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Suggestion for 6 day walk

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#1
Hi all,

Long time lurker, first time poster. I'm from Australia and I'm planning to do part of the camino around September next year (would love to do the full camino one day but at the moment I can only have certain amount of time off, and I would like to combine it with a trip to Morocco).

My question is... for first time pilgrim (and novice hiker), for around 6 easy-ish walking days, which of these options would you recommend?
- Sarria to Santiago (my initial plan)
- SJPdP to Pamplona (and spend time sightseeing in Pamplona... the more I look into Pyrenees area, the more tempted I am, but also worried about the very challenging first part)
- Camino Ingles (which I can complete within my timeframe)

If you have any other suggestions as well, please let me know!

Thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
#2
Hello! At the risk of offending some, here are my thoughts. If all you want is a piece of paper, go for the Ingles or Sarria to Santiago plan. If you would like to see beautiful countryside, challenge yourself physically for a few days and enjoy a wonderful Spanish city go for the SJPdP to Pamplona plan. In later years you might choose to return to walk the entire pilgrimage. Personally, I enjoy staying in a Spanish city long enough to explore it and find some gems.
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#3
Hello! At the risk of offending some, here are my thoughts. If all you want is a piece of paper, go for the Ingles or Sarria to Santiago plan. If you would like to see beautiful countryside, challenge yourself physically for a few days and enjoy a wonderful Spanish city go for the SJPdP to Pamplona plan. In later years you might choose to return to walk the entire pilgrimage. Personally, I enjoy staying in a Spanish city long enough to explore it and find some gems.
Thanks Sparrow! Yes I was thinking, on one hand it would be nice to get a compostela at the end, but on the other hand if I do want to do the entire 800km one day I can see the point of doing the first section first and coming back in the future to do the rest. I don't know if doing Sarria to Santiago first would "spoil the ending" as such if/when I do decide to do the whole CF one day?

I'm also seriously considering Camino Ingles, but it seems a lot quieter than the CF route. When I did a section of VF in Italy it was fairly quiet I only met a few other pilgrims along the way (some days I wouldn't see anyone), and while it was exactly what I was looking for at the time I think I want my next Camino to be a bit more social?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
#4
Excellent point about "spoil the ending". The character of pilgrims changes along the way. You may enjoy the excitement and anticipation of the pilgrims just starting out. You will still bring home a credencial with sellos that you can use in the future, provided of course that you start where you left off.
 
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Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Burgos, Camino Frances (2012 - 2018)
#5
I would definitely go for the SJPdP - Pamplona walk. The scenery is beautiful, the Napoleon route not as challenging as many think (providing you get good weather - if you don't, take the Varcarlos route) and Pamplona is a beautiful city with good transport links, accommodation, bars and restaurants. And lots of young people.

It will whet your appetite for the rest of the CF and get you off to a good start. You don't have to do the whole CF in one hit. Santiago de Compostella was around a thousand years ago and it isn't going anywhere.
 

julia-t

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2015-17
Kumano Kodo March 2018
Camino Portuguese Valenca-SdC April 2018
#6
My first time, I only had 5 days, and intended to walk from Saint Jean PdP to Pamplona - but ended up walking on to Puente la Reina, where I had one of the best evenings. It was a short bus ride back to Pamplona the next morning. Don't limit yourself more than you have to!
Otherwise you could consider walking the last part of the Portuguese from Valenca or Tui.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
#7
I am obsessed with folks not missing Santiago.

You can walk Sarria to Santiago this time.

When you walk full camino once you arrive in Ponferrada you can walk Invierno and have a different Santiago arrival.

Or, this time walk from Tui to Santiago.

Australia is long way to come from and not receive a Compostela.

Buen camino whatever path you take.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#8
Thanks Sparrow! Yes I was thinking, on one hand it would be nice to get a compostela at the end, but on the other hand if I do want to do the entire 800km one day I can see the point of doing the first section first and coming back in the future to do the rest. I don't know if doing Sarria to Santiago first would "spoil the ending" as such if/when I do decide to do the whole CF one day?
...
I like the way you think. In 2009 due to the previously twisted ankle I stopped my CF in Logrono. And almost 10 years later I'm confirmed Camino addict. That female doctor at Logrono ER was right, the Camino will always be (t)here. I would say start in SJPdP (if you want to experience the Pyrenees, well just one day actually) and get that sniff, touch of the Camino. And come back some time later, maybe continue from Pamplona or start in SJPdP again. Who knows. Although I was never on a pilgrimage to St.James it's different when you come to Praza do Obradoiro after a month of heat, rain, good, bad... It's rewarding after such long time. It really is. The feel of accomplishment is so overwhelming even for a non-believer (in my case).

