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The big map o the Caminos de Santiago

Spirits (of a liquid kind!) on the camino

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#1
Arn, If you are lucky you will have the opportunity to witness one of the most exciting ceremonies involving alcohol in Galicia - the Queimada.

Wiki describes it as follows:
Queimada has origins in the Pagan festivals of Galicia. It is a punch made from Galician aguardiente (Orujo Gallego) - a spirit distilled from wine and flavoured with herbs or coffee, plus sugar, lemon peel, coffee beans and cinnamon.
Traditionally while preparing the punch a spell or incantation is recited, so that special powers are conferred to the queimada and those drinking it. Then the queimada is set alight, and slowly burns as more brandy is added.
Mention of queimada is found in Celtic, Roman, Visigothic, and Arabic literature. There is also evidence of the queimada tradition in the eleventh or twelfth century, around the time of the construction of Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela.
Jesus Jato at Ave Fenix in Villafranca del Bierzo often does a queimada ceremony with pilgrim participation.
At San Bol, the young Italian hospitaleros do a flamboyant queimada, throwing flames against the walls whilst pilgrims participate by repeating loud shouts and incantations against evil spirits lying in wait for pilgrims along the camino!
In a Santiago bar they use 50% proof alcohol, lemon peel, sugar and coffee beans. Once the flames have been extinguished you are given a tot measure of ‘fire water’ to drink. A memorable drink!

If you are interested in the Qeimada Spell, you will find it at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queimada
 

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Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#2
Sil,

I'll drink to that!

Say, on another note, I was posted to the AmEmb in Pretoria where I met my lovely Afrikaner Boer Masie. Sadly, she passed away in 2000. My kids, Christopher and Dau Romi are very into their SA heritage and believed that their spouses should share their interests and meet the family. They both took their honeymoon to SA and, have visited on occasion.

thanks for being such a supporter of this site...you add a remarkable wealth of insight and knowledge.

Arn
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#3
Dankie meneer Arn!
I am a teetotaller but in the spirit of this thread, I would like to say that my husband - who is your typical short-back-and-sides, beer drinking, rugby fanatic - was very partial to Estrella Galacia (a Lager similar to Castle in South Africa) Mahou and San Miguel. He found that many bars sold small glasses of 'cerveca' where he likes to have at least a pint so he always asked for a larger glass.
It is cheaper to buy beer in a supermecado - about 0.50 euro a can, a litre is about 1.20 euros. In a bar normally a caña and a botellin (bottle) (33 cl.) 1 euro and a beer mug about 1.90.
Red wine ± 1.20 euro and white wine 1.50 euro.
I'm not sure about other spirits but perhaps one of the other members can give you prices of whisky, brandy etc.
Abrazos,
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#4
sillydoll said:
Arn, If you are lucky you will have the opportunity to witness one of the most exciting ceremonies involving alcohol in Galicia - the Queimada.
I second that! During my last night in Santiago, I got to experience the Queimada with a group of Spanish pilgrims that took me under their wing. It was quite the "closing ceremony" for my Camino. We did it at a cafe just up the street from the pilgrim office - can't remember the name of it, though. The preparer recited the incantation while stirring the flaming mixture, and when it was done, we all toasted each other and said our goodbyes. Definitely a recommended cultural experience. :)
 
#6
wwaaahhh, now I want to go back and participate in a queimada!! I love rituals.
Lillian
who got turned on to Paxtaran and Orujo by the locals and loved them!
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#7
I too was fortunate enough to experience the Queimada in Samos, in a park across the street from the Monastery. We were sipping a caña in a local cafe when we got wind of the ceremony ocurring just a short distance down the street. Never one to miss a local ritual, off we went to investigate. It truly was "fire water" and to quote Sil, "a tot" was about all I could handle. I recall having very strange dreams that night and couldn't figure out whether to attribute it to the queimada or to the fact that we were incredibly lucky and got to sleep upstairs in the Monastery.... or perhaps both! An event not to be missed!
Buen Camino,
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#8
Deirdre,

Some rituals are remarkable...some memorable...some un forgetable while others are unbelievable!

I am ready for the challenge to my deepest sensibilities!

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#9
Did anyone ever try absinthe on the Way? I saw it (or something like it) mentioned in the movie Americano, which takes place mainly in Pamplona, with a detour thru the Camino. The Spanish woman who hooks up with some Americans introduces it to them in a Pamplona bar (called the Americano) and mentions that it is legal in Spain. Then she goes into its effects. Seems like a wild sort of deal, if true... :wink:

As for the Camino part of the film: The vivacious Spanish woman and one of the American guys become close, and she takes him for walk on the Way. She tells him about the Camino, and mentions that her father did the pilgrimage. I liked her description of the trek - an interesting movie.
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#10
Vinotinto,

Gosh man...there's more here than a movie plot!

Here's the wormwood plant (artemisia absinthium), often touted to help indigestion it had many uses in medieval life. Monks put wormwood in their ink to protect manuscripts from bookworms, nursing women rubbed the herb on their breasts to encourage weaning, and pilgrims stuffed a bit in their pockets to ward off fatigue.

Now I could see some uses as interesting, but licking scripture isn't one of them.
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#11
I don't know much about absenthe - I'm not even sure I can spell it correctly! However, my high school students know (or at least they think they know) alot about it. I know that it is emerald green - and I don't do green!!! Apparently it is back on the market in Europe again after having the halocinogens removed (was't that the wormwood?). My son brought some back (contraband) when he was studying in London a couple of years ago. I stay away from halucinogens and must admit that I have never been brave enough to try it. :roll: I tend to stick with my vino tinto, blanco and a caña. I thought I was very adventuresome with my orujo, patxarán and queimada!!! 8) This has gotten to be quite the thread!
Buen Camino,
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#13
I am a strong believer in pre-preparation for any adventure. Is it possible to get any of the more exotic firewater outside the local region. Not that I want to spoil my Camino...just curious! Remember, I live in an old home heated by wood fireplaces. Nothing like a fine libation late at night to get the Milky Way moving through my head.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#14
Arn said:
it possible to get any of the more exotic firewater outside the local region.
Heck, I can't even find orujo at the local tapas bars - so much for authenticity. But at least some of the local wine shops have plenty of Spanish vino tinto...
 
