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Spanish Camino Music - Selection No: 1

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CFx2, CPx1
The Guitar.
It is the instrument that springs to my mind when Spanish music is mentioned.
"What if," I thought, "I downloaded a selection to my phone and played them, on my little bluetooth speaker, during my roadside, picnic lunch stops along the Camino.
"That would be cool in a relaxing, yet relevant and appropriate way," I thought.
But would that annoy my fellow, perhaps meditative, pilgrims?
Or would it perhaps change the mind of some who would consider more popular music to be intrusive, but on hearing my selection realise that music is a matter of taste, and it is sometimes volume, and not selection that make it intrusive.

My music was without exception well received at lunch time along the Way, and often during relaxation after laundry and showering duties were accomplished towards the end of day.
Here is Selection No 1 from my playlist.

Recuerdos de la Alhambra (Memories of the Alhambra) - Composed by Francisco Tarrega in 1896.
A famous piece which appears in the repertoire of most, if not all, classical guitarists.
There appears to be disagreement on who is actually playing on the following utube clip.
Perhaps that's a good thing.

Utilising the Tremelo effect, the three fingers immediately after the thumb pluck a single note consecutively and in such rapid succession that the result sounds almost like one long sustained note. Simultaneously, the thumb plucks an almost basslike accompaniment . Many who have heard the piece initially think it is performed by two guitarists.
Ok Gerard, Enough with the blather. Post the link.


Regards and a belated Happy New Year!
Gerard

PS
Careful - Acclamation may lead to further Selections being posted, to the annoyance of the 'Yuk Classical Music' brigade.

PPS
Leave utube running and enjoy.
 
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gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CFx2, CPx1
I should perhaps include that on first investigating this piece many years ago I was told that it spoke to the dismay of the Moor after his final glance back at the Alhambra Palace that he and his ancestors had lived in for hundreds of years. They were leaving their wonderful home forever after the defeat of their army by the now conquering forces of Christianity.
The music expresses the emotion leading up to what has become known as, "The Moor's last sigh."

A more recent explanation states the music echos the sound of the water in the many marvelous fountains that decorate the Alhambra.
I'll stick with the first.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
The Guitar.
It is the instrument that springs to my mind when Spanish music is mentioned.
"What if," I thought, "I downloaded a selection to my phone and played them, on my little bluetooth speaker, during my picnic lunches along the Camino.
"That would be cool in a relaxing, yet relevant and appropriate way," I thought.
But would that annoy my fellow, perhaps meditative, pilgrims?
Or would it perhaps change the mind of some. who would consider more popular music to be intrusive? And on hearing my selection realise that music is a matter of taste, and it is volume that often makes it intrusive.

My music was without exception well received at lunch time along the Way, and often during relaxation after laundry and showering duties were accomplished towards the end of day.
Here is selection No 1 from my playlist.

Recuerdos de la Alhambra (Memories of the Alhambra) - By Francisco Tarrega - Composed in 1896.
A famous piece which appears in the repertoire of most, if not all, classical guitarists.
There appears to be disagreement on who is actually playing on the following utube clip. Perhaps that's a good thing.

Utilising the Tremelo effect, in which the three fingers immediately after the thumb pluck a single note consecutively and in such rapid succession that the result sounds almost like one long sustained note. Simultaneously, the thumb plucks an almost basslike accompaniment . Many who have heard the piece initially think it is performed by two guitarists.
Ok Gerard, Enough with the blather. Post the link.


Regards and a belated Happy New Year!
Gerard

PS
Careful - Acclamation may lead to further Selections being posted, to the annoyance of the 'Yuk Classical Music' brigade.

PPS
Leave utube running and enjoy.
Thank you. That was lovely.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
But would that annoy my fellow, perhaps meditative, pilgrims?
I love classical music. And classical guitar.
So it would be far more pleasant than the music some blast for all of us to hear. But even so...yes. I might be annoyed. I like the content. But outdoors on the camino...just...not the best place.

music is a matter of taste, and it is volume that often makes it intrusive.
It's volume, yes, partly. And partly content. But it's also a matter of imposing any music on people who might prefer not to listen to it.

On the other hand, sharing this is an act of gracious generosity. Thank you! There's choice, and anyone who wants to can check it out, and others can just move on.
 

