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Starting a new kilt thread (it is February, after all!).

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Hi all - thought I would start a brand new kilt thread, in the idle time before Spring arrives - for those who do and those who don't and those who might etc ... and I have a few questions to ask other kilt wearers ...

So - the kilt - has to be the full 8 yards as the 5 yard looks and moves a little flimsily (I didn't say girlie! - though I might have meant that ;)) .... superb comfort, cool in summer, warm in winter and the nether regions are always aired.

(Q. "Is anything worn under the kilt?" A. "No ma'am, it is all in perfect working order.") - though I do wear cotton black boxer shorts for modesty (or maybe I don't)..

Chaps - it isn't until you wear a kilt that you really realise that trousers are not made for our anatomy!!

Science fact! Men who wear kilts are significantly more fertile than men who wear tight trousers. We have external stuff down there that needs to be cool for fertility (is why it is all on the outside) and trousers, tucked up and squashed tight produces too much heat - so if you want to start a family start wearing a kilt!

PV kilts are available at approx £50 in a range of tartans - might be wise not to choose military or a clan you don't belong to - honour and all that - Scottish National is rather nice. - and it is the only tartan, plaid, that you wear, except for matching hose flashes - no tartan shirts or ties or hats or socks!!

Manliness? Of course, as long as it is worn mid knee - too high and it looks like a skirt, too low and it looks like an old dowager dress - and remember - the kilt, 'man skirt', is old - why, the Roman Legions wore skirts!

And! you get to wear a knife too, the Sgian-Dubh (pronounced Skeen Do), tucked into one of your long hose (socks). As they are part of national dress it is legal to wear them (but in your pack when travelling on transport!). They have a blade of just under 3 & 1/2 inches, the legal limit in the EU. Most shops sell them blunt as an accessory, but mine is honed sharp and is fab for cutting food.
Of which, in France and Spain most farming/hunting/working men carry a folded knife which they bring out at table so it isn't seen as unusual to bring out your Sgian Dubh.

This is the one that I have, a copy of a Victorian military design. Wood handle inlaid with brass studs, leather scabbard and brass fittings.
51745

If one buys the PV working kilt (Polyester Viscose) it can be washed .. though ironing is then a problem to get the pleats sharp again, but also there are 1 hour dry cleaners in most shopping malls - so no problem, and they press really well!

Upside is comfort, coolness, manliness, style (!)
Downside is no pockets, so you need to add a belt pouch, and, too many photos taken of you with strangers?
Not sure if this is an upside or a downside - but women sit up like Meerkats when you appear - even at a distance.😁

So Q's for other Camino kilt wearers - maybe we can get a Q & A and feedback and so on going??
Do you wear your wide black leather kilt belt or a different type of belt on Camino?
Do you wear your sporran?
How do you feel about footwear? Boots, even lightweight fabric ones, give balance and weight, whereas sandals without socks - to me - always looks wrong - how do you feel about this?

and - there is an internal ancient male thing going on when we choose the kilt - this might sum it up 😁😁😁

51747

Though the stomach is gone - 30 lbs lighter now!!
 
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J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
I have been looking at kilts for a long time, they are becoming more popular in the hikers sector here in the States. I just found out I am Scots with some Irish and touch of Danish. I am now trying to discover what clan I might be a part of.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
I have been looking at kilts for a long time, they are becoming more popular in the hikers sector here in the States. I just found out I am Scots with some Irish and touch of Danish. I am now trying to discover what clan I might be a part of.

JF - Do it!!
Your surname Gregory is part of the Clan MacGregor (also old clan Gregor).

Your Clan Motto is "My Race is Royal". There are four Tartans but unlikely to find one with a PV kilt - Scottish National could be the way to go, though the Freedom tartan is fairly close.

The famous Rob Roy is an ancestor of yours!!! a good thing - your clan still hated by the Campbells, a bad thing ;).

This is your Crest -

51751
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
might be wise not to choose military or a clan you don't belong to - honour and all that - Scottish National is rather nice.
To find a tartan you can wear check https://www.tartanregister.gov.uk/

and it is the only tartan, plaid, that you wear, except for matching hose flashes - no tartan shirts or ties or hats or socks!!
Polka dotted shirts not recommended either - fashion and all that.

Some tartan and bagpipe jokes: http://www.xmarksthescot.com/forum/f165/tartan-joke-35070/index2.html
 
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J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
JF - Do it!!
Your surname Gregory is part of the Clan MacGregor (also old clan Gregor).

