is safe. I would be comfortable if my wife or daughters walked alone. If you are worried take a self defense course. By the way walking stick can be used for self defense.
 
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Mark Lee

Guest
I'm female and I walked solo from Ponferrada to Santiago last fall. I felt extremely safe and minded my own business. I carried a whistle, but never needed it. My hiking poles served as a deterrent once when a dog approached me a little to fast. On my day to Palas de Rei an oldish man stopped his car next to me and asked if I wanted a lift, I graciously but firmly refused. Basic personal safety rules apply wherever you go, same holds for the Camino. Watch for speeding cars in blind turns when you are walking on the road. If you plan on walking before sunrise, wear a reflective vest and other reflective paraphenalia over and above using a headlamp or flashlight. Common sense should prevail. If you don't feel comfortable in a situation, quietly leave the situation and seek to be among other pilgrims. Avoid getting drunk beyond your faculties (anyhow the hangover would prevent you from walking the next day). I think that should cover it. The only guns you can have are your biceps; the only mace, used for cooking; the only knives, for slicing tomatoes or cheese.
I can attest (twice) that one can indeed walk the Camino whilst hungover. Not very far (for me I was only able to cover about 12K each time), but it's possible, but not recommended.
That was the only time I was booted out of an albergue (private). Logrono after several of us had tapas crawled till 4:00 am. The woman cleaning the albergue around 9:00 am woke me from my slumber and told me to "vamanos", ha ha. :D
 

towanda1961

Laura
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances and Invierno (2015)
What are your top 3 safety tips, for a person (female) traveling CF solo?

Has/does anyone bring personal safety devices? I.e. Mace, knife, gun? (My husband wants to know)

What else?

Tia!
I had people ask me if I would be carrying a gun, so I understand where that comes from.

I walked alone in 2015, and for 11 days I was totally alone on the Invierno. I had two odd events, once (on the Frances ) in a village I was off track and in a shadowy corner behind a building. Two young men approached and told me that they would show me the way but several things seemed "off," so I thanked them and retraced my steps until I was with a group of people, and the young men walked off in a other direction.

The second event was on the Invierno when an older man passed me slowly in a car and a while later came back and passed me slowly again. I was uncomfortable as we were far from any village, but for all I know he was checking on my safety.

In other words, be alert and pay attention to your intuition, but Spain is very safe for women and on the Frances you are rarely alone. And the local people are very helpful and protective.

Buen Camino and walk in peace. You'll become more confident and comfortable each step.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
I've walked and cycled a few caminos, including three with my donkey. I was far more worried for her safety than mine at times. After all, a donkey is a useful working animal, and who would want to steal a pilgrim?
Place where your stuff is most at risk is in your accommodation. Don't leave your passport and money on your bunk while you are in the shower, for example. Your personal risk? Most dangerous thing you can do, in my opinion, is walk on roads without pavements (sidewalks) in the dark. I don't walk at night other than back from the bar. You miss the waymarks and the view, anyway. Next most dangerous thing is shining a head torch in my eyes before it is time to leave. My time, not your time. If you do it more than once I will rip it off your head, jump up and down on it, and make you eat the bits.
Has that put the risks into perspective? Good. have a great time, don't rush, stop and enjoy the view. And the wine and Tapas. You may even feel like putting your head round a church door from time to time.
 
Past OR future Camino
Portuguese
I walked on my own and mainly solo with no problems concerning personal safety at any time. Not from people, not from dogs. I walk without listening to music so I was aware of the only possible source of concern that being traffic on approaching towns. I didn't lose any possession either as I had a routine that I followed to ensure I knew where things were at all times. My experience was one of relaxation, fun and delight. Plan, start, enjoy!
 

Lynn Edwards

New Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPP 2015
@MTtoCamino thank you for your understanding! I was born in MT (Butte), raised in Mn, and currently live in TX. I'm familiar with the 'gun culture'. Good to get your perspective to share with my father and husband.
When are you traveling? I am in Texas too and plan on going April- May
 
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Flem

Member
Past OR future Camino
2015 - 2019 several caminos (7 differents)
What are your top 3 safety tips, for a person (female) traveling CF solo?

Has/does anyone bring personal safety devices? I.e. Mace, knife, gun? (My husband wants to know)

What else?