#15
Here's my Paxtaran story (part of my Camino Magic tales):
I got to Pamplona and had to buy a sleeping sack (colder than I expected in August). I went with a Canadian pilgrim, Martin, who I had met in the Orisson gite. On the way back we stopped to eat at a local bar (La Raspa) that served the pilgrim menu, and which had been recommended by the hospitalero at the Paderborn albergue. (story getting long, eh?). We had probably one of the best meals I had on the Camino. The bar owner (Alvaro) was very attentive... he had walked the Camino 3 times and I could tell he wanted to please his patrons. After the meal ended, he asked if we wanted an after-dinner drink. I had no idea what to ask for and he recommended Paxtaran. The pilgrims at the other table heard it and raised their glasses with an approving nod. I said "sure". SO he brings us a large brandy snifter with a reddish drink served over small cubes of ice. I smelled it first and it had an anise smell. Now I am not a licorice liker and was not sure what to expect, but when I took a sip, I swooned! Wow, what a nice smooth taste. It is sweet and very warming (like cognac does to me), even though it was cold (from the ice). So I asked him about it.... It is made with a fruit which in Spanish is called "endrino". In Basque it is called arañon. He makes it himself at home, by placing the endrinos in anise and letting it "ripen" for I don't know how long. This is what turns it reddish. We chatted awhile and he leaves and returns with a whole unopened 1 liter bottle, places it in front of me and says, "for you". I was more than amazed at his generosity. We kissed the double cheek kiss, he wished us well and on we went back to the albergue. I told Martin, "carrying this bottle means an extra 2 pounds! I do not want to carry this, so here's the plan. 2 women, who we had also met in Orisson were not planning to do the next day's stage due to concern that after going up to the Alto del Perdon, the descent would be too much for their knees, so therefore they would bus it to Puente La Reina. Perfect. I would give them the bottle and the next day, "everyone will drink Paxtaran"!! They agreed and I gave them the bottle. I never saw them again!!!! I was hoping that they would be enjoying and toasting to Lillian for the paxtaran! Forward a week...I was telling this story to the 4 Spaniards I had been walking with that day while we were having an almuerzo at a bar, and one of the women pulls out her camera and asks, "is this them?" And there was a long table with several pilgrims Martin, and the 2 French women, and they were holding their glasses up in the air and toasting to..... yep, me!! Apparently there was another albergue in Puente, and that's where they stayed. So I felt like I got closure to my question: "What happened to my Paxtaran?" I just love the synchronous events I experienced on the Camino.
 
#16
A week later, I went to visit my uncle in a small village in the Palencia province and he had an endrino bush in his yard. They look like large firm blueberries. In english they might be called sloe berries from the blackthorn bush?? Not entirely sure. Hey, is this what they use for sloe gin?
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#17
Great spiritual tale Mermaidlilli...a super all's well that end's well.

So far we've brought to the surface a fair number of pilgrims that have found the way to be a way of wonders! I know there's more out there and I have until April to fill up my note book. Since I will spend a week in Malaga at a resort before I make my Camino...I may have to keep my tongue loosened by drinking the local vino as I practice my Spanish.

And to my teetotaler SA friend Sil, I am sure your hubby has tried one of these: Van Ham and possibly Landskroon Port. I'm going to have one or the other before I hit the sack.

I would like to delve into what the pelegrinos drank in the Middle Ages. I suspect some of the aforementioned would be among them. Anyone got a handle on that?

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#18
MermaidLilli said:
SO he brings us a large brandy snifter with a reddish drink served over small cubes of ice.
Hmm...now that I think about it, I believe I did have some of this stuff in a Galician town...not too shabby.
 
#19
If you enjoy wine the Camino can be a wine tour:

Navarra - Although Navarra includes a slice of the Rioja wine region it has become known for its own eponymous DO. Thanks to a more open, less protectionist attitude than that shown by its neighbour, Navarra has surged ahead with a policy of planting international’ grape varieties.
Senorio de Sarria S.A. in Puente la Reina is the first international vineyard on the Camino. Bodegas Castillo de Monjardin S.A. in Villamayor sits smack on the route to Santiago and forms part of an elegant complex.

Rioja - Right on the Camino Francés sits the province of La Rioja and its vineyards are the most famous on the route.

León - The harsh remote plains of the meseta in León have little to offer the oenophile other than a grape variety unknown elsewhere – Prieto Picudo, which produces wine with pungent, ripe red berry aromas. Between Leon and Astorga you will see hobbit holes where the locals store their home produced wines.

Bierzo - The Bierzo region on the boundary between the kingdom of León and Galicia is on one of the prettiest sections of the Camino between Ponferrada and Villafranca and you pass plenty of vineyards and bodegas on the path. The wines tend to fall between the light wines of Galicia and the robust reds of the Duero.

Ria Baixas - If you go in towards the sea the vineyards of the Rias Baixas on the Camino Portugese in Galicia extend southwards from Santiago de Compostela to the river Mino. The vines are often trained on pergolas so that the bunches of fruit are protected by their own leaves during the summer. The local grape is the Albarino, which produces a crisp, fresh and fragrant wine.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#20
:
William Marques said:
The harsh remote plains of the meseta in León have little to offer the oenophile other than a grape variety unknown elsewhere
Well, my Spanish friend who lives in Leon might disagree with you, at least when it comes to future potential. He hosted me for 2 days while I was on the Camino, and took me along with his family to a fascinating underground restaurant, carved out of a hillside. We had some really good wine, and he told me that the Leon region is an "up-and-coming" wine area. Of course, it can't match Rioja at present, but given time it might become special in its own right...as did Oregon wine country, which has become one of the great sources of pinot noir (I live relatively close to a number of Oregon wineries). :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#21
OK VinoTinto...you've done it again!

I've eaten in a former dungeon, a former church, a cave in France and Jordan, but never in an underground restaurant. Give it up!

Darn, my Camino of penance is becoming a gastronomic ferris wheel.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#22
Arn said:
in an underground restaurant. Give it up!
I'm not sure exactly where the restaurant is at (or even what the name of it is), except that it's too far to walk from Leon. Since I stayed with my friend and his family, we drove there (for his father-in-law's birthday celebration). The food was amazing - multiple courses of fine cured meats, good vino, smooth orujo, and nice company. I even got to cook some meat for everyone on a small grill that was brought to the table!

