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Spiritual Journey

BarbyLivie

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 28-May 14, 2018
#1
I have searched but not yet found how people have planned for this spiritual journey. I am Catholic - and this pilgrimmage originated as a Christian journey. I don’t want to go on this walk being distracted - but hope to focus on prayer, petition, getting closer to God through the history of the thousands who have gone before for centuries. I visited with my priest who suggested I read the gospels at very least & the New Testament in total if possible - lectio divino and meditation on the Word. He suggested having a list of people/intentions for which to pray. Any other suggestions out there? Ideas that worked to enrich your walk for greater spiritual benefit? Thank you!
 

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timr

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#4
Whenever a church is open - and I agree it is less often than you'd wish - take 10 mins there. Surprisingly often on the CF you'll find an evening Mass in a sizeable village - about 3 nights in 4 I reckon. In my experience, as a walking (Catholic) priest, always a special welcome for pilgrims. Likewise on Sundays listen of for church bells. I found Mass a few times this way. If you're with someone - try walking together in silence for the first half hour morning and afternoon. I have seen and experienced this in various contexts and people find it powerful. I don't know which route you plan but there are a good number of monasteries and convents along the way. With and without accommodation but you'll always be welcome for morning or evening prayers. Some very special monastery / convent stays. You'll find plenty of threads. I'm walking from Canterbury to Rome right now. Buen Camino.
 
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Aptrail

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Aug/Sept, 2016
Hospilatero May, 2018
Planning:
San Salvador & Primativo May/June '18
#5
Great question Barby! 'While I am not Catholic, I was able to attend mass 14 times of the 26 days it took me to walk from SJPP to Santiago. One of those times was in a church that was part of the English speaking mission to the Camino. I left in tears after being moved by the homily. And, that experience was part of what led me to go from the Camino to Costa Rica to volunteer for a year. The other thing that I like to do is set a meditation timer on my phone and sit for 15 minutes of silence each day. I did that in open churches as well as in open and natural settings. It was quite rich. I am going back next week and plan to do the same as I am able. Hope it is giving you all you need. Buen Camino.
 

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timr

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#6
Great question Barby! 'While I am not Catholic, I was able to attend mass 14 times of the 26 days it took me to walk from SJPP to Santiago. One of those times was in a church that was part of the English speaking mission to the Camino. I left in tears after being moved by the homily. And, that experience was part of what led me to go from the Camino to Costa Rica to volunteer for a year. The other thing that I like to do is set a meditation timer on my phone and sit for 15 minutes of silence each day. I did that in open churches as well as in open and natural settings. It was quite rich. I am going back next week and plan to do the same as I am able. Hope it is giving you all you need. Buen Camino.
@Aptrail Thanks for sharing so beautifully. Humbling and encouraging to hear of the effect of a homily. I will keep you in prayer in the coming weeks as I move towards Rome, as you do to SdC. I'm on walkingtim.com Buen Camino. T
 
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BarbyLivie

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 28-May 14, 2018
#7
Whenever a church is open - and I agree it is less often than you'd wish - take 10 mins there. Surprisingly often on the CF you'll find an evening Mass in a sizeable village - about 3 nights in 4 I reckon. In my experience, as a walking (Catholic) priest, always a special welcome for pilgrims. Likewise on Sundays listen of for church bells. I found Mass a few times this way. If you're with someone - try walking together in silence for the first half hour morning and afternoon. I have seen and experienced this in various contexts and people find it powerful. I don't know which route you plan but there are a good number of monasteries and convents along the way. With and without accommodation but you'll always be welcome for morning or evening prayers. Some very special monastery / convent stays. You'll find plenty of threads. I'm walking from Canterbury to Rome right now. Buen Camino.
Whenever a church is open - and I agree it is less often than you'd wish - take 10 mins there. Surprisingly often on the CF you'll find an evening Mass in a sizeable village - about 3 nights in 4 I reckon. In my experience, as a walking (Catholic) priest, always a special welcome for pilgrims. Likewise on Sundays listen of for church bells. I found Mass a few times this way. If you're with someone - try walking together in silence for the first half hour morning and afternoon. I have seen and experienced this in various contexts and people find it powerful. I don't know which route you plan but there are a good number of monasteries and convents along the way. With and without accommodation but you'll always be welcome for morning or evening prayers. Some very special monastery / convent stays. You'll find plenty of threads. I'm walking from Canterbury to Rome right now. Buen Camino.
Father - thank you so much for these thoughts! I will be doing the Camino Primitivo starting April 28th and will listen for the bells! I will have some solitude and look forward to it. Buen Camino!
 

BarbyLivie

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 28-May 14, 2018
#8
Great question Barby! 'While I am not Catholic, I was able to attend mass 14 times of the 26 days it took me to walk from SJPP to Santiago. One of those times was in a church that was part of the English speaking mission to the Camino. I left in tears after being moved by the homily. And, that experience was part of what led me to go from the Camino to Costa Rica to volunteer for a year. The other thing that I like to do is set a meditation timer on my phone and sit for 15 minutes of silence each day. I did that in open churches as well as in open and natural settings. It was quite rich. I am going back next week and plan to do the same as I am able. Hope it is giving you all you need. Buen Camino.
Thank you, Aptrail - and Buen Camino!
 

timr

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#9
Father - thank you so much for these thoughts! I will be doing the Camino Primitivo starting April 28th and will listen for the bells! I will have some solitude and look forward to it. Buen Camino!
I did Primitivo a couple of years ago and loved every step. Not so many (formal) services on that route. I will keep you in mind. I'm on walkingtim.com Buen Camino Tim
 

Introibo

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances ( March 2015 )
Camino Portugues ( September 2015 )
#10
You can usually find quiet time even when walking with others. Just drop off the pace slightly
and walk say 100yds behind. You're close enough to still be with them but you won't be able
to hear them.

Like Brianne I carried a set of rosary beads with me. If you sit down, close your eyes and start
"mumbling" most people will give you the time of quiet you need. Take several cheap sets with
you as I ended up giving a few away.

Buen Camino
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#11
To use the walk as a moving contemplation is not so hard to do if you are walking alone. There will be others around, but a little guarding the eyes signals to others that you're wanting space (the rosary idea is a good one too!).

And then not to forget that short moments many times are not insignificant - a few minutes here and there all through the day adds up to hours of meditation. And I find singing or chanting helpful: singing the same thing over and over can bring a lovely kind of concentration and contemplation together, especially when you're actually connecting with the meaning of what you are singing -Taizé chants are particularly good ones for this. And the Camino is a great place to do that!

Another suggestion is to make a point to stay at paroquial albergues run by monastics, such as the beautiful ones at Carrion de los Condes and Zabaldika (and others). The heart that goes into what they do is palpable. And there are a number of places along the way where you can participate in vespers at convents or in chapels (Rabe, Fromista, and of course at Rabinal come to mind). These are really special.
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#12
At the beginning of each day after I have put my pack together and am ready to walk, I leave the accommodation and go off to a quiet spot. There I spend a bit of time prepare my physical and spiritual being for the day ahead.

For the physical side, I will engage in stretching my legs, arms, shoulders, back, and feet. For my spiritual side, I will meditate on Jesus, read a quick passage from Psalms, and pray. My focus is about preparing for a day ahead filled with people, and all that such contact and interaction will bring.

Then, as I take my first steps on Camino, I recite this memorized writing (Max Lucado) quietly to myself:

Quote

It’s quiet. It’s early. The sky is still black. The world is still asleep. The day is coming.

In a few moments the day will arrive. It will roar down the track with the rising of the sun. The stillness of the dawn will be exchanged for the noise of the day. The calm of solitude will be replaced by the pounding pace of the human race. The refuge of the early morning will be invaded by decisions to be made and deadlines to be met. For the next twelve hours I will be exposed to the day’s demands. It is now that I must make a choice.

Because of Calvary, I’m free to choose. And so I choose.

I choose love. No occasion justifies hatred; no injustice warrants bitterness. I choose love. Today I will love God and what God loves.

I choose joy. I will invite my God to be the God of circumstance. I will refuse the temptation to be cynical… the tool of the lazy thinker. I will refuse to see people as anything less than human beings, created by God. I will refuse to see any problem as anything less than an opportunity to see God.

I choose peace. I will live forgiven. I will forgive so that I may live.

I choose patience. I will overlook the inconveniences of the world. Instead of cursing the one who takes my place, I’ll invite Him to do so. Rather than complain that the wait is too long, I will thank God for a moment to pray. Instead of clinching my fist at new assignments, I will face them with joy and courage.

I choose kindness. I will be kind to the poor, for they are alone. Kind to the rich, for they are afraid. And kind to the unkind, for such is how God has treated me.

I choose goodness. I will go without a dollar before I take a dishonest one. I will be overlooked before I will boast. I will confess before I will accuse. I choose goodness.

I choose faithfulness. Today I will keep my promises. My debtors will not regret their trust. My associates will not question my word. My wife will not question my love. And my children will never fear that their father will not come home.

