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Spanish language question

hunsta

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015
Hey all. I have a small question I need someone who speaks fluent Spanish to help me with.
Before my last Camino. I endeavoured to learn a little Spanish to help me along the way. Which it did. And I picked up a little whilst there.
Now to my question. Whilst there, on quite a few occasions in conversation we heard the term ( and excuse spelling) "Baly Baly Baly". We took this to be perhaps like saying " Yeah Yeah Yeah" or " OK OK OK".
Would that be correct? Or does it mean something totally different?
Cheers
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Hey all. I have a small question I need someone who speaks fluent Spanish to help me with.
Before my last Camino. I endeavoured to learn a little Spanish to help me along the way. Which it did. And I picked up a little whilst there.
Now to my question. Whilst there, on quite a few occasions in conversation we heard the term ( and excuse spelling) "Baly Baly Baly". We took this to be perhaps like saying " Yeah Yeah Yeah" or " OK OK OK".
Would that be correct? Or does it mean something totally different?
Cheers
It's vale, vale, vale, but it is pronounced as you wrote it, and indeed it means what you think.
 

hunsta

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015
Correct. And spelling in Spanish is ‘vale’
V pronounced closer to our ‘b’ .. the ‘e’ at the end sounds like e in egg. Not our ‘y’

I’ve only got a smattering of Spanish but okay 😂. with this term

It's vale, vale, vale, but it is pronounced as you wrote it, and indeed it means what you think.
Thank you very much. I thought it was that. Much appreciated. 👍👍
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Vale, Vale, Vale.
It's a great expression isn't it?

The other one that caught me out..........till I thought about it, was......

S.O.S.
At least that's what I heard.

I was thinking "what does this acronym stand for"?

And then the penny dropped!

Eso Es. That's it!! :rolleyes:
 
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Anamya

Keeping it simple
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
Spanish speaker, but Portuguese native here. So please, Spaniards, correct me if I'm saying the wrong thing!!

"Vale, vale, vale", in a very pedantic translation, would be something like "it´s valid, it´s valid, it´s valid", or that whatever you said "has value". The verb "valer" is usually translated as "to be worth".
As you correctly noticed, it´s used as "ok, ok, ok" when everything is going to be fine :)
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Spanish speaker, but Portuguese native here. So please, Spaniards, correct me if I'm saying the wrong thing!!

"Vale, vale, vale", in a very pedantic translation, would be something like "it´s valid, it´s valid, it´s valid", or that whatever you said "has value". The verb "valer" is usually translated as "to be worth".
As you correctly noticed, it´s used as "ok, ok, ok" when everything is going to be fine :)
That's correct. But we also can say "vale, vale, vale" to finish a discussion no matter you are thinking the other side is wrong. In this case we often add "lo que tu digas".
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
That's correct. But we also can say "vale, vale, vale" to finish a discussion no matter you are thinking the other side is wrong. In this case we often add "lo que tu digas".

That's the way I hear it used.

You often here Australians Say "Yeh, Yeh, Yeh" Used in the same context.
Either as agreement, as in Yes, That's it.
Or in disagreement! As in, let's move on!
 

Pilgrim9

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP-SdC (2017)
SdC-Muxia-Fisterra-SdC (2017)
Lisboa-SdC (2018)
Ferrol-SdC (2018)
I love the emphasis that natural-born speakers of Castilian put on stimulating their conversational partners: plodding sentences are never emitted, some vim or spice is almost always added to the message.

Here is a spice puzzle:

If
< ¡Claro que si! > equates to "Clearly it is so!", or "Indeed!" or "Of course!",
then
< ¡Claro que no! > should, obviously, mean "Obviously not!" or similar.

But in conversations between those whose first language is Castilian, the two phrases seem to be used interchangeably to mean "of course!".

Is that correct?

Claro que ...
 

Camino Chrissy

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Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
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Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
my very favourite Spanish words!
My favorite Spanish words are "cafe con leche"!🙂
The next level mind-blower for you is:

🧦

S-O-C-K-S




(Eso sí que es)
Love this! Possibly I could increase my Spanish skills if all the words had the same pronunciation in English...and pictures included.😁🤣
 
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Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
That's the way I hear it used.

