• PLEASE NOTE: Please think twice before you travel to Spain now. More here.

Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement

Starting slowly on the Le Puy route

Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
I'm planning to walk the Le Puy route solo in Sept/Oct 2020. I've walked the Camino Frances (2015) from SJPDP. I've walked others since then, as well as the Wainwright Coast to Coast Walk, but I'm not getting any younger. I'll be 78 next fall, and I want to take the walk slowly, averaging 10 miles a day, but hopefully starting even more slowly. I'm wondering if staying at St-Christophe-sur-Dolaison the first night might be comparable to stopping at Orisson on the CF. Those first 7.5 km to Orisson took me 4 hours! My ability to walk longer days grew, of course, but I took 45 days with one rest day to walk to Santiago. Has anyone else here walked the Via Podiensis using shorter stages than the traditional ones? I would love to see some itineraries with shorter stages. Many thanks in advance for any suggestions you might have.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés five times, Madrid two days, Ingles once.
Hi Kathy,
I'll be starting in Le Puy in mid-Aug, will turn 76 somewhere in Spain, and may take my full 90 days allowance by Schengen visa. I do between 7 and 12 miles a day with multiple rest days - so doubt I'll catch up with you, alas... Bon Chemin/Buen Camino !
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
Hi Kathy,
I'll be starting in Le Puy in mid-Aug, will turn 76 somewhere in Spain, and may take my full 90 days allowance by Schengen visa. I do between 7 and 12 miles a day with multiple rest days - so doubt I'll catch up with you, alas... Bon Chemin/Buen Camino !
It's great to hear from someone else who prefers walking 7-12 mile days. I'm not going on from SJPdP to Santiago this time. I might even split the Le Puy into two parts and only walk half next fall and half in 2021. I'm still deciding. Are you looking at any possible itinerary suggestions for the Le Puy route?
 

markmcilroy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances August/Sept 2016
Camino Frances Sept/October 2017
Le Puy to Conques May 2018
Hi Kathy, I had a quiet chuckle when I read the title of your post.....we started on the Le Puy in May 2018 and are going back this May to carry on from Conques where we stopped. But no one can have a fast start on the Le Puy as the first hill you encounter which is still in Le Puy is rather steep one and we were both knackered by the time we go to the top of it. It's a lot tougher than the CF with lots of hills and rough under foot but apparently that is only for the first 200kms or so.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
Hi Kathy, I had a quiet chuckle when I read the title of your post.....we started on the Le Puy in May 2018 and are going back this May to carry on from Conques where we stopped. But no one can have a fast start on the Le Puy as the first hill you encounter which is still in Le Puy is rather steep one and we were both knackered by the time we go to the top of it. It's a lot tougher than the CF with lots of hills and rough under foot but apparently that is only for the first 200kms or so.
Where did you stop the first night?
 

AJGuillaume

Pèlerin du monde
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
I'm planning to walk the Le Puy route solo in Sept/Oct 2020. I've walked the Camino Frances (2015) from SJPDP. I've walked others since then, as well as the Wainwright Coast to Coast Walk, but I'm not getting any younger. I'll be 78 next fall, and I want to take the walk slowly, averaging 10 miles a day, but hopefully starting even more slowly. I'm wondering if staying at St-Christophe-sur-Dolaison the first night might be comparable to stopping at Orisson on the CF. Those first 7.5 km to Orisson took me 4 hours! My ability to walk longer days grew, of course, but I took 45 days with one rest day to walk to Santiago. Has anyone else here walked the Via Podiensis using shorter stages than the traditional ones? I would love to see some itineraries with shorter stages. Many thanks in advance for any suggestions you might have.