I choose gentleness. Nothing is won by force. I choose to be gentle. If I raise my voice, may it be only in praise. If I clench my fist, may it be only in prayer. If I make a demand, may it be only of myself.

I choose self-control. I am a spiritual being. After this body is dead, my spirit will soar. I refuse to let what will rot, rule the eternal. I choose self-control. I will be drunk only by joy. I will be impassioned only by my faith. I will be influenced only by God. I will be taught only by Christ. I choose self-control.

Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. To these I commit my day. If I succeed, I will give thanks. If (and when) I fail, I will seek His grace. And then, when this day is done, I will place my head on my pillow and rest.

UnQuote
 
#13
Whenever a church is open - and I agree it is less often than you'd wish - take 10 mins there. Surprisingly often on the CF you'll find an evening Mass in a sizeable village - about 3 nights in 4 I reckon. In my experience, as a walking (Catholic) priest, always a special welcome for pilgrims. Likewise on Sundays listen of for church bells. I found Mass a few times this way. If you're with someone - try walking together in silence for the first half hour morning and afternoon. I have seen and experienced this in various contexts and people find it powerful. I don't know which route you plan but there are a good number of monasteries and convents along the way. With and without accommodation but you'll always be welcome for morning or evening prayers. Some very special monastery / convent stays. You'll find plenty of threads. I'm walking from Canterbury to Rome right now. Buen Camino.
Blessings on you and for your journey, Father.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2017), Camino de Fisterra (2017), Berlin-Santiago-Muxia (starting 2018)
#14
I'm Protestant but chose the Camino precisely because it originated as (and still is) a Christian route. And my reason for walking was to grieve. But although I had intended to do a lot of active prayer and intercession and Bible reading on the Way, I did a lot less than I had anticipated.

I did, however, take time to stop in churches along the way to just have a quiet moment to lift up praise and worship within the walls of buildings that had seen thousands of hearts reach out to God and call Him Lord. I walked the Norte and so often the view would just take my breath away, and almost always I would take a moment just then to practice gratitude and thank the One who made it all. I experienced hundreds of "kisses from heaven", something beautiful or mystical or 'serendipitous' that touched my soul and either only meant something to me or that only I saw. When I met people who really touched or helped me, I would take time to pray for them when we parted ways, sometimes with them and sometimes on my own. I used the opportunities presented to me to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ and my testimony with people along the way, some of which had never heard what Christians believe, which was also a wonderful way to remind myself of God's love and grace and goodness. I sang songs of worship whenever they came to me, even if there were others present - some were old hymns, some more contemporary, but they ministered to God and He ministered to me and through me in those moments. 'Amazing Grace' became almost an anthem for me and it was both the first song I sang in desperation on the Camino and my song of peace, my Selah, when I reached Finisterre. I would read scripture some nights before bed off my phone and often bits of it would come back to me the next day or a few days later that I could 'chew' on. I let myself laugh or cry when the emotions rose in my heart and I shared them with the Lover of my soul, my Father, my Saviour, my Creator and my Redeemer - the One who came up with the whole idea of emotion and thought and reaction.

I guess my point is that I found that not being too regimented about it helped me to connect with God and keep it a spiritual journey. I can only recall a few times in my life when I felt closer to God than I did before I reached Santiago.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF011, CF012, CP013, CF014, CA015, S.Anton015, CF015, CI015
Ditch Pig016, CF017, CP017, CdN(018)
#15
I maybe going completely off the rails for the OP but I am sorry because we all have different reasons for being on the Camino and IMHO being a Catholic is not important at all.
Somewhat like Viriani (VNwalking) I spend the day in mediation while I walk.
I don't chant or pray or recite the rosary.
My entire Camino is spent in contemplation and personal feelings about my day and things bigger than life, nature and the Camino spirit(uality.)
I stop into churches along the way and get down on my knees to pray for my daughter who I lost to a suicide in 2010.
I try to breathe in the history from each village and count the centuries they have endured since Roman dominance and think about how really very short life is for each of us.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Portuguese
Piamonte
#16
I maybe going completely off the rails for the OP but I am sorry because we all have different reasons for being on the Camino and IMHO being a Catholic is not important at all.
Somewhat like Viriani (VNwalking) I spend the day in mediation while I walk.
I don't chant or pray or recite the rosary.
My entire Camino is spent in contemplation and personal feelings about my day and things bigger than life, nature and the Camino spirit(uality.)
I stop into churches along the way and get down on my knees to pray for my daughter who I lost to a suicide in 2010.
I try to breathe in the history from each village and count the centuries they have endured since Roman dominance and think about how really very short life is for each of us.
Spirituality is a broad church, (no humour intended). I found my first Camino to be very spiritual. I'm not Catholic but I met people who were, and others who had their own reasons for walking: the Falklands veteran carrying a rosary and seeking atonement for his actions of 30 years earlier, a widow grieving her recently-departed husband, the lady trying to come to terms with her disastrous relationship with her father. Like you I respected a thousand years of people walking the route before me. And enjoyed the solitude and companionship, the history and the rural tranquility. Sitting alone in the darkened church at Eunate, and later pointing-out the wild thyme to the German tour group that arrived and walked the final couple of kilometres into Puente la Reina. The second Camino wearing a pink ribbon on my hat for a friend diagnosed with breast cancer, and reassuring another friend back home on subsequent Camino who was similarly diagnosed subsequent to my departure. I didn't intend to embark on a spiritual journey, but that is now for me a large part of the Camino. (Suicide make a shocking interjection into my life only last Friday, by the way: the daughter of a colleague.)

We all have our own reasons and motivations for walking, and for many spirituality is not among them. However, there is no doubt that the Camino makes an indelible impression.
 

BarbyLivie

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 28-May 14, 2018
#17
At the beginning of each day after I have put my pack together and am ready to walk, I leave the accommodation and go off to a quiet spot. There I spend a bit of time prepare my physical and spiritual being for the day ahead.

For the physical side, I will engage in stretching my legs, arms, shoulders, back, and feet. For my spiritual side, I will meditate on Jesus, read a quick passage from Psalms, and pray. My focus is about preparing for a day ahead filled with people, and all that such contact and interaction will bring.

Then, as I take my first steps on Camino, I recite this memorized writing (Max Lucado) quietly to myself:

Quote

It’s quiet. It’s early. The sky is still black. The world is still asleep. The day is coming.

In a few moments the day will arrive. It will roar down the track with the rising of the sun. The stillness of the dawn will be exchanged for the noise of the day. The calm of solitude will be replaced by the pounding pace of the human race. The refuge of the early morning will be invaded by decisions to be made and deadlines to be met. For the next twelve hours I will be exposed to the day’s demands. It is now that I must make a choice.

Because of Calvary, I’m free to choose. And so I choose.

I choose love. No occasion justifies hatred; no injustice warrants bitterness. I choose love. Today I will love God and what God loves.

I choose joy. I will invite my God to be the God of circumstance. I will refuse the temptation to be cynical… the tool of the lazy thinker. I will refuse to see people as anything less than human beings, created by God. I will refuse to see any problem as anything less than an opportunity to see God.

I choose peace. I will live forgiven. I will forgive so that I may live.

I choose patience. I will overlook the inconveniences of the world. Instead of cursing the one who takes my place, I’ll invite Him to do so. Rather than complain that the wait is too long, I will thank God for a moment to pray. Instead of clinching my fist at new assignments, I will face them with joy and courage.

I choose kindness. I will be kind to the poor, for they are alone. Kind to the rich, for they are afraid. And kind to the unkind, for such is how God has treated me.

I choose goodness. I will go without a dollar before I take a dishonest one. I will be overlooked before I will boast. I will confess before I will accuse. I choose goodness.

I choose faithfulness. Today I will keep my promises. My debtors will not regret their trust. My associates will not question my word. My wife will not question my love. And my children will never fear that their father will not come home.

I choose gentleness. Nothing is won by force. I choose to be gentle. If I raise my voice, may it be only in praise. If I clench my fist, may it be only in prayer. If I make a demand, may it be only of myself.

I choose self-control. I am a spiritual being. After this body is dead, my spirit will soar. I refuse to let what will rot, rule the eternal. I choose self-control. I will be drunk only by joy. I will be impassioned only by my faith. I will be influenced only by God. I will be taught only by Christ. I choose self-control.

Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. To these I commit my day. If I succeed, I will give thanks. If (and when) I fail, I will seek His grace. And then, when this day is done, I will place my head on my pillow and rest.

UnQuote
This is excellent - gracias!
 

BarbyLivie

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 28-May 14, 2018
#18
I'm Protestant but chose the Camino precisely because it originated as (and still is) a Christian route. And my reason for walking was to grieve. But although I had intended to do a lot of active prayer and intercession and Bible reading on the Way, I did a lot less than I had anticipated.

