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Starting Mozarabe in September

Camino(s) past & future
Frances,2014,
Frances,2015
Madrid,2015
Salvador,2015
Mozarabe,
Sanabres,
Porto,2016
Levante,2017
#1
I will be starting the VdLP in early September and am thinking about taking one of the "newer" camino stretches from Malaga or Almeria. Any inputs are welcome. Seems like the alberques and water and food have been worked out by the locals and the stages are kind of short so a couple can be merged. Suggestions, experiences or advice?

thx, ortemio
 
#2
Hi, Ortemio, I just moved your thread to the mozarabe subforum so you might get more input. As you'll see if you scroll through the posts in that subforum, there are a few great posts, particularly magwood's blog from Malaga. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/forums/camino-mozárabe.101/

In resources, there is a walking guide from Almería to Granada. And a bunch of other posts you will see.

I am tentatively thinking that Almería to Santiago will be my next year's camino, so I can celebrate my retirement with a BIG camino! Not sure I can convince my family to agree to a two month walk, but I typically do 6 weeks, so what's the big deal?

Anyway, keep us posted with your plans and questions, the more info out there on the route, the better. And I assume you've seen the online guide, which deals with each option (Jaén, Almería or Malaga).
http://www.caminomozarabedesantiago.es/documentos/guia-esp.pdf

Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012) VDLP (2014) Portuguese (2015)
#5
I will be starting the VdLP in early September and am thinking about taking one of the "newer" camino stretches from Malaga or Almeria. Any inputs are welcome. Seems like the alberques and water and food have been worked out by the locals and the stages are kind of short so a couple can be merged. Suggestions, experiences or advice?

thx, ortemio
Hi Irtemio - I walked from Malaga in April through to May and had a wonderful camino - it was tough with some very long days but so enjoyed the route. Very few pilgrims along the way so when we did meet up it was with great joy - also had lovely weather until after Merida when the whole of Spain experienced all the rain. Got lost a couple of times due to inconspicuous markers but it was not bad. Generally the route was well marked and very good accommodation. If you would like any other info will be more than willing to supply - buen camino
 

Carel5

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, Camino Mozarabe - Almeria - Merida
2018, Via Francigena - Gran San Bernardo - Lucca
#6
Hi Ortemio. The Camino Mozarabe from Almeria is long but really beautiful, and with very different landscapes, from the desert-like hills near Almeria, along the mountains (north of Sierra Nevada), the hills and olive groves after Granada, the Sierra Morena and the dehesa between Cordoba and Merida. The signposting is excellent, the distances between towns are reasonable. However, don't expect many other pilgrims. I met them only in the last days before Merida. Not everywhere are there albergues, but most towns have reasonable priced pensions and hostals, so you can do a mix of both.

Somewhere here I left notes about my walk in April, There are also nice reports here from people who started in Malaga.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances,2014,
Frances,2015
Madrid,2015
Salvador,2015
Mozarabe,
Sanabres,
Porto,2016
Levante,2017
#7
Looking at the weather for September and thinking ... I lived in Arizona for many years and have plenty of experience hiking in the heat but ...
DO I really want to do 30 days of +90F? Seems like the temps do not come down until October and there are no trees and UV index +8.5 uhmmm.... don't know, camino del norte is calling ;-)
 
#8
I hear you, ortemio. I had asked about starting in Almeria around May 10, and immediately heard from Amancio (who lives in Granada) that I was setting myself up for a very hot camino. My compromise is to start in Granada, even though I would very much love to walk the route from Almeria. I just can't get there early enough. Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances,2014,
Frances,2015
Madrid,2015
Salvador,2015
Mozarabe,
Sanabres,
Porto,2016
Levante,2017
#9
Actually it seems like Almeria is cooler and it gets really hot as you approach Mérida, 36-37 C ouch, October looks good everywhere :) but I have to be back by the end of October
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances,2014,
Frances,2015
Madrid,2015
Salvador,2015
Mozarabe,
Sanabres,
Porto,2016
Levante,2017
#10
I start from Almeria Sat 3 Sept ... Should be interesting. I will be the guy with the cane staff, the chinese straw hat and the orange backpack . ;)

Any suggestions about were to stay in Almeria?
 