You often here Australians Say "Yeh, Yeh, Yeh" Used in the same context.
Either as agreement, as in Yes, That's it.
Or in disagreement! As in, let's move o

I love the emphasis that natural-born speakers of Castilian put on stimulating their conversational partners: plodding sentences are never emitted, some vim or spice is almost always added to the message.

Here is a spice puzzle:

If
< ¡Claro que si! > equates to "Clearly it is so!", or "Indeed!" or "Of course!",
then
< ¡Claro que no! > should, obviously, mean "Obviously not!" or similar.

But in conversations between those whose first language is Castilian, the two phrases seem to be used interchangeably to mean "of course!".

Is that correct?

Claro que ...
Yes. It is correct. Also "por supuesto" is valid for "of course".
 

linkster

¡Nunca dejes de creer!
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
I find spanishdict.com useful as a reference. The pronounciation tab shows the phonetic spelling and someone actually saying the word.

 

Peligro

I walk between cafe breaks
Year of past OR future Camino
St. Jean to SdC the slow way (Aug'15, Aug'17, Jan'18, Aug'18, Jan'19, Jul'19) Primitivo (May'20)
To anybody that might be taking lessons from this thread, just want to point out that it’s not always vale, vale, vale - you don’t have to say it three times. In fact, if you said it three times every time you’d be “that guy” that thinks you have to say it three times. 😂
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
To anybody that might be taking lessons from this thread, just want to point out that it’s not always vale, vale, vale - you don’t have to say it three times. In fact, if you said it three times every time you’d be “that guy” that thinks you have to say it three times. 😂
It seems that simply saying vale once is a bit more serious - it gives the word more weight and importance, like you have actually listened to what someone said and are agreeing with them. Twice, a little less so, and three times is just "okay, okay, okay - let's get on with it!"
I'm not sure if my analysis is correct though, and of course tone and context matter a lot.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I've also had some people say "vale" more or less continuously and randomly during a conversation as English speakers would say "yes" acknowledging an ongoing conversation context. It is a great word with multiple uses. The very discussion of this is another reason why walking a Camino broadens ones understanding and experiences.
 

SioCamino

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF 2015, CPo 2016, VDLP[Sev-Các] 2017, VDLP[Các-Sal] 2018
Repetition is also used a lot in spoken Spanish for emphasis, communication etc... Hence the "vale, vale, vale"

It reminds me of a chat with a hospitalero one day, can't remember where on the VDLP, he was given us some directions to exit the town and then the end of the directions were "y entonces , flecha, flecha, flecha, flecha, flecha....." 😃
 
Year of past OR future Camino
June 2018
Hey all. I have a small question I need someone who speaks fluent Spanish to help me with.
Before my last Camino. I endeavoured to learn a little Spanish to help me along the way. Which it did. And I picked up a little whilst there.
Now to my question. Whilst there, on quite a few occasions in conversation we heard the term ( and excuse spelling) "Baly Baly Baly". We took this to be perhaps like saying " Yeah Yeah Yeah" or " OK OK OK".
Would that be correct? Or does it mean something totally different?
Cheers
Vale, vale, vale, 'That's right!' or same Latin root, 'Valid! x3. V=B. Viente = 20 you hear bent ay.
Spanish is easy. 4 hours a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks, living with a family, you can be fluent.
 

SioCamino

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF 2015, CPo 2016, VDLP[Sev-Các] 2017, VDLP[Các-Sal] 2018
I think my 2 favourite phrases are "¡Ojalá!" (handy for so many situations, hopefully/if the fates allow/ god willing) and one which i learnt at the Pilgrim's Office : "¿ya está?" To which the answer is usually "sí, ya está" ( is that it!? Is that everything? Do you need anything else? Etc etc)
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
It seems that simply saying vale once is a bit more serious - it gives the word more weight and importance, like you have actually listened to what someone said and are agreeing with them. Twice, a little less so, and three times is just "okay, okay, okay - let's get on with it!"
I'm not sure if my analysis is correct though, and of course tone and context matter a lot.
I agree
 