I did, however, take time to stop in churches along the way to just have a quiet moment to lift up praise and worship within the walls of buildings that had seen thousands of hearts reach out to God and call Him Lord. I walked the Norte and so often the view would just take my breath away, and almost always I would take a moment just then to practice gratitude and thank the One who made it all. I experienced hundreds of "kisses from heaven", something beautiful or mystical or 'serendipitous' that touched my soul and either only meant something to me or that only I saw. When I met people who really touched or helped me, I would take time to pray for them when we parted ways, sometimes with them and sometimes on my own. I used the opportunities presented to me to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ and my testimony with people along the way, some of which had never heard what Christians believe, which was also a wonderful way to remind myself of God's love and grace and goodness. I sang songs of worship whenever they came to me, even if there were others present - some were old hymns, some more contemporary, but they ministered to God and He ministered to me and through me in those moments. 'Amazing Grace' became almost an anthem for me and it was both the first song I sang in desperation on the Camino and my song of peace, my Selah, when I reached Finisterre. I would read scripture some nights before bed off my phone and often bits of it would come back to me the next day or a few days later that I could 'chew' on. I let myself laugh or cry when the emotions rose in my heart and I shared them with the Lover of my soul, my Father, my Saviour, my Creator and my Redeemer - the One who came up with the whole idea of emotion and thought and reaction.

I guess my point is that I found that not being too regimented about it helped me to connect with God and keep it a spiritual journey. I can only recall a few times in my life when I felt closer to God than I did before I reached Santiago.
Wonderful advice - thank you!!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 9, 2018 -June 27 2018
#19
At the beginning of each day after I have put my pack together and am ready to walk, I leave the accommodation and go off to a quiet spot. There I spend a bit of time prepare my physical and spiritual being for the day ahead.

For the physical side, I will engage in stretching my legs, arms, shoulders, back, and feet. For my spiritual side, I will meditate on Jesus, read a quick passage from Psalms, and pray. My focus is about preparing for a day ahead filled with people, and all that such contact and interaction will bring.

Then, as I take my first steps on Camino, I recite this memorized writing (Max Lucado) quietly to myself:

Quote

It’s quiet. It’s early. The sky is still black. The world is still asleep. The day is coming.

In a few moments the day will arrive. It will roar down the track with the rising of the sun. The stillness of the dawn will be exchanged for the noise of the day. The calm of solitude will be replaced by the pounding pace of the human race. The refuge of the early morning will be invaded by decisions to be made and deadlines to be met. For the next twelve hours I will be exposed to the day’s demands. It is now that I must make a choice.

Because of Calvary, I’m free to choose. And so I choose.

I choose love. No occasion justifies hatred; no injustice warrants bitterness. I choose love. Today I will love God and what God loves.

I choose joy. I will invite my God to be the God of circumstance. I will refuse the temptation to be cynical… the tool of the lazy thinker. I will refuse to see people as anything less than human beings, created by God. I will refuse to see any problem as anything less than an opportunity to see God.

I choose peace. I will live forgiven. I will forgive so that I may live.

I choose patience. I will overlook the inconveniences of the world. Instead of cursing the one who takes my place, I’ll invite Him to do so. Rather than complain that the wait is too long, I will thank God for a moment to pray. Instead of clinching my fist at new assignments, I will face them with joy and courage.

I choose kindness. I will be kind to the poor, for they are alone. Kind to the rich, for they are afraid. And kind to the unkind, for such is how God has treated me.

I choose goodness. I will go without a dollar before I take a dishonest one. I will be overlooked before I will boast. I will confess before I will accuse. I choose goodness.

I choose faithfulness. Today I will keep my promises. My debtors will not regret their trust. My associates will not question my word. My wife will not question my love. And my children will never fear that their father will not come home.

I choose gentleness. Nothing is won by force. I choose to be gentle. If I raise my voice, may it be only in praise. If I clench my fist, may it be only in prayer. If I make a demand, may it be only of myself.

I choose self-control. I am a spiritual being. After this body is dead, my spirit will soar. I refuse to let what will rot, rule the eternal. I choose self-control. I will be drunk only by joy. I will be impassioned only by my faith. I will be influenced only by God. I will be taught only by Christ. I choose self-control.

Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. To these I commit my day. If I succeed, I will give thanks. If (and when) I fail, I will seek His grace. And then, when this day is done, I will place my head on my pillow and rest.

UnQuote
Wow I have just read the most important preparation advice for my upcoming first camino walk
Beautiful
Jane
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#20
At the beginning of each day after I have put my pack together and am ready to walk, I leave the accommodation and go off to a quiet spot. There I spend a bit of time prepare my physical and spiritual being for the day ahead.

For the physical side, I will engage in stretching my legs, arms, shoulders, back, and feet. For my spiritual side, I will meditate on Jesus, read a quick passage from Psalms, and pray. My focus is about preparing for a day ahead filled with people, and all that such contact and interaction will bring.

Then, as I take my first steps on Camino, I recite this memorized writing (Max Lucado) quietly to myself:

Quote

It’s quiet. It’s early. The sky is still black. The world is still asleep. The day is coming.

In a few moments the day will arrive. It will roar down the track with the rising of the sun. The stillness of the dawn will be exchanged for the noise of the day. The calm of solitude will be replaced by the pounding pace of the human race. The refuge of the early morning will be invaded by decisions to be made and deadlines to be met. For the next twelve hours I will be exposed to the day’s demands. It is now that I must make a choice.

Because of Calvary, I’m free to choose. And so I choose.

I choose love. No occasion justifies hatred; no injustice warrants bitterness. I choose love. Today I will love God and what God loves.

I choose joy. I will invite my God to be the God of circumstance. I will refuse the temptation to be cynical… the tool of the lazy thinker. I will refuse to see people as anything less than human beings, created by God. I will refuse to see any problem as anything less than an opportunity to see God.

I choose peace. I will live forgiven. I will forgive so that I may live.

I choose patience. I will overlook the inconveniences of the world. Instead of cursing the one who takes my place, I’ll invite Him to do so. Rather than complain that the wait is too long, I will thank God for a moment to pray. Instead of clinching my fist at new assignments, I will face them with joy and courage.

I choose kindness. I will be kind to the poor, for they are alone. Kind to the rich, for they are afraid. And kind to the unkind, for such is how God has treated me.

I choose goodness. I will go without a dollar before I take a dishonest one. I will be overlooked before I will boast. I will confess before I will accuse. I choose goodness.

I choose faithfulness. Today I will keep my promises. My debtors will not regret their trust. My associates will not question my word. My wife will not question my love. And my children will never fear that their father will not come home.

I choose gentleness. Nothing is won by force. I choose to be gentle. If I raise my voice, may it be only in praise. If I clench my fist, may it be only in prayer. If I make a demand, may it be only of myself.

I choose self-control. I am a spiritual being. After this body is dead, my spirit will soar. I refuse to let what will rot, rule the eternal. I choose self-control. I will be drunk only by joy. I will be impassioned only by my faith. I will be influenced only by God. I will be taught only by Christ. I choose self-control.

Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. To these I commit my day. If I succeed, I will give thanks. If (and when) I fail, I will seek His grace. And then, when this day is done, I will place my head on my pillow and rest.

UnQuote
Awesome Dave. Love the Quote.
 

kirkie

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#21
At the beginning of each day after I have put my pack together and am ready to walk, I leave the accommodation and go off to a quiet spot. There I spend a bit of time prepare my physical and spiritual being for the day ahead.

For the physical side, I will engage in stretching my legs, arms, shoulders, back, and feet. For my spiritual side, I will meditate on Jesus, read a quick passage from Psalms, and pray. My focus is about preparing for a day ahead filled with people, and all that such contact and interaction will bring.

Then, as I take my first steps on Camino, I recite this memorized writing (Max Lucado) quietly to myself:

Quote

It’s quiet. It’s early. The sky is still black. The world is still asleep. The day is coming.

In a few moments the day will arrive. It will roar down the track with the rising of the sun. The stillness of the dawn will be exchanged for the noise of the day. The calm of solitude will be replaced by the pounding pace of the human race. The refuge of the early morning will be invaded by decisions to be made and deadlines to be met. For the next twelve hours I will be exposed to the day’s demands. It is now that I must make a choice.

Because of Calvary, I’m free to choose. And so I choose.

I choose love. No occasion justifies hatred; no injustice warrants bitterness. I choose love. Today I will love God and what God loves.

I choose joy. I will invite my God to be the God of circumstance. I will refuse the temptation to be cynical… the tool of the lazy thinker. I will refuse to see people as anything less than human beings, created by God. I will refuse to see any problem as anything less than an opportunity to see God.

I choose peace. I will live forgiven. I will forgive so that I may live.

I choose patience. I will overlook the inconveniences of the world. Instead of cursing the one who takes my place, I’ll invite Him to do so. Rather than complain that the wait is too long, I will thank God for a moment to pray. Instead of clinching my fist at new assignments, I will face them with joy and courage.

I choose kindness. I will be kind to the poor, for they are alone. Kind to the rich, for they are afraid. And kind to the unkind, for such is how God has treated me.

I choose goodness. I will go without a dollar before I take a dishonest one. I will be overlooked before I will boast. I will confess before I will accuse. I choose goodness.

I choose faithfulness. Today I will keep my promises. My debtors will not regret their trust. My associates will not question my word. My wife will not question my love. And my children will never fear that their father will not come home.