In 2018, we walked from Switzerland to Le Puy-en-Velay, then on to SJPdP, Irun and the Camino del Norte. For a number of reasons, we walked short stages, an average of 15km per day (which, if I am not mistaken, is about 10 miles a day).
Here's our stages between Le Puy and SJPdP:
Montbonnet 17.4km
Monistrol-d'Allier 13.8km
Saugues 12km
Le Sauvage 19.9km
St-Alban-sur-Limagnole 13.3km
Aumont-Aubrac 15.6km
Finieyrols 17.3km
Nasbinals 11km
St Chely d'Aubrac 17km
St Come d'Olt 16.4km
Estaing 20.6km
Golinhac 16km
Conques 21km
Conques 0 (Rest day)
Decazeville 19km
Felzins 21.5km
Figeac 12km
Puy Clavel 20km
Cajarc 12km
Limogne-en-Quercy 19km
Bach 13.3km
Mas de Vers 9km
Cahors 18.6km
Cahors 0 (Rest day)
Lamartinie 16.5km
Montcuq 18.7km
Lauzerte 16.5km
Durfort-Lacapelette 13.8km
Moissac 14.8km
Auvillar 21km
Miradoux 17.3km
Lectoure 15.9km
La Romieu 19km
Condom 16km
Laressingle 6km
Montreal du Gers 13km
Eauze 17km
Manciet 11.1km
We stayed with a friend in the area, and she dropped us off at Nogaro.
Luppe Violles 14.2km
Aire sur l'Adour 16.7km
Miramont-Sensacq 17.5km
Arzacq-Arraziguet 15.9km
Uzan 16.6km
Arthez-de Bearn 13.8km
Sauvelade 17.8km
Navarrenx 13.8km
Aroue 18.9km
Haranbeltz 18.7km
Bussanarits 19.7km
We didn't stay in SJPdP, as we walked from Bussanarits onwards to Hendaye/Irun.
We stayed mainly in chambres d'hôtes.
Hope this helps
Bon Chemin, Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
In 2018, we walked from Switzerland to Le Puy-en-Velay, then on to SJPdP, Irun and the Camino del Norte. For a number of reasons, we walked short stages, an average of 15km per day (which, if I am not mistaken, is about 10 miles a day).
Here's our stages between Le Puy and SJPdP:
Montbonnet 17.4km
Monistrol-d'Allier 13.8km
Saugues 12km
Le Sauvage 19.9km
St-Alban-sur-Limagnole 13.3km
Aumont-Aubrac 15.6km
Finieyrols 17.3km
Nasbinals 11km
St Chely d'Aubrac 17km
St Come d'Olt 16.4km
Estaing 20.6km
Golinhac 16km
Conques 21km
Conques 0 (Rest day)
Decazeville 19km
Felzins 21.5km
Figeac 12km
Puy Clavel 20km
Cajarc 12km
Limogne-en-Quercy 19km
Bach 13.3km
Mas de Vers 9km
Cahors 18.6km
Cahors 0 (Rest day)
Lamartinie 16.5km
Montcuq 18.7km
Lauzerte 16.5km
Durfort-Lacapelette 13.8km
Moissac 14.8km
Auvillar 21km
Miradoux 17.3km
Lectoure 15.9km
La Romieu 19km
Condom 16km
Laressingle 6km
Montreal du Gers 13km
Eauze 17km
Manciet 11.1km
We stayed with a friend in the area, and she dropped us off at Nogaro.
Luppe Violles 14.2km
Aire sur l'Adour 16.7km
Miramont-Sensacq 17.5km
Arzacq-Arraziguet 15.9km
Uzan 16.6km
Arthez-de Bearn 13.8km
Sauvelade 17.8km
Navarrenx 13.8km
Aroue 18.9km
Haranbeltz 18.7km
Bussanarits 19.7km
We didn't stay in SJPdP, as we walked from Bussanarits onwards to Hendaye/Irun.
We stayed mainly in chambres d'hôtes.
Hope this helps
Bon Chemin, Buen Camino!
In 2018, we walked from Switzerland to Le Puy-en-Velay, then on to SJPdP, Irun and the Camino del Norte. For a number of reasons, we walked short stages, an average of 15km per day (which, if I am not mistaken, is about 10 miles a day).
Here's our stages between Le Puy and SJPdP:
Montbonnet 17.4km
Monistrol-d'Allier 13.8km
Saugues 12km
Le Sauvage 19.9km
St-Alban-sur-Limagnole 13.3km
Aumont-Aubrac 15.6km
Finieyrols 17.3km
Nasbinals 11km
St Chely d'Aubrac 17km
St Come d'Olt 16.4km
Estaing 20.6km
Golinhac 16km
Conques 21km
Conques 0 (Rest day)
Decazeville 19km
Felzins 21.5km
Figeac 12km
Puy Clavel 20km
Cajarc 12km
Limogne-en-Quercy 19km
Bach 13.3km
Mas de Vers 9km
Cahors 18.6km
Cahors 0 (Rest day)
Lamartinie 16.5km
Montcuq 18.7km
Lauzerte 16.5km
Durfort-Lacapelette 13.8km
Moissac 14.8km
Auvillar 21km
Miradoux 17.3km
Lectoure 15.9km
La Romieu 19km
Condom 16km
Laressingle 6km
Montreal du Gers 13km
Eauze 17km
Manciet 11.1km
We stayed with a friend in the area, and she dropped us off at Nogaro.
Luppe Violles 14.2km
Aire sur l'Adour 16.7km
Miramont-Sensacq 17.5km
Arzacq-Arraziguet 15.9km
Uzan 16.6km
Arthez-de Bearn 13.8km
Sauvelade 17.8km
Navarrenx 13.8km
Aroue 18.9km
Haranbeltz 18.7km
Bussanarits 19.7km
We didn't stay in SJPdP, as we walked from Bussanarits onwards to Hendaye/Irun.
We stayed mainly in chambres d'hôtes.
Hope this helps
Bon Chemin, Buen Camino!
Thank you so much! This is a wonderful resource! This does help so much. Many thanks!
 

markmcilroy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances August/Sept 2016
Camino Frances Sept/October 2017
Le Puy to Conques May 2018

