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Spanish Mass Primer

DowtyCamino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May-July (2014),
May-July (2017)
#1
Perhaps an odd question, but is there any kind of primer for a Spanish Mass. Last camino we attended mass on several occasions but, to be honest, having only a limited Spanish vocabulary and being Protestant and unable to participate in the Eucharist, the services were too "foreign" to be very meaningful.
I understand that a lot of ritual in the church has significance and I feel it would be more meaningful if we had a basic understanding of the service. If no such primer exists, perhaps someone would volunteer a brief explanation of the order of the service.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017); Finisterre (2018)
#2
The Mass in Spanish follows the same order as in English. The priest enters and says opening prayers. When you are seated a lector comes up and reads from either the Hebrew Scripture or New Testament. A psalm and response follow. Then a second reading from the NT (weekends and special feast days only). Then everybody stands and listens to the priest read the Gospel. People then sit for the homily. Stand up for prayers of the faithful (for the world, sick, dead, etc). Then preparation of the gifts. Then some places kneel for the words of consecration. Then stand for the Lords Prayer. Come forward for communion. Sit. Then stand for closing prayers of thanksgiving. The final words should be something to the effect of "Go and be the light of Christ in the World."
There are always some variations but the pacing of the Mass is the same world over. For a more in depth theological explanation you can research in English.
Hope this helps -
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPdP-Burgos, 2015)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Sarria, 2018)
Sarria-Santiago (Oct. 2018)
#3
Not an odd question at all, Dowty Camino. For a start, there is an English-Spanish translation of the mass in a forum thread called Spanish Words of the Mass. You will find it much faster by doing a search than I could possibly figure out how to link it here. As far as a "primer" I will send you a private message, as a discussion of that sort will almost certainly run afoul of the forum rules-- no discussion of religion, politics, or bullfighting. :) However, if you can get your hands on a copy of the DVD set Catholicism by Bishop Robert Baron, there is one disc that deals specifically with the Mass, what goes on during it and why. (It is also visually gorgeous, filmed in many beautiful locations.) The series ran on either PBS or Discovery Channel a few years ago, so it may be available from your library if you live in the US.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#5
Perhaps an odd question, but is there any kind of primer for a Spanish Mass. Last camino we attended mass on several occasions but, to be honest, having only a limited Spanish vocabulary and being Protestant and unable to participate in the Eucharist, the services were too "foreign" to be very meaningful.
I understand that a lot of ritual in the church has significance and I feel it would be more meaningful if we had a basic understanding of the service. If no such primer exists, perhaps someone would volunteer a brief explanation of the order of the service.
I am a Catholic priest......but er, I am not writing infallibly here! ;) Nor comprehensively, nor dogmatically. Mass in Spain very much the same as Mass in English.

The parts of the Mass, essentially are
1. Introduction Sign of the Cross, and greeting by priest, followed by penitential rite, which may include or lead to the "Kyrie" /Lord Have Mercy. In Spanish Señor ten piedad/Cristo ten piedad/Senor ten piedad, repeated in dialogue by priest and people. On Sundays and some feast days there will then be the Gloria. (Everyone will join in.)
2.The first major part of the Mass follows, the Liturgy of the Word. It is the same the world over, with the same readings, essentially used everywhere, though there can be some local variation for feast days. Everyone will sit down at this point if not already sitting.
There will be a first reading - can be either a NT letter, or Apocalypse, or in the six weeks after Easter always the Acts of the Apostles, or it can be from the OT.
This is followed by a psalm, to which the people respond between each verse.
On Sundays and major feast days only there will be a second reading here - in which case the first reading will be OT and the second reading NT.
There is then a brief Alleluia verse.
Then the Gospel. Everyone in the church will stand for this.
There may be a sermon delivered by the priest after this.
On Sunday there will then be the Profession of Faith/ Credo/I believe in God/ Creo en un solo Dios
There may or not be some prayers/intercessions here to which the people will respond, but let's keep it simple.
3. We then move to the second major part, the Liturgy of the Eucharist. You will see the priest preparing bread and wine, and washing his hands, leading to the Sanctus/Holy, holy, holy/Santo, Santo, Santo. (Everyone will join in). In Spain people will either stand or kneel for this part of the Mass. The priest then moves to the Canon, the fixed prayers for the consecration of bread and wine. You will see the priest hold up the host and the chalice for the people to see. There are more prayers after this, leading to a common declaration of AMEN - the "great amen".
4. Then we have the Communion Rite. The people will stand, if they have been kneeling, and recite together with the priest the Our Father/ Padre nuestro. There are further prayers and the priest will then distribute communion. Just before this, the priest will say The Peace of the Lord be always with you La paz del Señor esté siempre con vosotros. There MAY be an exchange of greetings in the church at this point, a hug/handshake/or kiss. A handshake and a smile will never be misunderstood here! There is no need to say anything.
5. Thereafter there may be a period of silence and a few concluding prayers and a blessing, the concluding rite.