I'm sure it must be well-known in Leon, though. It was quite the dining experience, although if you're claustrophobic you may have some trouble...;-)
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#23
I am claustrophobic...but have overcome it to scuba, go into caves to see prehistoric wall paintings and view relics in Ethiopa...so, for a fantastic meal...I'm there!

Vinotinto, here's what I''ve been able to find so far to unravel the mystery:

In Cigales, is a converted underground bodega, a series of caves dug into a hillside mound. Cueva San Simon is a name that keeps coming up. Does that ring a bell?

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#24
Arn said:
Cueva San Simon is a name that keeps coming up. Does that ring a bell?
You hit the jackpot, m'man! Here's a website with some pictures to get your salivary glands going:

http://www.cuevasansimon.com/

I definitely recommend their food, and the atmosphere is great - although the main cavern in the back is a smoking area, so if you struggle with that, you should take your meal further up front... :arrow:
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#26
Hey all,

If you like stogies, don't forget that in Spain, Cuban cigars are legal. And they go well with vino tinto, cafe con leche, and orujo... :mrgreen:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#27
Queimada? How did I miss that?

Look everyone, I'm sorry but ... threads like this should be banned .. they are much too close to the experiences, I sit here and read them and I LONG to just throw stuff in a bag and GO - this is terrible ... are we all like this forever? Hooked on this blasted uncomfortable, hard, sweaty, painful, tiring, magnificent, joyful, trek/journey/ Camino?

(adds to list - get involved in a queimada next year)
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#28
Yes, Br. David... just get used to it. I was told that once the Camino gets you ... it never lets you go. I believe it. I am 5 days short of 4 months since I arrived in Santiago de Compostela. I think about the Camino, my companions and the experience every single day. I just had an article published on my Camino and as people begin to read it I find myself talking about it more again. It doesn't go away.... :)
Buen Camino,
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#29
Br. David said:
I sit here and read them and I LONG to just throw stuff in a bag and GO - this is terrible ... are we all like this forever? Hooked on this blasted uncomfortable, hard, sweaty, painful, tiring, magnificent, joyful, trek/journey/ Camino?
Yeah, and if I lived in England I'd probably be on the Way every holiday. Consider yourself lucky that you're only separated from Spain by a dinky Channel, vs. a continent (for us West Coasters) and an ocean. :cry:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#30
It's become obvious that the folks that make the Camino come from around the globe and do it for various reasons. In that we are in the Holy Day season and, there are pilgrims underway, here's my question:

What "holiday" specific libations might they be enjoying?

Vinotinto and Sil and others have clearly indicated what one can expect Spring thru October...but what now?

To take make it a bit more personal...what one specific drink might you drink right there at home?

I like mulled wine...in fact, I think I'll have one right now. It's 4pm somewhere!

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#31
Arn said:
To take make it a bit more personal...what one specific drink might you drink right there at home?
For Xmas, it would be vino tinto, of course - probably a nice Spanish or French wine, but an Oregon pinot noir would do... :wink:

As for New Year's Eve - well, vino is OK, but some harder stuff is appropo, like tequila, or anything with rum in it...yum! And of course, whenever a stogie is involved, one must complement it with port wine, whiskey, bourbon, or cognac... :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#32
I'll have to wait until my Camino...to get a taste of the many fine opportunities.

Here...for News Year...I have a fine Islay of Jura whisky and a superior South African Landskroon port.

I am ready my man! :lol:

Arn
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#33
For a truly Sarf Efrikan Christmas you must try Amarula Cream or Mampoer brandy.
The Marula fruit is the one that drives elephants mad. The fruit falls from the tree and ferments and the elephants, who just love Marula berries, wander a round in alcoholic bliss for a while!
The tree is unusual in that it is dioecious, which means that they have a specific sex. This has lead to the belief among the Venda that bark infusions can be used to determine the sex of an unborn child. If a woman wants a son the male tree is used, and for a daughter, the female tree. If the child of the opposite sex is born, the child is said to be very special as it was able to defy the spirits! Now you know!

Mampoer (called moonshine in the US and 'Poteen' by the Irish) is a strong, homemade distilled brandy made from fruit. The secrets of distilling this potent ‘brandy’ are carried over from generation to generation and this adds to the mystery that surrounds it. In the Cape area they call it 'Witblits'. Although it is illegal to sell the brandy on the open market you can go on a Mampoer tour from the town of Zeerust where tourists go from farm to farm, sampling the different varieties.

Cheers!
 
#34
Arn said:
It's become obvious that the folks that make the Camino come from around the globe and do it for various reasons. In that we are in the Holy Day season and, there are pilgrims underway, here's my question:

What "holiday" specific libations might they be enjoying?

Arn
In the UK we are lucky and one of the major supermarkets is selling a Bierzo wine from Villafranca called Pilgrimage. I took the precaution of tasting a bottle - well more than one actually, and that is what we will be drinking with our Christmas dinner with a white Burgundy and a Champagne (the Via Francigena goes through Reims).

Merrry Christmas and a Happy New Year
William
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#35
Sil,

How about Van Der Hum? I still have a bottle from some years back...might give it a try.

William...I've begun a search for the Villafranca "Pilgrimage". If it's possible to get it here in the US...I'll give it a try.

Thanks

Arn
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#37
I'll second that!
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#38
I am on the hunt!

So far, from what I see, the English have cornered the distribution on the

The Pilgrimage Mencia and The Pilgrimage Godello from the Bierzo.

Both TESCO Wine Club (UK):

http://www.tesco.com/winestore/

and Guy Anderson:

http://www.guyandersonwines.co.uk

are the key distributors. I've queried GA about who may have these listed in the USA.

Still, the cost may be competitive when you consider it comes to your door. Vinotinto doesn't have to walk a KM and I can sit in my chair.

More later...
Arn
 
#39
IF you're able to wait......
"For the moment it is sold only in 434 Tesco stores at £6.99 but early next year it should be available in the US from this importer:
Well Oiled Wine Company
1 Loudoun Street
SW Leesburg, Virginia 20175
USA
Tel: 703-771-1477
Fax: 703-779-2454
Website: http://www.welloiledwineco.com/

Early next year is right around the corner!
With Love
Lillian
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#40
Good work, Lillian!
My local wine dealer is always stocking new Spanish wines... I'll get on to him about this one right away! We'll see if we can get it in Connecticut!