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
I'm planning to walk the Le Puy route solo in Sept/Oct 2020. I've walked the Camino Frances (2015) from SJPDP. I've walked others since then, as well as the Wainwright Coast to Coast Walk, but I'm not getting any younger. I'll be 78 next fall, and I want to take the walk slowly, averaging 10 miles a day, but hopefully starting even more slowly. I'm wondering if staying at St-Christophe-sur-Dolaison the first night might be comparable to stopping at Orisson on the CF. Those first 7.5 km to Orisson took me 4 hours! My ability to walk longer days grew, of course, but I took 45 days with one rest day to walk to Santiago. Has anyone else here walked the Via Podiensis using shorter stages than the traditional ones? I would love to see some itineraries with shorter stages. Many thanks in advance for any suggestions you might have.
Fantastic! My husband and I did Le Puy to Santiago, mid-August to late October, in 2018, We are in out 60s. But we walked several days with a 70+ American nurse who was way to fast for us to keep up with her!!! Accommodation is an issue at weekends or any other holiday right across the French part of the walk. And even doing 20k a day would not guarantee conveniently located accommodation. You might have to get cabs to ferry you to and from a bit. Also, parts of the track, though absolutely magnificent, can be quite steep. You might like to check out the blogs I wrote (not for practical advice - but more for the feel of it all 😊) https://readingontheroad54893552.wordpress.com/2018/08/27/holy-mary-mother-of-god-shes-black/
Buen Camino, Bon Chemin
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011), Camino Frances (2015), Camino Ingles (2017), Camino Muxia (2017), LePuy(2019)
My friend and I walked the Le Puy this May, 2019. She turned 82 on the way and I turned 72 the day we left Le Puy. She went on to Santiago while I had to stop at Cahors. So you definitely can do this. Our days averaged 10 - 15 miles per day, often on the short side because of the distances between accommodations. Our first day we stopped at Montbonnet, and I think St. Christophe might be too early for you to stop. It was uphill from Le Puy but not as steep as St. Jean to Orisson. Our second night was at Monistrol, also a shorter etape than for most. We did book ahead because we wanted demi-pension if possible and because in May lots of French were taking advantage of long holiday weekends, and they tended to reserve ahead. Join the FB forum for the Via Podiensis. It is a terrific resource with encouraging, helpful moderators. Bon chemin!
ps. I hope to return to Cahors this spring to finish the Le Puy.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
My stages, where they coincided (gaps indicate non-coincidence, not longer legs). My comfortable average is 15km:
Here's our stages between Le Puy and SJPdP:
Montbonnet 17.4km
Monistrol-d'Allier 13.8km
Saugues 12km
Le Sauvage 19.9km
St-Alban-sur-Limagnole 13.3km
Aumont-Aubrac 15.6km
Finieyrols 17.3km
Nasbinals 11km
St Chely d'Aubrac 17km
St Come d'Olt 16.4km

The first day out of Le Puy has a later start due to the pilgrim mass at 0700, most of the way across town from the exit point. Your thought to shorten Day 1 is smart.

There's not a good spot between St Come d'Olt and Estaing, but if you shoulder-walk the main road the route is shorter (and flatter).

Estaing 20.6km
Golinhac 16km

The descent into Conques is legendary, and better on fresher legs than at the end of a long day. So I stopped at Senergues.
Conques 21km

Cahors 18.6km
Cahors 0 (Rest day)

Moissac 14.8km

Both Cahors (almost exactly halfway) and Moissac have excellent rail connections, making good places to break annual stages.

Auvillar 21km
Miradoux 17.3km
Lectoure 15.9km
La Romieu 19km
Condom 16km
Laressingle 6km
Montreal du Gers 13km
Eauze 17km

Not a lot of alternatives on this stretch.

Aire sur l'Adour 16.7km
Miramont-Sensacq 17.5km
Arzacq-Arraziguet 15.9km

Navarrenx 13.8km
Or this stretch either. Navarrenx has some connections, and gives legs a chance to get in shape before crossing the mountains. Quite a few route and lodging options from here to SJPP, as you pick up the foothills.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
My stages, where they coincided (gaps indicate non-coincidence, not longer legs). My comfortable average is 15km:


The first day out of Le Puy has a later start due to the pilgrim mass at 0700, most of the way across town from the exit point. Your thought to shorten Day 1 is smart.

There's not a good spot between St Come d'Olt and Estaing, but if you shoulder-walk the main road the route is shorter (and flatter).



The descent into Conques is legendary, and better on fresher legs than at the end of a long day. So I stopped at Senergues.




Both Cahors (almost exactly halfway) and Moissac have excellent rail connections, making good places to break annual stages.



Not a lot of alternatives on this stretch.


Or this stretch either. Navarrenx has some connections, and gives legs a chance to get in shape before crossing the mountains. Quite a few route and lodging options from here to SJPP, as you pick up the foothills.
Thank you so much! Lots of good suggestions here. I do appreciate it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
Identical to my first Chemin de St. Jacques.


