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Starting on the southern coast of Portugal

2020 Camino Guides

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
There have been some posts from people wanting to start their Caminho Portugues on the southern Atlantic coast of Portugal. I think that anyone who has done that has had to find his/her way on quiet roads with no marked trails.

There is now a fully marked off-road trail from Sagres (southwest tip of the country) to Santiago do Cacem (about 100 miles from Lisbon). That still leaves a gap between Santiago do Cacem and Lisbon, but the gap is shrinking.

This "Rota Vicentina" is an effort to drum up rural tourism, and I know it is not based on anything having to do with the Camino. But this might be an acceptable second-best way to start walking in the south for those who want a longer walk through Portugal to Santiago.

I have been in Santiago do Cacem and have seen the church to Santiago that is there, so there must be some bygone connection.

No albergues of course, but the route seems to be charted to take you through towns with very affordable places.

http://www.rotavicentina.com/en/
http://intelligenttravel.nationalgeogra ... -portugal/

Bom caminho, Laurie
 

Diogo92

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Português 2013, 2014
C. de Fátima 2014
C. do Salnés 2015
Hi there everybody.

The Rota Vicentina it's a wonderful thing to do. Has peregrina2000 said and well, it's an effort from the Portuguese Institute of Tourism to improve Rural Tourism and other associated Nature kind types of tourism in the coast of Alentejo.

It's a very good place for people to camp, you'll find many good Camping Parks over there, and you will also be very near from the beach and the ocean.

The way splits into two parts, one more inland and other more near from the coast.

I warn everybody that decides to start a southern Caminho and pass through this route, not to do it in Summer time, or if you do it, be prepared for 30 degrees or more heat without wind. Alentejo it's one of the most dry regions from Portugal in the Summer, but it's also very beautiful with all his country side landscapes, great food and great people!

Here it his the video of presentation to the route (english version).

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xzlAhbD0dg[/youtube]

I hope you come visit my country :D

Best Regards
Diogo
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
Hi Laurie thanks for starting this thread,I thought I would post some comments on the waymarking between Tavira and Santiago which also starts on the south coast.I am thinking of doing about 12-14 days in October of this year, and this route appeals to me because I could come back for the next 2-3 years to complete it. There is arrows from Tavira to Mertola(about the first 110 km) then last year there was the waymarking from Viseu to Santiago (the last 390km). There is a group which formed in the last few years who cover some of the areashttp://www.grupoamigossantiago.blogspot.co.uk and they are getting around to waymarking as social days out. There has been waymarking in the area of Nisa in February of this year, I tried to give a link but it would not do it, but if you put the words - sinalizacao, caminho do santiago and nisa into the google search engine you should be able to find it. Also there has been waymarking around Belmonte which is before Serra Da Estrela, there is a facebook page with photos of it, again I have had difficulty posting the thread but if you put Caminho do Santiago, Belmonte, sinalizacao into google search you should be able to find a link.

There is a lot of meetings going on between local councils to talk babout this route, so maybe in the next 4-6 years it will be fully marked (960-1000km).

mike
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Mike,
That sounds like a wonderful route, Mike. Up through the Serra da Estrella could add some elevation gain to what might otherwise be on the flatter side of caminos. I continue to be amazed by the generosity and dedication of people who bother to put markings up so that we can all enjoy these routes. (and p.s., Mike, are we going to be a few days and a few kms apart this summer?)

I was in southern Portugal this past weekend and saw some of the markings for the Rota Vicentina myself. It looks to me like there is good infrastructure there for the route up to Santiago do Cacem, and I even saw four people who were carrying backpacks and who must have been walking the path.

I completely agree with Diogo that it would be suicidal to walk this route in summer. I walked about 10 km on the headlands between two beach town in pleasant 20 degree weather, and it got hot, so I can imagine what it would be in the middle of summer. And thanks, Diogo, for the video, seems like a good expenditure of tourism dollars to promote this walk. Seems very well planned. Now, we just need to get the route from Santiago de Cacem to Lisbon -- how about a walk along the coast up through Troia, on the ferry over to Setubal, and then to Lisbon from there???
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
peregrina2000 said:
I was in southern Portugal this past weekend and saw some of the markings for the Rota Vicentina myself. It looks to me like there is good infrastructure there for the route up to Santiago do Cacem,
Hi Laurie this route appeals to me as well, it certainly would be easier towards the end of the 2 weeks of finding transport out and back to the UK and if I remember my credencial picture of the camino, the route from Lagos after Cacem goes either to Lisbon or to the Interior route.