Turga

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
If you like Spanish/classical guitar music, you may like the CD “Greatest hits of the guitar” by John Williams (if it is still available). Apart from Recuerdos de la Alhambra and classical pieces by Bach, Händel and other classical composers, it also contains a collection of Spanish pieces, e.g. Sevilla, Asturias, Spanish Dance, El Colibri and more.
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CFx2, CPx1
If you like Spanish/classical guitar music, you may like the CD “Greatest hits of the guitar” by John Williams (if it is still available). Apart from Recuerdos de la Alhambra and classical pieces by Bach, Händel and other classical composers, it also contains a collection of Spanish pieces, e.g. Sevilla, Asturias, Spanish Dance, El Colibri and more.
As you advise Indeed it does contains a collection of Spanish pieces, but unfortunately for me all played by John Williams. My playlist was to give preference to a variety of mainly Spanish artists with a smattering of deserving others, Williams being one.
It was and is the 'Black Legend' that did and will continue to concern me in this regard.

Bluetooth earphones are a better answer. :)
I am just lucky but I have never been subjected to loud pop/whatever on the Camino, and have heard no complaints from others. Perhaps our youngsters have more manners than is generally acknowledged. I certainly think so.
As to bluetooth earphones, I am about to invest. Not for music but for audible books. Where some like to meditate or pray, I'm hoping to acquaint myself with some of the acknowledged greats of literature I have so far managed to avoid. But now it is time. I see the Meseta as the type of place in which my education can continue.

Regards
Gerard
 
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Peregrinopaul

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP(2012) Madrid(2014)Frances(2015) VdlP(2016)
VdlP(2017)Madrid/Sanabres/Frances reverse(2018)
Black legend?
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-FIN(09/2018)
PORTO-SANT(11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe(01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT(09/2019)
Madrid(7/2020)
I am just lucky but I have never been subjected to loud pop/whatever on the Camino, and have heard no complaints from others. Perhaps our youngsters have more manners than is generally acknowledged.
Then you haven't walked at same time as I, and although no longer a youngster but I have a little game of cat and mouse. When I pass sometimes with a piece of music playing (volume appropriate) from my mobile like the cyclist that you hear in the distance and suddenly passes with a ring or not of the bell and is gone again. I do the same, at a healthy waking pace and those that want to listen will attempt to catch-up. I walk my camino, my way and that includes my desire to choose an appropriate piece of music that's appropriate but I am mindful of others hence the reason I pass and continue at pace and manage the volume. Sometimes the music spurs me on when tired, others are receptive and comment positively and it can be a conversation starter. Personally I'm not keen on your piece of music but I would have enjoyed listening to it when approaching and likely have gone into 4th or 5th (proverbial walking gear) and in a few mimutes I'd be gone, out of sight and out of earshot with a smile on my face and spring in my step 🤠
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-FIN(09/2018)
PORTO-SANT(11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe(01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT(09/2019)
Madrid(7/2020)
"What if," I thought, "I downloaded a selection to my phone and played them, on my little bluetooth speaker, during my picnic lunches along the Camino.
I think thats a great idea, others I've witnessed playing their various instruments gather a crowd and it became an icebreaker for conversation and a little music playing in background over a bocadilo heightens the senses, adds to the experience and encourages healthy conversation. Anyone not wanting to listen can walk on bye and eat up a mountain, alone in perfect harmony with natures bird chorus eating their carrot sticks and humus contemplating how golden their silence is. Or you could simply choose both options 🤠
 
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VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I think thats a great idea
I don't.
I have a little game of cat and mouse.
This is one reason I prefer more solitary caminos. I'm not in the least antisocial, but I find this kind of thing to be as pleasant as having a mosquito hovering around my ears.

Sorry, but why do you need to subject the rest of us to your music?
Enjoy whatever you enjoy privately and that's totally fine. But please keep it to yourself.

a little music playing in background over a bocadilo heightens the senses, adds to the experience and encourages healthy conversation.
For some people maybe, but some of us find the taste of the food to be sense content enough, and others would rather converse without competing with background noise. The post may be your experience but it's not everybody's...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011), Camino Frances (2015), Camino Ingles (2017), Camino Muxia (2017), LePuy(2019)
I should perhaps include that on first investigating this piece many years ago I was told that it spoke to the dismay of the Moor after his final glance back at the Alhambra Palace that he and his ancestors had lived in for hundreds of years. They were leaving their wonderful home forever after the defeat of their army by the now conquering forces of Christianity.
The music expresses the emotion leading to "The Moor's last sigh."