It depends. It was perfect for my second Chemin de St. Jacques when I was in poorer shape than the first. It depends!!
Thanks. I don't think I'd regret it. Except that stopping there changes the second stop, doesn't it, and then everything afterwards?
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
My friend and I walked the Le Puy this May, 2019. She turned 82 on the way and I turned 72 the day we left Le Puy. She went on to Santiago while I had to stop at Cahors. So you definitely can do this. Our days averaged 10 - 15 miles per day, often on the short side because of the distances between accommodations. Our first day we stopped at Montbonnet, and I think St. Christophe might be too early for you to stop. It was uphill from Le Puy but not as steep as St. Jean to Orisson. Our second night was at Monistrol, also a shorter etape than for most. We did book ahead because we wanted demi-pension if possible and because in May lots of French were taking advantage of long holiday weekends, and they tended to reserve ahead. Join the FB forum for the Via Podiensis. It is a terrific resource with encouraging, helpful moderators. Bon chemin!
ps. I hope to return to Cahors this spring to finish the Le Puy.
I've been in the Facebook for some time. but I'm just now beginning to plan in earnest so may have more questions. Thanks so much for your comments.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
Fantastic! My husband and I did Le Puy to Santiago, mid-August to late October, in 2018, We are in out 60s. But we walked several days with a 70+ American nurse who was way to fast for us to keep up with her!!! Accommodation is an issue at weekends or any other holiday right across the French part of the walk. And even doing 20k a day would not guarantee conveniently located accommodation. You might have to get cabs to ferry you to and from a bit. Also, parts of the track, though absolutely magnificent, can be quite steep. You might like to check out the blogs I wrote (not for practical advice - but more for the feel of it all 😊) https://readingontheroad54893552.wordpress.com/2018/08/27/holy-mary-mother-of-god-shes-black/
Buen Camino, Bon Chemin
Thanks. I'm looking forward to reading your blogs.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
From past Caminos, I find it works best for me to let the Camino decide my day-to-day experiences - even tho' I love to over-plan leading up to the first step! 😊
I agree entirely. I think I'll feel best knowing where I'm staying for the first couple of days, but then I'll decide day to day.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
We did the second day to Monistrol instead of St. Privat, and then to Saugues. We had found the climb to Saugues at the end of the day pretty tough the first time, so it was much better to start the day. After that the stopping points were the same.
That sounds like a good plan
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
I would highly recommend getting the Miam Do Do guidebook. It is written in French and since I know no French I was afraid to get it. I bought the Michelin guide and found it completely inadequate. It was 2014 and maybe now it is better. Somewhere on the CF I met a Frenchman who also started in Le Puy. Read his guide and realized even without French it is really easy to figure out and has a wealth of information in it. Especially accommodations and maps and guides to towns and their services. If I ever do it again it that book will be on the top of my list. I got my passport in the Camino office in Paris and they had the book there. I am sure you can buy it really easily in Paris or in Le Puy before you begin your camino! It is a beautiful camino with awesome food and all kinds of great scenery. Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
I would highly recommend getting the Miam Do Do guidebook. It is written in French and since I know no French I was afraid to get it. I bought the Michelin guide and found it completely inadequate. It was 2014 and maybe now it is better. Somewhere on the CF I met a Frenchman who also started in Le Puy. Read his guide and realized even without French it is really easy to figure out and has a wealth of information in it. Especially accommodations and maps and guides to towns and their services. If I ever do it again it that book will be on the top of my list. I got my passport in the Camino office in Paris and they had the book there. I am sure you can buy it really easily in Paris or in Le Puy before you begin your camino! It is a beautiful camino with awesome food and all kinds of great scenery. Buen Camino.
Thanks. I’ve ordered the Miam Miam Dodo guide. It’s good to hear another endorsement of it.
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
]
I would love to see some itineraries with shorter stages.

I was a young 74 year old when I started from Le Puy. And in three months I will be approaching the Swiss border on my way to Rome.

Regretably I cannot offer your an itineray with shorter stages. But you have quite a bit to consider already.

I recommend several several other things, though, for your consideration.

1) Michelin Guide 161 Chemins de Compostelle
It shows the route in 32 days. These were not my stages and will not be yours. However the presentation is straight forward with both a regular Michelin map and an elevation guide with towns and villages (with distances) and some points of possible interest shown and a selection of accomodation at poinys along the route with contact details.

2) going up and down hills
I suggest you practice stepping "short".
The steeper the hill the shorter the step.
Depending on the steepness, the toes of one foot stop about 4 inches (100 mm) in front of the other. This means you don't have to spend energy lifting your feet too far of the ground.
And practice breathing in and out with each foot fall.
This way you set up a rythm that you can sustain for qute a long time before wanting to take a rest.
The idea is not to speed up or slow down, just adjust the length of the step.

3) dress for the middle of the day when starting.
At the albergue at Zalbadika (just before Pamplona) we were all chatting after night prayer. The young ones had called me the "fast one" because I seemed to race up the hill out of Saint-Jean. I reflected, that, while it was very cool first thing, I had dressed with a single merino top. I knew I would warm up and that the day would also. And I didn't want to get cold by stopping to change my tops.

4) It might be difficult anywhere near where you live, but try working up to achieving an elevation gain of, say, 400 metres before breakfast. With permission the stairs in moderate to high rise buildings may be a good resource for this. Both up and down!

5) Training: what to carry?
I suggest you always wear the clothes and pack with expected contents on every training trip.

Hope you find this helpful.

Hope to hear of you safe and successful arrival at Saint-Jean

Kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
My stages, where they coincided (gaps indicate non-coincidence, not longer legs). My comfortable average is 15km:


The first day out of Le Puy has a later start due to the pilgrim mass at 0700, most of the way across town from the exit point. Your thought to shorten Day 1 is smart.