Someone talked on this forum last year of going from Lagos but they never came back and posted what happened, usually when I find a blog about going from the South Coast it is in German and I always seem to have difficulty in getting the computer I am on to translate.
 

Diogo92

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Português 2013, 2014
C. de Fátima 2014
C. do Salnés 2015
I’ll probably do it next year, or if it’s good weather in December this year, I could try to do it in that time. I only have vacations in May and December, 15 days in each month, so usually it could be a little complicated for me to arrange these kinds of walks :p

Temperatures in Alentejo at the middle of a so called normal summer, could reach out to 35 or even 39º! Imagine walking with your backpack and with all that eat. It would be devastating.
I think that Rota Vicentina it’s a good thing to explore, but I think that the official organism that handles Tourism in Portugal must be very carefully and pay attention or we could be talking in making costa Vicentina in a new Algarve.

I’ve got to be honest with you and say that I don’t know the way from Santiago do Cacém to Lisboa. The problem with the route that peregrina2000 talked about making in the future is that, they are trying to make Troia to become an some sort of Portuguese resort for rich people, with Golf Clubs, 5* Hotels, closed condominium’s, stuff like that.
And usually those kinds of interests go over the terms of Nature and common sense. Money talks in here, and if some crazy mad man thinks that these it’s not a good thing for his house, he could pay some money and bribe someone so that the route couldn’t be constructed or something like that.

But if they manage to do it, I think that the plan to catch the Ferry to Setubal it’s very good, they would only have to find a way from people coming from Setúbal to Cacilhas, so that they could take the boat to Lisbon.

Best regards
Diogo
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Since there were some recent posts on a Lisbon thread about starting from the southern tip of Portugal and walking the Rota Vicentina (not a caminho, so maybe not for the purists), I thought I'd just bring this post up and ask if anyone has walked this route, and if so, how was it?

Bom caminho, Laurie
 

Diogo92

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Português 2013, 2014
C. de Fátima 2014
C. do Salnés 2015
Since there were some recent posts on a Lisbon thread about starting from the southern tip of Portugal and walking the Rota Vicentina (not a caminho, so maybe not for the purists), I thought I'd just bring this post up and ask if anyone has walked this route, and if so, how was it?

Bom caminho, Laurie
For what I've been told, it's well marked, beautifull, but it still lacks a lot of support infrastructures for sleeping and eating.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago(2014)
Camino de Finisterre (2014-2015)
Camino del Norte (2015)
Camion de Portugues (2015)
There have been some posts from people wanting to start their Caminho Portugues on the southern Atlantic coast of Portugal. I think that anyone who has done that has had to find his/her way on quiet roads with no marked trails.

There is now a fully marked off-road trail from Sagres (southwest tip of the country) to Santiago do Cacem (about 100 miles from Lisbon). That still leaves a gap between Santiago do Cacem and Lisbon, but the gap is shrinking.

This "Rota Vicentina" is an effort to drum up rural tourism, and I know it is not based on anything having to do with the Camino. But this might be an acceptable second-best way to start walking in the south for those who want a longer walk through Portugal to Santiago.

I have been in Santiago do Cacem and have seen the church to Santiago that is there, so there must be some bygone connection.

No albergues of course, but the route seems to be charted to take you through towns with very affordable places.

http://www.rotavicentina.com/en/
http://intelligenttravel.nationalgeogra ... -portugal/

Bom caminho, Laurie
Hello Peregrina2000,

My husband and I are interested in walking the Rota Vicentina and then going on through to Santiago and Finesterre. Have you walked this route before? Any good maps or resources you could recommend? Any new information about the road from Santiago do Cacem to Lisbon?

Nancy

Nancy
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Nancy,
Welcome to the forum!

I haven´t walked this route, but I do think the online resources look quite complete. I was in Sagres about a year ago and saw a lot of markings, so I think it must be pretty well marked.

Hoping some of our Portugal-based people can help out with some of these questions, but I don´t think that anyone is working on getting the route from Santiago do Cacem marked to Lisbon. The one possibility I had heard about involved both a ferry from Troia over to Setubal and then bypassing Lisbon by staying on the east side of the Tejo River, which I wouldn´t think would be too appealing.

Let us know if you do walk it, it´d be great to hear some first hand experiences. Buen camino, Laurie
 

petitewalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 fall), Camino Portuguese (fall 2017)
Hello Peregrina2000,

My husband and I are interested in walking the Rota Vicentina and then going on through to Santiago and Finesterre. Have you walked this route before? Any good maps or resources you could recommend? Any new information about the road from Santiago do Cacem to Lisbon?

