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Stages on Camino de Levante

S

Stephen McLoughlin

Guest
#1
Hi can anyone advise me where I would get information on the stages on Camino de Levante please...?

I’m aware of the book, it’s in the post, I’m hungry for information on my next Camino! (Even though I finished my last one one Wed!)

Thanks in advance!

Stephen
 

sulu

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ronces-SdC (03-04/10);Oporto-SdC (10/2011); VdlP via Portugal 03/04 2012/2013;Part Invierno 2012; Toulouse to Sarrance 2012; Ingles to Muxia June 2013 Cami Catala and Aragones 2014; El Salvador & Primitivo 2014; Camino de Madrid 2016; Levante 2015,2017
#2
You can see the book on line, though only in the Spanish version.
http://www.vieiragrino.com/camino/camino.asp
I did some in March/April 2015 and some March 2017 and it's in my blog; notdunroaminyet.blogspot.com
Twice I gave up and said I would never walk again, twice I've been back and I intend to finish it next April :D I'll get there yet!
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#4
You can see the book on line, though only in the Spanish version.
http://www.vieiragrino.com/camino/camino.asp
I did some in March/April 2015 and some March 2016 and it's in my blog; notdunroaminyet.blogspot.com
Twice I gave up and said I would never walk again, twice I've been back and I intend to finish it next April :D I'll get there yet!
I'm just curious why you had given up before if you don't mind me asking. Was it more difficult? Injuries? Too much alone time?
 
#5
Hi can anyone advise me where I would get information on the stages on Camino de Levante please...?

I’m aware of the book, it’s in the post, I’m hungry for information on my next Camino! (Even though I finished my last one one Wed!)

Thanks in advance!

Stephen
Hi, Stephen,
I have a post with all of my stages in an attachment. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/my-stages-on-the-levante.19142/

Also, if you scroll through the Levante subforum, you will see that there are other posts with stages.

There is also a lot of good information on line. And if you have specific questions, there is a bunch of forum members who always are happy to opine. A forum member, Jean Luc, is a member of the Valencia Association and is always very helpful, too.

It is a very solitary camino, but you probably know that. The first few days out of Valencia are rough -- all asphalt and a lot of suburban development. But after that, wow. Lots of castles, interesting villages, historic sites -- and the mountains between Toledo and Avila are wonderful. It sounds like you have already chosen to walk the Levante and it was a great decision, IMO!
 
S

Stephen McLoughlin

Guest
#6
Hi, Stephen,
I have a post with all of my stages in an attachment. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/my-stages-on-the-levante.19142/

Also, if you scroll through the Levante subforum, you will see that there are other posts with stages.

There is also a lot of good information on line. And if you have specific questions, there is a bunch of forum members who always are happy to opine. A forum member, Jean Luc, is a member of the Valencia Association and is always very helpful, too.

It is a very solitary camino, but you probably know that. The first few days out of Valencia are rough -- all asphalt and a lot of suburban development. But after that, wow. Lots of castles, interesting villages, historic sites -- and the mountains between Toledo and Avila are wonderful. It sounds like you have already chosen to walk the Levante and it was a great decision, IMO!
Thank you so much! Solitude is exactly what I’m after!
 

sulu

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ronces-SdC (03-04/10);Oporto-SdC (10/2011); VdlP via Portugal 03/04 2012/2013;Part Invierno 2012; Toulouse to Sarrance 2012; Ingles to Muxia June 2013 Cami Catala and Aragones 2014; El Salvador & Primitivo 2014; Camino de Madrid 2016; Levante 2015,2017
#7
I'm just curious why you had given up before if you don't mind me asking. Was it more difficult? Injuries? Too much alone time?
Probably a combination. I always walk in Spring and Autumn so I usually walk alone and should be used to it. I found the walk through Castilla la Mancha to be boring, it was too sunny, it is very flat, there were no villages, seldom anywhere to sit and rest and no shade, it all became too much. I gave up in Toledo.
When I returned I was quite stupid, I thought i was super woman and got over tired very quickly, I had blisters and swollen feet. It was entirely my fault and I learnt a lesson. When I went back to Cebreros to pick up again I had a wonderful walk but I didn't have enough time to finish.
It is a little too easy for me to give up, I only have to get a train or a bus to get home, mostly a good rest is all that is required to make things seem better but I opted to just give in. The Camino de Levante is a really interesting Camino and goes through some wonderful places and great scenery, it is a question of taking the rough with the smooth but company helps with that and I saw no-one, I would hate anyone to be put off by my experiences but it probably is pot luck if you meet anyone, there were plenty of people walking when I did my last week, they were just walking on different days to me!
 
#8
Weather and company were two of the things that really added to my enjoyment. It was May 2013, one of the wettest Mays ever on record in Spain, but we seemed to be walking in little rain-free bubble that stayed firmly planted over my head the whole time. Only one period of rain while walking, a few hours, so nothing to complain about.