Tia!
Talked with a young woman on the CP. I asked her how she handle walking alone.
She said as long as she could see one pilgrim in front and ine behind inside hearingdistance she feel safe.
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Le Puy - León, Camino Frances (2012 - 2019)
Just to clarify for the benefit of pilgims from the US - there is NO "gun culture" in Europe. I'm also a middle-aged Brit and haven't seen a real firearm (apart from the occasional armed police officer at an airport) in many years. The possession of handguns by civilians is illegal. The only knife permitted outside the home or work is a folding pocket knife with a blade of less than 3 inches. Pepper spray, Mace, CS etc absolutely forbidden. (They are classed as firearms.) Breach of any of these laws will result in prison. Most European countries have similar legislation. The Camino is very safe (crime levels in Europe are low, anyway) andthe only risk is petty theft - I endorse the advice to keep your valuables in sight/on your person at all times. Enjoy your Camio.
 

gracyelezebeth

New Member
What are your top 3 safety tips, for a person (female) traveling CF solo?

Has/does anyone bring personal safety devices? I.e. Mace, knife, gun? (My husband wants to know)

What else?

Tia!

You absolutely dont have to feel bad about the question you asked. as a woman i too had safety concerns given that i was travelling in Europe for the 1st time & i dint know the language much.
I walked the path alone but there were many others who are doing the same . So you see you are solo but not alone. Just take care that you start & end your walk in daylight... once you are comfortable you can
tweek your timings. Dont worry n enjoy the walk.
 

KariC

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2016
I agree with the above comments, and felt totally safe walking alone. (and it seldom really was "alone," as others have noted.) Walking the Camino Portugues, I never was in the really big public hostels where I think the property theft is more likely to happen, but that is far more likely than personal / physical crime. As far as personal safety, never had a moment where I felt my personal safety was in danger. Even took a ride offered by a stranger when I ended up late afternoon in Ribadumia, after having been assured by the tourist office in Pontevedra and the hostel in Armenteira that there was lodging there, only to find out there are no hotels, hostels, nada. He was one of the camino angels - went out of his way to give me a ride to Vilanova, where there was a hostel. I'd never do that in the US.
My husband was worried about me, too. What I did was send a short daily e-mail with a sentence or two and a collage of pix, to him and other friends/family.
 

kdespot

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés SJPP-SdC Sept-Oct 2016
Just to clarify for the benefit of pilgims from the US - there is NO "gun culture" in Europe. I'm also a middle-aged Brit and haven't seen a real firearm (apart from the occasional armed police officer at an airport) in many years. The possession of handguns by civilians is illegal. The only knife permitted outside the home or work is a folding pocket knife with a blade of less than 3 inches. Pepper spray, Mace, CS etc absolutely forbidden. (They are classed as firearms.) Breach of any of these laws will result in prison. Most European countries have similar legislation. The Camino is very safe (crime levels in Europe are low, anyway) andthe only risk is petty theft - I endorse the advice to keep your valuables in sight/on your person at all times. Enjoy your Camio.
Must be nice. We're all just nuts here these days in the U.S. But then I guess everyone has noticed that.
 
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Glenshiro

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Le Puy - León, Camino Frances (2012 - 2019)
It isn't just US citizens who worry about their personal safety. Last year I met a Brazilian guy in Condom who was doing the Chemin for the third time. I asked why he had come all the way to Europe and he told me that he and a group of friends would go for a run every Saturday morning in his home town of Salvador - but only if there were 15 or more of them, otherwise they risked being robbed at gunpoint. He just loved the freedom and safety of rural France.
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
No gun culture at all, but definitely in France and Spain there is a hunting culture. You can cross or go sometimes along fields marked as "coto de caza público" (public hunting preserve). For example, in the forest, between Valcarlos and Ibañeta.
In the Piedmont way, along the Pyrinees, I saw before Hôpital Saint Blaise many hunting wooden stalls and even a signpost with a slightly unnerving message: "Dear pilgrim, please walk quietly, don' t scare away our preys. Thank you".Very polite...:eek::eek:
I heard some "pops" in some forest stages in Spain, but maybe it was just my imagination.:p
 
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Verity

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Sarria to Santiago (2016)
Pamplona to Santiago (2017)
There's literally thousands of miles of hiking trails all over the lower 48 in the US and more in Alaska and Hawaii. Some of the more famous trails here are the Appalachian Trail and the Pacific Crest Trail. They attract millions of hikers annually. I believe that overall they are very safe and criminal activity on them is rare. A hiker on them is more than likely going to fall victim to poor judgement or the elements than a criminal incident.
I believe most of the concern about safety on the Camino (more specifically the Camino Frances) stems from the murder of a female pilgrim near Astorga two years ago.
I live in Spain, it was on Spanish tv and the Guardia were everywhere in that area of the route. The Camino is of huge importance. I am a 66 year old femail, I did Sarria to Santiago alone last November and am starting in Pamplona(three days in from France) in a few weeks, starting in Feb. I have lots of femail friends who have done it alone. Spain is a very safe country in general. As people say be careful with your passport, money, etc. I take a money belt which I take with me even when I get a shower, never out of my sight. It is fantastic!!
 