Buen Camino, (hic!)
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#41
Deirdre said:
My local wine dealer is always stocking new Spanish wines
Mine too - I think I'll ask them as well, thanks for the idea. I've been buying a number of Spanish wines from them. Most are reasonably priced (compared to, say, Franch wines), and a good number are from the regions where the Camino passes through. One bottle of good vino even has "Santiago" in the title, but it doesn't seem to be related to the Camino or the city... :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#42
Lillian wrote: be available in the US from this importer:Well Oiled Wine Company
1 Loudoun Street SW Leesburg, Virginia 20175
Lillian...well done!

It's just around the corner from me and I should be just back from my camino and on my way to Maine to teach sailing. What a fantastic find. I can drive up 95 singing the songs I've learned, drinking the wine I've come to treasure.

Deirdre, Lillian, Vinotinto...seems to me it's time to start the "Camino Vino Lovers Club!"

What do you think?

Maybe we can even search out the best of the best and post a listing...Gosh, I can see it now (thru my vino road mapped eyes) wines to be remembered.

Arn
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#43
Vinotinto, Deirdre, Lillian and my other fellow lovers of the grape!

On the "Inner Being" thread, Charles piqued my interest in several areas, but I am drawn to poets, so I looked into Rumi, the Sufi poet.

It seems there is much to comment his works and, the following strikes me as appropriate for the "little old vino drinkers US".



God has given us a dark wine so potent that,
drinking it, we leave the two worlds.

God has put into the form of hashish a power
to deliver the taster from self-consciousness.

God has made sleep so
that it erases every thought.

God made Majnun love Layla so much that
just her dog would cause confusion in him.

There are thousands of wines
that can take over our minds.

Don't think all ecstacies
are the same!

Jesus was lost in his love for God.
His donkey was drunk with barley.

Drink from the presence of saints,
not from those other jars.

Every object, every being,
is a jar full of delight.

Be a conoisseur,
and taste with caution.

Any wine will get you high.
Judge like a king, and choose the purest,

the ones unadulterated with fear,
or some urgency about "what's needed."

Drink the wine that moves you
as a camel moves when it's been untied,

and is just ambling about.

Mathnawi IV, 2683-96
The Essential Rumi, Coleman Barks

I'll drink to that!

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#44
Arn said:
Vinotinto, Deirdre, Lillian and my other fellow lovers of the grape!
Thanks, devil dog! :mrgreen: I had some primo vino for Xmas, including an awesome pinot noir, a great WA State cab, and a nice merlot - regardless of Miles' distain for it. Hope you get that reference, otherwise you can't be in the club! :wink: :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#45
Sounds like a chuggin' contest to me!

Look anyone that would rather sleep in and get up early to play golf...than drink wine with his friends...sheeesshh!

Pass me the Merlot Brother!

Arn

ps...not a bad movie either!
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#46
For those who are not planning to brush their teeth with wine, here are a few photographs of the many 'fuentes' - water fountains and taps - along the camino that offer safe, drinking water to travellers and pilgrims.
http://www.amawalker.blogspot.com
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#47
Sil,

The blog and the article are fantastic! Just adding to the many opportunities I and my fellow pelegrinos will have on our Camino.

Thanks for so much!

Buen Camino
Arn
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#48
Sil,
I remember so many of those fountains... Your photos are fantastic - as is the rest of your blog. Thinking about the warmth and beauty of the meseta is very nice on this cold, sleety, dreary New Years Day! At least that is the weather in the northeast USA.

But the weather doesn't dampen the promise of a New Year and all the wonderful things that will come with it!
Happy New Year everyone!

Buen Camino,
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#49
On the "Pilgrimage" wine question:

Mermaidlilli wrote:IF you're able to wait......
Here's the response I received from Richard Riddell of Well Oiled:

"Hi Arn,

Well Oiled Wine company is the US importer for Pilgrimage. The first shipment will be landing in early March."


So, by the time I return to the US, some of you may already had the opportunity to get some and provide additional input.

Vino for everyone!

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#50
Arn said:
Vino for everyone!
I'll drink to that! :wink:

By the way, I've tried a couple good Portuguese reds recently - nice, as well as inexpensive. That, combined with my love of Port with a fine stogie, makes me want to walk the Portuguese route next...and at the rate the dollar is getting pounded by the Euro, it will probably end up being the only affordable option for us poor Americanos... :cry: :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#51
Vinotinto wrote: at the rate the dollar is getting pounded by the Euro
Again, I think if you consider what we here in the US receive annually for the same position, we and our EU friends are paying about the same for a like item. I personally "like" vino.

All things go in cycles, for years the US was in the cat's bird seat...it will come around.

Heck, Sil and I can both remember when the 1 Rand = $1.14 US

I think right now it's about 6 Rand = $1.00 US

Gosh VT...even on my poor old retired Marine pension I could live high on the Berg!

Hey folks, it's only money. If tomorrow never came...who will get the money you leave behind?

Do you're Camino and enjoy every moment as if it were gold dropping into a bucket.

Buen Camino,

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#52
Arn said:
Gosh VT...even on my poor old retired Marine pension I could live high on the Berg!
A lifer, eh? :mrgreen: What rank/MOS did you retire as, if I may ask? I did 6 years active (which was more than enough for me) as a gun-plumber, and left the Corps as an E-5. I got RIFFED after GW1 - checked out another MOS, but decided the 1st Civ Div at Camp Living Room was my next duty station...(hehe).

Well, don't mind my stingy ways - I'm on a personal finance kick right now, since I'm looking to buy a condo or house soon. But I haven't let the dollar stop me from getting out of the US yet...and the Camino was the first vacation where I actually managed to save money! :wink: :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#53
Vinotinto commented:
A lifer, eh?
Well, YES...Initially a grunt in Nam, then embassy Marine in Pakistan and South Africa, then a mustang officer. I was selected to 0-6, but took my 23 and ran back home. Initially a 2311 (ammo humper/EOD type), then grunt officer, then one of the first primary 02's in the Corps among unrestricted officers.

I managed to DRINK my way (getting back to the thread) thru most really bad countries on the planet, including many in the Middle East and Africa. Alcohol was too expensive in Norway, too watered down in Afghanistan, but never, never to bad to drink.