Jac8020

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 april
#11
Hi Irtemio - I walked from Malaga in April through to May and had a wonderful camino - it was tough with some very long days but so enjoyed the route. Very few pilgrims along the way so when we did meet up it was with great joy - also had lovely weather until after Merida when the whole of Spain experienced all the rain. Got lost a couple of times due to inconspicuous markers but it was not bad. Generally the route was well marked and very good accommodation. If you would like any other info will be more than willing to supply - buen camino
Hi Marilyn
I'm planning on starting this weekend from Malaga. Any advice on accommodation? Hard to find details and I'm not sure how to get access to albergues on a weekend.
Thnx. Val
 

Jac8020

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 april
#12
I will be starting the VdLP in early September and am thinking about taking one of the "newer" camino stretches from Malaga or Almeria. Any inputs are welcome. Seems like the alberques and water and food have been worked out by the locals and the stages are kind of short so a couple can be merged. Suggestions, experiences or advice?

thx, ortemio
Hi Ortemio
What's the weather been like? Did you leave from Almería or Malaga?
I'm planning on leaving from Malaga this weekend. Hope for other peregrinos on this route. Did sections of Levante, always 100% alone. Much more fun with others.
Val
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (15 April 2013)
Camino Portuguese (1 May 2014)
Camino Mozárabe from Málaga (8 April 2015)
Camino del Norte & Camino Ingles (April 2016)
#13
Hi @Jac8020. I can see that you have also posted a comment on my blog, but it might be useful to answer it here as it might be of interest to others.

I have attached a couple of files which may be of use to you. The PDF is a list of stages from Málaga to Cordoba with information taken from the amigos guide, including contact numbers. The JPEG image shows stages from Cordoba to Mérida, I lost the original document so all I have is this image. They might be helpful - I remember referring to this concise information a lot when I walked last year.

I didn't stick religiously to the stages as set out, but I think the list includes all telephone numbers for the albergues and other accommodation.

It is advisable to telephone ahead on the day of arrival so that they can expect you. We often had to wait until after siesta time to obtain a key, or until the policia local returned from a mission. I don't remember there being any particular problems at weekends, but I doubt if any ayuntamientos will be open. Perhaps it is wise to telephone those places where you expect to arrive at the weekend during the week before to make arrangements.

As for footwear, which you asked about on my blog. I have always worn mid height boots so have no experience of trail runners. The terrain wasn't particularly hard going as far as I recall, other than the elevation. Be sure to have something with you for wading through shallow rivers on a couple of occasions. My walking partner @george.g managed with flip-flops, but I would have felt very vulnerable in those. I strapped my croc sandals on with elastic knee support straps which worked a treat (see pic).

The weather has cooled a little from the intense heatwave that raged for a few weeks. I have been walking in the mountains this morning and although the start was cool, it soon heated up, probably to mid-high 20's (C).

Please don't hesitate to ask any specifics. I guess you know that I included quite a bit of info in my daily posting to my blog live from the camino Mozárabe last year (see link in signature line).

I wish you a wonderful camino and would be very interested to hear how you progress.

Cordoba-Merida.jpg

IMG_9724.jpg

IMG_9726.jpg
 

Attachments

Last edited:
#14
Maggie, you are a great resource!

Jac, wishing you a great Camino, and hoping that you will keep in touch with the forum. There are others (including me :)) planning/hoping to walk this route in the near future, and we would all really appreciate your comments.
 

george.g

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French way 10, 11
Norte 12
Vdlp 13
Levante 14
Mozarabe/Malaga 15
Augusta 16
Mozarabe/Almeria 17
#15
Hi Jac,
Yup flipflops not a great idea for wearing during river crossings, they tried to float off, Maggie's crocs seem a lot better, she wouldn't let me wear them so I can't be certain.
While I'm on the subject of footwear just bought a pair of Hokka One One's Mafate 4 (cheap) thinking maybe the footwear for next years camino, only problem is they are not waterproof so I will have to modify a pair of gaiters.
Regards
George
 

Jac8020

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 april
#16
Hi @Jac8020. I can see that you have also posted a comment on my blog, but it might be useful to answer it here as it might be of interest to others.

I have attached a couple of files which may be of use to you. The PDF is a list of stages from Málaga to Cordoba with information taken from the amigos guide, including contact numbers. The JPEG image shows stages from Cordoba to Mérida, I lost the original document so all I have is this image. They might be helpful - I remember referring to this concise information a lot when I walked last year.

I didn't stick religiously to the stages as set out, but I think the list includes all telephone numbers for the albergues and other accommodation.

It is advisable to telephone ahead on the day of arrival so that they can expect you. We often had to wait until after siesta time to obtain a key, or until the policia local returned from a mission. I don't remember there being any particular problems at weekends, but I doubt if any ayuntamientos will be open. Perhaps it is wise to telephone those places where you expect to arrive at the weekend during the week before to make arrangements.

As for footwear, which you asked about on my blog. I have always worn mid height boots so have no experience of trail runners. The terrain wasn't particularly hard going as far as I recall, other than the elevation. Be sure to have something with you for wading through shallow rivers on a couple of occasions. My walking partner @george.g managed with flip-flops, but I would have felt very vulnerable in those. I strapped my croc sandals on with elastic knee support straps which worked a treat (see pic).