But if you would like to obtain Compostela then go for Ingles. It's very nice Camino, not so commercialized as CF, beautiful nature, good infrastructure, well marked, just enough people walking it etc.

Anyway I wish you Un Buen Camino ;)
 
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Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Burgos, Camino Frances (2012 - 2018)
#9
My first time, I only had 5 days, and intended to walk from Saint Jean PdP to Pamplona - but ended up walking on to Puente la Reina, where I had one of the best evenings. It was a short bus ride back to Pamplona the next morning.
Good point! Actually, in 6 days you can get to Los Arcos, which is a lovely town with a breathtaking church, and on the main bus route between Pamplona and Logroño, both of which have good connections to Madrid.
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#10
Thanks so much for all the advice, everyone! Lots to think about! And yes I have also thought of walking a bit further than Pamplona, but not sure how the logistics would work if I have to catch a flight the next day. Good to know there are regular buses, I will have to look into it more.

Another question: which section tends to be less rainy/have better weather around mid-late September?
 
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james mcev

Born under a wandering star?
Camino(s) past & future
Yeah. Obviously!!
#14
Well, I have to say, you should seriously consider the Camino Ingles, from Ferrol to Santiago. 5 days would do it and a day in Santiago. It gives a taste of a longer Camino, and you have the benefit of starting and finishing a complete ( if short) camino. Lovely scenery, some urban, more rural, and by the end of day 1 you will connect with fellow walkers, who will remain your contacts throughout the journey, as there are fewer accommodation options. I did it in April,(my first Camino) and thoroughly enjoyed it, (I walked alone). At that time, on the same schedule, there were a group of 5 Spanish, a few Irish, 4 Italians, a few English, and 4 Germans. We all walked separately, but met up regularly throughout each day at cafe's etc, passing each other on the route, and every night for dinner/drinks, from the end of day 1 to Santiago. There was great camaraderie, but also lots of time on your own. I would definitely recommend this route, not too taxing, but challenging in parts, you complete a full route, and qualify for a Compostela, (if that's important to you), and you get a taster for a longer Camino. I am planning my second Camino on the Portuguese route towards the end of the year, so a word of warning , you may get hooked on this Camino thing if you choose this route!!

Buen Camino, which ever route you choose.:)
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (Planning)
#15
Having walked both, I think Tui-Santiago is more interesting than Sarria -Santiago. They both have good infrastructure and you will see other pilgrims, so you get the "Camino feeling".

In terms of weather, it is indeed a gamble.
Have lots of fun and Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
#16
Sarria to Santiago was a let down (in terms of scenery) as opposed to the SJPdP to Pamplona (or a little bit further). It is a tougher walk (whether you take Napoleon or Valcarlos) but it's not as crowded, the food is a bit better, and the countryside is wonderful. I'd do this first.
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#17
Having walked both, I think Tui-Santiago is more interesting than Sarria -Santiago. They both have good infrastructure and you will see other pilgrims, so you get the "Camino feeling".

In terms of weather, it is indeed a gamble.
Have lots of fun and Buen Camino!
How scenic is the route? Is it better than the CF?
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#18
Sarria to Santiago was a let down (in terms of scenery) as opposed to the SJPdP to Pamplona (or a little bit further). It is a tougher walk (whether you take Napoleon or Valcarlos) but it's not as crowded, the food is a bit better, and the countryside is wonderful. I'd do this first.
Thanks! I'm definitely leaning that way now...
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#19
Well, I have to say, you should seriously consider the Camino Ingles, from Ferrol to Santiago. 5 days would do it and a day in Santiago. It gives a taste of a longer Camino, and you have the benefit of starting and finishing a complete ( if short) camino. Lovely scenery, some urban, more rural, and by the end of day 1 you will connect with fellow walkers, who will remain your contacts throughout the journey, as there are fewer accommodation options. I did it in April,(my first Camino) and thoroughly enjoyed it, (I walked alone). At that time, on the same schedule, there were a group of 5 Spanish, a few Irish, 4 Italians, a few English, and 4 Germans. We all walked separately, but met up regularly throughout each day at cafe's etc, passing each other on the route, and every night for dinner/drinks, from the end of day 1 to Santiago. There was great camaraderie, but also lots of time on your own. I would definitely recommend this route, not too taxing, but challenging in parts, you complete a full route, and qualify for a Compostela, (if that's important to you), and you get a taster for a longer Camino. I am planning my second Camino on the Portuguese route towards the end of the year, so a word of warning , you may get hooked on this Camino thing if you choose this route!!