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Peligro

I walk between cafe breaks
Year of past OR future Camino
St. Jean to SdC the slow way (Aug'15, Aug'17, Jan'18, Aug'18, Jan'19, Jul'19) Primitivo (May'20)
It seems that simply saying vale once is a bit more serious - it gives the word more weight and importance, like you have actually listened to what someone said and are agreeing with them. Twice, a little less so, and three times is just "okay, okay, okay - let's get on with it!"
I'm not sure if my analysis is correct though, and of course tone and context matter a lot.
I would agree - my wife says it multiple times when she's done letting me talk 🤣
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Hey all. I have a small question I need someone who speaks fluent Spanish to help me with.
Before my last Camino. I endeavoured to learn a little Spanish to help me along the way. Which it did. And I picked up a little whilst there.
Now to my question. Whilst there, on quite a few occasions in conversation we heard the term ( and excuse spelling) "Baly Baly Baly". We took this to be perhaps like saying " Yeah Yeah Yeah" or " OK OK OK".
Would that be correct? Or does it mean something totally different?
Cheers
Hi
Vale. vale ,vale. The Spanish pronounce V as B which is why it sounds like Bale. It is just an affirmative expression meaning Yeah, sure Ok. You may also hear claro, claro claro.
Buen Camino
Vince
 

CMMCKEON

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino del Norte, Camino Portuguese
Hi, In preparation for my 5th Camino, I took Spanish lessons via Zoom for one hour per week with Magdalena. In April 2021 I was a complete beginner, now I can hold a decent conversation in Spanish and look forward to September when, hopefully, I begin the Camino del Norte.

[Edited to correct date]
 

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MariaSP

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
I love the emphasis that natural-born speakers of Castilian put on stimulating their conversational partners: plodding sentences are never emitted, some vim or spice is almost always added to the message.

Here is a spice puzzle:

If
< ¡Claro que si! > equates to "Clearly it is so!", or "Indeed!" or "Of course!",
then
< ¡Claro que no! > should, obviously, mean "Obviously not!" or similar.

But in conversations between those whose first language is Castilian, the two phrases seem to be used interchangeably to mean "of course!".

Is that correct?

Claro que ...
Claro que sí can be used ironically to mean 'whatever'. So, if you say something and the other person replies 'claro que sí' (ironically) they are not agreeing with you.

Regarding both 'claro que sí' and 'claro que no' being used interchangeably to mean 'of course': in both cases you are agreeing with what the other person said; 'claro que sí' agrees with a positive statement and 'claro que no' agrees with a negative statement. So they can both be translated as 'of course', but not interchangeably.

They can be also used to disagree. In this case, you use 'claro que sí' to disagree with a negative statement and 'claro que no' to disagree with a positive statement.

Imagine I say 'Galicia is the best place in the world'. If you agree with this positive statement, you can reply 'claro que sí'. If you strongly disagree, you can say 'claro que no'.

If I say 'Galicia is NOT the best place in the world', you can agree by saying 'claro que no' or you can disagree by saying 'claro que sí'.
 
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The Kolbist

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
past: Frances, inland Portuguese, Fatima
future: Del Norte, coastal Porugues, Englis
That's the way I hear it used.

You often here Australians Say "Yeh, Yeh, Yeh" Used in the same context.
Either as agreement, as in Yes, That's it.
Or in disagreement! As in, let's move on!
T
That's correct. But we also can say "vale, vale, vale" to finish a discussion no matter you are thinking the other side is wrong. In this case we often add "lo que tu digas".
Or in America and only in America - we can add the two positives that makes negative - depending on the tones - "Yeah Right" :)
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2014
Hey all. I have a small question I need someone who speaks fluent Spanish to help me with.
Before my last Camino. I endeavoured to learn a little Spanish to help me along the way. Which it did. And I picked up a little whilst there.
Now to my question. Whilst there, on quite a few occasions in conversation we heard the term ( and excuse spelling) "Baly Baly Baly". We took this to be perhaps like saying " Yeah Yeah Yeah" or " OK OK OK".
Would that be correct? Or does it mean something totally different?
Cheers
It could mean vale -the "v" is pronounced like a "b". Vale - means okay in Spanish -so probably a good guess on your part! I am not fluent but I have a degree in Spanish and French. I think to be anywhere near fluent you need to be a natve speaker or live in Spain
 