The weather has cooled a little from the intense heatwave that raged for a few weeks. I have been walking in the mountains this morning and although the start was cool, it soon heated up, probably to mid-high 20's (C).

Please don't hesitate to ask any specifics. I guess you know that I included quite a bit of info in my daily posting to my blog live from the camino Mozárabe last year (see link in signature line).

I wish you a wonderful camino and would be very interested to hear how you progress.

View attachment 29225

View attachment 29227

View attachment 29228
Thanks very much for your reply. It is very hot and dry out there. Very. Very hot and very dry. Well into the 30s mid afternoon. I walked as far as Cabra and caught the bus to Córdoba. Didn't even consider doing the 40km day into Córdoba. I've done 40+ days a few times but wouldn't consider it in this weather, the hottest times being when you are most exhausted. No.

Hot! Hot! And I'm used to heat. Didn't see another walker. Not one. Spent nights alone in albergues. The best was looking at 23 bunks above and beside me to my left. No need to share bathrooms or drying racks or indeed anything. I'd hoped to see at least one (lack of walkers was too like the stretches I did on the C. Levante, which I did not enjoy). Still, I'd prefer no one to the numbers on the Frances!

The policía were so helpful in the albergues they organised: had to wait until 07:50 to return keys in Encinas Reales. In town ones, everything was fine. Door keys didn't work in Villanueva de Concepcion but a chain of chairs did.

Water? Wading through anything? No chance. All the water ways are dry, bar one with nicely placed stepping stones.

Shoes: trail runners have been excellent in the dry heat. Just perfect. I suspect they'll be worn out by the time I get back to Madrid to pick up my boots.

I'm heading from Córdoba to Almería to walk to Granada. I've noticed it's slightly cooler in the morning and maybe the highs won't be as high in a few days. Some reasons for this choice: no ~40km days necessary, well documented and it's a new area for me.
Wish me luck and some congenial company. Val
 

Carel5

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, Camino Mozarabe - Almeria - Merida
2018, Via Francigena - Gran San Bernardo - Lucca
#17
Thanks very much for your reply. It is very hot and dry out there. Very. Very hot and very dry. Well into the 30s mid afternoon. I walked as far as Cabra and caught the bus to Córdoba. Didn't even consider doing the 40km day into Córdoba. I've done 40+ days a few times but wouldn't consider it in this weather, the hottest times being when you are most exhausted. No.

Hot! Hot! And I'm used to heat. Didn't see another walker. Not one. Spent nights alone in albergues. The best was looking at 23 bunks above and beside me to my left. No need to share bathrooms or drying racks or indeed anything. I'd hoped to see at least one (lack of walkers was too like the stretches I did on the C. Levante, which I did not enjoy). Still, I'd prefer no one to the numbers on the Frances!

The policía were so helpful in the albergues they organised: had to wait until 07:50 to return keys in Encinas Reales. In town ones, everything was fine. Door keys didn't work in Villanueva de Concepcion but a chain of chairs did.

Water? Wading through anything? No chance. All the water ways are dry, bar one with nicely placed stepping stones.

Shoes: trail runners have been excellent in the dry heat. Just perfect. I suspect they'll be worn out by the time I get back to Madrid to pick up my boots.

I'm heading from Córdoba to Almería to walk to Granada. I've noticed it's slightly cooler in the morning and maybe the highs won't be as high in a few days. Some reasons for this choice: no ~40km days necessary, well documented and it's a new area for me.
Wish me luck and some congenial company. Val
Hi Val,

Big chance that it will be cooler between Almeria and Granada as stage 4-9 are mostly above 1000 meters altitude.

Most stage, except 3 and 8 (about 28-29 km) are not so long.

There is however some climbing involved in some stages.

At the end of all stages there is an albergue now, and in some towns you have the choice between hostal and albergue.

A lot of info (phone numbers, info on albergues, GPX-tracks, maps) can be found on the website of the Almeria Amigos.

http://www.almeriajacobea.es/

Among others route description and info on albergues and hostals in English,

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6y5pMfqcK4RZHdEcUx2N2lsbm8/view

I wish you a good camino

Carel
 

Jac8020

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 april
#18
Hi Val,

Big chance that it will be cooler between Almeria and Granada as stage 4-9 are mostly above 1000 meters altitude.

Most stage, except 3 and 8 (about 28-29 km) are not so long.

There is however some climbing involved in some stages.

At the end of all stages there is an albergue now, and in some towns you have the choice between hostal and albergue.

A lot of info (phone numbers, info on albergues, GPX-tracks, maps) can be found on the website of the Almeria Amigos.

http://www.almeriajacobea.es/

Among others route description and info on albergues and hostals in English,

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6y5pMfqcK4RZHdEcUx2N2lsbm8/view

I wish you a good camino

Carel
Thanks so much Carel. Particularly good news if it should be a bit cooler. Don't mind not breaking out my wet gear but having to wear a little more as it's a little cooler would be a pleasure!