Buen Camino, which ever route you choose.:)
I've been looking into Camino Ingles but from what I've gathered it's very quiet for the most part that you barely meet anyone some days?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugese (2018)
#21
I recently walked the Camino Portugese from Porto to Santiago, which was 10 walking days. I love the idea of you starting at the Valenca, Portugal/Tui Spain border. I’d spend a day exploring those 2 cities. They are fascinating. Then walk 5 days to Santiago. If you are looking for a very special hotel we loved Hotel A Torre do Xudeu which is directly on the Camino 59C84EB8-9526-4E86-AB7E-7FB69BFE7A37.jpeg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: St-Jean-PdP - Santiago dC - Muxía - Fisterra (Aug 2017 and March/April 2018)
#22
Another Aussie here. Last year at the end of August, I also had just 6 days available. I set out from St Jean PdP, and ended up in Logroño.
This year in late March I went back, started again at Logroño and after a further 29 days of walking I made it through everything including blizzards to Santiago, Muxía and Finisterra. My goal was to complete that before turning 70, and I made it by a month.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: See post signature.
Upcoming: Nothing planned
#23
Will you be in Morocco before or after if before there are Southern caminos to start on from Cadiz, Gibraltar, Sevilla, Malaga but they might not be the best options for a first timer.

I really liked Camino Inglés from Ferrol and it is suitable for 6 short walking days. But as you say it is quite solitary (for me a good thing).

San Salvador can be done in 6 days as well I pressume as I did it in 3 and normally do double stages). So Beautiful but also quite lonley. And you get a Salvadoriana in Oviedo.

Valenca/Tui to SdC wasn't the most scenic route.

Part of camino norte in the middle there are some really nice scenic routes but if you want the Compostela I say Inglés.
 
Camino(s) past & future
.
#24
Camino del Norte - Bilbao to Santander, about 5-6 days, with a couple of short stages, or shorter still if you metro out to Portugalete. Will include two little ferry trips across bays, countless coastal visual feasts and the chance to stay at Ernesto's (Guemes), an albergue that will give you a flavour of the (fast disappearing) camino spirit. And if it was on your tick list, you'd have time to visit the Bilbao Guggenheim on the first morning before making the 12km river walk over to Portugalete.
If you want that Compostela then I'd second those above recommending the Ingles. I think the Salvador, tho' a gem and the right length, would likely be hard work for a first-time pilgrim novice hiker.
 

james mcev

Born under a wandering star?
Camino(s) past & future
Yeah. Obviously!!
#25
I've been looking into Camino Ingles but from what I've gathered it's very quiet for the most part that you barely meet anyone some days?
I guess most Camino's can be as solitary or as social as you wish. Figures from the pilgrims office show 1,404 completed the Ingles in Sept 2017, and got a Compostela, one can reasonably assume others don't get one so figures are probably higher. In any case, you have plenty of time to research and decide routes. Go with what feels right, and you won't go far wrong !!
James
 

anthonymhughes

Irish lad heading back for more Camino!
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Frances & Camino Portuguese (Aug-? 2018)
#26
I can't speak for the Camino Ingles as I've never done it, but my favourite part of the Camino Frances was the first week. From St. Jean, you will arrive in Pampalona within 3 days, so as others have said, you can walk on for a few days and get a bus back to Pampalona. If receiving the Compostela accreditation is important to you then consider what the others have said...Ingles or Portuguese from Tui.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (Planning)
#27
The route from Valença/Tui to Santiagp is not super scenic, but the cities are very interesting. And for us Australians, where every building is new, some of the constructions in there are super impressive.

That said, Sarria to santiago is a little bit more scenic, but not thaaaatt much, I think. Quite comparable, although Sarria wins in that aspect. Tui wins for food and for finding acommodation without much worry.
 