Salude,
Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#54
Arn said:
I was selected to 0-6, but took my 23 and ran back home. Initially a 2311 (ammo humper/EOD type),
Very impressive, Sir. I did some 2311 stuff as well at my last duty station in the armory at MCRD, San Diego (and a bit at my first, at a rifle range in Camp Pendleton). I had no desire to be a 2111 for 20 years, so being RIFFED wasn't too big a problem for me - I knew I wasn't cut out to be a 20-year man anyway. But, despite some rough spots, I'll always remember the Corps fondly - it did a lot for me (including helping me finish the Camino).

Arn said:
I managed to DRINK my way (getting back to the thread) thru most really bad countries on the planet
I didn't imbibe during my tour - my drinking days came much later in life (my family has a history of alcoholism, so I felt I had to wait until I knew I could handle it). I kind of wish I'd started earlier, though. But you know what they say about overseas tours: you either become a heavy drinker or a PT freak, and I chose the latter... :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#55
Vinotinto wrote: Very impressive, Sir
Vinotinto...we are Marines, I am retired, WE are Marines...no yes, Sir...yes, Sir...three bags full!

Stow the Sir...Arn is who I am...My Brother!

Vinotinto also wrote: you either become a heavy drinker or a PT freak
Then, some of us can do both :D

Though, let me say this, I didn't drink my first 5 years in the Corps.

Semper Fi

Arn
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#56
There are several ´bodega villages´ south of Leon, several of which have cave restaurants. I know a really good one, that specializes in ´paradillas de asados,´or loosely ´parades of roasted meats!´ (good local vino, too, no matter what oenophiles say!)

If you stop by here on your journey maybe we can take a trip over there and have a feast. But we have bodegas right here in our tiny town, and I´d be glad to show you through at least one.

Rebekah
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#57
Rebekah,

You are on!

Vinotinto mentioned a restaurant called Cueva San Simon. Is that the one you speak of? I think I'd like to go there when I come through. I'd also want to try a "local" bodega.

I will be starting at SJPP on April 19th and want to be in SDC by my birthday May 21 and stay for the Feast Day on 23 May.

Does that sound doable?

Buen Camino,
Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#58
Arn said:
I'd also want to try a "local" bodega.
My Spanish friend who lives in Leon took me to a cafe/restaurant/bar where the speciality is a sort of soggy potato chip-like finger food that's pretty good for snacking (it went well with vino tinto, at any rate). Unfortunately, I can't remember the name of the place - perhaps Rebekah might know...?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#59
OK you old Jarheads... I gave up and went and got my provincial map.

the cave place I know best is Valdevimbre (or ´Baldebimbre´ as you see it on signs). Most of the town is underground. It´s about 25 k south of Leon. I really groove on it, and I have a mild case of claustrophobia!
The ´local bodegas´ I mentioned are the little hillside caves that make Moratinos remarkable along the Camino Frances. I wish I had a Euro for every time I´ve been asked if those are ´hobbit houses!´

I have a nice, deep, dry bodega, (i tried to upload a pic, but it didn´t work) but there´s no electricity or water over there. I´d like to put it to work somehow for the pilgrims, but I´ve not been struck with an inspiration yet. (It´s right off the camino, and it´s a steady 63 degrees inside, very cool and lovely in summertime.) Unfortunately quite a few pilgrims see our bodega hill and conclude it is a public toilet. Right in our doorways. Shame. We don´t have restaurants in ours, but a couple of people still make their own rather brutal wine here. (the orujo´s kept at home.)

Anyway, jumping to the soggy potato thing in Leon? Might be patatas al aglio, or even patatas bravas. Leon is a fabulous bar-crawling town, one of the last ones in Spain where the tapas are consistently excellent and FREE with your drinks.

Rebekah
(21 years a US Air Force brat)
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#60
Awe shucks! Don't tell me these are NOT Hobbit houses!!??
 

Attachments

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#61
Anyone in the Boston area? Opportunity to go to a free wine tasting of Spanish wines.

http://www.localwineevents.com/Greater- ... 63146.html

"Innovation" is the word that best describes the viticulture and vinification of Penedes. This is the first region in Spain to use stainless steel equipment and cold-fermentation. Also the first organic vineyards registered in Spain were located in the area. Penedes is the home of 95% of the Cava produced in the country. Rose version of cava represents less than 1% of all cava and the pink color is achieved by the addition of red wine made from Cabernet Sauvignon, Monastrell or Garnacha grapes. Offering hints of strawberry and raspberry fruit with bright citrus acidity, this will be my 'drink of choice' as an aperitif with delightful tapas of cured ham, anchovy fillets and mussels! By the way, the name 'Cava' is derived from the Catalan word for 'cave' or 'cellar'.
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#62
Rebekah, Sil and Vinotinto,

I don't care what kind of houses those are...if they have good food and vino inside..I'm there!

About the wine tasting in the Boston area...what about down here in the Virginia area? We've got taste and class.

As far as "Jarheads"...I'm sure you meant it as a term of endearment. I guess 21 years in the AF might equate to a few years with IBM, or a moon shot. Then again, seriously, serving in any of the forces is both a calling and an honor. Salute!

Will keep in touch!

Arn
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#63
First we have the peregrinos
Then we have the tourogrinos
Sometimes we see perro-grinos

I think Arn and Vinotinto have earned the title - pero-vinos (or will it be pero-drinkos)!
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#64
sillydoll said:
I think Arn and Vinotinto have earned the title - pero-vinos (or will it be pero-drinkos)!
Well, as long as we aren't pero-lushos... :wink: But I'll certainly drink to pero-vinos - Salud! :) :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#65
A Tale of Two Wino’s on the Camino

First we have the peregrinos
Who traveled from a far
They had the right intention
But they didn’t have a car

Then we have the tourogrinos
Who think cheap is all the rage
By plane, by bus, by plush tour bikes
They start at the last stage

Sometimes we see perro-grinos
Those of us who bide the grape
Be it pilgrim, tours or fighting bulls
We keep our wrists in shape

For you see the Buen Camino
Is a Way, however done
And my friend and I salud you all
Cause we never stop at One


Apologies to Sil...none to Vinotinto

Arn
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
#66
I believe we ate at the wonderful underground restaurant - Cueva San Simon. It was in Villadangos del Paramo, and everything about it was memorable! The owner and his family were very welcoming and friendly.

lynne
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#67
Hi,

Vinotinto mentioned the cave restaurant to me a while back. That peaked my interest. Then Rebekah, offered to take me there on my way through. Though, from what she says, there are a number of "cave" eateries in the region.

I've been a wino for a long time. That's why I'll never be an alcoholic. Once I reach for a twist off cap...I know I've had enough.