EL LECHERO

Friends no Strangers
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Hey all. I have a small question I need someone who speaks fluent Spanish to help me with.
Before my last Camino. I endeavoured to learn a little Spanish to help me along the way. Which it did. And I picked up a little whilst there.
Now to my question. Whilst there, on quite a few occasions in conversation we heard the term ( and excuse spelling) "Baly Baly Baly". We took this to be perhaps like saying " Yeah Yeah Yeah" or " OK OK OK".
Would that be correct? Or does it mean something totally different?
Cheers
I understand it to mean " Fine". For example. " I'd like to have a Coke"
"Vale" says the Waiter
Interesting that word does not exit in Mexican Spanish...
 
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EL LECHERO

Friends no Strangers
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Hey all. I have a small question I need someone who speaks fluent Spanish to help me with.
Before my last Camino. I endeavoured to learn a little Spanish to help me along the way. Which it did. And I picked up a little whilst there.
Now to my question. Whilst there, on quite a few occasions in conversation we heard the term ( and excuse spelling) "Baly Baly Baly". We took this to be perhaps like saying " Yeah Yeah Yeah" or " OK OK OK".
Would that be correct? Or does it mean something totally different?
Cheers
Aprovecha! I used that a lot in Spain.
 

RRat

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Planning 2017
Hey all. I have a small question I need someone who speaks fluent Spanish to help me with.
Before my last Camino. I endeavoured to learn a little Spanish to help me along the way. Which it did. And I picked up a little whilst there.
Now to my question. Whilst there, on quite a few occasions in conversation we heard the term ( and excuse spelling) "Baly Baly Baly". We took this to be perhaps like saying " Yeah Yeah Yeah" or " OK OK OK".
Would that be correct? Or does it mean something totally different?
Cheers
Vale is compable to us baby boomers using "cool". Something can be "cool" or "cool,cool,cool" if we want to emphasize how "cool" it is.
 
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Pilgrim9

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP-SdC (2017)
SdC-Muxia-Fisterra-SdC (2017)
Lisboa-SdC (2018)
Ferrol-SdC (2018)
Claro que sí can be used ironically to mean 'whatever'. So, if you say something and the other person replies 'claro que sí' (ironically) they are not agreeing with you.

Regarding both 'claro que sí' and 'claro que no' being used interchangeably to mean 'of course': in both cases you are agreeing with what the other person said; 'claro que sí' agrees with a positive statement and 'claro que no' agrees with a negative statement. So they can both be translated as 'of course', but not interchangeably.

They can be also used to disagree. In this case, you use 'claro que sí' to disagree with a negative statement and 'claro que no' to disagree with a positive statement.

Imagine I say 'Galicia is the best place in the world'. If you agree with this positive statement, you can reply 'claro que sí'. If you strongly disagree, you can say 'claro que no'.

If I say 'Galicia is NOT the best place in the world', you can agree by saying 'claro que no' or you can disagree by saying 'claro que sí'.
Thank you for this clarification.
 

Bogong

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
First, March 2014
My favorite Spanish words are "cafe con leche"!🙂

Love this! Possibly I could increase my Spanish skills if all the words had the same pronunciation in Englishe pronunciat...and pictures included.😁🤣e sam
If only english words had the same pronunciation in english! Even within an english speaking country they vary a lot. Visiting Auckland's wonderful Maritime Museum the guide told us of the commander's " "beard" floating ashore after the wreck of HMS Orpheus. Turned out it was "bed". Relating this to two lovely New Zealand ladies from another part of the country later they were highly amused. Thn a news flash came on tne radio that thevpolice had made a murder arrest. " They've caught the kuller" said one. I once watctched the movie "coal Miner's daughter" For the first three quarters of an hour I couldn't understand a single word! But these are mild examples compared to what goes on in Australia. If you live in a country you just take it all in your stride but heaven help a visitor!
De colores

Bogong
 
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henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
Not only in America - I think it’s fair to say English speakers generally use different tones for meaning
But in Spanish - they use the subjunctive!

I’d challenge anyone (as stated above) to be truly ‘fluent’ in Spanish including the correct use of the subjunctive, 100% success in choosing correctly por vs para and ser vs estar, correct use of pronouns and the full range of tenses and have a wide working vocabulary in just one month! It’s beyond my imagination.