Tamsin Grainger

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés
De la plata
Hi Kbie - despite the very very sad events on April 2015 the Caminos of Spain are probably the safest back-roads of any country in the world. You can bring a (small) knife - one that you can use to cut the bread & cheese & ham & tomatoes to make your picnic lunch. (BTW A knife like the one that Paul Hogan used in Crocodile Dundee would not be allowed.)
Except of course you cannot bring it on the plane. unless you pay £40 to put the rucksack in the hold. Anyone suggest a remedy to this? I do need a decent knife.
 
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rorerich

CaminoLifer
Past OR future Camino
2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, (2019)
I'm in agreement with having trust AND common sense. I do buy a pocket knife for bread and cheese as soon as I can...and keep it in my pants pocket. I also think that my poles could be of some defense. Yet, I have never felt at risk walking alone or with others. HOWEVER - late last fall on the Camino Sanabres my sister and I walked through areas where people were obviously out hunting. I wasn't sure, though, that we were obvious to the hunters - was glad my pack was a bright red and there were times we made a lot of noise on purpose since we could definitely hear gunshots not far from us.
 

Russnikovsky

Buen Camino
Past OR future Camino
10 x Frances complete, SJPDP>Santiago>Fisterra>Muxia
1x Via De La PLata y 1x Camino Levante
I would suggest that you ask pilgrims at the albergues or hostels if they mind you walking with them? or if you prefer walking alone then always make sure there are pilgrims either infront of you or behind you, extra pairs of eyes on 2 legs are your free CCTV, i personally think taking weapons could go wrong if they are used against you, i have walked 13 caminos and only had two incidents towards me, but i shouted at them so loud that it was enough, noise is always a good thing to make people aware, some personal alarm maybe?
 
Past OR future Camino
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
Except of course you cannot bring it on the plane. unless you pay £40 to put the rucksack in the hold. Anyone suggest a remedy to this? I do need a decent knife.
I agree it is a potential problem. One solution I saw was to buy an appropriate knife when you arrive in Spain (or France). If you are not taking it home you could donate to the last albergue or hostel you stay in. I have an Espinal knife that folds up to around 80 mm (so theoretically can be taken into the cabin), but as I always have checked baggage it goes in there. Cheers
 

CaptNoglos

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
I agree it is a potential problem. One solution I saw was to buy an appropriate knife when you arrive in Spain (or France). If you are not taking it home you could donate to the last albergue or hostel you stay in. I have an Espinal knife that folds up to around 80 mm (so theoretically can be taken into the cabin), but as I always have checked baggage it goes in there. Cheers
That is the most sensible advice I have seen here. A small knife like that is v cheap to buy.
 

murraydv

Via de la Plata / Sanabres / Camino de Levante
Past OR future Camino
Completed Via de la Plata (2018).
Started Camino de Levante (2019).
"Mace, knife, gun"?! Really? I am pretty sure these are illegal in Spain, at the very least the last two, and quite certain if some hospies knew you would be carrying they would not give you a bed.
I agree with these comments, if you really feel that you need these devices, then perhaps the Camino is not for you. The Camino should be aan enjoyable experience, not looking over your shoulder for possible trouble. There are many feemales on the Camino traveling alone, It is safe.
 
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mdelag

Member
Past OR future Camino
**CAMINO FRANCES: LEON-SANTIAGO sept. (2015)
**CAMINO FRANCES SJPP-SANTIAGO (2019)
Hi !! I think the Camino is a safe place for females walking alone. Use your common sense, walk near other pligrims. As all women, we have a sensibility that tells us what we shouldn’t be doing. Walk wthout fear, just be cautious in a normal sense. I think with a whistle you will be fine. Don’t get out of the marked path, follow the arrows and make your daily walking plan, so you arrive to your destination having daylight.
Enjoy your camino as much as you can, you’ll have a wonderful experience !!!!
Buen Camino peregrina
 
Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Compare attacks on women on the Camino with attacks on women in your own home town or nearest city for perspective. In my opinion, the Camino is SO much more safe than any trail in the USA and as a survivor of both sexual and physical abuse, I have no fear walking the Camino alone.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
The forum is not the place for a general debate about weapons, or the need for them. It becomes political and an exchange of opinions. As such it is of little assistance to new pilgrims.

I have deleted a number of posts that were devoted to exchanges of personal views. I think the original poster has been provided with enough advice and I am closing the thread.
 
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