Your Clan Motto is "My Race is Royal". There are four Tartans but unlikely to find one with a PV kilt - Scottish National could be the way to go, though the Freedom tartan is fairly close.

The famous Rob Roy is an ancestor of yours!!! a good thing - your clan still hated by the Campbells, a bad thing ;).

This is your Crest -

View attachment 51751
Thank you for the information.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
Thank you all for this information, I will follow through with checking this out.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
Incidentally,
What d´ye call a pigeon takin his winter holidays in Aviemore ?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
in a rush, but be careful! Humour is dangerous...
Thanks, informative.I don’t know about Scots Gallic as I did not speak it, but listening for 50 years to some sptheakers of irish Gaelic, I discovered that - and am ready for correction here from this who know better - that there is no word for yes or no. There is ‘it is’ or it is not’, but nothing definitive . At least from my point of view, which is mine, and not definitive either!
 

Neoscan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sept 2016)
I not sure my full length woolen kilt would be suitable for walking great distances- it's pretty heavy! But that's what gives it a great swing and keeps me warm in wintertime. I'm not a fan of Polyester Viscose kilts as I've seen far too many tourists walking around Edinburgh in them but I guess they'd be lighter for walking in and easier to wash as you mention.

Wide black leather kilt belt- yes. Nothing smaller would do.

Sporran- yes, of course! A kilt without a sporran looks ridiculous as does a kilt worn with sandals.
 

Stephen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Twice walked from St Jean to Estella and once from Sarria to Santiago. Maybe someday I'll find the time to do the entire walk.
I've found the time. Just completed SJPP to Santiago. 25 Aug to 1st Oct, 2016.
And now the Portuguese from Lisbon.

josephmcclain

Active Member
Don’t possess a kilt, but have often thought about having one. To me it would seem the perfect thing for the camino. Am a McClain here. Probably some long ago Scotts-Irish mix up!
 

AndreaCT

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2016 Camino Frances to Leon
Fall 2017 Camino Frances to Finisterre
May 2019 Portuguese
Q. "Is anything worn under the kilt?" A. "No ma'am, it is all in perfect working order.") David, it took me a second and then that part of your post gave me my first laugh of the day!!!
 

Stephen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Twice walked from St Jean to Estella and once from Sarria to Santiago. Maybe someday I'll find the time to do the entire walk.
I've found the time. Just completed SJPP to Santiago. 25 Aug to 1st Oct, 2016.
And now the Portuguese from Lisbon.
There was once a polity called Dalriada which covered south west Scotland and north east Ireland.
A surname there was Mac Gille Eathain, meaning 'son of the servant of St John'.
Over the years that would have changed to McClain.
 

Iriebabel

Iriebabel & the cyborg turtle
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April (2018)
Camino Del Norte end of March 2019
Brilliant simply brilliant! 😍 Kilt on! 🤩. a confident man is very sexy. You gave me a good giggle with this thread and great information about kilts at the same time Thanks.
 

Stephen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Twice walked from St Jean to Estella and once from Sarria to Santiago. Maybe someday I'll find the time to do the entire walk.
I've found the time. Just completed SJPP to Santiago. 25 Aug to 1st Oct, 2016.
And now the Portuguese from Lisbon.
I'm not sure I'd wear a kilt myself.
 

wildrover

thewildrover
Camino(s) past & future
2015 april c/f. vdlp feb 2016. Norte / primitivo Sep 2016. C/f 12/16. Vdlp 12/17. 12/18. Lana 02/19.
Hi all - thought I would start a brand new kilt thread, in the idle time before Spring arrives - for those who do and those who don't and those who might etc ... and I have a few questions to ask other kilt wearers ...

So - the kilt - has to be the full 8 yards as the 5 yard looks and moves a little flimsily (I didn't say girlie! - though I might have meant that ;)) .... superb comfort, cool in summer, warm in winter and the nether regions are always aired.

(Q. "Is anything worn under the kilt?" A. "No ma'am, it is all in perfect working order.") - though I do wear cotton black boxer shorts for modesty (or maybe I don't)..

Chaps - it isn't until you wear a kilt that you really realise that trousers are not made for our anatomy!!

Science fact! Men who wear kilts are significantly more fertile than men who wear tight trousers. We have external stuff down there that needs to be cool for fertility (is why it is all on the outside) and trousers, tucked up and squashed tight produces too much heat - so if you want to start a family start wearing a kilt!

PV kilts are available at approx £50 in a range of tartans - might be wise not to choose military or a clan you don't belong to - honour and all that - Scottish National is rather nice. - and it is the only tartan, plaid, that you wear, except for matching hose flashes - no tartan shirts or ties or hats or socks!!