So a few landmarks.....
  • At the beginning, after a few minutes everyone will sit: this marks the liturgy of the word. People will then stand for the Gospel.
  • Then, with people sitting, you will see the priest prepare the offerings at the altar.
  • Then you will see the priest raising separately the host and chalice. This is the central moment of the Mass, the consecration. People will be either kneeling or standing at this time.
  • Shortly after this everyone will stand and recite together the Lord's Prayer. May exchange a sign of peace after this.
  • This will be followed by the distribution of communion by the priest and/or lay ministers.
  • Then some concluding prayers.

I don't want to complicate it any more, but ask any questions you wish.

As a general guide, get in a seat behind a "little old lady" and do what she does in terms of posture. And people will not mind if you stand, sit or kneel at the wrong time, even though you may feel everyone is looking at you. They won't be! If you want to sit throughout Mass, I don't think anyone would ever object. particularly if you look a bit dusty and tired.

This may help
https://www.misas.org/sta.tic/descarga/missa_es_en.pdf

There are lots of apps and sites which will give you the readings for the day and generally Spanish readings will be indentical to the English, if you want to read along. I have got past any embarrassment at being seen looking at my phone during Mass to follow the readings in far flung countries. And no one has ever objected!!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPdP-Burgos, 2015)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Sarria, 2018)
Sarria-Santiago (Oct. 2018)
#6
DowtyCamino, there's not much I could add to what timr and TerryRuttger have to say, other than I'll second the suggestion to find the readings of the day and follow along or read beforehand. That will give you something to meditate on during the homily/sermon -- or when things start to get baffling. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Northern Way (2017)
#7
@timr @Bala thank you both. This is much appreciated.

Anything a non-catholic should not do? (aside from common courtesy things like not talking, not checking text messages, not participating in communion??) Or that we should do explicitly to show respect?
 

DowtyCamino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May-July (2014),
May-July (2017)
#8
I am a Catholic priest......but er, I am not writing infallibly here! ;) Nor comprehensively, nor dogmatically. Mass in Spain very much the same as Mass in English.

The parts of the Mass, essentially are
1. Introduction Sign of the Cross, and greeting by priest, followed by penitential rite, which may include or lead to the "Kyrie" /Lord Have Mercy. In Spanish Señor ten piedad/Cristo ten piedad/Senor ten piedad, repeated in dialogue by priest and people. On Sundays and some feast days there will then be the Gloria. (Everyone will join in.)
2.The first major part of the Mass follows, the Liturgy of the Word. It is the same the world over, with the same readings, essentially used everywhere, though there can be some local variation for feast days. Everyone will sit down at this point if not already sitting.
There will be a first reading - can be either a NT letter, or Apocalypse, or in the six weeks after Easter always the Acts of the Apostles, or it can be from the OT.
This is followed by a psalm, to which the people respond between each verse.
On Sundays and major feast days only there will be a second reading here - in which case the first reading will be OT and the second reading NT.
There is then a brief Alleluia verse.
Then the Gospel. Everyone in the church will stand for this.
There may be a sermon delivered by the priest after this.
On Sunday there will then be the Profession of Faith/ Credo/I believe in God/ Creo en un solo Dios
There may or not be some prayers/intercessions here to which the people will respond, but let's keep it simple.
3. We then move to the second major part, the Liturgy of the Eucharist. You will see the priest preparing bread and wine, and washing his hands, leading to the Sanctus/Holy, holy, holy/Santo, Santo, Santo. (Everyone will join in). In Spain people will either stand or kneel for this part of the Mass. The priest then moves to the Canon, the fixed prayers for the consecration of bread and wine. You will see the priest hold up the host and the chalice for the people to see. There are more prayers after this, leading to a common declaration of AMEN - the "great amen".
4. Then we have the Communion Rite. The people will stand, if they have been kneeling, and recite together with the priest the Our Father/ Padre nuestro. There are further prayers and the priest will then distribute communion. Just before this, the priest will say The Peace of the Lord be always with you La paz del Señor esté siempre con vosotros. There MAY be an exchange of greetings in the church at this point, a hug/handshake/or kiss. A handshake and a smile will never be misunderstood here! There is no need to say anything.
5. Thereafter there may be a period of silence and a few concluding prayers and a blessing, the concluding rite.