I’ll admit I’m not the sharpest tool in the box with language learning but I’ve had 4 years of fortnightly classes and countless visits to Spain and I’m just a solid B1, B2 on a good day, on the international scale. C2+ is fluent(ish)
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
But in Spanish - they use the subjunctive!

I’d challenge anyone (as stated above) to be truly ‘fluent’ in Spanish including the correct use of the subjunctive, 100% success in choosing correctly por vs para and ser vs estar, correct use of pronouns and the full range of tenses and have a wide working vocabulary in just one month! It’s beyond my imagination.

I’ll admit I’m not the sharpest tool in the box with language learning but I’ve had 4 years of fortnightly classes and countless visits to Spain and I’m just a solid B1, B2 on a good day, on the international scale. C2+ is fluent(ish)
I wholeheartedly agree! Being able to have very simple conversations vs being truly conversational or fluent is very, very different.
 

Peligro

I walk between cafe breaks
Year of past OR future Camino
St. Jean to SdC the slow way (Aug'15, Aug'17, Jan'18, Aug'18, Jan'19, Jul'19) Primitivo (May'20)
I wholeheartedly agree! Being able to have very simple conversations vs being truly conversational or fluent is very, very different.
I was a Spanish major in college, I’ve lived in Valencia and visited every non-pandemic year for the last 30 years, I’ve been married to a Spaniard for 24 years and I still make mistakes and learn new words all the time. My wife has lived in the US for 26 years and still makes mistakes in English, especially if she’s tired. Our daughter is bilingual but still struggles from time to time in Spanish since she’s never spent more than two weeks at a time with her grandparents in Valencia. The fun is not in speaking perfectly, it’s in learning and communicating. That’s one of the best things about the Camino - so many languages are spoken and there is SO MUCH to learn from the other pilgrims.
 

calmeg

Member
On our various caminos we have heard Vale a lot of times. To us, vale in Spain seems to be used as a noun, verb, adjective or adverb, depending on the mood of the speaker. And as to fluency- I was once told that if you can tell and understand jokes in Spanish- you are fluent.
 

Doughnut NZ

From Aotearoa New Zealand
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
If only english words had the same pronunciation in english! Even within an english speaking country they vary a lot. Visiting Auckland's wonderful Maritime Museum the guide told us of the commander's " "beard" floating ashore after the wreck of HMS Orpheus. Turned out it was "bed". Relating this to two lovely New Zealand ladies from another part of the country later they were highly amused. Thn a news flash came on tne radio that thevpolice had made a murder arrest. " They've caught the kuller" said one. I once watctched the movie "coal Miner's daughter" For the first three quarters of an hour I couldn't understand a single word! But these are mild examples compared to what goes on in Australia. If you live in a country you just take it all in your stride but heaven help a visitor!
De colores

Bogong
That's odd, the only people that I have heard speaking in a funny accent have all been fureners.

We did used to have fun with women visiting from the USA though. If we went out to lunch with them we would play a game where we tried to get them to say "I will have six please" to the waiter 😉
 
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Beeks

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
(2019) only 2 weeks available! St. Jean PDP - Pamplona, then Sarria - SDC with the family,
That's odd, the only people that I have heard speaking in a funny accent have all been fureners.

We did used to have fun with women visiting from the USA though. If we went out to lunch with them we would play a game where we tried to get them to say "I will have six please" to the waiter 😉
Cheeky!
 

Yoyo

✿ Se hace el camino al andar. ✿
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Doesn't exist "vale" in Mexican Spanish??
What word do they use for OK?

"vale" on its own is rarely used.
Mexicans are more likely to say "sale". For more emphasis, they may even say "¡sale y vale!". This is mainly for agreeing to a plan or suggestion.

Depending on context, they may also say "correcto", "está bien" or "de acuerdo" or a number of other expressions. "OK" is also commonly used.
 

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I find spanishdict.com useful as a reference. The pronounciation tab shows the phonetic spelling and someone actually saying the word.