Manliness? Of course, as long as it is worn mid knee - too high and it looks like a skirt, too low and it looks like an old dowager dress - and remember - the kilt, 'man skirt', is old - why, the Roman Legions wore skirts!

And! you get to wear a knife too, the Sgian-Dubh (pronounced Skeen Do), tucked into one of your long hose (socks). As they are part of national dress it is legal to wear them (but in your pack when travelling on transport!). They have a blade of just under 3 & 1/2 inches, the legal limit in the EU. Most shops sell them blunt as an accessory, but mine is honed sharp and is fab for cutting food.
Of which, in France and Spain most farming/hunting/working men carry a folded knife which they bring out at table so it isn't seen as unusual to bring out your Sgian Dubh.

This is the one that I have, a copy of a Victorian military design. Wood handle inlaid with brass studs, leather scabbard and brass fittings.
View attachment 51745

If one buys the PV working kilt (Polyester Viscose) it can be washed .. though ironing is then a problem to get the pleats sharp again, but also there are 1 hour dry cleaners in most shopping malls - so no problem, and they press really well!

Upside is comfort, coolness, manliness, style (!)
Downside is no pockets, so you need to add a belt pouch, and, too many photos taken of you with strangers?
Not sure if this is an upside or a downside - but women sit up like Meerkats when you appear - even at a distance.😁

So Q's for other Camino kilt wearers - maybe we can get a Q & A and feedback and so on going??
Do you wear your wide black leather kilt belt or a different type of belt on Camino?
Do you wear your sporran?
How do you feel about footwear? Boots, even lightweight fabric ones, give balance and weight, whereas sandals without socks - to me - always looks wrong - how do you feel about this?

and - there is an internal ancient male thing going on when we choose the kilt - this might sum it up 😁😁😁

View attachment 51747

Though the stomach is gone - 30 lbs lighter now!!
All of the above is great. Only Scots should wear kilts, though.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
All of the above is great. Only Scots should wear kilts, though.

WWhhooohhh - tell that to the Irish!! and the Galician celts!! - and what about the Canadian Tartan?? Thin ice here!! :)

and what about being Scot but growing up in another country (me)? Or parents being Scots??

and the Royal Family? they wear kilts - and they are German Greeks !! oh dear ..... 😂
 
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Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
51783

In a restaurant in the precincts of Laon Cathedral, September 2018
This what happens to young (at heart) men who wear the kilt.

The back story is this:
I was eating by myself. There was a party of three women at a nearby table: mother and daughters, aunt and neices, whatever. As their meal was ending the elder was taking photos of the other two and vice versa. Always the gentleman I offerred, using my very best hand movements, to take photos of all three. That done one of the daughters indicated one of me with her mother. I gave them my email address and now have an invitation "whenever in Corsica ..."
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
JF - Do it!!
Your surname Gregory is part of the Clan MacGregor (also old clan Gregor).

Your Clan Motto is "My Race is Royal". There are four Tartans but unlikely to find one with a PV kilt - Scottish National could be the way to go, though the Freedom tartan is fairly close.

The famous Rob Roy is an ancestor of yours!!! a good thing - your clan still hated by the Campbells, a bad thing ;).

This is your Crest -

View attachment 51751
Ah! The old Hamburger vs Soup feud still raging then?
 

robproct

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP from Lisbon 2018
I have long yearned for a kilt to go with the bagpipes that I have had for many years but the cost has always put me off, Scots heritage you see. Macmillan clan. The price of the full 8 metre woollen one iin Australia is around AUD 650 (around 370GBP) so I was suddenly heartened at David's mention of them for 50GBP. Really?? A kilt would be great to wear on the camino, let it all hang out as they say. I was entranced at outside the cathedral at Santiago with a local guy playing what were probably Basque pipes with wonderful wild tunes which were hauntingly beautiful and quite different to the Scottish repertoire. I wonder if he is a regular there?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: St-Jean-PdP - Santiago dC - Muxía - Fisterra (Aug 2017 and March/April 2018)
This should be better....As I said, I haven't worn it on a Camino....
Sorry....photo file must be too big
I have long yearned for a kilt to go with the bagpipes that I have had for many years but the cost has always put me off, Scots heritage you see. Macmillan clan. The price of the full 8 metre woollen one iin Australia is around AUD 650 (around 370GBP) so I was suddenly heartened at David's mention of them for 50GBP. Really?? A kilt would be great to wear on the camino, let it all hang out as they say. I was entranced at outside the cathedral at Santiago with a local guy playing what were probably Basque pipes with wonderful wild tunes which were hauntingly beautiful and quite different to the Scottish repertoire. I wonder if he is a regular there?
Short answer ...those are Galician pipes, and yes they are almost always there, in my experience and knowledge.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
Hola @David - WOW 47 posts (I suppose some of those are your responses). I have seen men on the camino in kilts that looked a bit more like one that those Roman boys would have worn.
As for comfort and fertility - well being almost 70 I don't think this will be an issue. Being more Irish than English or Scottish I might have to find a kilt from the Emerald Isle.