So a few landmarks.....
  • At the beginning, after a few minutes everyone will sit: this marks the liturgy of the word. People will then stand for the Gospel.
  • Then, with people sitting, you will see the priest prepare the offerings at the altar.
  • Then you will see the priest raising separately the host and chalice. This is the central moment of the Mass, the consecration. People will be either kneeling or standing at this time.
  • Shortly after this everyone will stand and recite together the Lord's Prayer. May exchange a sign of peace after this.
  • This will be followed by the distribution of communion by the priest and/or lay ministers.
  • Then some concluding prayers.

I don't want to complicate it any more, but ask any questions you wish.

As a general guide, get in a seat behind a "little old lady" and do what she does in terms of posture. And people will not mind if you stand, sit or kneel at the wrong time, even though you may feel everyone is looking at you. They won't be! If you want to sit throughout Mass, I don't think anyone would ever object. particularly if you look a bit dusty and tired.

This may help
https://www.misas.org/sta.tic/descarga/missa_es_en.pdf

There are lots of apps and sites which will give you the readings for the day and generally Spanish readings will be indentical to the English, if you want to read along. I have got past any embarrassment at being seen looking at my phone during Mass to follow the readings in far flung countries. And no one has ever objected!!!

So very helpful. This is exactly what I was looking for.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#9
@timr @Bala thank you both. This is much appreciated.

Anything a non-catholic should not do? (aside from common courtesy things like not talking, not checking text messages, not participating in communion??) Or that we should do explicitly to show respect?
No not really, to be honest! And I would hate to think anyone who might otherwise attend would feel in any way intimidated and not willing to come in. There is no need to be. I don't think I have ever seen anything unfriendly directed at a stranger, unless you count the distribution of T shirts and skirts to bare-shouldered and bare-legged people at the Vatican. And I think, especially along the camino, standard walking gear, including shorts, would not be thought in any way out of place.
It is common to bow to the altar just before entering your seat, or to genuflect (kneel on one knee and stand up again) but neither is strictly required and no one will really notice if you don't. Bowing is easier than genuflecting!
As I said above, follow what a local does in terms of standing and sitting, but no one will ever be too put out if you are out of step.
Elsewhere in the English-speaking world, it is common for "non-Catholics-who-wish-to-receive-a-blessing" to be invited to approach the priest at communion time, with their hands crossed across the chest, (to indicate they are not going to receive communion) but this is not a universal sign and I don't think it is common in Spain.
On a very wet day last year, I stumbled upon a 10am Sunday Mass in a small village and took everything wet off and arrayed it at the back of the church, discretely, for drying. Then I went and sat in the seat were it soon transpired an elderly gentleman was used to parking his hat. I moved along and soon found that I was sitting in the place where an elderly lady was used to parking her body. But neither seemed to mind TOO much!!;) Generally I think people will be delighted that you have come and will shake hands with you if there is a "sign of peace" just before communion.
Quiet-ish talking before the service begins is quite common in Spain and it certainly is the norm in Italy where I lived for four years. More so than in UK I think. As you say it is not normal to talk during the service.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPdP-Burgos, 2015)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Sarria, 2018)
Sarria-Santiago (Oct. 2018)
#10
Northern Laurie, the one thing to really be on the lookout for, particularly along the Camino Francés, is a pilgrim blessing after mass has ended. Often the local people will look around and motion you forward or you may see the priest looking around. Any pilgrim is welcome -- and encouraged -- to come forward for this blessing, regardless of your faith or lack of it. It seems many are aware of the blessings at Roncesvalles and in Santiago, but don't realize how often these take place in the various towns and villages. Or that the townspeople are praying for our safe journeys night after night.