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#68
Arn said:
That's why I'll never be an alcoholic.
I hate barfing when I drink too much, but it's a good teacher. What's worse, though, is the dual, contradictory feelings of the alcohol buzz (good) and the nausea/vomiting (bad). There's something drastically wrong with that dichotomy.

Since I never touched booze until well into my 30s, I had to learn my limits the hard way - once with vino (during my first visit to Spain), and once with hard liquor in Cancun ("doble" turned out to be the most dangerous word in Spanish I learned)...that was enough for me. :mrgreen: :arrow:
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002-2004-2006-2008-2011-2015
Cycled from Scotland,walked Francias, walked V.D.L.P, winter on Francais, stroll on Englaise
#69
Hi,
I had a significant birthday today - it contains the numbers 5 & 6, but not in that order.
My dilema is - of the amber fluids given as presents - which do I carry in my Sigg flask when I leave home on Saturday to stravaig along the Francais.
The Choices are :- The Famous Grouse (2 litres), Dalwhinnie, Black Bush (Irish), Glenmorangie or Glenmorangie Lasanta, and my favourite, Highland Park.
I leave the choice to the taste and discrimination of the forum members with the promise that if I meet you within the first day or four you can taste what I am carrying, but please be quick I have to pack and the choices are diminishing (Dalwhinnie is tonights choice).
Yours Aye
Dael
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#70
Dael said:
The Choices are :- The Famous Grouse (2 litres), Dalwhinnie, Black Bush (Irish), Glenmorangie or Glenmorangie Lasanta, and my favourite, Highland Park.
I ain't sure which one of those goes well with Cuban puros, but I'd take that little factor into account when choosing yer booze... :wink: 8) :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#71
Dael wrote:which do I carry in my Sigg flask
Dael my lad, Now you're in my favorite sweet spot! Until I was stationed in Scotland, I wasn't much for single malts. That changed and I'm pleased it did!

I've been a fav of Dalwhinney for nearly 30 years. In fact, it was a visit to their distillery that changed my course. Until that time, I thought all whisky had the tart bitter peat highlight, but, as Dalwhinney draws from a glacial lake, the gentleness is marked and I like that. I've also developed a taste for a wee dram now and again of the Islay whisky's. I've a very nice pewter pocket flask that I originally carried Bowmore in (actually it's a Bowmore flask), but most recently, I've come across another island whisky...Isle of Jura. Yessssieeeee! It sets heavy on the tongue, nearly melts right in...a nectar close to honey in flavor. So, I'd say, Jura, Dalwhinney and then Bowmore. My humble opinion of course!

Gosh, a Sigg flask of single malt! Man, we wouldn't be capable of moving for two days, or if we could...would we have sufficient memory to know which way we were headed!

Buen Camino,

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#72
Arn said:
So, I'd say, Jura, Dalwhinney and then Bowmore. My humble opinion of course!
Don't mind if I do...I've copied and pasted your paragraph for later reference - always willing to try whatever might go well with a nice stogie... :mrgreen: :arrow:
 
#73
I forgot to mention that there is another custom in the Basque country... a sidreria. After my Camino i joined family and went to one with them and was so amused at how a sidreria works. You are seated at long tables and everyone eats the same menu. You are served several dishes along with dessert. But the fun part is serving your own cider. The one I went to had 2 rooms with 16 barrels each and which each hold 15000 liters of cider. Each barrel is made from a different type of apple. You open the little faucet and hold your glass real low in order to obtain a head. You drink very little at a time, thereby getting to sample each barrel. It is alcoholic of course and by the end, you will join tables where there is singing, dancing, napkins waving.... I had so much fun!! Here is a you tube video of people serving themselves, so you can see what it´s like. Then if you put sidreria in the search you can find videos of people singing and acting silly. Gotta love those Spaniards!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X78nTj9ptCo
I hope you can find one while in Navarra, maybe in Pamplona? It is definitely a unique experience.
Apple Love
Lillian
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#74
Darn...I can hear Johnny Walker's brain housing group turning at high speed from here..."OOPS, Arn's found another spirit to imbibe!"

Well, yes!

Thanks Lillian, I freely admit that in these later years of my life I've found that a good social life can usually be found among folks surrounding a table of sumptuous food and quaffing, sometimes unique, alcoholic beverages.

The idea of going barrel to barrel...a glass at a time appeals!

My how my list of watering opportunities is growing.

Salud!!

Arn
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#75
I wrote:My how my list of watering opportunities is growing.
Well, that's for My Camino...but here at home, in the present.

My training is moving along famously and, because I've stopped drinking beer (except if at a pub) I've lost 15 pounds. Recognizing that my consumption (a modest amount to be sure) of liquid libations is stalling my weight loss, I've set Lenten abstention of all hard liquor as my goal.

No more bloody Mary's in the morning, or fine box wines at lunch. Out..out I say, to my usual VERY tall gin and tonics, or Mount Gay rum and cokes in the afternoon. Put away the port or Bristol Creme as the evening beckons. Reserve and permit only a fine wine for supper, but just a glass or two...not two bottles.

The late evening time will pass in prayer, for the liquor store drop in sales. I suspect they'll send out the sheriff just to make sure I'm not dead. Though, doing without a fine single malt at bed time will be penance enough for me to think the long sleep an option.

Now...where's that Dalwhinney...it's not Lent yet!

Salud

Arn
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#77
Rebekah,

I am sure I'll try the Cuban Rum..but over the years I've found if you drink enough, it matters not where it came from as long as you still know where you're going!

Salud!