I am so impressed by the details the Almeria Amigos provide. Just today I found the english version of their main PDF. I'd already collected the Spanish and details of the accomodation etc. I'm looking forwards to it.

Thanks for your best wishes

Val
 

Jac8020

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 april
#19
Hi Jac,
Yup flipflops not a great idea for wearing during river crossings, they tried to float off, Maggie's crocs seem a lot better, she wouldn't let me wear them so I can't be certain.
While I'm on the subject of footwear just bought a pair of Hokka One One's Mafate 4 (cheap) thinking maybe the footwear for next years camino, only problem is they are not waterproof so I will have to modify a pair of gaiters.
Regards
George
Hi George
I wore trail shoes instead of my usual goretex shoes or boots (Malaga to Cabra and later, Almería to Granada). Brilliant. Yes, dusty socks and wet after one creek. Socks and shoes dried a lot better than if they'd been my goretex jobs. No foot problems because of shoes for one of the first time. Some rain, no problem. I wouldn't wear them if it was going to be cold and I knew I'd be getting wet frequently. My Brooks trail shoes and thongs (Aussie version -footwear) were the right answer for these legs of the Mozarabe for me.
Best wishes
Val
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances,2014,
Frances,2015
Madrid,2015
Salvador,2015
Mozarabe,
Sanabres,
Porto,2016
Levante,2017
#20
Hi Ortemio
What's the weather been like? Did you leave from Almería or Malaga?
I'm planning on leaving from Malaga this weekend. Hope for other peregrinos on this route. Did sections of Levante, always 100% alone. Much more fun with others.
Val
I forgot to update this thread after I finished, Some thoughts:

Started walking early Aug, hottest summer in many years, flew to Malaga and took a bus to Almeria. Temperature ~38C
By the time I made it to Granada it was hovering around 43C
Loved the city would live there even with the heat.
Cordoba, after the mezquite not much more. LOts of hot days, I did research for walking on the heat and had a chinese hat, wide and light. Its like a portable shade. The back of the hat kept rubbing against the backpack, so I cut a piece off the edge. Used cotton t-shirts to keep moisture longer and drank lots of water, I mean LOts.
Merida, it was hovering around 47C, I heard a pilgrim died while climbing the large mountain after Seville.
Caceres was a nice city, they were filming some episodes for game of thrones.
Salamanca started to cool down and soon after I changed to the camino Sanabres. That is the best of all the caminos that I have taken. Loved the up-down, took some alternate routes and found myself in the middle of ancient oak trees with the wild smell of boletus mushrooms all around.
By this time I had the camino smile fixed to my face and thruly enjoyed the rest of the way to Santiago.
Once there I still had 15 days left to torture my feet so I took a bus to Porto and walked back up to Santiago. Crazy but worth every minute, being in such good shape after all them km made the Portugues a great experience.

What I learned:
Walking in the heat is tough but if prepared is not a problem.
(personal opinion ) I would not do again or recommend the portion of the via de la plata that i did .sad. that would be the best descriptor.
The Sanabres is on the top of my list to redo in the fall, late october best. Only gatcha there is that the albergues have great kitchens but do not allow you to cook, they have no pots,pans or plates or utensils...some yahoo from galicia prohibited such unhealthy practices as preparing your own food.
The termal waters in Ourense are a must.
In the Camino Portugues I stopped using the arrows and just followed the sand along the coast, wow. The arrows tend to make you meander around neighborhoods to go see a closed church or some other monument... pull up a map in your cell phone , you can't get lost if the ocean is at your left.

After 57days, made it home with baby feet, not one blister.

Equipment : z-pack arcblast backpack, Altra lone peak 3.0 shoes, chinese hat, 1.5m staff ( named 'don miguel segundo' ), silk sleeping bag, 6 kilos total and I noticed that there were 2kilos of never used sun creams and foot care and chargers and blah blah

I'm heading back out to walk Lisbon to Santiago mid february.
Life is good! Keep smiling and look up Chantal Maillard, her poems and philosophy kept my mind busy, wonderful.

Abrazos y Buen camino.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Catalan, (May-July 2012), Via Francigena (Barcelona to Rome - 2015), Via Francigena (Rome to Canterbury - 2016)
#21
I start from Almeria Sat 3 Sept ... Should be interesting. I will be the guy with the cane staff, the chinese straw hat and the orange backpack . ;)

Any suggestions about were to stay in Almeria?
I'm searching for the same information. Is there a pilgrim albergue in Almeria, or do you have to stay in a normal youth hostel?
 

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