I choose gentleness. Nothing is won by force. I choose to be gentle. If I raise my voice, may it be only in praise. If I clench my fist, may it be only in prayer. If I make a demand, may it be only of myself.

I choose self-control. I am a spiritual being. After this body is dead, my spirit will soar. I refuse to let what will rot, rule the eternal. I choose self-control. I will be drunk only by joy. I will be impassioned only by my faith. I will be influenced only by God. I will be taught only by Christ. I choose self-control.

Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. To these I commit my day. If I succeed, I will give thanks. If (and when) I fail, I will seek His grace. And then, when this day is done, I will place my head on my pillow and rest.

UnQuote
Dave, thank you for sharing how you prepare every day. Your memorised prayer cannot fail to be the best compass. I will copy it. I doubt if I have the capacity to memorise it, but it will be on my phone for reference at any time, in my everyday Camino of life.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#22
Before my first pilgrimage Terry bought me 'Making a Pilgrimage' by Sally Welch. There are also other books here by Sally Welch (list on Amazon) which you might like to check.
For our pilgrimage on the Primitivo we used 'Forty Days', by Gary T Johnson, which is a pdf download. We found it very helpful as it is a selection of readings and thoughts with photos along the Camino. He also has a full year's devotional - the link is in the original pdf.
Buen Camino and God bless you.
 

Harington

una abuelita inglés
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
#25
I have searched but not yet found how people have planned for this spiritual journey. I am Catholic - and this pilgrimmage originated as a Christian journey. I don’t want to go on this walk being distracted - but hope to focus on prayer, petition, getting closer to God through the history of the thousands who have gone before for centuries. I visited with my priest who suggested I read the gospels at very least & the New Testament in total if possible - lectio divino and meditation on the Word. He suggested having a list of people/intentions for which to pray. Any other suggestions out there? Ideas that worked to enrich your walk for greater spiritual benefit? Thank you!
I too am a Catholic, and my four Caminos and the entire Via Francigena have been for spiritual/religious motivations. There is time for prayer and reflections, and I always took people's prayer intentions with me and prayed every day for them. However, I think Christ requires us to turn outward as well as inward on these journeys. He is there in other people, so we should be open to that. I think "see Christ in other people; be Christ to other people" covers it. Sorry to sound pious...but you asked! PS have fun as well _ Jesus did.
 

kirkie

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#26
I too am a Catholic, and my four Caminos and the entire Via Francigena have been for spiritual/religious motivations. There is time for prayer and reflections, and I always took people's prayer intentions with me and prayed every day for them. However, I think Christ requires us to turn outward as well as inward on these journeys. He is there in other people, so we should be open to that. I think "see Christ in other people; be Christ to other people" covers it. Sorry to sound pious...but you asked! PS have fun as well _ Jesus did.
This reminds me of the following:
The Master was in a good mood, so the disciples asked him what steps he had taken in the search for divinity.
He told them that he had first passed into the Land of Action, where he had stayed for some years.
He moved on to the Land of Affliction, and there he remained till his heart had been purified of all inordinate affection.
He then passed into the Land of Love, and whatever remained of his egotism was consumed by the burning flames of Love.
Thus he reached the Land of Silence, where he saw before his eyes all the mysteries of life and death.
The disciples asked if that was the end of his search.
No, he replied.
One day God said to me: Today I will bring you into the most secret sanctuary of the Temple, the very Heart of God. And he was led into the Land of Laughter.
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#27
One day God said to me: Today I will bring you into the most secret sanctuary of the Temple, the very Heart of God. And he was led into the Land of Laughter.
1000 likes.
Wonderful. Wonderful.
And so true.
We take ourselves soooo seriously, and that's part of the problem.
 

BarbyLivie

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 28-May 14, 2018
#28
I too am a Catholic, and my four Caminos and the entire Via Francigena have been for spiritual/religious motivations. There is time for prayer and reflections, and I always took people's prayer intentions with me and prayed every day for them. However, I think Christ requires us to turn outward as well as inward on these journeys. He is there in other people, so we should be open to that. I think "see Christ in other people; be Christ to other people" covers it. Sorry to sound pious...but you asked! PS have fun as well _ Jesus did.
Not at all! I believe the meditation is part of it - but a servant’s Heart is what I will be praying for, too. What hope, joy, happiness can I bring to those whose paths I cross and what can I learn from them. Thanks for your notes!
 

BarbyLivie

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 28-May 14, 2018
#29
This reminds me of the following:
The Master was in a good mood, so the disciples asked him what steps he had taken in the search for divinity.
He told them that he had first passed into the Land of Action, where he had stayed for some years.
He moved on to the Land of Affliction, and there he remained till his heart had been purified of all inordinate affection.
He then passed into the Land of Love, and whatever remained of his egotism was consumed by the burning flames of Love.
Thus he reached the Land of Silence, where he saw before his eyes all the mysteries of life and death.
The disciples asked if that was the end of his search.
No, he replied.
One day God said to me: Today I will bring you into the most secret sanctuary of the Temple, the very Heart of God. And he was led into the Land of Laughter.
Laughter, indeed! Love it!
 

MTowers

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago in 2015 and Camino Finisterre in September 2017
#30
At the beginning of each day after I have put my pack together and am ready to walk, I leave the accommodation and go off to a quiet spot. There I spend a bit of time prepare my physical and spiritual being for the day ahead.

For the physical side, I will engage in stretching my legs, arms, shoulders, back, and feet. For my spiritual side, I will meditate on Jesus, read a quick passage from Psalms, and pray. My focus is about preparing for a day ahead filled with people, and all that such contact and interaction will bring.

Then, as I take my first steps on Camino, I recite this memorized writing (Max Lucado) quietly to myself:

Quote

It’s quiet. It’s early. The sky is still black. The world is still asleep. The day is coming.

In a few moments the day will arrive. It will roar down the track with the rising of the sun. The stillness of the dawn will be exchanged for the noise of the day. The calm of solitude will be replaced by the pounding pace of the human race. The refuge of the early morning will be invaded by decisions to be made and deadlines to be met. For the next twelve hours I will be exposed to the day’s demands. It is now that I must make a choice.

Because of Calvary, I’m free to choose. And so I choose.

I choose love. No occasion justifies hatred; no injustice warrants bitterness. I choose love. Today I will love God and what God loves.

I choose joy. I will invite my God to be the God of circumstance. I will refuse the temptation to be cynical… the tool of the lazy thinker. I will refuse to see people as anything less than human beings, created by God. I will refuse to see any problem as anything less than an opportunity to see God.

I choose peace. I will live forgiven. I will forgive so that I may live.

I choose patience. I will overlook the inconveniences of the world. Instead of cursing the one who takes my place, I’ll invite Him to do so. Rather than complain that the wait is too long, I will thank God for a moment to pray. Instead of clinching my fist at new assignments, I will face them with joy and courage.

I choose kindness. I will be kind to the poor, for they are alone. Kind to the rich, for they are afraid. And kind to the unkind, for such is how God has treated me.

I choose goodness. I will go without a dollar before I take a dishonest one. I will be overlooked before I will boast. I will confess before I will accuse. I choose goodness.

I choose faithfulness. Today I will keep my promises. My debtors will not regret their trust. My associates will not question my word. My wife will not question my love. And my children will never fear that their father will not come home.

I choose gentleness. Nothing is won by force. I choose to be gentle. If I raise my voice, may it be only in praise. If I clench my fist, may it be only in prayer. If I make a demand, may it be only of myself.

I choose self-control. I am a spiritual being. After this body is dead, my spirit will soar. I refuse to let what will rot, rule the eternal. I choose self-control. I will be drunk only by joy. I will be impassioned only by my faith. I will be influenced only by God. I will be taught only by Christ. I choose self-control.

Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. To these I commit my day. If I succeed, I will give thanks. If (and when) I fail, I will seek His grace. And then, when this day is done, I will place my head on my pillow and rest.

UnQuote
Beautiful, inspirational words which I will take with me in September when myself and four friends will be walking from Tui to Santiago. God bless you. Buen Camino x
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
#31
All the above are good advice. Some of mine are the same or similar, and some may be different.
1. Have a spiritual goal, but no expectations. You can control your focus on your goal, but leave the expectations to the Camino. It will provide. And besides, what you receive in the end will undoubtedly exceed any expectations you may have had -- and probably in a different way than you expected.
2. Always keep your heart and your mind open to what you see, what you hear, and who you meet. Everything that happens to one on a spiritual journey happens for a reason. The Camino is one of those "Thin Places" that you may have heard about.
3. Pray for others, and ask others to pray for you. Sooner or later you will need the prayers of others to help you through a tough time -- you will feel those prayers. See my post in www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/the-story-of-your-stone-at-the-cruz-de-ferro.21624/#post-168472 for one way to structure your prayers for others.
4. Attend Mass as often as possible, but don't necessarily let the fact that you may not be able to every day distract you from your overall spiritual goal. One of the rewards of attending Mass, especially in the small, thousand year-old village churches, is the awareness of the continuity of your Christian heritage. The ancestors of that old and wrinkled person sitting next to you probably built that church.
5. Begin and end each day with a simple prayer. We started each day with Joyce Rupp's Pilgrim Prayer from her book, "Walk in a Relaxed Manner," and we finished with a simple prayer of gratitude for our safe taravels and for the experiences of the day.
6. As a spiritual person on a dedicated spiritual journey, be aware that there is someone (you know who) who will always be trying to distract you from your goal or to throw some impediment or obstacle in your way. Don't give in.