Like sulu, I often start out alone, and the year before the Levante I had been totally alone on the Madrid - Invierno combination (with an exception for the Sahagun to Ponferrada blast of people), so I knew what I was getting into. But I was so lucky to meet two Frenchmen on day 3 or 4. And we wound up walking into Santiago together 40 odd days later. They walked longer stages than I was used to, but I decided to try to do their pace so I could stay with them and found I really like 35 km days! So you just never know.

I would highly recommend the Levante in springtime, but then I would always recommend springtime for most caminos. The fields and the flowers combine to make for heavenly color combinations and the temps are generally manageable.

And sulu, thanks for pointing out the only disadvantage I can think of that comes with living close to the Camino. For years I have envied you and how you can just pop over and start walking, but I see you have come up with a downside -- those of us who pay thousands of dollars to get to Spain just can't quit and go home and come back in a month or so!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Levante
#9
Hi can anyone advise me where I would get information on the stages on Camino de Levante please...?

I’m aware of the book, it’s in the post, I’m hungry for information on my next Camino! (Even though I finished my last one one Wed!)

Thanks in advance!

Stephen
Hello Stephen,
My name isPatricia and you can stay at my Rural Hotel in the Camino uin Mota del Cuervo (Cuenca). Hostal Rural Plaza, since 1868 receiving pilgrims from everywhere.
Let me know if you need something and I can help u. Hope you’ll have a nice Camino, take care with the sun and don’t forget to drink water. When you are passing through La Mancha you will see the incredible extensions of vineyards and always the horizon around you.
Regards,
Patricia Plaza
 
#10
I too highly recommend this epic route. There are more pilgrims walking it every year but until now it has been like what walking the Camino Francés sounds like 30 years ago.
It is a route which goes through all of Spain from the glorious south through Toledo, the great walled city of Ávila, through Castilla La Mancha and heads north where you will certainly meet other pilgrims joining. Don Quixote country, castles on every hilltop and fruit and olive trees as far as the eye can see. Don't hesitate!
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#11
Just don't start in Cartehenga like we did, the route is poorly marked with few amenities from there, it does pick up after it joins onto the route from Valencia, and the sections from Toledo / Avila are great... But dare I say it much of this route is more suited to cyclist... And I say this as someone who loves the Vdlp and long lonely roads. Sections of the Levante can also be unbearably hot, with no shade or water so definitely a spring or late autumn route.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
#12
I would second JW but add that what I think I enjoyed most was the many really attractive small towns. Toledo and Ávila are great, of course (the first, "el Greco view" of Toledo arriving from the south is probably my favourite view from any Camino). But so many small towns had something to surprise - Medina del Campo with the oldest functioning butchers' market in the world, a wealth of mudéjar churches in Arévalo, the albergue inside the bullring in La Roda (and its delicious explode in the mouth "miguelitos" pastries), a modern art museum inside a renaissance palace in San Clemente, a forbidding castle Cesare Borgia escaped from in Chinchilla de Montearagón, an albergue in the ancient convent at El Toboso, the windmills at Mota del Cuervo, a superb multi-colonnaded plaza in Tembleque, Teresa of Ávila's dovecote in sad almost depopulated Gotarendurra, fine castles in many places, some excellent wines and delicious food. I could go on, and see I have a bit.
 
#13
I would second JW but add that what I think I enjoyed most was the many really attractive small towns. Toledo and Ávila are great, of course (the first, "el Greco view" of Toledo arriving from the south is probably my favourite view from any Camino). But so many small towns had something to surprise - Medina del Campo with the oldest functioning butchers' market in the world, a wealth of mudéjar churches in Arévalo, the albergue inside the bullring in La Roda (and its delicious explode in the mouth "miguelitos" pastries), a modern art museum inside a renaissance palace in San Clemente, a forbidding castle Cesare Borgia escaped from in Chinchilla de Montearagón, an albergue in the ancient convent at El Toboso, the windmills at Mota del Cuervo, a superb multi-colonnaded plaza in Tembleque, Teresa of Ávila's dovecote in sad almost depopulated Gotarendurra, fine castles in many places, some excellent wines and delicious food. I could go on, and see I have a bit.
Thanks for that trip down memory lane Alan!

Although I often walk alone or at least start out alone, I am glad that I did the first half (Valencia-Toledo) with a Camino buddy. During the almost 3 weeks we walked we only saw one other pilgrim. It was summer and it was in 2014 so the numbers will be up slightly during others seasons I assume. Toledo-Zamora I did alone March 2015 and here too only saw 2 others although we only coincided on 2 days. Although I walked for basically 11 days alone for some reason I was fine with it. Maybe because I had the experience of walking the Mozárabe from Granada to Mérida without seeing a soul for 16 days the fall before.
 

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