Nancy

Nancy
Nancy, I have been looking at doing some or all of the Rota Vicentina the end of Sept. I will be in the Algarve for my daughters wedding and it looks like a great add on to our trip. www.rotavicentina .com is a great site and offers quite a bit of info.
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Starting from Cabo São Vicente, the utmost south west point of Europe and Portugal you'll find the" last German sausage before America :)"


How to get from there to America after you bought a sausage does not tell the story but the best alternative is to swim...:p

I only read once about a Dutch guy on the internet who walked from Cabo São Vicente to Santiago .can't find his blog anymore . But I remember it was a pretty lonesome trail for some time. From São Vicente to Lisbon it is about 300 kms so ending up in Santiago is about 850 kms
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Starting from Cabo São Vicente, the utmost south west point of Europe and Portugal you'll find the" last German sausage before America :)"


How to get from there to America after you bought a sausage does not tell the story but the best alternative is to swim...:p

I only read once about a Dutch guy on the internet who walked from Cabo São Vicente to Santiago .can't find his blog anymore . But I remember it was a pretty lonesome trail for some time. From São Vicente to Lisbon it is about 300 kms so ending up in Santiago is about 850 kms
After googling I found the link

http://www.pelgrim-helmut.nl/Pages/Main/html/Caminho_Portugues/reisverslag_caminho_portugues.html

However in Dutch on the first page you find all the places he has been so that gives you the idea how pilgrim Helmut (which is his name ) walked.
From Lisbon he followed the traditional way to Santarèm, Coimbra Porto and so on.
Bom caminho
 

edumad

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Português '12 '14 (Rates), '18 (Ponte de Lima)
Interior '15 (Vila Real)
Francês '16 (Ponferrada).
There is a costal long distance path in the plan that would take you from the Cape of St Vincent all the way up the coast to Galicia.

I believe recent improvements and appearance of walkboards and cycle paths are in line with the development of this. It would be the Portuguese section of a cross European coastal path the E9. Unfortunately I think none of it is waymarked yet.
 

marjude

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
4/2011 VdlP,
4/2014 Rota Vincentina, Portugues.
4/2016 Aragones, Frances.
4/2019 Madrid, Frances
Hi to all the people interested in the Rota Vicentina Walk,

A friend and I did the walk beginning of April last year with good weather. Make sure you take food and plenty of WATER with you because most days we didn’t walk through any villages and if we did the shop may not have been open. It is a lonely route through the hilly forest trails; we didn’t see anybody else in these areas. On our walk we only saw about 4 other pilgrims walking north to South. There were no pilgrim facilities, we stayed in hostels or small hotels and in the first few sections we asked our hosts to book ahead for us when we had our packs taken ahead by taxi.

We started our walk in Cabo de S Vicente and walked North to Santiago do Cacem. We down loaded the guide notes from the Rota Vicentina site and we were able to get a guide book from the tourist office in Sagres. The route is very well marked all the way. There was no accommodation in Cado Vicente so we stayed 2 nights in Vila do Bispo as the first days walk ends in Vila Bispo.

Day 1: Cabo de Vicente- Vila do Bispo 16km, Hotel Mira Sagres 30e incl breaky (only acc there). Shops / restaurant opposite hotel, Mercado. We took a bus to Sagres and then a taxi 8e to Cabo Vicente and walked the coast and back to Vila Bispo. The walks along the coast are very beautiful.

Day 2: Vila do Bispo – Carrapateira 23km, Pensao Das Lunas 35e (2 nights) breakfast 7.50. Shop/restaurant, Mercado. We sent our packs ahead by taxi 8e, each (friend had blisters). There was a village Pedralva on today’s walk that is being re-established, it has acc on your right as you enter the village. Today we had to cross the same creek 6 times; Off came the shoes each time. If you don’t carry your pack make sure you take a small towel to dry your feet. Some of the crossings were quite deep and we had to take our walking shorts off because we couldn’t tell how deep the water was.

Day 3: Carrapateira – Carrapapeira 14km, today was a loop walk out to the coast and back.