Buen Camino y Vaya con Dios...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2014); Madrid, Salvador and Norte or Primitivo (2018)
#33
Whenever a church is open - and I agree it is less often than you'd wish - take 10 mins there. Surprisingly often on the CF you'll find an evening Mass in a sizeable village - about 3 nights in 4 I reckon. In my experience, as a walking (Catholic) priest, always a special welcome for pilgrims. Likewise on Sundays listen of for church bells. I found Mass a few times this way. If you're with someone - try walking together in silence for the first half hour morning and afternoon. I have seen and experienced this in various contexts and people find it powerful. I don't know which route you plan but there are a good number of monasteries and convents along the way. With and without accommodation but you'll always be welcome for morning or evening prayers. Some very special monastery / convent stays. You'll find plenty of threads. I'm walking from Canterbury to Rome right now. Buen Camino.
Tim I am really enjoying your blog on your current journey. Will try to follow when I am out on mine. Hope all continues to go well for you.
 

jflorez

Joe Florez
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: Apr/May/Jun (2018)
#34
I have searched but not yet found how people have planned for this spiritual journey. I am Catholic - and this pilgrimmage originated as a Christian journey. I don’t want to go on this walk being distracted - but hope to focus on prayer, petition, getting closer to God through the history of the thousands who have gone before for centuries. I visited with my priest who suggested I read the gospels at very least & the New Testament in total if possible - lectio divino and meditation on the Word. He suggested having a list of people/intentions for which to pray. Any other suggestions out there? Ideas that worked to enrich your walk for greater spiritual benefit? Thank you!
Thank you for asking this question. I had yet to see any questions focus on the spiritual, religious aspect of this journey. Which, is ok. I hold no expectations of why anyone else is walking. I only know my reasons. But, like you, I am looking at this as a spiritual journey, as a Catholic yearning for a connection to a greater meaning than just a physical challenge. I will be carrying a rosary that was blessed by Pope Francis at the Vatican, and one which I hold dear as it was a gift. I will be reflecting and praying for forgiveness for anyone whom I have trespassed against, and praying for family and friends. I am actually walking the Camino Frances starting this Sunday, the 29th, and also hoping to attend Mass as often as I can along the way, but I am also trying to let go of my modern need to attempt to control every little thing and instead take each day as the joyous gift that it is, grateful that I am able to take the time to do this.

Buen Camino!
 

kirkie

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#35
Thank you for asking this question. I had yet to see any questions focus on the spiritual, religious aspect of this journey. Which, is ok. I hold no expectations of why anyone else is walking. I only know my reasons. But, like you, I am looking at this as a spiritual journey, as a Catholic yearning for a connection to a greater meaning than just a physical challenge. I will be carrying a rosary that was blessed by Pope Francis at the Vatican, and one which I hold dear as it was a gift. I will be reflecting and praying for forgiveness for anyone whom I have trespassed against, and praying for family and friends. I am actually walking the Camino Frances starting this Sunday, the 29th, and also hoping to attend Mass as often as I can along the way, but I am also trying to let go of my modern need to attempt to control every little thing and instead take each day as the joyous gift that it is, grateful that I am able to take the time to do this.

Buen Camino!
jflorez, buen camino. trust yourself, and the camino will open up for what you are meant to receive from it. when you remember, laugh!
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#36
Open your soul to the guidance of the Apostle first, I'd say, also of course to the Gospel, your guardian angel, always to God, and Mary too who is kindly towards Christian pilgrims.

Possibly start a little ledger of prayer intentions and add names to the list before and along the Way as you go ?

You will be distracted on the walk, but don't take it in annoyance, but maybe meditate on the poor woman with a bleed who disturbed the Lord on His own Way for another purpose, and yet He halted and took the time for her that she needed. Seek that same openness in the Spirit.

Remember mostly though that your feet will be doing most of the constant prayer, and your soul -- keep your mind focused where it belongs, which will be the here and now of each next step, each pilgrim menu, each new conversation, that particular horizon, each peculiar problem of where you might find a place to lay your head down.

And seek Masses and the Church as you can. Go to Confession.

Finally, follow everyone else's loving advice too.
 

Fletchonides

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Pamplona (2014)
Pamplona - Burgos (2016)
Burgos - Leon (June 2017)
Leon - SdC (June 2018)
#37
Thank you for asking the question, and loving the responses. I have walked a number of times with my wife, and after a couple of days the first year, we realized that we were praying less than we normally would. We were getting up and out and walking, and then either talking to people or talking about the people we had met. So we evolved the habit that about a half hour into our walk, we would separate and my wife would pray the Rosary, while I would put on worship music on Spotify. It gave us that deliberate space at the start of the day that we need. After a 'while' (defined by how long we needed, when the next stop for coffee was, and who came alongside to talk to us), we would come back together.

Some apps that I find useful are ibreviary/Laudate for morning prayer / daily church readings; Bible/Youversion gives me a verse of the day or reading plan and also audio of the Scripture passages; Pray as You Go or Sacred Space have audio version that you can stick on as you walk. Explore them before you go and find one that you think would work on the journey

Definitely visit Churches / evening prayer / Mass when you can, but don't get hung up on it if you can't. I think we had one Sunday where we left too early for Mass, and arrived at our destination where there was no evening Mass.

The concept of carrying people and thoughts with you became quite a part of my prayer experience that seemed to fit well within the concept of being on pilgrimage. I posted a brief report and photos each day on Facebook, and asked people to let me know if they wanted me to pray for them, so I did. if you have a list of petitions/people you are carrying with you it makes it easier to select some each day. I also asked God for a theme or thought to carry for the day. Some days it was my family, or my work etc. each day I was amazed at how there seemed to be something different to carry with me and reflect on.

How can I be a prayer to the people around me? is something you could ask/pray both before you go and each day as you walk. At every meal I would ask if people minded if I gave thanks for the meal; there are always opportunities to care for people and you won't know until each day unfolds what they will be, either in the conversations you have with people or more practically. The second year, we had our backpacks transported, and that gave us the opportunity one day to carry the backpack of a friend whose back had become too sore that day.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014 (Astorga-Santiago)
Camino de San Salvador 2016
Camino Primitivo Aug 2018
#38
Hi Barby,

I did my first camino with a youth group led by some Jesuit priests and collaborators in 2014. It was a wonderful experience. I also walked the San Salvador in 2016. I have a few recommendations.

1. Start with a mass and organise a pilgrim blessing before departing.

2. Try and participate in the Eucharist whenever possible.

3. Scripture. In my first pilgrimage we used to read one of the Songs of Ascent (Psalms 120 -134) and spend the first hour in silence away from each other repeating the verse, which struck us the most. The Songs of Ascent were prayed by the Jews who walked on pilgrimage to Jersualem. Along the route the Jesuit priests used the Book of Exodus and provided an exegesis and reflections on the text.

4. Repetitive prayer. The Rosary and the Jesus Prayer (popular in Eastern Christianity) can be very helpful. We can unite the repetitive movements of our body with the repetition of our prayer.

5. Journaling can also be another good tool.

6. Appreciating the beauty in creation.

7. Listening to others and sharing your own experiences.

8. You can also join this facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/227889631282496/?ref=br_rs
 

laineylainey

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012 - 2015 CF
2015 SdC-Fisterra-Muxia
2016 Porto-SdC
2017 Salvador&Primitivo
2017 Mozarabe
#39
Thanks to BarbyLivie for posting such a great post and to all the fantastic replies. I have only been a member for a couple of years and recently was becoming a little disheartened with it, but this thread has been the best I have ever read and my heart has filled with love as I have read the responses. What wonderful words, simply wonderful and obviously so well intentioned. I only wish we could all have been in a room, a hall, wherever, just together, to have this conversation. But then I think we all were in a way. I give thanks to God for this, and BarbyLivie have a wonderful Camino. Remember though your journey can be part of others journey too and you may find your spiritual experience is enhanced by those who share your path.
Buen Camino from a grateful peregrina
 
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago '11, Logroño to Leon '12, Porto to Santiago '14, Gubbio to Spoleto '17.
#40
I have searched but not yet found how people have planned for this spiritual journey. I am Catholic - and this pilgrimmage originated as a Christian journey. I don’t want to go on this walk being distracted - but hope to focus on prayer, petition, getting closer to God through the history of the thousands who have gone before for centuries. I visited with my priest who suggested I read the gospels at very least & the New Testament in total if possible - lectio divino and meditation on the Word. He suggested having a list of people/intentions for which to pray. Any other suggestions out there? Ideas that worked to enrich your walk for greater spiritual benefit? Thank you!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago '11, Logroño to Leon '12, Porto to Santiago '14, Gubbio to Spoleto '17.
#41
I unexpected find myself face to face with Jesus when I encounter a stranger and am distracted with my feet, or hunger, or weather, or worry... God calls me back to spiritual discipline through those I encounter.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#42
in a church that was part of the English speaking mission to the Camino. I left in tears after being moved by the homily. And, that experience was part of what led me to go from the Camino to Costa Rica to volunteer for a year. .
Wow, this is very pleasing to see! I was part of that Camino Chaplaincy Meseta outreach, the Mass you attended was likely in Terradillos de los Templarios. The meseta outreach is no more, but I feel so good knowing someone was so touched by it they went on to serve, too!
Thank you for sharing this.
 