Cheers for now, from Oz!🦘;)
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
I have long yearned for a kilt to go with the bagpipes that I have had for many years but the cost has always put me off, Scots heritage you see. Macmillan clan. The price of the full 8 metre woollen one iin Australia is around AUD 650 (around 370GBP) so I was suddenly heartened at David's mention of them for 50GBP. Really?? A kilt would be great to wear on the camino, let it all hang out as they say.
And you play the pipes?? Cool!
Indeed - £50 for an 8yd pv kilt, 16oz heavyweight - see here - Scotland Kilt Company. You would need a belt, sporran, kilt pin, long hose, flashes (elastic garters with tartan flashes showing), and possibly a Sgian Dubh - all available in this store (and others) but also available on Ebay.

Note re pv kilts and sporrans. Sporrans are sold with two types of fastenings, narrow leather belt and chain belt - the chain causes pilling wear on a pv kilt so go for the leather belt type.

Enjoy!!! ;)
 
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wildrover

thewildrover
Camino(s) past & future
2015 april c/f. vdlp feb 2016. Norte / primitivo Sep 2016. C/f 12/16. Vdlp 12/17. 12/18. Lana 02/19.
WWhhooohhh - tell that to the Irish!! and the Galician celts!! - and what about the Canadian Tartan?? Thin ice here!! :)

and what about being Scot but growing up in another country (me)? Or parents being Scots??

and the Royal Family? they wear kilts - and they are German Greeks !! oh dear ..... 😂
Wearing your own national dress is fine, whether your Galician, Irish etc. They are remaining true to their nations. They’re not trying to pass themselves off as Scottish. Why not wear your own countries traditional attire.
 
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wildrover

thewildrover
Camino(s) past & future
2015 april c/f. vdlp feb 2016. Norte / primitivo Sep 2016. C/f 12/16. Vdlp 12/17. 12/18. Lana 02/19.
Well,I'm not Scots but having lived here for 30 years I'm going to continue wearing my kilt.Colquhoun tartan.
What does this mean, exactly? You’re now Scottish. My aunt has lived in Norway for over 50 years. At official engagements, she wears Scottish traditional dress. Not Norwegian. BECAUSE.....she’s Scottish!!!
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Well, judging by those posts that seems to be the end of the fun then .... time for us all to go off and get a life I guess.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
New Zealand has several areas settled by Scots, so many of us in those regions have grown up with a strong sense of Scots heritage, even though our parents were born in NZ.
Kilts are a commonly worn item in those areas, particularly for black tie events, weddings, dancing or sport days.
We even have our own specialist kilt makers.
Try telling us we aren't Scots by heritage, or that we cant wear kilts and tartan.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
There are more bagpipe bands in New Zealand than there are in Scotland! Heritage, lineage, is important to many people throughout the world. Descendants of Scots, Irish; proud of that lineage, that history, those inherited genes ..... seems fair to me to feel one has the right to wear the kilt as part of that, and proudly.

If no lineage at all that doesn't stop a man wearing a kilt - plain, utility .... many choices .... just my opinion of course ;)
 
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David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Passport laws for New Zealanders - if a citizen has a parent or grandparent born in the UK - which I would point out includes Scotland - then they have the right to a British passport - (dual passport holding is allowed) - which suggests that New Zealanders with Scots ancestors are indeed considered to be 'Scottish' - well, Scots enough to hold a UK passport with all the rights and responsibilities. ;)

If we have to dress by national dress - well, I hope that Scots aren't wearing trousers or carrying an umbrella - English national dress you know 😂
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
That’s not my opinion, that’s fact
Facts always need to be proven. Has the Lord Lyon King of Arms, for example, published something in support of your fact? Or would my Sovereign (and yours?) have me arrested as I stepped over the border wearing the kilt not made in Scotland!?