Day 4: Carrapateira – Arrifana 25km,Pousadas de Juventude (youth hostel) inc breakf, email: ARRIFANNA2MOVIJOVEM.PT shops/restaurant, Mercado (a bit of a walk). I would recommend sending packs on by taxi today. When you arrive at the coast you have to cross a creek that runs out to the sea, we could have walked across a shallower section but then we would have had to climb a cliff, at 62 no thanks, so for us there was no way around and the water was almost waist deep. A bike rider went through before us so we could judge it’s depth and the climb up the headland on the other side was steep. It was a surfers camping spot so there were people around if help was needed.

Day 5: Arrifana – Aljezar 12km, Hotel Amazigh. Shop/mercado

Day 6: Aljezar – Odeceixe 19km, Casa Hospedes Celeste 20e inc breakf, run by a lovely lady who has walked the Camino and she asks pilgrims to sign her pilgrim book that dates back to the sixties. Shops/restaurant, Mercado. There was a town called Rogil along the way today with shops open. After Rogil you start walking along the edge of a canal and that was hot walking.

Day 7 :Odeceixe – Sao Teotonio 24km, Hotel, ph +351 283 958 406 20e inc breakf. Shops, café,mercado. A hard day, we climbed up and down all day through Eucalyptus forests ( I felt right at home being from Australia) and there were a few water crossings, we only took our boots off once.

Day 8: Sao Teotonio – Odemira 22km, Residencial Rita 22.50 inc breakf. Shops/restaurant, Mercado. When we crossed the bridge into town we turned left and found our acc down in that area. An easy day.

Day 9: Odemira – S Luis by bus today, I think there were a lot of km’s today and my friend was still struggling with blisters. There was supposed to be acc here but when we arrived we were told it was 3km out of town so we decided to wait for the next bus to -- Cercal do Alentejo, Residencial Café/Restaurant Solardo Alentejo 20e, the sign is above a café at the bus stop. There were shops in S Luis.

Day 10: Cercal do Alentejo – Vale Seco by bus—then walk to Santiago do Cacem 25km, Porto das Covas Residencial 20e no breakf ( not far from bus station for bus to Lisbon) hard to find acc here, we were tired and probably didn’t look hard enough. Shops/restaurant, Mercado. The walk to Vale Seco was long km’s and according to the guide book there was only a bar there, so not being sure about acc we didn’t want to walk a long day and arrive not knowing if we could find acc. We took the early bus and asked the driver to let us off at Vale Seco, there was a bar there but it looked like it hadn’t been open for years. Our first thoughts were, what have we done, no bar, no nothing, our guide book showed if we walked along the N20 towards Santiago do Cacem the path would cross the N20 and we could then follow our route, we walked ?km’s along a narrow busy road until we found our path and off we went. I think the guide book said this was a fairly easy day and only 18km’s but I have written 25km’s. This was a day of “ aren’t we there yet” ; It just seemed to drag on.

Day 11: bus to Lisbon.

Because we were going on to walk the Portugese Camino I didn’t keep my guide book so this info is out of my diary. It was an interesting walk but I missed the interaction with other pilgrims that you have on the Camino walks. The Portugese people were so friendly and helpful and the seafood was beautiful.

I stayed in Lisbon for a few days before travelling south to have a good look around and recover from jetlag. I stayed at the Hotel do Chile 35e night breakf 5e, where Diogo from the forum works and I can thoroughly recommend it. There was a bus stop not far away that took you down to the main city area or you were close enough to walk if you wanted to, shops and places to eat close by.

I also did Laurie’s walking tour which was great, some places I would never have found without her guide. You can find it on the forum in the Portugese section under ( My walking tour, Peregrina 2000). If you have time also take a tram from the water front down to the Belem district and visit the Mosteiro do Jeronimos a 16th century Monastery, worth a visit it was beautiful.

If anyone has any questions please ask.

Judy.
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Hi to all the people interested in the Rota Vicentina Walk,

A friend and I did the walk beginning of April last year with good weather. Make sure you take food and plenty of WATER with you because most days we didn’t walk through any villages and if we did the shop may not have been open. It is a lonely route through the hilly forest trails; we didn’t see anybody else in these areas. On our walk we only saw about 4 other pilgrims walking north to South. There were no pilgrim facilities, we stayed in hostels or small hotels and in the first few sections we asked our hosts to book ahead for us when we had our packs taken ahead by taxi.

We started our walk in Cabo de S Vicente and walked North to Santiago do Cacem. We down loaded the guide notes from the Rota Vicentina site and we were able to get a guide book from the tourist office in Sagres. The route is very well marked all the way. There was no accommodation in Cado Vicente so we stayed 2 nights in Vila do Bispo as the first days walk ends in Vila Bispo.