There's not a good spot between St Come d'Olt and Estaing, but if you shoulder-walk the main road the route is shorter (and flatter).



The descent into Conques is legendary, and better on fresher legs than at the end of a long day. So I stopped at Senergues.




Both Cahors (almost exactly halfway) and Moissac have excellent rail connections, making good places to break annual stages.



Not a lot of alternatives on this stretch.


Or this stretch either. Navarrenx has some connections, and gives legs a chance to get in shape before crossing the mountains. Quite a few route and lodging options from here to SJPP, as you pick up the foothills.
Kitsambler, I so appreciate all the help you gave me when I walked the LePuy route in June 2018. You are very generous in taking the time to share so many details! You are one of the jewels in the crown of what this forum is all about!
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
I was a young 74 year old when I started from Le Puy. And in three months I will be approaching the Swiss border on my way to Rome.

Regretably I cannot offer your an itineray with shorter stages. But you have quite a bit to consider already.

I recommend several several other things, though, for your consideration.

1) Michelin Guide 161 Chemins de Compostelle
It shows the route in 32 days. These were not my stages and will not be yours. However the presentation is straight forward with both a regular Michelin map and an elevation guide with towns and villages (with distances) and some points of possible interest shown and a selection of accomodation at poinys along the route with contact details.

2) going up and down hills
I suggest you practice stepping "short".
The steeper the hill the shorter the step.
Depending on the steepness, the toes of one foot stop about 4 inches (100 mm) in front of the other. This means you don't have to spend energy lifting your feet too far of the ground.
And practice breathing in and out with each foot fall.
This way you set up a rythm that you can sustain for qute a long time before wanting to take a rest.
The idea is not to speed up or slow down, just adjust the length of the step.

3) dress for the middle of the day when starting.
At the albergue at Zalbadika (just before Pamplona) we were all chatting after night prayer. The young ones had called me the "fast one" because I seemed to race up the hill out of Saint-Jean. I reflected, that, while it was very cool first thing, I had dressed with a single merino top. I knew I would warm up and that the day would also. And I didn't want to get cold by stopping to change my tops.

4) It might be difficult anywhere near where you live, but try working up to achieving an elevation gain of, say, 400 metres before breakfast. With permission the stairs in moderate to high rise buildings may be a good resource for this. Both up and down!

5) Training: what to carry?
I suggest you always wear the clothes and pack with expected contents on every training trip.

Hope you find this helpful.

Hope to hear of you safe and successful arrival at Saint-Jean

Kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
Thank you for your good suggestions. I have the Michelin guide you mention, although I haven't yet had a chance to get familiar with it. I've also ordered the Miam Miam Dodo, which so many pilgrims recommend. I haven't thought about taking short steps on ascents, but I'm sure that's exactly what I do by instinct. I also like zigzagging on very steep ascents when it's possible. I find steep downhills much easier and actually enjoy them, except when they are rocky or root-covered. I'll need to think about dressing for the middle of the day. I do tend to underdress a bit, because I get warm easily, but when it's quite chilly in the morning, I find I need at least a fleece jacket until I warm up. Your #4 suggestion is very interesting and I'll give it a try. Stairs are brutal but so good for training at the same time. I've walked quite a few long walks, as I wrote above, so I have a good idea about training and what to bring and wear. I love all the suggestions that I can get though and really appreciate your input. Many thanks!
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
rocky or root-covered.
Welcome to the Le Puy route, where there is no word for "switchback" in the French language, so the paths are built straight uphill or downhill. They were mimicking the Roman roads, vestiges of which are incorporated into the GR65. As a consequence of this design philosophy, the water sluices right down the path, which becomes a stream bed thereby. In wet weather (May), you are wading. In dry weather (September), you are walking eroded dry stream-beds, rather than well-maintained forest paths.

Speaking of maintenance, it is the responsibility of the local municipality. The FFRG national hikers association only looks after the route marking, not the footway maintenance.

At any rate, these sorts of sections are only (roughly) one-third of the Le Puy route; the remaining is about one-third unpaved farm roads, and one-third paved country byways (very lightly traveled).
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
Welcome to the Le Puy route, where there is no word for "switchback" in the French language, so the paths are built straight uphill or downhill. They were mimicking the Roman roads, vestiges of which are incorporated into the GR65. As a consequence of this design philosophy, the water sluices right down the path, which becomes a stream bed thereby. In wet weather (May), you are wading. In dry weather (September), you are walking eroded dry stream-beds, rather than well-maintained forest paths.

Speaking of maintenance, it is the responsibility of the local municipality. The FFRG national hikers association only looks after the route marking, not the footway maintenance.

At any rate, these sorts of sections are only (roughly) one-third of the Le Puy route; the remaining is about one-third unpaved farm roads, and one-third paved country byways (very lightly traveled).
Wow, thank you, Kitsambler. Forewarned is forearmed.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago, Sept/Oct 2012
Le Puy to Roncesvalles, Oct/Nov 2014
2) going up and down hills
I suggest you practice stepping "short".
The steeper the hill the shorter the step.
Depending on the steepness, the toes of one foot stop about 4 inches (100 mm) in front of the other. This means you don't have to spend energy lifting your feet too far of the ground.
And practice breathing in and out with each foot fall.
This way you set up a rhythm that you can sustain for quite a long time before wanting to take a rest.
The idea is not to speed up or slow down, just adjust the length of the step.