Also, I like to recommend that any time you stop in a church, look around for the statue of Santiago. He's watching out for us, too! :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#11
Northern Laurie, the one thing to really be on the lookout for, particularly along the Camino Francés, is a pilgrim blessing after mass has ended. Often the local people will look around and motion you forward or you may see the priest looking around. Any pilgrim is welcome -- and encouraged -- to come forward for this blessing, regardless of your faith or lack of it. It seems many are aware of the blessings at Roncesvalles and in Santiago, but don't realize how often these take place in the various towns and villages. Or that the townspeople are praying for our safe journeys night after night.

Also, I like to recommend that any time you stop in a church, look around for the statue of Santiago. He's watching out for us, too! :)
Yes I would absolutely agree. At evening Masses in particular on weekdays, in the tiniest of places, there is nearly always some recognition of visitors. And it can be very moving! Especially the case in monastic albergues like Sahagun, Leon, Rabanal, and a good few others. But also in quite unlikely looking places! At the monasteries you do not have to be staying there to attend. You can visit from another hostel (paying attention to curfew time!)

It is a common tradition in Catholic churches to 'light a candle' as a sign you have remembered someone else, living or dead. You do not need to be a Catholic to do this. There is usually a box to take a coin next to the candles.
 

DowtyCamino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May-July (2014),
May-July (2017)
#12
OK timr, since you've expanded the subject to 'lighting a candle' (thank you) can I ask a few other questions?
What other things (not necessarily connected with mass) a pilgrim might be able to participate in?
If one wanted a silent moment to meditate or pray, would the traditional place be a side chapel, or somewhere else?
Addressing a priest in Spain? Padre, Senior.
Traditional greetings and responses?

Other than "admire at the art and architecture", what else could one do in the many cathedrals and monasteries, etc, along the way to appreciate being there?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#13
Northern Laurie, the one thing to really be on the lookout for, particularly along the Camino Francés, is a pilgrim blessing after mass has ended. Often the local people will look around and motion you forward or you may see the priest looking around. Any pilgrim is welcome -- and encouraged -- to come forward for this blessing, regardless of your faith or lack of it. It seems many are aware of the blessings at Roncesvalles and in Santiago, but don't realize how often these take place in the various towns and villages. Or that the townspeople are praying for our safe journeys night after night.

Also, I like to recommend that any time you stop in a church, look around for the statue of Santiago. He's watching out for us, too! :)
The Parochial Albergue in Carrion de los Condes, while not the most luxurious of buildings, has most wonderful hospitality, and a well organised, well presented pilgrim blessing after evening Mass which seems always to be particularly appreciated by non-Catholics who attend. Again, you do not need to be staying in the albergue to attend the Mass and blessing.
And the Female Benedictines in Leon have evening prayer and blessing very very very welcoming to all, with a little "practice" beforehand from a consummate, retired infant teacher- sister!! You assemble in the albergue, but again you don't need to be staying there, and you are led to the monastic church.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#14
OK timr, since you've expanded the subject to 'lighting a candle' (thank you) can I ask a few other questions?
What other things (not necessarily connected with mass) a pilgrim might be able to participate in?
If one wanted a silent moment to meditate or pray, would the traditional place be a side chapel, or somewhere else?
Addressing a priest in Spain? Padre, Senior.
Traditional greetings and responses?