Wiebmer

Ning Wiebmer
Donating Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Frances, 500 miles. 2016 Via Francigena, 200 miles. 2018 Frances Burgos to Sarria.
#43
At the beginning of each day after I have put my pack together and am ready to walk, I leave the accommodation and go off to a quiet spot. There I spend a bit of time prepare my physical and spiritual being for the day ahead.

For the physical side, I will engage in stretching my legs, arms, shoulders, back, and feet. For my spiritual side, I will meditate on Jesus, read a quick passage from Psalms, and pray. My focus is about preparing for a day ahead filled with people, and all that such contact and interaction will bring.

Then, as I take my first steps on Camino, I recite this memorized writing (Max Lucado) quietly to myself:

Quote

It’s quiet. It’s early. The sky is still black. The world is still asleep. The day is coming.

In a few moments the day will arrive. It will roar down the track with the rising of the sun. The stillness of the dawn will be exchanged for the noise of the day. The calm of solitude will be replaced by the pounding pace of the human race. The refuge of the early morning will be invaded by decisions to be made and deadlines to be met. For the next twelve hours I will be exposed to the day’s demands. It is now that I must make a choice.

Because of Calvary, I’m free to choose. And so I choose.

I choose love. No occasion justifies hatred; no injustice warrants bitterness. I choose love. Today I will love God and what God loves.

I choose joy. I will invite my God to be the God of circumstance. I will refuse the temptation to be cynical… the tool of the lazy thinker. I will refuse to see people as anything less than human beings, created by God. I will refuse to see any problem as anything less than an opportunity to see God.

I choose peace. I will live forgiven. I will forgive so that I may live.

I choose patience. I will overlook the inconveniences of the world. Instead of cursing the one who takes my place, I’ll invite Him to do so. Rather than complain that the wait is too long, I will thank God for a moment to pray. Instead of clinching my fist at new assignments, I will face them with joy and courage.

I choose kindness. I will be kind to the poor, for they are alone. Kind to the rich, for they are afraid. And kind to the unkind, for such is how God has treated me.

I choose goodness. I will go without a dollar before I take a dishonest one. I will be overlooked before I will boast. I will confess before I will accuse. I choose goodness.

I choose faithfulness. Today I will keep my promises. My debtors will not regret their trust. My associates will not question my word. My wife will not question my love. And my children will never fear that their father will not come home.

I choose gentleness. Nothing is won by force. I choose to be gentle. If I raise my voice, may it be only in praise. If I clench my fist, may it be only in prayer. If I make a demand, may it be only of myself.

I choose self-control. I am a spiritual being. After this body is dead, my spirit will soar. I refuse to let what will rot, rule the eternal. I choose self-control. I will be drunk only by joy. I will be impassioned only by my faith. I will be influenced only by God. I will be taught only by Christ. I choose self-control.

Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. To these I commit my day. If I succeed, I will give thanks. If (and when) I fail, I will seek His grace. And then, when this day is done, I will place my head on my pillow and rest.

UnQuote
This is so beautiful. Thank you.
 

Wiebmer

Ning Wiebmer
Donating Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Frances, 500 miles. 2016 Via Francigena, 200 miles. 2018 Frances Burgos to Sarria.
#44
I have searched but not yet found how people have planned for this spiritual journey. I am Catholic - and this pilgrimmage originated as a Christian journey. I don’t want to go on this walk being distracted - but hope to focus on prayer, petition, getting closer to God through the history of the thousands who have gone before for centuries. I visited with my priest who suggested I read the gospels at very least & the New Testament in total if possible - lectio divino and meditation on the Word. He suggested having a list of people/intentions for which to pray. Any other suggestions out there? Ideas that worked to enrich your walk for greater spiritual benefit? Thank you!
Aren't you blessed to walk this lovely Camino as a Catholic....it has a special meaning for us. It's our history.

My first Camino (2015), during the harder walks, I identified "Mea Culpa Mountains". I said a special prayer for people I had wronged -- hurt or been insensitive to. My pilgrimage had a penitential aspect. We also met a physically challenged pilgrim, who when someone tried to help with his burden said, "I am offering up my suffering". Sacramental suffering can be a beautiful and focused prayer.

But it's not all about the challenges -- it's also a walk of beauty and gratitude. I often listen to chant music or the Rosary.

Have a blessed pilgrimage -- you're joining a powerful group of other pilgrims who have been doing this with a spiritual purpose for over 1000 years!
 

Bogong

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
First, March 2014
#45
Barbie,
What a wonderful strand this is!

It shows a whole kaleidoscope of experiences and approaches, many unique as we are all individual.

For me, the whole of life is a spiritual journey. The Camino is a chapter in it. I didn’t think too much about pre-planning (for years I had walked/run 10k or so nearly every morning, mainly through the bush, and used this as prayer time) but did have a time in solitary prayer in the Cathedral at Bayonne before heading off. It was still winter, and day after day I walked mostly alone. Every day i would choose a different prayer point, progressively working through my family and friends, also silent gratitude and thanks for all around me had to offer. And read through several of the Gospels on the way. Met up with some devout people at times on the way, and just about everyone was helpful and friendly.

But I did have an experience at first light alone on the Meseta. An overwhelming sense that the whole universe was puny and that there was somethinh much greater in which it was all enveloped. These presence was Love.

So lots of advice and offered experiences. But it will be uniquely you.

De Colores

Bogong

PS Try to get hold of a copy of John Rafferty’s book which is a chronology of the experiences of a range of people of different faiths.
 
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#46
So enjoyed reading these posts. Thank you. How we express our Religion/Spirituality is intensely personal. The word goodness is mentioned a lot in these responses--kindness, lightness, compassion. Surely these qualities are the finest expression of the human spirit.

It may seem an obvious suggestion, Barby, but reflecting (journal writing/poetry) can take you to deeper places.

The idea of pilgrimage is so ancient and it is possible these trails were walked before medieval Christian pilgrims. It seems an innate drive, to know one's self and one's connection to the great cosmic web of life. Walking in Nature can truly serve to open one's heart. One thing seems certain; love allows other things to grow and flourish....
 

Dinah Shaw

Volcano Climber
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte and Frances Sept 6 - Oct 11, 2016
#47
At the beginning of each day after I have put my pack together and am ready to walk, I leave the accommodation and go off to a quiet spot. There I spend a bit of time prepare my physical and spiritual being for the day ahead.

For the physical side, I will engage in stretching my legs, arms, shoulders, back, and feet. For my spiritual side, I will meditate on Jesus, read a quick passage from Psalms, and pray. My focus is about preparing for a day ahead filled with people, and all that such contact and interaction will bring.

Then, as I take my first steps on Camino, I recite this memorized writing (Max Lucado) quietly to myself:

Quote

It’s quiet. It’s early. The sky is still black. The world is still asleep. The day is coming.

In a few moments the day will arrive. It will roar down the track with the rising of the sun. The stillness of the dawn will be exchanged for the noise of the day. The calm of solitude will be replaced by the pounding pace of the human race. The refuge of the early morning will be invaded by decisions to be made and deadlines to be met. For the next twelve hours I will be exposed to the day’s demands. It is now that I must make a choice.

Because of Calvary, I’m free to choose. And so I choose.

I choose love. No occasion justifies hatred; no injustice warrants bitterness. I choose love. Today I will love God and what God loves.

I choose joy. I will invite my God to be the God of circumstance. I will refuse the temptation to be cynical… the tool of the lazy thinker. I will refuse to see people as anything less than human beings, created by God. I will refuse to see any problem as anything less than an opportunity to see God.

I choose peace. I will live forgiven. I will forgive so that I may live.

I choose patience. I will overlook the inconveniences of the world. Instead of cursing the one who takes my place, I’ll invite Him to do so. Rather than complain that the wait is too long, I will thank God for a moment to pray. Instead of clinching my fist at new assignments, I will face them with joy and courage.

I choose kindness. I will be kind to the poor, for they are alone. Kind to the rich, for they are afraid. And kind to the unkind, for such is how God has treated me.

I choose goodness. I will go without a dollar before I take a dishonest one. I will be overlooked before I will boast. I will confess before I will accuse. I choose goodness.

I choose faithfulness. Today I will keep my promises. My debtors will not regret their trust. My associates will not question my word. My wife will not question my love. And my children will never fear that their father will not come home.