This is such true and excellent advice that I'm quoting it so that it will have a second play on this thread!
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances x 2 , Norte x 2 , Le Puy x 3 , Portuguese x 2,
Mont St Michel , Primitivo .
It's great to hear from someone else who prefers walking 7-12 mile days. I'm not going on from SJPdP to Santiago this time. I might even split the Le Puy into two parts and only walk half next fall and half in 2021. I'm still deciding. Are you looking at any possible itinerary suggestions for the Le Puy route?

Have commenced from Le Puy 3 times now and the reason is very simple ;
Its beautiful so please take your time .
Montbonnet first stop then Monistrol as the climb out to the most breathtaking views is best done in the morning.
MMDD for accommodation and whenever you see a horse shoe in this book beside the name.... stop as this will be a farm environment.
It will also have their email address / language spoken and beds in room all shown.
The food will surpass most dished up on the Frances by a long way.
Go as far as Moissac if you wish to divide .
Luggage transport is first grade if you run into difficulties and each Gite will assist in the selection of accommodation for the upcoming days.
And they all speak English ;)
Pay unders and you will see what i mean:):)
 

BlackRocker57

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy route 2014; Le Puy route continuation 2016; Le Puy route 2017; Le Puy route 2019 [incl. Célé]
I'm planning to walk the Le Puy route solo in Sept/Oct 2020. I've walked the Camino Frances (2015) from SJPDP. I've walked others since then, as well as the Wainwright Coast to Coast Walk, but I'm not getting any younger. I'll be 78 next fall, and I want to take the walk slowly, averaging 10 miles a day, but hopefully starting even more slowly. I'm wondering if staying at St-Christophe-sur-Dolaison the first night might be comparable to stopping at Orisson on the CF. Those first 7.5 km to Orisson took me 4 hours! My ability to walk longer days grew, of course, but I took 45 days with one rest day to walk to Santiago. Has anyone else here walked the Via Podiensis using shorter stages than the traditional ones? I would love to see some itineraries with shorter stages. Many thanks in advance for any suggestions you might have.

no problemo «Singingheart» 🙏🏽 rekkon you might just make it as far as Montbonnet on the first day ... Saint-Christoph is just 9km ... and the climb is not as severe as to Orisson ...

you could take a decent, long rest-break at Saint-Christoph at the newly-opened café–restaurant snd then continue on to Montbonney ...

the stops / itinerary that AJ Guillaume suggests is very do-able if you want to take this path gently ...

and enjoy having the time to take it all in ... plenty of accommodation nowadays along this path to work on 15km or thereabouts each day 😀 There are new accommodations and new refreshment stops opening every year, including interestingly by former pilgrims ...
 
Last edited:

BlackRocker57

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy route 2014; Le Puy route continuation 2016; Le Puy route 2017; Le Puy route 2019 [incl. Célé]
We did the second day to Monistrol instead of St. Privat, and then to Saugues. We had found the climb to Saugues at the end of the day pretty tough the first time, so it was much better to start the day. After that the stopping points were the same.

agree totally with this ... I prefer to start the day to Saugues rather than at the end of the day ... the ol’ feet twould be dragging on that climb 😉
 

BlackRocker57

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy route 2014; Le Puy route continuation 2016; Le Puy route 2017; Le Puy route 2019 [incl. Célé]
I would highly recommend getting the Miam Do Do guidebook. It is written in French and since I know no French I was afraid to get it. I bought the Michelin guide and found it completely inadequate. It was 2014 and maybe now it is better. Somewhere on the CF I met a Frenchman who also started in Le Puy. Read his guide and realized even without French it is really easy to figure out and has a wealth of information in it. Especially accommodations and maps and guides to towns and their services. If I ever do it again it that book will be on the top of my list. I got my passport in the Camino office in Paris and they had the book there. I am sure you can buy it really easily in Paris or in Le Puy before you begin your camino! It is a beautiful camino with awesome food and all kinds of great scenery. Buen Camino.

the little Michelin guide is still [almost totally] inadequate / hopeless 😉 quite aside from its inaccuracies it is now very much out-of-date ... Michelin are not specialist publishers for the pilgrim / hiker market, unlike le Vieux Crayon and FFRP, who are very focussed on their niche markets ... and update their products regularly ... the MMD guidebooks, the MMD app [for smartphones] and the FFRP Topoguides are the «go-to» resources for this path imho ❣️🤔‼️
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Thank you for your good suggestions. I have the Michelin guide you mention, although I haven't yet had a chance to get familiar with it. I've also ordered the Miam Miam Dodo, which so many pilgrims recommend. I haven't thought about taking short steps on ascents, but I'm sure that's exactly what I do by instinct. I also like zigzagging on very steep ascents when it's possible. I find steep downhills much easier and actually enjoy them, except when they are rocky or root-covered. I'll need to think about dressing for the middle of the day. I do tend to underdress a bit, because I get warm easily, but when it's quite chilly in the morning, I find I need at least a fleece jacket until I warm up. Your #4 suggestion is very interesting and I'll give it a try. Stairs are brutal but so good for training at the same time. I've walked quite a few long walks, as I wrote above, so I have a good idea about training and what to bring and wear. I love all the suggestions that I can get though and really appreciate your input. Many thanks!
The suggestions are excellent. Leave the Michelin Guide at home it is useless. Just use the Miam Miam Dodo. Take it from not just me but others who have used it.
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
the little Michelin guide is still [almost totally] inadequate / hopeless (and) quite aside from its inaccuracies it is now very much out-of-dat
Leave the Michelin Guide at home it is useless. Just use the Miam Miam Dodo. Take it from not just me but others who have used it.