I for one enjoy my Scottish connection. The bit I don't like is, when wearing the kilt, passers-by often ask if there is a highland band playing locally: presumably because they are enamoured of the range of Scottish music they would hear.

In my view, Scots is as Scots does. And in wearing the kilt I am reminded of the harsh times my ancestors had as crofters in the highlands and in the later exodus following the clearances. Scots is as Scots does.

@wildrover , for your next pilgrimage I wish you kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
 

josephmcclain

Active Member
There was once a polity called Dalriada which covered south west Scotland and north east Ireland.
A surname there was Mac Gille Eathain, meaning 'son of the servant of St John'.
Over the years that would have changed to McClain.
Thanks for the response. Somehow I missed seeing it until just now. That is really interesting information. If you have any other sources you could pass along, please do! And thanks, again.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Don’t possess a kilt, but have often thought about having one. To me it would seem the perfect thing for the camino. Am a McClain here. Probably some long ago Scotts-Irish mix up!

As Stephen said (above) - Western Isles and where the first clan was formed by your ancestors about 1200 years ago. Many spellings (which is normal) - seems that your association is the Clan MacLaine of Lochbuie.

There was a partial migration to Ireland at one point - so your confused background! ;)
 

Fergus

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
planning my first
I have been wearing kilts for years and while I do have a family tartan, I do not wear a kilt due to scottish heritage. I wear a kilt for the comfort and freedom. I have walked two caminos in a kilt and I feel badly for all of the men that are missing out. I have many kilts that are made out of lighter weight faster drying material.
 

Attachments

Tim O'Collins

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - 2015 and on to Finisterre
Camino Portuguese - 2015
Hi all - thought I would start a brand new kilt thread, in the idle time before Spring arrives - for those who do and those who don't and those who might etc ... and I have a few questions to ask other kilt wearers ...

So - the kilt - has to be the full 8 yards as the 5 yard looks and moves a little flimsily (I didn't say girlie! - though I might have meant that ;)) .... superb comfort, cool in summer, warm in winter and the nether regions are always aired.

(Q. "Is anything worn under the kilt?" A. "No ma'am, it is all in perfect working order.") - though I do wear cotton black boxer shorts for modesty (or maybe I don't)..

Chaps - it isn't until you wear a kilt that you really realise that trousers are not made for our anatomy!!

Science fact! Men who wear kilts are significantly more fertile than men who wear tight trousers. We have external stuff down there that needs to be cool for fertility (is why it is all on the outside) and trousers, tucked up and squashed tight produces too much heat - so if you want to start a family start wearing a kilt!

PV kilts are available at approx £50 in a range of tartans - might be wise not to choose military or a clan you don't belong to - honour and all that - Scottish National is rather nice. - and it is the only tartan, plaid, that you wear, except for matching hose flashes - no tartan shirts or ties or hats or socks!!

Manliness? Of course, as long as it is worn mid knee - too high and it looks like a skirt, too low and it looks like an old dowager dress - and remember - the kilt, 'man skirt', is old - why, the Roman Legions wore skirts!

And! you get to wear a knife too, the Sgian-Dubh (pronounced Skeen Do), tucked into one of your long hose (socks). As they are part of national dress it is legal to wear them (but in your pack when travelling on transport!). They have a blade of just under 3 & 1/2 inches, the legal limit in the EU. Most shops sell them blunt as an accessory, but mine is honed sharp and is fab for cutting food.
Of which, in France and Spain most farming/hunting/working men carry a folded knife which they bring out at table so it isn't seen as unusual to bring out your Sgian Dubh.

This is the one that I have, a copy of a Victorian military design. Wood handle inlaid with brass studs, leather scabbard and brass fittings.
View attachment 51745

If one buys the PV working kilt (Polyester Viscose) it can be washed .. though ironing is then a problem to get the pleats sharp again, but also there are 1 hour dry cleaners in most shopping malls - so no problem, and they press really well!

Upside is comfort, coolness, manliness, style (!)
Downside is no pockets, so you need to add a belt pouch, and, too many photos taken of you with strangers?
Not sure if this is an upside or a downside - but women sit up like Meerkats when you appear - even at a distance.😁

So Q's for other Camino kilt wearers - maybe we can get a Q & A and feedback and so on going??
Do you wear your wide black leather kilt belt or a different type of belt on Camino?
Do you wear your sporran?
How do you feel about footwear? Boots, even lightweight fabric ones, give balance and weight, whereas sandals without socks - to me - always looks wrong - how do you feel about this?

and - there is an internal ancient male thing going on when we choose the kilt - this might sum it up 😁😁😁

View attachment 51747

Though the stomach is gone - 30 lbs lighter now!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
I have many kilts that are made out of lighter weight faster drying material.
Like you, @Fergus , I have worn a lightweight etc kilt for many years. It has minimal pleats (about 9). The outcome is that it hangs badly after washing.