Day 1: Cabo de Vicente- Vila do Bispo 16km, Hotel Mira Sagres 30e incl breaky (only acc there). Shops / restaurant opposite hotel, Mercado. We took a bus to Sagres and then a taxi 8e to Cabo Vicente and walked the coast and back to Vila Bispo. The walks along the coast are very beautiful.

Day 2: Vila do Bispo – Carrapateira 23km, Pensao Das Lunas 35e (2 nights) breakfast 7.50. Shop/restaurant, Mercado. We sent our packs ahead by taxi 8e, each (friend had blisters). There was a village Pedralva on today’s walk that is being re-established, it has acc on your right as you enter the village. Today we had to cross the same creek 6 times; Off came the shoes each time. If you don’t carry your pack make sure you take a small towel to dry your feet. Some of the crossings were quite deep and we had to take our walking shorts off because we couldn’t tell how deep the water was.

Day 3: Carrapateira – Carrapapeira 14km, today was a loop walk out to the coast and back.

Day 4: Carrapateira – Arrifana 25km,Pousadas de Juventude (youth hostel) inc breakf, email: ARRIFANNA2MOVIJOVEM.PT shops/restaurant, Mercado (a bit of a walk). I would recommend sending packs on by taxi today. When you arrive at the coast you have to cross a creek that runs out to the sea, we could have walked across a shallower section but then we would have had to climb a cliff, at 62 no thanks, so for us there was no way around and the water was almost waist deep. A bike rider went through before us so we could judge it’s depth and the climb up the headland on the other side was steep. It was a surfers camping spot so there were people around if help was needed.

Day 5: Arrifana – Aljezar 12km, Hotel Amazigh. Shop/mercado

Day 6: Aljezar – Odeceixe 19km, Casa Hospedes Celeste 20e inc breakf, run by a lovely lady who has walked the Camino and she asks pilgrims to sign her pilgrim book that dates back to the sixties. Shops/restaurant, Mercado. There was a town called Rogil along the way today with shops open. After Rogil you start walking along the edge of a canal and that was hot walking.

Day 7 :Odeceixe – Sao Teotonio 24km, Hotel, ph +351 283 958 406 20e inc breakf. Shops, café,mercado. A hard day, we climbed up and down all day through Eucalyptus forests ( I felt right at home being from Australia) and there were a few water crossings, we only took our boots off once.

Day 8: Sao Teotonio – Odemira 22km, Residencial Rita 22.50 inc breakf. Shops/restaurant, Mercado. When we crossed the bridge into town we turned left and found our acc down in that area. An easy day.

Day 9: Odemira – S Luis by bus today, I think there were a lot of km’s today and my friend was still struggling with blisters. There was supposed to be acc here but when we arrived we were told it was 3km out of town so we decided to wait for the next bus to -- Cercal do Alentejo, Residencial Café/Restaurant Solardo Alentejo 20e, the sign is above a café at the bus stop. There were shops in S Luis.

Day 10: Cercal do Alentejo – Vale Seco by bus—then walk to Santiago do Cacem 25km, Porto das Covas Residencial 20e no breakf ( not far from bus station for bus to Lisbon) hard to find acc here, we were tired and probably didn’t look hard enough. Shops/restaurant, Mercado. The walk to Vale Seco was long km’s and according to the guide book there was only a bar there, so not being sure about acc we didn’t want to walk a long day and arrive not knowing if we could find acc. We took the early bus and asked the driver to let us off at Vale Seco, there was a bar there but it looked like it hadn’t been open for years. Our first thoughts were, what have we done, no bar, no nothing, our guide book showed if we walked along the N20 towards Santiago do Cacem the path would cross the N20 and we could then follow our route, we walked ?km’s along a narrow busy road until we found our path and off we went. I think the guide book said this was a fairly easy day and only 18km’s but I have written 25km’s. This was a day of “ aren’t we there yet” ; It just seemed to drag on.

Day 11: bus to Lisbon.

Because we were going on to walk the Portugese Camino I didn’t keep my guide book so this info is out of my diary. It was an interesting walk but I missed the interaction with other pilgrims that you have on the Camino walks. The Portugese people were so friendly and helpful and the seafood was beautiful.

I stayed in Lisbon for a few days before travelling south to have a good look around and recover from jetlag. I stayed at the Hotel do Chile 35e night breakf 5e, where Diogo from the forum works and I can thoroughly recommend it. There was a bus stop not far away that took you down to the main city area or you were close enough to walk if you wanted to, shops and places to eat close by.