I choose gentleness. Nothing is won by force. I choose to be gentle. If I raise my voice, may it be only in praise. If I clench my fist, may it be only in prayer. If I make a demand, may it be only of myself.

I choose self-control. I am a spiritual being. After this body is dead, my spirit will soar. I refuse to let what will rot, rule the eternal. I choose self-control. I will be drunk only by joy. I will be impassioned only by my faith. I will be influenced only by God. I will be taught only by Christ. I choose self-control.

Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. To these I commit my day. If I succeed, I will give thanks. If (and when) I fail, I will seek His grace. And then, when this day is done, I will place my head on my pillow and rest.

UnQuote
That is powerful. I love it. Thank you
 

Dominick

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via De La Plata (2018)
#48
I have searched but not yet found how people have planned for this spiritual journey. I am Catholic - and this pilgrimmage originated as a Christian journey. I don’t want to go on this walk being distracted - but hope to focus on prayer, petition, getting closer to God through the history of the thousands who have gone before for centuries. I visited with my priest who suggested I read the gospels at very least & the New Testament in total if possible - lectio divino and meditation on the Word. He suggested having a list of people/intentions for which to pray. Any other suggestions out there? Ideas that worked to enrich your walk for greater spiritual benefit? Thank you!
Hola Amiga,
How refreshing to read your comment regarding such an important topic and what I believe is the foundation of El Camino. While I respect everyone’s reason for walking El Camino, and realize that spirituality can be a very personal matter; when I first started reading comments from different forums/websites, I was a little surprised that the spiritual aspect of El Camino is not talked about too often, even though a “Pilgrim” is often defined as a person who takes a journey to a sacred place for religious reasons (such as yourself and many of us).
With the grace of God, I will be walking the “Via De La Plata” in September/October of 2018, and intend to make Mi Camino very much of a spiritual journey. One of the approaches that I use to put myself into a spiritual state-of-mind is “fasting”. I am not necessarily talking about a food fast (especially during a walk), but fasting with regards to some other aspects of my life which I am willing to give up – that may be hindering me from getting closer to God; and with God’s grace & help, I hope to be “open” to hearing & understanding what God is saying to me. I also like some of the other thoughts that people have mentioned: prayer, reading scripture, meditating, going to church, etc. I am a long-distance hiker, and I appreciate the benefits of being out in nature and realize how nature can have a spiritual impact on one’s psyche (if one is open to that). I also think there is something uplifting and reviving regarding the solitude found in walking alone. I am not averse to walking with others, but have found that groups (large & some small) can sometimes be a distraction, unless one is lead to walk and/or interact with a group.
I wish you the best on your journey - Perregrino.
Dominick
“The journey is the destination”
 

MoniRose

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(5/28-7/4, 2012) Camino Frances - SJPP to Santiago
(7/22-8/2, 2013) Camino Finesterra
(?) Camino Le Puy
#49
When I first heard of the Camino in Oct 2011, I was compelled to go by something bigger than myself. Thus, my spiritual journey began. Through tears of both fear and excitement, never knowing “Why me?”, I prayed that I could trust God.
I travelled alone and began my walk on May 28, 2012, feeling completely inadequate...and trusting God.
Every step of the way was a prayer and God showed himself daily in the people I met.
If you look you will find Him. Your spiritual journey will happen as you stay focus on the Spirit.
Buen Camino ❤️
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France (2015 and 2016)
#50
May I suggest, if you have a smart phone, download the Universalis App, and use it to say the Divine Office; if you can, try to say every one of the offices, morning, readings, mid-morning, midday, afternoon, evening and night prayers. But morning, evening and night prayer especially. There will be lots of open Cathedrals, churches, shrines and hermitages, as well as beautiful quiet spots to pray. You can say the shorter offices over a cup of coffee too. The Universalis App makes it so easy - everything is right there for you. I also set a simple alarm for noon as a reminder and said the Angelus when the alarm went off. You don't even need to stop walking for the Angelus. Buen Camino.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#51
This is one of the most important and encouraging threads I have read lately. Thank you @BarbyLivie ☺ from one happy peregrina.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Catalan, (May-July 2012), Via Francigena (Barcelona to Rome - 2015), Via Francigena (Rome to Canterbury - 2016)
#52
Whenever a church is open - and I agree it is less often than you'd wish - take 10 mins there. Surprisingly often on the CF you'll find an evening Mass in a sizeable village - about 3 nights in 4 I reckon. In my experience, as a walking (Catholic) priest, always a special welcome for pilgrims. Likewise on Sundays listen of for church bells. I found Mass a few times this way. If you're with someone - try walking together in silence for the first half hour morning and afternoon. I have seen and experienced this in various contexts and people find it powerful. I don't know which route you plan but there are a good number of monasteries and convents along the way. With and without accommodation but you'll always be welcome for morning or evening prayers. Some very special monastery / convent stays. You'll find plenty of threads. I'm walking from Canterbury to Rome right now. Buen Camino.
I walked Barcelona to Rome a few years ago. I was fortunate enough to attend a mass in a church in Torino where the priest gave such a moving homily I can still remember it. (I don't speak Italian, but I didn't need to - the Holy Spirit interpreted everything.)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Catalan, (May-July 2012), Via Francigena (Barcelona to Rome - 2015), Via Francigena (Rome to Canterbury - 2016)
#53
I have searched but not yet found how people have planned for this spiritual journey. I am Catholic - and this pilgrimmage originated as a Christian journey. I don’t want to go on this walk being distracted - but hope to focus on prayer, petition, getting closer to God through the history of the thousands who have gone before for centuries. I visited with my priest who suggested I read the gospels at very least & the New Testament in total if possible - lectio divino and meditation on the Word. He suggested having a list of people/intentions for which to pray. Any other suggestions out there? Ideas that worked to enrich your walk for greater spiritual benefit? Thank you!
Don't be concerned with planning. You'll be led. Six years after my Camino Catalan, I still suffer from PTSD (post-transcendental stress disorder). All I can recommend is lots of quiet time. Your intention for "prayer, petition, getting closer to God through the history of the thousands who have gone before for centuries" is exactly on the mark. God bless.
 

Baba John

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Frances, 2017 Frances, (2019 ???)
#54
Aren't you blessed to walk this lovely Camino as a Catholic....it has a special meaning for us. It's our history.

My first Camino (2015), during the harder walks, I identified "Mea Culpa Mountains". I said a special prayer for people I had wronged -- hurt or been insensitive to. My pilgrimage had a penitential aspect. We also met a physically challenged pilgrim, who when someone tried to help with his burden said, "I am offering up my suffering". Sacramental suffering can be a beautiful and focused prayer.

But it's not all about the challenges -- it's also a walk of beauty and gratitude. I often listen to chant music or the Rosary.

Have a blessed pilgrimage -- you're joining a powerful group of other pilgrims who have been doing this with a spiritual purpose for over 1000 years!
My reaction is to say "Aren't you blessed to walk this lovely Camino as a --------" Yes, you are.
 

Baba John

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Frances, 2017 Frances, (2019 ???)
#55
At the beginning of each day after I have put my pack together and am ready to walk, I leave the accommodation and go off to a quiet spot. There I spend a bit of time prepare my physical and spiritual being for the day ahead.

For the physical side, I will engage in stretching my legs, arms, shoulders, back, and feet. For my spiritual side, I will meditate on Jesus, read a quick passage from Psalms, and pray. My focus is about preparing for a day ahead filled with people, and all that such contact and interaction will bring.

Then, as I take my first steps on Camino, I recite this memorized writing (Max Lucado) quietly to myself:

Quote

It’s quiet. It’s early. The sky is still black. The world is still asleep. The day is coming.

In a few moments the day will arrive. It will roar down the track with the rising of the sun. The stillness of the dawn will be exchanged for the noise of the day. The calm of solitude will be replaced by the pounding pace of the human race. The refuge of the early morning will be invaded by decisions to be made and deadlines to be met. For the next twelve hours I will be exposed to the day’s demands. It is now that I must make a choice.

Because of Calvary, I’m free to choose. And so I choose.

I choose love. No occasion justifies hatred; no injustice warrants bitterness. I choose love. Today I will love God and what God loves.

I choose joy. I will invite my God to be the God of circumstance. I will refuse the temptation to be cynical… the tool of the lazy thinker. I will refuse to see people as anything less than human beings, created by God. I will refuse to see any problem as anything less than an opportunity to see God.

I choose peace. I will live forgiven. I will forgive so that I may live.

I choose patience. I will overlook the inconveniences of the world. Instead of cursing the one who takes my place, I’ll invite Him to do so. Rather than complain that the wait is too long, I will thank God for a moment to pray. Instead of clinching my fist at new assignments, I will face them with joy and courage.

I choose kindness. I will be kind to the poor, for they are alone. Kind to the rich, for they are afraid. And kind to the unkind, for such is how God has treated me.

I choose goodness. I will go without a dollar before I take a dishonest one. I will be overlooked before I will boast. I will confess before I will accuse. I choose goodness.

I choose faithfulness. Today I will keep my promises. My debtors will not regret their trust. My associates will not question my word. My wife will not question my love. And my children will never fear that their father will not come home.