So I am looking for other makers, but freight to the outer most ends of the earth can be a multiple of price of the kilt.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Hi Fergus - exactly, freedom and comfort! I took the liberty of brightening up your photo - couldn't improve the sharpness, sorry.

51939
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Like you, @Fergus , I have worn a lightweight etc kilt for many years. It has minimal pleats (about 9). The outcome is that it hangs badly after washing.

So I am looking for other makers, but freight to the outer most ends of the earth can be a multiple of price of the kilt.

Hi - I just NZ-Googled and found that there are just a couple of online kilt companies and even their PV kilts are hundreds of dollars!! Coo - there is such a business opportunity there!!!

A thought - I just weighed mine and for me to airmail a package of that weight to NZ would be about £20 .. under $40? So if you wanted an 8yd casual kilt (which is nice and heavy and fully pleated) you could buy one from somewhere like the Scotland Kilt company as they ship internationally - I just looked on their website and they only charge £15 to America and Canada so NZ should only be a fiver more - and!! on non-EU sales they refund the vat on a sale too - we pay 20%, is included in the price shown -so ... £10 off for you? would make it, what, £60 all in delivered?.
See here - https://www.thescotlandkiltcompany.co.uk/pages/fast-worldwide-shipping
 
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Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
Kiwi's swear by them for 100 years!
Yip and the Swanndri is still available from Kiwi farm supply stores. And very practical, as you know, for on farm work and.

Never had one myself but saw many in my tramping ground, the southern Tararua's

And there are many family photos from the 1800's taken in bush homes showing the blokes with a tartan rug wrapped kilt style and a belt to keep it in place. Very practical with damp conditions underfoot and the undergrowth ripping the bottom end of trousers to bits.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
so NZ should only be a fiver more
@David, thanks. Yes we have a kilt maker based in Dunedin. And a few mail order shops operated from a family home, selling a range of imported product. And there are two not terribly far from me.

The Scotland Kilt company wanted GBP 150 for freight for a kilt priced at GPB 50. I need to start a conversation with them!
 
Last edited:

Fergus

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
planning my first
Like you, @Fergus , I have worn a lightweight etc kilt for many years. It has minimal pleats (about 9). The outcome is that it hangs badly after washing.

So I am looking for other makers, but freight to the outer most ends of the earth can be a multiple of price of the kilt.
I have found a local lady who is a gifted seamtress. I am giving her one of my kilts to disect or measure or whatever she requires in order to duplicate my kilt with a few modifications, I'll let you know how it turns out and perhaps we will have a new source for hiking kilts. Currently it is -26c on our farm. Yes I am wearing pants.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
Like you, @Fergus , I have worn a lightweight etc kilt for many years. It has minimal pleats (about 9). The outcome is that it hangs badly after washing.

So I am looking for other makers, but freight to the outer most ends of the earth can be a multiple of price of the kilt.
I will PM you the name of a local kilt maker - she's originally from the UK but now works out of New Plymouth.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Hmmm.... seems like there could be a good market for a special "Camino" tartan... ¿Es posible?
Yep. I'm a Yankee with an English surname (but with a tiny amount of Scot in the blood.) There have been a number of tartans designed for use by us. I did check the below site for tartans related to St. James or Camino but I didn't see any. A tartan can be designed and registered and "permission" given for pilgrims to wear it. But then you have to find someone that will weave it.

 