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#78
Rebekah Scott said:
Just wait til you hit Spain. The rum here is the real stuff, From CUBA!
Rum...mmmmm. When we hit a dance club in Santiago, my Spanish friends asked me what I wanted to drink. I said, "rum and coke." So they had the bartender make them (of course I ended up drinking more than one...shuh!) with some sort of high-end rum. I wish I'd gotten the name of that rum of the gods, because it was smooth, delicious, and made me dance like the naughty pilgrim that I was... :mrgreen: :arrow:
 
#79
When I arrive in Santiago this year, I sure hope I find that dancing club. I could dance all night, even if I just walked 35 kilometers! What a great way to celebrate, VT.
About rum.... I am partial to Cruzan Rum, since I grew up in St Croix. It is very good. (had to give it a plug).
In another thread, there was mention of hot wine and wanted to share this. My mom (Aragonesa) told me that before the kids (elementary age) would go to school, her mom would serve them a hot cup of wine, where mom (and siblings) would dip bread and eat it. Then off to school she would go.
Last year when walking with some young (20 somethings) couples, I told them what mom told me she date for breakfast as a child and one of the women said she grew up with something similar. Her mom would cut slices of bread, pour wine over it and sprinkle sugar. This she would eat and go to school. And this is 2 generations later. I asked her if she would serve this to her children when she has them someday and she said sure.
Anyway.... can you imagine doing that stateside? Kids would be removed by DCF in a heartbeat. But it made me think about the different attitudes to alcohol. Alcoholism does not seem to be a concern in Spain when it involves children having wine. Wow.
Dancing,
Lillian
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#80
HI Lilli,
You make an interesting observation. As a teacherin a boys' highschool I am constantly exposed to the national obsession of our teenagers with alcohol. The need to "get a drink', "buy a drink", 'have a drink" occupies so much of their time. When they travel with me to Europe the conversation inevitably turns to "drinking age". It is difficult to explain that in Europe the "drinking age" is virtually a non-issue. It is simply not a "rite of passage" as it is for American youth.

We put such a taboo on even a glass of wine - I offerred it to my son at Christmas when he was "underage" 16, 17, 18) and he declined. Drinking wine isn't cool and besides you don't get drunk from a glass. Now my son is not a big drinker (he is 25 now) but he was uncomfortable drinking in front of adults... My students don't understand why one would drink wine - I guess it doesn't rapidly produce the desired effect.

It is a pity our culture promotes behaviour that fosters the eventual excessive use and consumption of alcohol and all the bad behaviour that accompanies it! Heaven knows I like a drink as much as anyone - but I guess it seems to me that parents ought to be able to teach their kids how to drink .. just like they would teach them anything else! Maybe that's where I'm naïve. :wink:

Sláinte,
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#81
DeirdrE wrote:It is a pity our culture promotes behaviour that fosters the eventual excessive use and consumption of alcohol and all the bad behaviour that accompanies it!
The USA is rapidly turning into a nanny state where "IF it will save just one life" has become a battle cry of folks with little self control or ability to influence others by setting the example without writting new rules.

NOW, to a favorite topic of mine...the consumption of beverages that taste good. I've never intentionally had a drink with the ultimate goal being to get drunk. It's kinda like taking drug, even on the advise of a doctor. I don't like not to be in control of myself. So I don't do it! Hard to believe huh, based on what I've written on this thread. VT will tell you that Marines like to embellish stories about their capacity to drink and ability to last a long time under pressure.

I grew up in an Italian family where dinner saw a 7 ounce glass in front of each child, starting at about 7 years old. Initially, the split was 1 ounce of wine and 6 ounces of water. As you grew older the formula was adjusted 1 ounce each year until you had a full 7 ounces of wine at age 13-14.

Mom always made pasta on Sundays...so did everyone else on the street. What a fantastic smell up and down as folks cooked sauce all day. On Monday, supper was homemade bread, dipped in the extra tomato sauce and warm red wine with sugar.

When I was stationed at the embassy in Paris, I'd walk to work from my apartment in the St Germain area up the Rue St Michel...working my way through the kiosks for crepes liberally soaked in Gran Marnier...good grief that was good.

Salud,
Arn
 
#82
Hi Arn

And while much of the world is sleeping here we are in Australia. interrupting our camino planning, rising early to pick this year's vintage. A couple of whites are already in the shed fermenting while the reds are yet to be picked. Moderation is the word when it comes to the consumption says she who hardly touches a drop.

Cheers
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#83
Hi Rose Louise,

I have fond memories of Australia and hope to go back in the not to distant future. I was scheduled to chaperone as HS biology class with a friend of mine to Australia, but my Camino got in the Way.

My family in South Africa will be putting down the Paarl Valley whites and the Stellenbosch Red soon. I miss the crush! What a time to sit down wind among the vines and sample the newest vintages.

I firmly believe in moderation: never more than two bloody Mary's in the morning, or two pints of dark before lunch. A fine white with a crisp salad for dinner with, a serious Red at Supper. Close out the evening with a superior single malt and to bed.

yesssssssssieeeeeeeeeee!

Arn
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#84
Arn, when you walk el camino again (and I'm sure it will call you back) you should walk in September which is the month of wine and harvesting.
The Fiesta de San Mateo in Logroño (which is the heart of La Rioja) is a celebration of the grape harvest with a big festival.
Catalonia’s Cava week is a weeklong festival dedicated to the Catalan version of champagne.
The Jerez de la Frontera´s Fiestas de Otoño. Three weeks of sherry tasting, horses and flamenco dancers.
Have fun planning your autum pilgrimage!
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#85
Sil wrote:Arn, when you walk el camino again (and I'm sure it will call you back) you should walk in September
Sil, as you know, there are plans afoot for my future and I believe a September Camino is a distinct possibility...maybe in 2010!

Never a bad idea to mix business with pleasure.

Salud,
Arn
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#86
Well Vinotinto...I'm on the wagon!

Yup, no more bloody Mary's in the morning, dark pints at Noon. Gone are the afternoon Rum and Cokes or very fine Gin and tonics. The late night single malts are put on hold.

What might you ask brings about this drastic change...easy Lent!

I figured if I gave up something I really enjoyed and looked forward to, I may gain a few more graces and lose some size in a few more places.

Oh, I do allow myself a glass of wine at lunch and dinner. But only one glass.

Buen dry Camino,

Arn
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#87
Arn,
I was taught by the dear Sisters of Notre Dame who taught me well in elementary school, that one should ADD something for Lent. A little extra rather than always giving the negative connotation of deprivation (I nearly spelled that "depravation" - possibly ok, as well) Anyway, I think you should add some extra daily prayers for your local spirits merchant whom you may well cause to go out of business!

Buen Lenten Camino,
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#88
DeirdrE wrote:local spirits merchant whom you may well cause to go out of business!
I've already alerted the Sheriff's Office not to send someone by to see if I'm OK; just in case the ABC merchant takes notice of my absence and is worried.