I choose gentleness. Nothing is won by force. I choose to be gentle. If I raise my voice, may it be only in praise. If I clench my fist, may it be only in prayer. If I make a demand, may it be only of myself.

I choose self-control. I am a spiritual being. After this body is dead, my spirit will soar. I refuse to let what will rot, rule the eternal. I choose self-control. I will be drunk only by joy. I will be impassioned only by my faith. I will be influenced only by God. I will be taught only by Christ. I choose self-control.

Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. To these I commit my day. If I succeed, I will give thanks. If (and when) I fail, I will seek His grace. And then, when this day is done, I will place my head on my pillow and rest.

UnQuote
Gracias Senor. Peace be with you.
 

Baba John

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Frances, 2017 Frances, (2019 ???)
#56
I have searched but not yet found how people have planned for this spiritual journey. I am Catholic - and this pilgrimmage originated as a Christian journey. I don’t want to go on this walk being distracted - but hope to focus on prayer, petition, getting closer to God through the history of the thousands who have gone before for centuries. I visited with my priest who suggested I read the gospels at very least & the New Testament in total if possible - lectio divino and meditation on the Word. He suggested having a list of people/intentions for which to pray. Any other suggestions out there? Ideas that worked to enrich your walk for greater spiritual benefit? Thank you!
Ms. Barby (Aussie???)

What to say???

The Camino cliches...Walk your own pace...If you leave something behind, don't go back for it...The Camino will show you...Man (in your case woman) makes plans, and God laughs (universal cliche),...etc.,etc.,etc.
I am not a Catholic. I am not really sure if I am a Christian. I don't know if God really cares???

I go into every church that is open and attend every mass and take communion when offered, which seems to be at every mass. I have never gone to confession. How much time does one priest have??? When I walk I have three mantras that I use. One is from a Hindu holy man whom I came into contact with many years ago. The second is the Our Father that I learned even many more years ago in a church in Lexington, Massachusetts, and the third is the Hail Mary that I copied down from the stone walls at a shrine dedicated to Mary in La Crosse, Wisconsin a few years ago. They present themselves, and I accept, I repeat.

When I was eleven or twelve I purchased a slim volume entitled All Men Seek God that had quotes from all the major religions, philosophers, scientists, agnostics, atheists... It was an impulse buy...really.
My whole life has been a spiritual journey that has just seemingly 'appeared'. Sometimes I go right, and sometimes I go left. When I look back I have no regrets. What is that lyric from the Rolling Stones??? "We don't always get what we want, we get what we need". And, Mother Theresa's thought "We accept" don't be foolish (???), but in the end "We accept".

As a unstructured pilgrim my knee jerk response is to advise you to 'put one foot in front of the other and just walk', but a woman, who just happens to be a Catholic of some renowned, Theresa de Jesus (Avila) whom I met in a library in SE Iowa spent her life talking and serving God (today we would say "she had God on her speedial---literally). Worked within the framework of a very structured church and with many confessors who were not within a country mile of her in developed spiritual consciousness. She persisted, and miracles appeared in spite of fear and small minds.
I mention this because who am I to say weather you should walk like me, or a more structured Catholic paradigm like Theresa. In the end you will walk your walk. Your Camino will be your Camino (another cliche). And, whatever happens, I feel somewhat certain that you 'will get what you need', and you will put 'put one foot in front of the other' (well, I guess you could take the bus, but it's just not the same).

Theresa of Avila: A Souls Progress/by Cathleen Medwick If you have the time and the inclination Avila is a lovely city and inhabited (still) by a great soul.

My computer says 9:37 CST, Sunday, April 29th 2018. You have been at it for one day(?). Your almost there. I'm writing from the Abbey Guesthouse on St. John's campus in Collegeville, Minnesota, USA. There is ice still on the lake (although melting), and hopefully the Robins can start building nests within the week. It has been a very long winter.
Your journey may seem like it stretches out in front of you, but the days will collapse very quickly and you will be closing in on Santiago only to feel the often felt twin pangs of joy and sadness. It is the duality that we live in. It begins and it ends.

My blessings to you and all your fellow pilgrims.

Buen Camino
 
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Camino(s) past & future
El Ingles - Finisterre . 2017
#57
Peace be with you on your pilgrimage Barby. May I invite you to pray this prayer of St. Francis ( that he actually pray this a lot). When Francis was discerning God's will.
Take rosary or any prayer beads will do. Try to walk at two hours by yourself if it's all possible ... Use this prayer as a mantra as you walk.The pray goes like this " who are you, Lord my God, Who am I? ....." Try to have the beads in one hand between your index finger and thumb.When you finish one verse then move to the next bead etc. Or if it's too difficult ...just pray the prayer without beads when you are walking. Although if you have the beads in your when are praying another pilgrim won't think you've been on the Camino to long and you mumbling to yourself :) When you stop for a break or before you start in the morning and or the evening. You can't pray this too much. Silence is the key.
I'm a spiritual Direction most of the folks find it very powerful. Anyway, I hope this is useful? I will hold you in my prayers. Buen Camino
 

Baba John

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Frances, 2017 Frances, (2019 ???)
#58
Peace be with you on your pilgrimage Barby. May I invite you to pray this prayer of St. Francis ( that he actually pray this a lot). When Francis was discerning God's will.
Take rosary or any prayer beads will do. Try to walk at two hours by yourself if it's all possible ... Use this prayer as a mantra as you walk.The pray goes like this " who are you, Lord my God, Who am I? ....." Try to have the beads in one hand between your index finger and thumb.When you finish one verse then move to the next bead etc. Or if it's too difficult ...just pray the prayer without beads when you are walking. Although if you have the beads in your when are praying another pilgrim won't think you've been on the Camino to long and you mumbling to yourself :) When you stop for a break or before you start in the morning and or the evening. You can't pray this too much. Silence is the key.
I'm a spiritual Direction most of the folks find it very powerful. Anyway, I hope this is useful? I will hold you in my prayers. Buen Camino

Silence is the key.

From out of nothing came everything. And when everything is attained, you will be back at the beginning; back to nothing.

This may become my 4th mantra. Thank you Br. Tandy.

Peace be with you...all of you

Buen Camino.
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
#59
...
PS Try to get hold of a copy of John Rafferty’s book which is a chronology of the experiences of a range of people of different faiths.
I'll second @Bogong's recommendation about John's book. It's a collection of brief (one or two pages) reflections -- very easy to read and many of the reflections are quite meaningful.
 

Sharonn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2015
Camino Portugues 2017
#60
I have searched but not yet found how people have planned for this spiritual journey. I am Catholic - and this pilgrimmage originated as a Christian journey. I don’t want to go on this walk being distracted - but hope to focus on prayer, petition, getting closer to God through the history of the thousands who have gone before for centuries. I visited with my priest who suggested I read the gospels at very least & the New Testament in total if possible - lectio divino and meditation on the Word. He suggested having a list of people/intentions for which to pray. Any other suggestions out there? Ideas that worked to enrich your walk for greater spiritual benefit? Thank you!
Hi Barbi
Good to read about your motivation to walk a Christian pilgrimage. My family and I have walked 2 caminos so far. We began each day by praying together. We trusted God to guide us daily. The camino provides an ideal opportunity to walk and talk with God as there are so many long quiet stretches. I took some daily devotional pages with and a small bible. Of course all of this is available on your smart phone. Many people walking the camino are searching for answers in life or have decisions to make. In short many camino pilgrims need prayer. Bless you and Buen Camino.
 

BoAbney

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2015)
#61
I have searched but not yet found how people have planned for this spiritual journey. I am Catholic - and this pilgrimmage originated as a Christian journey. I don’t want to go on this walk being distracted - but hope to focus on prayer, petition, getting closer to God through the history of the thousands who have gone before for centuries. I visited with my priest who suggested I read the gospels at very least & the New Testament in total if possible - lectio divino and meditation on the Word. He suggested having a list of people/intentions for which to pray. Any other suggestions out there? Ideas that worked to enrich your walk for greater spiritual benefit? Thank you!
My wife and I set pray intentions every morning before our walk, to focus on during the day, and start walking with a Hail Mary and an Our Father. We'd stop at stop at small chapels and churches along the Way for a break and quiet prayer. But, as many have unfortunately said, don't expect a lot of open churches or frequent Mass opportunities. We did the Primitivo over Holy Week 2017 and it was tough to find Masses. Good luck and Buen Camino!

https://abneycamino.wordpress.com/category/camino-daily/
 

MoniRose

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(5/28-7/4, 2012) Camino Frances - SJPP to Santiago
(7/22-8/2, 2013) Camino Finesterra
(?) Camino Le Puy
#62
I walked Barcelona to Rome a few years ago. I was fortunate enough to attend a mass in a church in Torino where the priest gave such a moving homily I can still remember it. (I don't speak Italian, but I didn't need to - the Holy Spirit interpreted everything.)
One beautiful thing about the Mass is that it is the same all over the world. I attended many on the Camino and was able to participate in spite of it being in Spanish. I am looking forward to doing the same this summer in Italy.
Monica
 


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