I also did Laurie’s walking tour which was great, some places I would never have found without her guide. You can find it on the forum in the Portugese section under ( My walking tour, Peregrina 2000). If you have time also take a tram from the water front down to the Belem district and visit the Mosteiro do Jeronimos a 16th century Monastery, worth a visit it was beautiful.

If anyone has any questions please ask.

Judy.
Great information Judy ! Compliments !

Um abraço
 

petitewalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 fall), Camino Portuguese (fall 2017)
Judi,
Thank you for writing all of this down. It sounds like a beautiful walk, but missing that interaction we love on the Camino.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks so much, Judy, this kind of information is very hard to come by.

I know this isn't officially a camino, but then, why is there an ancient stone carving of Santiago in the church in a town named Santiago do Cacem?!

bom caminho, Laurie
 

Prentiss Riddle

Aprendiz de todo, maestro de nada
Camino(s) past & future
Poco a poco: we're nibbling away at the Francés. (2015, 2016 & 2017)
Judy, here's one more obrigadíssimo! Such a great report.

Bom caminho,

Prentiss
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Thanks to everyone who has contributed to this thread. Only a few weeks ago I read about this route in a local magazine here in Holland. The pictures looked beautiful with trails high above the coast.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Just by chance just read a posting on Facebook (a Spanish Via de la Plata group) from somebody who walked the Rota Vicentina and on to Lisbon.
Here is what he said he did :
Walked Santiago do Cacem to Mélides.
From Mélides he went to Troia Peninsula. He then took a ferry from the pier to Setábul. From Setábul he walked to Barreiros where he took another ferry which took him to Lisbon.
Laurie mentioned this option above but her version skipped Lisbon. This option takes you there.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago(2014)
Camino de Finisterre (2014-2015)
Camino del Norte (2015)
Camion de Portugues (2015)
Hi, Nancy,
Welcome to the forum!

I haven´t walked this route, but I do think the online resources look quite complete. I was in Sagres about a year ago and saw a lot of markings, so I think it must be pretty well marked.

Hoping some of our Portugal-based people can help out with some of these questions, but I don´t think that anyone is working on getting the route from Santiago do Cacem marked to Lisbon. The one possibility I had heard about involved both a ferry from Troia over to Setubal and then bypassing Lisbon by staying on the east side of the Tejo River, which I wouldn´t think would be too appealing.

Let us know if you do walk it, it´d be great to hear some first hand experiences. Buen camino, Laurie

Hi Laurie,

Still doing the research on this but it looks doable. Thanks for your response and suggestions. I have only been to Portugal once but was not even thinking about way marking.

Will keep in touch!

Nancy
 

amsimoes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I am out.
Friends have my email.
Thanks so much, Judy, this kind of information is very hard to come by.

I know this isn't officially a camino, but then, why is there an ancient stone carving of Santiago in the church in a town named Santiago do Cacem?!

bom caminho, Laurie
Hi Laurie
The Military Order of Santiago, whose office was in the village and castle of Palmela, was the administrator of the territory conquered from the Moors now called Alentejo.
The Cacém Santiago Castle served as a defense against incursions by coming coastline.
Santiago do Cacém is heir of the history of the Roman city of MIrogriba, located a few kilometers.
AMSimoes
 

Capitao_Goma

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Português (2002)
Caminho Português do Interior: Coina-Barreiro (2014)
Just by chance just read a posting on Facebook (a Spanish Via de la Plata group) from somebody who walked the Rota Vicentina and on to Lisbon.
Here is what he said he did :
Walked Santiago do Cacem to Mélides.
From Mélides he went to Troia Peninsula. He then took a ferry from the pier to Setábul. From Setábul he walked to Barreiros where he took another ferry which took him to Lisbon.
Laurie mentioned this option above but her version skipped Lisbon. This option takes you there.
Hey LTfit. Once you walked in Barreiro (and if you have the chance to repeat Caminho Português starting at Algarve), i offer you a suggestion. If you come from Palmela, you can reach Covas de Coina (GPS 38.587131, -9.021523) and go towards Lisbon. Just pass over the little towns of Coina, Palhais, Telha Velha (GPS 38.640644, -9.059177) and then, downing side by side the river until you get the boat station at Barreiro.

This way that i'm talking about consists in a new project that some local volunteers are trying to recover. The Municipality of Barreiro already made some activities to encourage younger population within. Take care!
 
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Camino Chrissy Rota Vicentina 7

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