Brilliant - I use spanishdict.com regularly and did not know about that function. I do now!
Thanks @linkster
 
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Esperanza

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
I’ve spent a lot more time in Mexico than Spain, but my opinion is “vale” is the equivalent of “bueno,” which Mexicans say constantly. Other words and phrases exist for agreement, but that is true in both Spain and Mexico. I would translate them both as “okay.”
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
To see a classic example of this watch the Two Ronnies sketch "Four candles" first aired in 1976 and still funny
What part of England are their accents from? I met an English guy on the Camino in 2016 who was about as unintelligible. A young German girl that I was walking with told me that she thought that her English was very good (it was excellent), but she couldn't understand him at all. I assured her that it wasn't her language skills, as I couldn't understand him either!
 
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Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
What part of England are their accents from? I met an English guy on the Camino in 2016 who was about as unintelligible. A young German girl that I was walking with told me that she thought that her English was very good (it was excellent), but she couldn't understand him at all. I assured her that it wasn't her language skills, as I couldn't understand him either!
I was unable to laugh at Rick's video as I was unable to understand a word! I couldn't get past three minutes and even that was pure torture.😂
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Aw. I said Thank you Chrissy, good of you to say so. Read it through, it almost makes sense
Thank you for translating, David. It was the last part I strughled with...all good now.☺️
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
David

there is a ‘private message’ option, which I understand is visible only to the participants and not the moderators. Perhaps that might be an option for ‘banter’ between two people without inviting moderation?

I’ve almost always found the (volunteer) moderators on here to be very reasonable; but the ‘house style’ of the forum is biased very much towards the informative and away from the opinionated. That’s just how it is.

regards

D
 
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OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020
Vale is Castilian. In Galicia some people could say "Está bien" or "Ta ben". In Cataluña and the Basque country I don't know.
Hi Pelegrin
I did wonder whether this expression ‘vale’ - was a more regional one .. … on my first trip to spain before starting a camino ., I did some touring around via bus etc and didn’t ‘hear’ this word consciously until Córdoba. / in lessons I’d not been given this word .. (a teacher from Sth America ).
At least Spanish pronunciation is consistent; the same letter always produces the same sound. The same cannot be said about English... 😅

I agree mostly. The pronunciation is consistent ; especially if you stick to the ‘rules’ (ie as to where the emphasis is placed and only one emphasis per word (in my understanding)..
BUT it does catch a lot of people out 😂 when they read ‘hola’ or any Spanish word starting with ‘H’ and start the word with ‘huh’ - (when we all know it’s pronounced as English would say ‘ola’).

my 2 cents
Annie
 

Jacobus

Pilgrim since 2008
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francés(2008,09 14)
Del Norte (2011)
Portuguese(2015,2017)
Inglés 2015
Fisterre (2015 17)
Hey all. I have a small question I need someone who speaks fluent Spanish to help me with.
Before my last Camino. I endeavoured to learn a little Spanish to help me along the way. Which it did. And I picked up a little whilst there.
Now to my question. Whilst there, on quite a few occasions in conversation we heard the term ( and excuse spelling) "Baly Baly Baly". We took this to be perhaps like saying " Yeah Yeah Yeah" or " OK OK OK".
Would that be correct? Or does it mean something totally different?
Cheers
Can vale said once with proper inflection mean ok? Like in is that all right?
Lets start walking ¿vale?
 

PhyllisRowland

Rowlandinha
Year of past OR future Camino
2015
Can vale said once with proper inflection mean ok? Like in is that all right?
Lets start walking ¿vale?
Yes, it is often used just like that, ending a statement where in English we'd use "is that okay with you?" or just "okay?" I'm stopping here, okay?
 

AlainC

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
"vale" on its own is rarely used.
Mexicans are more likely to say "sale". For more emphasis, they may even say "¡sale y vale!". This is mainly for agreeing to a plan or suggestion.