Other than "admire at the art and architecture", what else could one do in the many cathedrals and monasteries, etc, along the way to appreciate being there?
I hope we can stop this from falling foul of the moderators! ;)
I think just a physiological break is good! Out of the sun and out of the heat for a moment.
I always look out as @Bala says for Santiago statue - you will see some monstrosities and some beauties! And then you will start noticing that St Roc is usually there with a wounded leg and a dog at his side.
In larger churches, I always like to look out for a carving or window of Tobias, the Archangel Raphael, the fish and the dog. That's just me. It is a very popular story, from the Book of Tobit, and depicted in virtually every continental cathedral and pre-reformation Anglican cathedrals.
Sitting in a side chapel or sitting in the body of the church equally OK for a prayer/meditation moment. If there is a large carved chair, with a coat of arms on the back, and possibly drapes suspended over it, you have found the 'cathedra' the formal chair of the bishop. Don't try it for size!
Outside of Mass times, I always feel no difficulty taking photos. Larger churches may have a sign saying no flash and no tripods.
I think "Padre" is just fine, and 99% of clerics will not expect to be greeted any differently than you would greet another person of similar age.
For English speakers, the daily English Mass at the Cathedral in Santiago has been particularly welcoming of other Christians and also non-Christians in recent years. I have not been there this year.
If in doubt - DO go in. And just be your normal polite self!! Do assume you are welcome.
In monasteries and convents there will be Morning Prayer/Lauds or Matins, Evening Prayer/Vespers, and Night Prayer/Compline which may not be at very convenient times for pilgrims but you would always be welcome.
The Poor Clares Convent in Carrion de los Condes (you are spoilt for choice in that town!) has a museum and it includes a collection of cribs. Other monasteries and convents will often have a shop selling handicrafts, or honey, or liqueurs - though your bag weight may be an issue.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
#15
For those that wish to have a reference for daily readings, order of the Mass, reflections on the daily readings, etc, and even digitized versions of the Bible, there is a free app called Laudate, which is available for iPhone and Android phones. Here's a link to the IOS version, and the Android version can be found on the Google Play Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/laudate-1-catholic-app/id499428207?mt=8
From the description on that link, it appears that versions of the app are available in several other languages. I'm confident that those of you who are native speakers of those languages will know how to find the version in your language.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
#16
OK timr, since you've expanded the subject to 'lighting a candle' (thank you) can I ask a few other questions?
What other things (not necessarily connected with mass) a pilgrim might be able to participate in?
If one wanted a silent moment to meditate or pray, would the traditional place be a side chapel, or somewhere else?
Addressing a priest in Spain? Padre, Senior.
Traditional greetings and responses?

Other than "admire at the art and architecture", what else could one do in the many cathedrals and monasteries, etc, along the way to appreciate being there?
As long as the church doors are open, anyone can come in and sit or kneel for a few moments of private prayer or meditation. In the larger cathedrals which have side chapels, those are an excellent place to pray and meditate, even if there is a Mass in progress--just enter and leave in as discrete and quiet manner as possible to not distract from the Mass.

And an FYI for those that may not already be aware, the ornate stained glass windows in the larger churches and cathedrals are usually designed to illustrate some story or portion of a story from the Bible. In olden days, when the general populace was mainly illiterate, those windows were a major teaching tool for the people.
 

DowtyCamino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May-July (2014),
May-July (2017)
#17
re Windows...I often play "guess the story depicted here" with windows. Sometimes it's easy, other times it's just plain bizarre...."why exactly is that saintly looking man looking inside the mouth of a lion with a lantern in his hand". I guessed Daniel in the lion's den, but this looked more like a someone giving the lion a good molar inspection. Some of the stories must be from either local legend, from the apocrypha, or extra-biblical or just purely symbolic. But its interesting to understand the motivations of the artists.

Things I like to pick out are the key descriptors of the saints (chicken for Domingo, etc.), the tetramorphos, and the windows gradients (darker and earthly images lower down and brighter and more heavenly images higher up). Sometimes you get a real bonus and find something like the carved miseracord in Chester UK depicting an elephant...it was clearly carved by someone who'd never seen one, but was relying on a verbal description. It has hooves like a camel and an oddly shaped head and trunk.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#18
@DowtyCamino Haha yes. Chester is near to my original home. I think I would enjoy mooching around an old church or two with you if we met up on the Camino. Windows and carvings exactly as you say, endlessly fascinating.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPdP-Burgos, 2015)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Sarria, 2018)
Sarria-Santiago (Oct. 2018)
#19
For those that wish to have a reference for daily readings, order of the Mass, reflections on the daily readings, etc, and even digitized versions of the Bible, there is a free app called Laudate, which is available for iPhone and Android phones. Here's a link to the IOS version, and the Android version can be found on the Google Play Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/laudate-1-catholic-app/id499428207?mt=8
From the description on that link, it appears that versions of the app are available in several other languages. I'm confident that those of you who are native speakers of those languages will know how to find the version in your language.
Great reference, especially for the daily scripture readings.