A more recent explanation states the music echos the sound of the water in the many marvelous fountains that decorate the Alhambra.
I'll stick with the first.
Thank you. I like your first explanation as well. I spent some time in Denia, Spain over the holidays, and I learned that after the Reconquista, the Moors all over Spain were eventually forced into deportation. Denia was one of the main ports from which they left.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
I tend to have a knee-jerk reaction of annoyance if music is inflicted upon me in certain circumstances - especially tinny pop music played just loud enough to be heard but not enjoyed. However (and this is a BIG however), sometimes unexpected music is a brilliant enhancement of a situation.

So, I consider this to be one of the lessons of walking the camino - for me to not react so suddenly and negatively, to respect the pleasure that the music gives to others, and maybe even to share that pleasure. (This is what I tell myself, anyway. In practice, the best I usually achieve is tolerance!) ;)

I admit that my judgement of music-playing situations depends on a lot of pre-conceptions, stereotypes and personal preferences. So it is probably good to disturb me on occasion! 🤣 :cool:

P.S. @gerardcarey - Keep those music recommendations coming. Even those who don't like public music still enjoy it on earphones.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
2013-14 CF
2015-16 CP Porto
2017 CP Lisbon, Ingles
2018 San Salvador
2019 CM, Primitivo, Ingles
Black legend?
I found this with a quick google search:
Spanish Music as Perceived in Western Music Historiography: A Case of the Black Legend?
Judith Etzion
International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music
Vol. 29, No. 2 (Dec., 1998), pp. 93-120

Black Legend'. (This term encompasses all the falsifications and misinformation that accumulated against Spain for centuries, as well as the consequent omission of what counted in Spain's favor and the exaggeration of what counted against it.) The extent to which the Black Legend infiltrated into Western music historiography is examined through major sources from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries.
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-FIN(09/2018)
PORTO-SANT(11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe(01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT(09/2019)
Madrid(7/2020)

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CFx2, CPx1
Thank you. I like your first explanation as well. I spent some time in Denia, Spain over the holidays, and I learned that after the Reconquista, the Moors all over Spain were eventually forced into deportation. Denia was one of the main ports from which they left.
How interesting is the fact of the expulsion of the Moriscos, the Christian descendants of Spanish Muslims who had been forceably converted to Christianity.
Wikipedia

Regards
Gerard
 

lbrown498

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
October 2012 done 2015 planning
In the bar/coffee shop in Espinal I heard a recording whose source I would really like to know. It was sort of a rhumba played on guitars and accordion. It sounded like a cousin of flamenco, but not exactly the same. I should have asked the woman tending the bar what it was, but I hadn't been in the country long enough for my Spanish, stale from long neglect, to be sufficiently resuscitated for an easy conversation. I don't know if it was Basque or just some less famous form of Spanish folk music, but it was wonderful.

When we arrived in Pamplona, we found the Quiosco de Musica in the center of the Plaza del Costillo surrounded by book seller's kiosks. One of these book sellers was playing a recording of the same music, or the same genre. If I could find out what it is and where to find a recording, I think I'd like to take that with me on my next stroll through the Spanish countryside.
 

Holly West

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
The Guitar.
It is the instrument that springs to my mind when Spanish music is mentioned.
"What if," I thought, "I downloaded a selection to my phone and played them, on my little bluetooth speaker, during my picnic lunches along the Camino.
"That would be cool in a relaxing, yet relevant and appropriate way," I thought.
But would that annoy my fellow, perhaps meditative, pilgrims?
Or would it perhaps change the mind of some. who would consider more popular music to be intrusive? And on hearing my selection realise that music is a matter of taste, and it is volume that often makes it intrusive.

My music was without exception well received at lunch time along the Way, and often during relaxation after laundry and showering duties were accomplished towards the end of day.
Here is selection No 1 from my playlist.

Recuerdos de la Alhambra (Memories of the Alhambra) - Composed by Francisco Tarrega in 1896.
A famous piece which appears in the repertoire of most, if not all, classical guitarists.
There appears to be disagreement on who is actually playing on the following utube clip.
Perhaps that's a good thing.