Depending on context, they may also say "correcto", "está bien" or "de acuerdo" or a number of other expressions. "OK" is also commonly used.
I have studied at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México and spent several months in México over the past 12 years. Yet, I have never heard a Méxicano say “sale”. Also “vale” is not widely used. They prefer “claro” or “verdad”
 
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Yoyo

✿ Se hace el camino al andar. ✿
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I have studied at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México and spent several months in México over the past 12 years. Yet, I have never heard a Méxicano say “sale”. Also “vale” is not widely used. They prefer “claro” or “verdad”
I lived in Mexico for almost 30 years and can assure you that "sale" is widely used.
"verdad" on the other hand is used more like an English question tag:
¿Tu hermano es ingeniero, ¿verdad? – Your brother is an engineer, isn't he?
¡Saludos! 👋 :)

PS: Decided to look it up and found this:

sale 1.png sale 2.png
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
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Year of past OR future Camino
2016
Hey all. I have a small question I need someone who speaks fluent Spanish to help me with.
Before my last Camino. I endeavoured to learn a little Spanish to help me along the way. Which it did. And I picked up a little whilst there.
Now to my question. Whilst there, on quite a few occasions in conversation we heard the term ( and excuse spelling) "Baly Baly Baly". We took this to be perhaps like saying " Yeah Yeah Yeah" or " OK OK OK".
Would that be correct? Or does it mean something totally different?
Cheers
"Vale", not baly, means alright. Ok. yes. It can be used in several different contexts.
 

KariC

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016
I’ve spent a lot more time in Mexico than Spain, but my opinion is “vale” is the equivalent of “bueno,” which Mexicans say constantly. Other words and phrases exist for agreement, but that is true in both Spain and Mexico. I would translate them both as “okay.”
De acuerdo. I've never heard "vale" except in Spain. Love that use of it; picked it up while I was there.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
De acuerdo. I've never heard "vale" except in Spain. Love that use of it; picked it up while I was there.
I'm taking Spanish lessons with a Venezuelan tutor who is currently living in Colombia. I asked her if people say vale or something else. She said that it is common in Venezuela - but just a single time as agreement, not vale, vale, vale - but is less common in Colombia, where I believe she said that people say cierto more often.
 

hunsta

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015
WOW 80 responses. Who'd-a-thunk ? However................naaaaaa! On second thoughts I'll leave it there. Gracias
 
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Joselito

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Sanabres 2016, Camino Frances 2017, Hospitalero sometime in the future....
Correct. And spelling in Spanish is ‘vale’
V pronounced closer to our ‘b’ .. the ‘e’ at the end sounds like e in egg. Not our ‘y’

I’ve only got a smattering of Spanish but okay 😂. with this term
Yes, it means OK or Sure; sort of how the English sometimes use "Right" - that's what "vale" means literally. By the way, the "b" and the "v" are pronounced the same in Spanish and are a bit odd for English speakers; it's a "voiced bilabial fricative." this means you bring your two lips close together but not quite touching. It's sort of like saying a "w" but without the "oo" lips' shape. Give it a try!
 

Teej41

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April/May 2018
What part of England are their accents from? I met an English guy on the Camino in 2016 who was about as unintelligible. A young German girl that I was walking with told me that she thought that her English was very good (it was excellent), but she couldn't understand him at all. I assured her that it wasn't her language skills, as I couldn't understand him either!
Their accents are London (working class) often referred to as 'Cockney'. The Queen is also from London but you can, I presume, understand what she says. So social class plays its part, not just the region of the country. If you can't understand them you'd have no chance in Newcastle upon Tyne or Glasgow.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
1989
But in Spanish - they use the subjunctive!

I’d challenge anyone (as stated above) to be truly ‘fluent’ in Spanish including the correct use of the subjunctive, 100% success in choosing correctly por vs para and ser vs estar, correct use of pronouns and the full range of tenses and have a wide working vocabulary in just one month! It’s beyond my imagination.

I’ll admit I’m not the sharpest tool in the box with language learning but I’ve had 4 years of fortnightly classes and countless visits to Spain and I’m just a solid B1, B2 on a good day, on the international scale. C2+ is fluent(ish)
If I were a pedant, I might point out that English retains traces of the subjunctive as well.
 
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Phileas

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
None yet. Starting soon (2017)
The word "vale" comes from the infinitive "valer", which could be translated, among other meanings, as "to be worth". Consequently, the word "vale" - which is third person, singular, present - could be translated (literally) as "it is worth" (or, figuratively speaking, as "what you say has some value to me").

At the end (or at the begining, we could say), both the Spanish words "valer" and "valor", and the English word "value" come from the same Latin word "valere".
 
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