Also, I've found the link for the English-Spanish translation of the basic prayers of the mass I mentioned above. Easy to copy the pdf and follow along. Hope this helps.

http://www.angilella.it/missa/missa_en_es.pdf
 

DowtyCamino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May-July (2014),
May-July (2017)
#20
@DowtyCamino Haha yes. Chester is near to my original home. I think I would enjoy mooching around an old church or two with you if we met up on the Camino. Windows and carvings exactly as you say, endlessly fascinating.
I grew up in Chester.....Chester, VA USA though.
If you're in Spain May 21 - Jun 28 perhaps we'll meet!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#21
I grew up in Chester.....Chester, VA USA though.
If you're in Spain May 21 - Jun 28 perhaps we'll meet!
What a shame! I would have been, but I have to return to Liverpool, (near Chester), on 16th for a family commitment. Originally I was planning on a month in Spain. Just 12 days now...
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances September/October (2014)
#22
I took along a copy of A Simple Prayer Book in Spanish. 58gm. Has parallel English and Spanish texts. Had the ordinary of the Mass in it. I bought it from the Confraternity of St JamesFor the Bible Readings to go with it, I had bought and downloaded to my kindle. I looked at these before Mass. I'm catholic, but was pleased to have the Words, and will take it again. Hope it helps.
 

Mark Barnes

Old Engineer
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - September - November (2017)
#23
You could attend a Catholic Mass near your home and that wiil be the same, or close, to that in Spain. It may take a few visits go get it but that would be the best way to be able to follow along when you get to Spain. That is my input.
 
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017
#24
Perhaps an odd question, but is there any kind of primer for a Spanish Mass. Last camino we attended mass on several occasions but, to be honest, having only a limited Spanish vocabulary and being Protestant and unable to participate in the Eucharist, the services were too "foreign" to be very meaningful.
I understand that a lot of ritual in the church has significance and I feel it would be more meaningful if we had a basic understanding of the service. If no such primer exists, perhaps someone would volunteer a brief explanation of the order of the service.
You've got lots of responses here-- and good ones. I am catholic, but my mom isn't. And I know she felt out of place at mass many times because there are lots of things going on that take some getting used to, and understanding. I had a difficult time at mass on the camino because I don't speak Spanish, and there were no little books or guides available like they have here in the US.

Here is an website in English that has good info: http://bustedhalo.com/googling-god/mass-class/what-to-do-at-mass
 
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017
#25
OK timr, since you've expanded the subject to 'lighting a candle' (thank you) can I ask a few other questions?
What other things (not necessarily connected with mass) a pilgrim might be able to participate in?
If one wanted a silent moment to meditate or pray, would the traditional place be a side chapel, or somewhere else?
Addressing a priest in Spain? Padre, Senior.
Traditional greetings and responses?

Other than "admire at the art and architecture", what else could one do in the many cathedrals and monasteries, etc, along the way to appreciate being there?
There is somewhere a place in the church where a red candle is lit. In larger churches it will be in a side chapel. This indicates God's presence, and this is where I always go to pray first. Then I go to light candles elsewhere. -- I love to look at the artwork, especially the carved stonework. How do they do that? And how did they choose what to carve? I also think of the many many pilgrims who have walked before me and stood looking at the beauty, and praying in the same place.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
#26
You could attend a Catholic Mass near your home...
Catholic, or Anglican/Episcopalian, or Lutheran (at least in the US) ... all follow the same flow as outlined above. The details of the prayers will vary somewhat, but the similarity of structure makes it easier to feel like you're oriented to what's going on.

And one other thing in terms of "what one can do": I try to contribute, whether by buying a candle or else wise. Those are expensive collections of old architecture and artwork to maintain.
 

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    Votes: 236 29.9%
  • October

    Votes: 96 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 11 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.6%
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