Utilising the Tremelo effect, in which the three fingers immediately after the thumb pluck a single note consecutively and in such rapid succession that the result sounds almost like one long sustained note. Simultaneously, the thumb plucks an almost basslike accompaniment . Many who have heard the piece initially think it is performed by two guitarists.
Ok Gerard, Enough with the blather. Post the link.


Regards and a belated Happy New Year!
Gerard

PS
Careful - Acclamation may lead to further Selections being posted, to the annoyance of the 'Yuk Classical Music' brigade.

PPS
Leave utube running and enjoy.
I also am not a fan of people who play music on the Camino because some of it is SUPER ANNOYING but I did enjoy this and thanks for sharing.
 

darealdeal77

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014 Camino Frances
I would check on “La Montaña” by the Gypsy Kings, not only is guitar, is Spanish, and talks about the Journey Home back to the mountains! For me it was very inspirational when I walked my Camino! Buen Camino!
 

woofer

Member
The Guitar.
It is the instrument that springs to my mind when Spanish music is mentioned.
"What if," I thought, "I downloaded a selection to my phone and played them, on my little bluetooth speaker, during my roadside, picnic lunch stops along the Camino.
"That would be cool in a relaxing, yet relevant and appropriate way," I thought.
But would that annoy my fellow, perhaps meditative, pilgrims?
Or would it perhaps change the mind of some who would consider more popular music to be intrusive, but on hearing my selection realise that music is a matter of taste, and it is sometimes volume, and not selection that make it intrusive.

My music was without exception well received at lunch time along the Way, and often during relaxation after laundry and showering duties were accomplished towards the end of day.
Here is Selection No 1 from my playlist.

Recuerdos de la Alhambra (Memories of the Alhambra) - Composed by Francisco Tarrega in 1896.
A famous piece which appears in the repertoire of most, if not all, classical guitarists.
There appears to be disagreement on who is actually playing on the following utube clip.
Perhaps that's a good thing.

Utilising the Tremelo effect, the three fingers immediately after the thumb pluck a single note consecutively and in such rapid succession that the result sounds almost like one long sustained note. Simultaneously, the thumb plucks an almost basslike accompaniment . Many who have heard the piece initially think it is performed by two guitarists.
Ok Gerard, Enough with the blather. Post the link.


Regards and a belated Happy New Year!
Gerard

PS
Careful - Acclamation may lead to further Selections being posted, to the annoyance of the 'Yuk Classical Music' brigade.

PPS
Leave utube running and enjoy.
It may interest you that the guitar is not the "national instrument" of Northern Spain. Fine if you're doing the de la Plata or Mozarabe but if you're on the del Norte and feel the need to have regionally appropriate music you need to start looking for gaita - bagpipe music. Loads of it there - by way of intro The Chieftains have recorded "Santiago" representing a voyage thru the 4 northern provinces with music from each. There are several early or medieval music ensembles on classical labels with church music and hymns written for the Camino. I can recommend several of those if you or any other reader is interested. Listening should be kept to headphones though. I sparingly do this even though I adore music, because I love the sounds of nature while walking !
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles 2016 Camino Portuguese 2017 Considering Invierno late (2020) In lieu of VdlP (2020)
Music can really lift a person when they are feeling down or despondent. So if you are on the Camino and you need perking up after a few kilometers, or the weather turns atrocious then play some music if you find it helpful. However do it responsibly using earphones! However you also need to be extra aware of your surroundings since you do not run down on a stretch of Camino Road, or a Bicigrino who is ringing his warning bell and you step directly into his path!.

Music is subjective but my list would include:

Gasper Sanz - Laberintos Ingeniosos - Xavier Diaz-Latorre
Julian Bream - Spanish Guitar Music - The Wesminter Recording
Pepe Romero - Concierto De Aranjuez - Neville Marriner)

Berroguetto - Navicularia and Viaxe Por Urticaria (Spanish/Galician Folk Music - used on the Film the Way)
Carlos Nunez - Aires De Pontevedra, etc.
Fado: Um Tesouro Português (from Portugal, there is more to Iberia than just Flamenco!)