I continue to use Michelin Guide 161 nearly four years after first buying it en route.

I acknowledge the gite-d'etape listings are most probably well out of date.

But has the route change in every or any stage? And who follows the published route slavishly? My most serendipitous moment was on leaving Larresingle. Walked down the hill and encountered a most wonderful
shared path along a disused railway to Gondrin.

I find both Michelin guides (France and Spain) most excellent publications for big picture planning and on the day. As did the women I encountered on the Massif Central who used hers to set me in the right direction. I bought mine a few hours later.

The guides are light weight, and easily go in my front pocket and equally easy to refer to when underway.

Miam Miam Dodo is also an excellent publication. For me it is too heavy. (I scanned it for (my sole) use on my tablet. But didn't want to waste battery every time I had a small emergency.

So, (health warning) it is not helpful to say don't use / take / not take / not use something without focussing on the specific aspect and without identifying good points.

There was a radio crime series one or two years ago where the detective just wanted "the facts, Ma'am, just the facts".

Kia kaha katoa (you all take care, be strong, get going)
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
This is such true and excellent advice ...

@gml, thank you.

When going up from Saint-Jean I was very surprised that I was passing everone, up to the col, with my short (almost mincing) steps.

I continue to ponder how many of the vast armada of pilgrims that started that day (many of whom seemed not well prepared) fell by the wayside long before Sarria, never to return, through lack of preparation (or whatever).

Kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
The latter part of my post #38 above was brought to mind by the recent thread on statistics. From memory the number arriving at Compostela from Saint-Jean and getting a certificate was a small proportion of those recorded at starting from Saint-Jean the same year.

While there will be explanations at the margin (not everyone who starts does so for a gong; some start one year and complete the next - my case; but so also not everyone who starts goes to the Saint-Jean pilgrim office first) it is still a large difference.

Accordingly, in my view, it is this forum where those who have been there and done it can encourage "newbies" to have some training goals and plans.

It doesn't matter too much that we differ from one wnother, so long as we explain where we come from and couch our advice as "suggestions for your consideration" or similar.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
I continue to use Michelin Guide 161 nearly four years after first buying it en route.

I acknowledge the gite-d'etape listings are most probably well out of date.

But has the route change in every or any stage? And who follows the published route slavishly? My most serendipitous moment was on leaving Larresingle. Walked down the hill and encountered a most wonderful
shared path along a disused railway to Gondrin.

I find both Michelin guides (France and Spain) most excellent publications for big picture planning and on the day. As did the women I encountered on the Massif Central who used hers to set me in the right direction. I bought mine a few hours later.

The guides are light weight, and easily go in my front pocket and equally easy to refer to when underway.

Miam Miam Dodo is also an excellent publication. For me it is too heavy. (I scanned it for (my sole) use on my tablet. But didn't want to waste battery every time I had a small emergency.

So, (health warning) it is not helpful to say don't use / take / not take / not use something without focussing on the specific aspect and without identifying good points.

There was a radio crime series one or two years ago where the detective just wanted "the facts, Ma'am, just the facts".

Kia kaha katoa (you all take care, be strong, get going)
Thanks. I started looking at the Michelin guide today, for the route,not where to stay. I like the stage maps, because they are so easy to read. I’ve worked out a tentative itinerary, not to be locked into it but to know how much time to allow, when buying a plane ticket.
 

Sanman

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis, Portuguese Camino (Cluny, Le Puys), Hadrian's Wall, West Highland Way
I'm planning to walk the Le Puy route solo in Sept/Oct 2020. I've walked the Camino Frances (2015) from SJPDP. I've walked others since then, as well as the Wainwright Coast to Coast Walk, but I'm not getting any younger. I'll be 78 next fall, and I want to take the walk slowly, averaging 10 miles a day, but hopefully starting even more slowly. I'm wondering if staying at St-Christophe-sur-Dolaison the first night might be comparable to stopping at Orisson on the CF. Those first 7.5 km to Orisson took me 4 hours! My ability to walk longer days grew, of course, but I took 45 days with one rest day to walk to Santiago. Has anyone else here walked the Via Podiensis using shorter stages than the traditional ones? I would love to see some itineraries with shorter stages. Many thanks in advance for any suggestions you might have.
 