Old Kiwi

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Last walked St Francis "2016"
Walking St Francis again "2019"
I have worn a kilt many times in pipe bands in New Zealand and am used to them. I do not think I would like to wear one on the Camino. A proper kilt is too heavy and hot, especially in the heat of Spain when I will be walking in June and July. A lighter kilt would be much better but I feel that a kilt must be worn with long socks, boots, sporran and wide black belt, which I think defeats the purpose of trying to stay cool in hot weather. Being a Kiwi I am used to walking and tramping in shorts in all weathers. Should I want to wear a kilt on the Camino I have one (it belongs to the family) with a bit of history. My family are Frasers from around Loch Ness. The last man beheaded in the Tower of London was Lord Lovatt (Simon Fraser). Had he not been beheaded and the title taken from the family, my brother would be Lord Lovatt and Chief of the Fraser Clan today. The kilt we have is the one worn by Lord Lovatt at the time of his beheding (as the family story goes) and has been passed down to the direct line since the 1600s. Family history says that this kilt is about 400 years old. But as I say, I will stick to shorts.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: St-Jean-PdP - Santiago dC - Muxía - Fisterra (Aug 2017 and March/April 2018)
I have worn a kilt many times in pipe bands in New Zealand and am used to them. I do not think I would like to wear one on the Camino. A proper kilt is too heavy and hot, especially in the heat of Spain when I will be walking in June and July. A lighter kilt would be much better but I feel that a kilt must be worn with long socks, boots, sporran and wide black belt, which I think defeats the purpose of trying to stay cool in hot weather. Being a Kiwi I am used to walking and tramping in shorts in all weathers. Should I want to wear a kilt on the Camino I have one (it belongs to the family) with a bit of history. My family are Frasers from around Loch Ness. The last man beheaded in the Tower of London was Lord Lovatt (Simon Fraser). Had he not been beheaded and the title taken from the family, my brother would be Lord Lovatt and Chief of the Fraser Clan today. The kilt we have is the one worn by Lord Lovatt at the time of his beheding (as the family story goes) and has been passed down to the direct line since the 1600s. Family history says that this kilt is about 400 years old. But as I say, I will stick to shorts.
And of course, hence the fine bagpipe tune Lord Lovatt's Lament....
 
Camino(s) past & future
😱
I have worn a kilt many times in pipe bands in New Zealand and am used to them. I do not think I would like to wear one on the Camino. A proper kilt is too heavy and hot, especially in the heat of Spain when I will be walking in June and July. A lighter kilt would be much better but I feel that a kilt must be worn with long socks, boots, sporran and wide black belt, which I think defeats the purpose of trying to stay cool in hot weather. Being a Kiwi I am used to walking and tramping in shorts in all weathers. Should I want to wear a kilt on the Camino I have one (it belongs to the family) with a bit of history. My family are Frasers from around Loch Ness. The last man beheaded in the Tower of London was Lord Lovatt (Simon Fraser). Had he not been beheaded and the title taken from the family, my brother would be Lord Lovatt and Chief of the Fraser Clan today. The kilt we have is the one worn by Lord Lovatt at the time of his beheding (as the family story goes) and has been passed down to the direct line since the 1600s. Family history says that this kilt is about 400 years old. But as I say, I will stick to shorts.
WOW! What a ‘great’ story. I put that in quotes because of the tragedy for the family but Ol’ NZ ain’t a bad place to be 😉
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
I have worn a kilt many times in pipe bands in New Zealand and am used to them. I do not think I would like to wear one on the Camino. A proper kilt is too heavy and hot, especially in the heat of Spain when I will be walking in June and July. A lighter kilt would be much better but I feel that a kilt must be worn with long socks, boots, sporran and wide black belt, which I think defeats the purpose of trying to stay cool in hot weather. Being a Kiwi I am used to walking and tramping in shorts in all weathers. Should I want to wear a kilt on the Camino I have one (it belongs to the family) with a bit of history. My family are Frasers from around Loch Ness. The last man beheaded in the Tower of London was Lord Lovatt (Simon Fraser). Had he not been beheaded and the title taken from the family, my brother would be Lord Lovatt and Chief of the Fraser Clan today. The kilt we have is the one worn by Lord Lovatt at the time of his beheding (as the family story goes) and has been passed down to the direct line since the 1600s. Family history says that this kilt is about 400 years old. But as I say, I will stick to shorts.
Let’s see a photo, please. That is definitely a piece of history.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
@David, thanks. Yes we have a kilt maker based in Dunedin. And a few mail order shops operated from a family home, selling a range of imported product. And there are two not terribly far from me.

The Scotland Kilt company wanted GBP 150 for freight for a kilt priced at GPB 50. I need to start a conversation with them!

£150!! surely a mistake if only £15 to the States. Yes, do get in touch with them - if problems you could have it delivered to me and I will post it to you for £20 (you could repay me via Paypal). :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014, VDLP 2018, Levante spring 2019
My camino kilt has just arrived - but it is only a rain kilt so don't get all excited! All the advantages mentioned above regarding fresh air and comfort, and good worn over a pair of trekking shorts (not to mention so easy to don and doff without hopping about trying to get a booted foot down a narrow leg). And just a couple of ounces - what's not to like? And although I do enjoy wearing my heavyweight woolen kilt in proper Scottish fashion, I won't be wearing my rain kilt in the same manner -it's translucent and I don't want to be accommodated in Police stations from Valencia to Santiago!
 