If you are travelling on one of the Southern Caminos I would include Sefardi Music:. After all before 1492 Spain was a rich multicultural society Blending Muslim/Jewish and Christianity. Christians from the Moorish South were allowed to go on Pilgimage. It was just the recurrent wars that got in the way!
Fortuna: Ladino Songs & Sephardic Music
Yamma Ensemble: Sephardic ladino from 15th century


 

ObeeOne

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning stage for 2020
PS
Careful - Acclamation may lead to further Selections being posted, to the annoyance of the 'Yuk Classical Music' brigade.

PPS
Leave utube running and enjoy.
[/QUOTE]
I would not mind if you posted more selections as I should like to have a playlist of lovely Spanish guitar music for my Camino.
 

woofer

Member
Music can really lift a person when they are feeling down or despondent. So if you are on the Camino and you need perking up after a few kilometers, or the weather turns atrocious then play some music if you find it helpful. However do it responsibly using earphones! However you also need to be extra aware of your surroundings since you do not run down on a stretch of Camino Road, or a Bicigrino who is ringing his warning bell and you step directly into his path!.

Music is subjective but my list would include:

Gasper Sanz - Laberintos Ingeniosos - Xavier Diaz-Latorre
Julian Bream - Spanish Guitar Music - The Wesminter Recording
Pepe Romero - Concierto De Aranjuez - Neville Marriner)

Berroguetto - Navicularia and Viaxe Por Urticaria (Spanish/Galician Folk Music - used on the Film the Way)
Carlos Nunez - Aires De Pontevedra, etc.
Fado: Um Tesouro Português (from Portugal, there is more to Iberia than just Flamenco!)

If you are travelling on one of the Southern Caminos I would include Sefardi Music:. After all before 1492 Spain was a rich multicultural society Blending Muslim/Jewish and Christianity. Christians from the Moorish South were allowed to go on Pilgimage. It was just the recurrent wars that got in the way!
Fortuna: Ladino Songs & Sephardic Music
Yamma Ensemble: Sephardic ladino from 15th century


My thoughts precisely. Much more appropriate selection in your final paragraph. The Spanish guitar and flamenco has much great music but people are mistaken if they think it's "Camino music". Keep it for the Costas !
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
My thoughts precisely. Much more appropriate selection in your final paragraph. The Spanish guitar and flamenco has much great music but people are mistaken if they think it's "Camino music". Keep it for the Costas !
Yes, when I watch a video about a Camino in Galicia, Asturias or the Basque country with Spanish guitar music it sounds strange to me.
 

woofer

Member
If you like Spanish/classical guitar music, you may like the CD “Greatest hits of the guitar” by John Williams (if it is still available). Apart from Recuerdos de la Alhambra and classical pieces by Bach, Händel and other classical composers, it also contains a collection of Spanish pieces, e.g. Sevilla, Asturias, Spanish Dance, El Colibri and more.
Apart from Asturias almost none of these pieces has anything to do with the vast majority of Caminos! You need to look to either the more Celtic nature of Asturian and Galician music with their preponderance for bagpipes and bouzouki, or the medieval hymns and church music actually composed for the Camino in the Medieval period. Guitars are for the sunny south and the Costas - not the Camino !
 

Turga

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
Guitars are for the sunny south and the Costas - not the Camino !
That could be….. Nevertheless, the original post was about Spanish guitar music :)
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CFx2, CPx1
Guitar music is not appropriate for Galicia, Asturias or the Basque country?
I can't believe I'm reading such piffle.
So Wagner should be kept for the exclusive enjoyment of Germans?
I could of course go on ad nauseum.
But I just cant be bothered.
Gerard
 
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Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
A recommendation with a backstory. On my most recent Camino Frances in 2016 I had the good fortune to hear James Kline playing his unique instrument at a fundraiser in Carrion de Los Condes. The next night serendipity led me to Moratinos where I was invited to share in the celebrations for the 10th anniversary of Rebekah and Paddy arriving in the village. And who should be the star attraction and fellow guest? :) This particular tune was inspired by a region of Spain, written by a Belgian and is played by an American who lives in France. Something of the Camino in that :cool:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles 2016 Camino Portuguese 2017 Considering Invierno late (2020) In lieu of VdlP (2020)
Guitar music is not appropriate for Galicia, Asturias or Basque country?
I can't believe I'm reading such piffle.
So Wagner should be kept for the exclusive enjoyment of Germans?
I could of course go on ad nauseum.
But I just cant be bothered.
Gerard
On my first Camino, my classical guitar playing daughter requested any Gallician Guitar sheet music I could find. In SdC I found a couple of shops selling sheet music but only one had Galician sheet music for Guitar and then only four pieces.