Buen Camino...my friends,
Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#89
Arn said:
Well Vinotinto...I'm on the wagon!
Bummer - despite the best efforts of the Confidence Course, I'm still leery of heights, so the wagon is off-limits to me... :wink:

Arn said:
I figured if I gave up something I really enjoyed and looked forward to, I may gain a few more graces and lose some size in a few more places.
I can dig it - good luck! But I've decided that for me, Lent is a time to take up something new vs. give something up. Sometimes thinking outside the box has its benefits...(hehe). :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#90
Vinotinto wrote:Lent is a time to take up something new
Ah My Brother....so, you think that my being on the wagon isn't "something new"?

It's so new that the callus on my hand where I Twist the caps off, on my finger tips where I flip the tabs up and the fingers I wrap my hand around the screw may disappear over the next 40 days,

But never fear...the callus on my trigger finger receives daily attention.

Buen Lenten Camino,

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#91
Arn said:
But never fear...the callus on my trigger finger receives daily attention.
Well, I was just a lowly POG, so my trigger finger is pretty smooth. But of course, I can see the value of getting rid of something for a time to gain a different perspective on things or go to a deeper place of spirituality.

Even so, remember that I have a long church history (23 years), and am also a seminary grad. My current church is big on Lent, and people seem to get off on "giving something up" for Lent. Being the rebel that I can be sometimes, I have a slightly negative knee-jerk reaction to that sort of thing. And heck - I forsook so many things in my youth (watch the movie 40-Year-Old Virgin if you want to form a mental picture of me) that I'm a little bitter about it, and I'm trying to make up for lost time (well, more or less).

So don't blame me if I cast a gimlet eye on Lent - although knowing what I know about you, you are tops on my list for one who is seeking a genuinely sacrificial and spiritual experience vs. a holier-than-thou goombah who is pushing a puffed-up martyrdom on everyone... :wink: :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#92
Vinotinto wrote: vs. a holier-than-thou goombah who is pushing a puffed-up martyrdom on everyone
You grow each time you make a decision...you stop growing when you allow others to make the decisions for you.

Push all you want My Brother...I'm right there with you,

Semper Fi

Arn
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#93
I subscribe to an e-newsletter called "Spanish Fiestas" and this month it is all about Spanish wines. What a waste for a teetotaller - but, I thought I would pass it on to those who might appreciate it - so cheers, jambo, salut, proost, cin cin etc!!

When buying Riojas it's easy to recognise supposed differences in quality according to whether they were labelled Rioja, Rioja Crianza, Rioja Reserva or Rioja Gran Reserva ...

'Rioja' simply means the wine has spent less than a year in an oak barrel whilst 'Vino de Crianza' is wine in its third year, matured for at least one year in the oak cask. 'Reserva' is aged for at least three years with at least one in an oak cask. 'Gran Reserva' is a vintage wine which has aged at least two years in an oak cask and three years in the bottle.

My favourite based on value for money is certainly the 'Crianza' wines. Personally I can't justify the additional cost of buying 'Reservas' and 'Grand Reservas' as I can't appreciate any noticeable jump in quality. As a poor man's Rioja I'd recommend Navarra wine which is produced further east around Pamplona.

A lesser known region abroad is Ribera del Duero which is centred on the town of Aranda del Duero between Madrid and Burgos. Its wines are recognised in international circles as the finest of Spanish reds. A couple to keep an eye out for are Pesquera and Vega Sicilia.

Catalunya is another area producing quality wines, I particularly enjoy Sangre de Toro from the Torres winery. The Penedes region just south-west of Barcelona is famous for its fine white wines and Cava, Spanish champagne at a fraction of the cost of its French counterpart. I'm not a great Cava drinker as it makes me fall over very quickly (!), however, there is one particular white wine I'd like to recommend which is from the opposite side of the peninsular from Catalunya.

In Galicia you'll find a wine region called Rías Baixas, home of the Albariño grape. This grape is difficult to cultivate and yields are low yet it produces what for me is the finest white wine I've
ever tasted. Albariño wines are known as the 'wines of the sea' given that their production is so close to the Atlantic ocean and how they complement the delicious seafood of the region so perfectly. If I lived in Galicia I'm sure I'd be a white wine drinker. The whites from the nearby Ribeiro region are also outstanding.

Another white I'd recommend comes from deepest Andalucia and is one of Spain's best selling wines. It is labelled Barbadillo (Castillo de San Diego) and is produced in Sanlúcar de Barrameda which is one point of Spain's 'sherry triangle' consisting of Jerez de la Frontera, El Puerto de Santa María and Sanlúcar.

This triangle represents the biggest sherry producing area in the world. Jerez is a town we get to visit frequently on our private tours the highlights being a tour of one of the sherry bodegas and a visit to the Royal School of Equestrian Art where you can see a performance of the famous dancing horses.
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#95
Thanks, Sil,
Great information.

Sláinte,
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#97
I think Arn and VT need new code names for when they meet in Santiago! One can be Baco (or Bacchus) and the other Dion (for Dionysos - both are the mythical names for the God of Wine)!

And a bit of trivia: The pre-Lent Carnivals celebrated in Haiti, Costa Rica and many other countries around the world were originally called “Bacchanalia" in honour of Baco the god of wine. The Roman Catholic Church adapted the pagan ritual as a pre-Lenten festival. Because Lent is time of conservatism and fasting, the Catholics took this opportunity to gorge themselves with food and partake in a wild costume festival. They called this festival Carnevale, an Italian word meaning “to put away the meat.”
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
#98
sillydoll said:
They called this festival Carnevale, an Italian word meaning “to put away the meat.”
not quite so, Carne vale means literally "Meat is valid", "Meat is OK", it is a feast just before 30 days of lent

Buen camino!
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#99
You are right - and I am right!

At the beginning of Middle Age the Catholic Church suggested an etymology for the word carnival: the ordinary latin carne- levare, which means “to leave the meat” (also meant that people should stop eating meat every Friday during the period of Lent).
The word was changed at a later date to carnevale, which meant that during carnival time “the meat is allowed”, as a consequence people were allowed to eat meat.

My etymology dictionary says:
Etymology: < Fr carnaval (or It carnevale) < ML carnelevarium < *carnem levare, to remove meat (see harvest & lever); assoc. by folk etym. with ML carne vale, “Flesh, farewell!” < L caro, flesh + vale: see valediction
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Good news for wine drinkers

The University of Santiago de Compostela says that drinking red wine might help ward off cancer, with a glass a day reducing the risk of lung cancer by 13 per cent compared to non-drinkers.
 


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