Sanman

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis, Portuguese Camino (Cluny, Le Puys), Hadrian's Wall, West Highland Way
Congrats Kathy, no advice on the shorter route and walking long days as I'm starting north of Le Puys, hoping after 350km we will be warmed up and ready to go. We are leaving mid April
Hope I can do it when I'm 78 - damn that's impressive!
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
I'm starting north of Le Puy

Where are you starting from?

In general terms, what is your intended route?

Kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)

PS: By mid April I hope to have passed through Lausanne, Swizterland on my way to Rome.
 

Sanman

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis, Portuguese Camino (Cluny, Le Puys), Hadrian's Wall, West Highland Way
Hi Alwyn - my dad and grandfather were named Alwyn

I'm staring in Cluny France walking south down thru Le Puys to SJPP - approx 1200km

Starting mid April finishing early June - 45 days walking, plus 5 rest days

What's your route?
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
Kia ora, my handle is made from the names of two family members plus my location.

In April 2016 I started from Le Puy with my intended final destination being Compstela.

Made good time to Saint-Jean but on the descent from Alto-del-Perdon pulled a bunch of muscles in my right hip-bone area. Pushed on to Burgos in fits and starts and then decided to retire hurt to London. Came back 18 months later to restart from the point of Estella-Lizzara, my last complete day earlier in Spain.

In France I followed the "official" route, but exercised my preference to walk almost exclusively on roads - better surfaces, more direct signage, went through more towns etc.

I enjoyed the route from Le Puy and I toy with the idea of starting in Lausanne, then Geneva and either taking the "high" route through Cluny or the route below Lyon. The cost of travel insurance for one of my advanced years may temper those thoughts.

My more enjoyable encounters were:

Moissac: gite La Petite Lumiere. This was my first rest day after 14 days. The hostess was brilliant and cooked great meals for the company - 12 on my first night and just two the next.

Eauze: gite La Grange de Marie France. I took the demi-pension option (now E40) both nights (I was suffering from pain in the join between leg and foot - I think I had my laces too tight that day at least) and had marvelous meals with Armagnac and stories as she cooked in a chef's kitchen - us curved along one side of the final assembly area, the ovens opposite us and Marie France in between. She arranged for me to see a local doctor and drove me to Manciet - effectively two rest days together.

Apart from the various stuff (the detail of links with the then Queen of England and the founder of the collegiate church La Romieu, for example), the scenery, the people (even though I said "Je regret, mais Je n'parle pas Francais" several times a day, with a Gallic shrug), the pilgrims.

Enjoy, kia kaha.
 

O Peracha

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago (2014)
Annapurna Base, Nepal (2014)
GR 5 - Holland to Pompey, France (2015)
Lisbon to Finesterre (2016)
I'm staring in Cluny France walking south down thru Le Puys to SJPP - approx 1200km

Starting mid April finishing early June - 45 days walking, plus 5 rest days

I hope you come back and report on the Cluny to Le Puy route. I've walked Le Puy to Santiago in 2014 but am planning on repeating in 2021. Considering tacking on the Cluny portion.

Bon chemin.
 

Suesim

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2018
Kia ora, my handle is made from the names of two family members plus my location.

In April 2016 I started from Le Puy with my intended final destination being Compstela.

Made good time to Saint-Jean but on the descent from Alto-del-Perdon pulled a bunch of muscles in my right hip-bone area. Pushed on to Burgos in fits and starts and then decided to retire hurt to London. Came back 18 months later to restart from the point of Estella-Lizzara, my last complete day earlier in Spain.

In France I followed the "official" route, but exercised my preference to walk almost exclusively on roads - better surfaces, more direct signage, went through more towns etc.

I enjoyed the route from Le Puy and I toy with the idea of starting in Lausanne, then Geneva and either taking the "high" route through Cluny or the route below Lyon. The cost of travel insurance for one of my advanced years may temper those thoughts.

My more enjoyable encounters were:

Moissac: gite La Petite Lumiere. This was my first rest day after 14 days. The hostess was brilliant and cooked great meals for the company - 12 on my first night and just two the next.

Eauze: gite La Grange de Marie France. I took the demi-pension option (now E40) both nights (I was suffering from pain in the join between leg and foot - I think I had my laces too tight that day at least) and had marvelous meals with Armagnac and stories as she cooked in a chef's kitchen - us curved along one side of the final assembly area, the ovens opposite us and Marie France in between. She arranged for me to see a local doctor and drove me to Manciet - effectively two rest days together.

Apart from the various stuff (the detail of links with the then Queen of England and the founder of the collegiate church La Romieu, for example), the scenery, the people (even though I said "Je regret, mais Je n'parle pas Francais" several times a day, with a Gallic shrug), the pilgrims.

Enjoy, kia kaha.
Marie is a real character - she likewise drove me to a local town to pick my sister up when she came to join us - no bus routes through to Eauze - fab place and lots of tales about Armagnac (and tasting) !!! Food good too.
 

Advertisement

Booking.com

Similar threads

Camino Conversations

Camino Conversations

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 57 4.3%
  • April

    Votes: 202 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 330 24.8%
  • June

    Votes: 96 7.2%
  • July

    Votes: 25 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.0%
  • September

    Votes: 386 29.0%
  • October

    Votes: 159 11.9%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top