Horses for courses, whatever floats your boat. In other words individual choice! I do not like much of the current popular music. 50 years ago my parents did not like my choice of progressive and heavy rock. My kids hate my eclectic taste for Classical/Folk/Middle Eastern and African Music (plus aforesaid Prog/Heavy Rock). the trick is not to annoy the neighbors:-}

PS My music system is based on Nine channel speakers at 180 Watts per channel plus two 150 Watt base speaker channels. I do live in a detached house which I rebuilt with acoustically damped walls and ceilings. Definitely gone off topic here!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Guitars are for the sunny south and the Costas - not the Camino!
Leaving aside the Via de la Plata and the Mozarabe and the other Caminos in the sunny south, I'm sure the folks organizing the CaminoArtes guitar classes and concerts along the Camino Frances in Palencia would benefit from your wisdom that their art has no place there.
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CFx2, CPx1
A recommendation with a backstory. On my most recent Camino Frances in 2016 I had the good fortune to hear James Kline playing his unique instrument at a fundraiser in Carrion de Los Condes. The next night serendipity led me to Moratinos where I was invited to share in the celebrations for the 10th anniversary of Rebekah and Paddy arriving in the village. And who should be the star attraction and fellow guest? :) This particular tune was inspired by a region of Spain, written by a Belgian and is played by an American who lives in France. Something of the Camino in that :cool:
IN MORATINOS?
PLAY IT AGAIN SAM!
 
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Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Guitar music is not appropriate for Galicia, Asturias or the Basque country?
I can't believe I'm reading such piffle.
So Wagner should be kept for the exclusive enjoyment of Germans?
I could of course go on ad nauseum.
But I just cant be bothered.
Gerard
I said that it sounds strange to me.
I would feel the same thing if a video of the Canary Islands or Andalucia had bagpipe music.
 

JudiJay

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (coastal) 2016
My Camino music moment was not from another pilgrim (which would drive me nuts - why do people feel they need to share their music?) But then I'm one of those introverts!). No, it was a spiritual experience not far out of Padrón. As we walked we could hear magnificent choral music ahead. Not too loud, but loud enough to identify the source: a curious bar / cafe / museum run by, as it turned out, a very knowledgeable chap about Spanish history in general and Camino history in particular. As we enjoyed his excellent coffee and a slice of his homemade Tarta de Santiago, the Prayer of St Francis came on, and I could not stop the tears. An unforgettable Camino moment. Later we asked fellow pilgrims if they heard anything, but no. His beautiful sello was a bonus and he refuses to give them unless people stop and talk. No stamp collectors for him.
 

woofer

Member
Leaving aside the Via de la Plata and the Mozarabe and the other Caminos in the sunny south, I'm sure the folks organizing the CaminoArtes guitar classes and concerts along the Camino Frances in Palencia would benefit from your wisdom that their art has no place there.
You are I'm sure aware that a very large number of commercial enterprises along the Caminos use that name as part of their business plan, so calling something "Camino" this, that or the other hardly qualifies as proving anything. I had hoped not to see sarcasm such as yours on this site. I have no problem you disagreeing with me , but my opinion remains there is a body of music specifically written for the Camino and regional culture is more appropriate than imported stuff. 2 weeks ago I attended a Paco Peña concert in Dublin. I love Spanish guitar - just not on Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles 2016 Camino Portuguese 2017 Considering Invierno late (2020) In lieu of VdlP (2020)
My thoughts precisely. Much more appropriate selection in your final paragraph. The Spanish guitar and flamenco has much great music but people are mistaken if they think it's "Camino music". Keep it for the Costas !
Very sad today I learned one of my favorite singers Sandra Sangiao has retired from the Barcelona Gypsy Klezmer/Balkan Orchestra. They played an eclectic mix of East European Klezmer, Jazz etc. I used to find their albums and music a great tonic while working, walking, cycling and just plain old chilling out. Klezmer is not authentic Spanish music or even music from the Sephardi tradition. But it was still great music when I heard it in a bar in Barcelona! I also saw them by accident at a win festival in Istria, Croatia last year.
 

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