Bobthebome

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (future - 2018) from Porto
And you play the pipes?? Cool!
Indeed - £50 for an 8yd pv kilt, 16oz heavyweight - see here - Scotland Kilt Company. You would need a belt, sporran, kilt pin, long hose, flashes (elastic garters with tartan flashes showing), and possibly a Sgian Dubh - all available in this store (and others) but also available on Ebay.

Note re pv kilts and sporrans. Sporrans are sold with two types of fastenings, narrow leather belt and chain belt - the chain causes pilling wear on a pv kilt so go for the leather belt type.

Enjoy!!! ;)
Have worn heavy wool kilts quite a bit, but how do these cheap ones fit? Do they dry quickly? Doing the Camino in October this year and hadn't previously thought of this option!
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
Hi all - thought I would start a brand new kilt thread, in the idle time before Spring arrives - for those who do and those who don't and those who might etc ... and I have a few questions to ask other kilt wearers ...

So - the kilt - has to be the full 8 yards as the 5 yard looks and moves a little flimsily (I didn't say girlie! - though I might have meant that ;)) .... superb comfort, cool in summer, warm in winter and the nether regions are always aired.

(Q. "Is anything worn under the kilt?" A. "No ma'am, it is all in perfect working order.") - though I do wear cotton black boxer shorts for modesty (or maybe I don't)..

Chaps - it isn't until you wear a kilt that you really realise that trousers are not made for our anatomy!!

Science fact! Men who wear kilts are significantly more fertile than men who wear tight trousers. We have external stuff down there that needs to be cool for fertility (is why it is all on the outside) and trousers, tucked up and squashed tight produces too much heat - so if you want to start a family start wearing a kilt!

PV kilts are available at approx £50 in a range of tartans - might be wise not to choose military or a clan you don't belong to - honour and all that - Scottish National is rather nice. - and it is the only tartan, plaid, that you wear, except for matching hose flashes - no tartan shirts or ties or hats or socks!!

Manliness? Of course, as long as it is worn mid knee - too high and it looks like a skirt, too low and it looks like an old dowager dress - and remember - the kilt, 'man skirt', is old - why, the Roman Legions wore skirts!

And! you get to wear a knife too, the Sgian-Dubh (pronounced Skeen Do), tucked into one of your long hose (socks). As they are part of national dress it is legal to wear them (but in your pack when travelling on transport!). They have a blade of just under 3 & 1/2 inches, the legal limit in the EU. Most shops sell them blunt as an accessory, but mine is honed sharp and is fab for cutting food.
Of which, in France and Spain most farming/hunting/working men carry a folded knife which they bring out at table so it isn't seen as unusual to bring out your Sgian Dubh.

This is the one that I have, a copy of a Victorian military design. Wood handle inlaid with brass studs, leather scabbard and brass fittings.
View attachment 51745

If one buys the PV working kilt (Polyester Viscose) it can be washed .. though ironing is then a problem to get the pleats sharp again, but also there are 1 hour dry cleaners in most shopping malls - so no problem, and they press really well!

Upside is comfort, coolness, manliness, style (!)
Downside is no pockets, so you need to add a belt pouch, and, too many photos taken of you with strangers?
Not sure if this is an upside or a downside - but women sit up like Meerkats when you appear - even at a distance.😁

So Q's for other Camino kilt wearers - maybe we can get a Q & A and feedback and so on going??
Do you wear your wide black leather kilt belt or a different type of belt on Camino?
Do you wear your sporran?
How do you feel about footwear? Boots, even lightweight fabric ones, give balance and weight, whereas sandals without socks - to me - always looks wrong - how do you feel about this?

and - there is an internal ancient male thing going on when we choose the kilt - this might sum it up 😁😁😁

View attachment 51747

Though the stomach is gone - 30 lbs lighter now!!
I’ve always wondered why men wearing kilts often have a bag/purse-like thing that hangs in front of their you know what’s.

I can hazard a guess, but I’d truly like to know.
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
Spoiler alert
If you take offence easily please look away now!!

Q: What do you call the (big) hairy thing a Scotsman has between his legs?

A: see a later post
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
I’ve always wondered why men wearing kilts often have a bag/purse-like thing that hangs in front of their you know what’s.

I can hazard a guess, but I’d truly like to know.
Sword on one side, dagger on the other side .. no pockets .... pretty good bag ... coincidentally it covers a 'sensitive' area too ...... ;)
 

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