Mike Savage

So many friends to meet . . . so little time
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés,Inglés
Muxia/Finisterre
Português Coastal
Português Central
Sanabrés
#28
Another option to consider is Ourense Spain to Santiago on the Camino Sanabres. I thought it was a pretty route and liked it more than the Inglés and more than the Tui to Santiago portion of the Portugués. Easy and short bus or train ride from Santiago de Compostela.
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#29
Another option to consider is Ourense Spain to Santiago on the Camino Sanabres. I thought it was a pretty route and liked it more than the Inglés and more than the Tui to Santiago portion of the Portugués. Easy and short bus or train ride from Santiago de Compostela.
I'd never even heard about that route actually. Will have to look into it. But I do feel like being on a more social route this time than a super quiet one. I did a few days of Via Francigena last year and it was stunning and very quiet (some days I didn't see anyone all day), but that's why I chose it. This time I'd like to mingle with people more!
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#30
The route from Valença/Tui to Santiagp is not super scenic, but the cities are very interesting. And for us Australians, where every building is new, some of the constructions in there are super impressive.

That said, Sarria to santiago is a little bit more scenic, but not thaaaatt much, I think. Quite comparable, although Sarria wins in that aspect. Tui wins for food and for finding acommodation without much worry.
I'm also a bit worried that it's harder to get to Tui than to Sarria/SJPDP and it would take up more travel time?
 

Mike Savage

So many friends to meet . . . so little time
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés,Inglés
Muxia/Finisterre
Português Coastal
Português Central
Sanabrés
#31
In my experience you will find the most people between Sarria and Santiago, the second most people Tui to Santiago, the third most between Ferrol to Santiago and finally the least between Ourense and Santiago. Good luck with your decision. I love the Galicia region and think it is all beautiful, green, and frequently wet. I have walked all four of these routes in the last two years during the same time of year that you are considering. SJPdP to Pamplona is beautiful but there would be too much travel time to get there for my liking.

Buen Camino!
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (Planning)
#32
I'm also a bit worried that it's harder to get to Tui than to Sarria/SJPDP and it would take up more travel time?
Tui is easy to reach from both Santiago Airport and Porto Airport, by bus or train. I believe it's the same for Sarria. Where are you landing?

EDIT: I just did some search, it is a 2-hour bus ride from Santiago with Alsa, the main bus company in Spain.
Or a 1h30min train ride from Porto, in Portugal. Directly from Madrid, it's a 8hour train ride with a change in Vigo.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I am currently walking the Camino del Norte summer 2018
#33
If you don’t care about a Compostela, pick any coastal section of Norte and you will not be disappointed!!! You will have gorgeous ocean views and beautiful towns/cities each night to explore....Buen Camino whatever you decide!
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#34
Tui is easy to reach from both Santiago Airport and Porto Airport, by bus or train. I believe it's the same for Sarria. Where are you landing?

EDIT: I just did some search, it is a 2-hour bus ride from Santiago with Alsa, the main bus company in Spain.
Or a 1h30min train ride from Porto, in Portugal. Directly from Madrid, it's a 8hour train ride with a change in Vigo.
Thanks for that! I'm still flexible on where I'm flying in to, but at this stage I'm thinking either fly in to Paris and catch a train to SJPDP (if I decide to do the first part of CF), or fly in to Madrid and catch a train to Sarria.. or to Santiago then Ferrol if I do the Ingles. Somehow I don't like the idea of having to get to Santiago first tho if I'm going to finish there.. I know a lot of people do it.

I guess if I decide to do the CP, I could fly to Lisbon instead?

Right now SJPDP seems very tempting to me and I'm looking at the possibility of stretching my holiday period and maybe walk as far as Logrono, so when I come back I might be able to do the rest of the walk in one trip.
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#35
If you don’t care about a Compostela, pick any coastal section of Norte and you will not be disappointed!!! You will have gorgeous ocean views and beautiful towns/cities each night to explore....Buen Camino whatever you decide!
That sounds amazing but I think the Norte might be too challenging for a novice hiker like myself?
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#36
Will you be in Morocco before or after if before there are Southern caminos to start on from Cadiz, Gibraltar, Sevilla, Malaga but they might not be the best options for a first timer.

I really liked Camino Inglés from Ferrol and it is suitable for 6 short walking days. But as you say it is quite solitary (for me a good thing).

San Salvador can be done in 6 days as well I pressume as I did it in 3 and normally do double stages). So Beautiful but also quite lonley. And you get a Salvadoriana in Oviedo.

Valenca/Tui to SdC wasn't the most scenic route.

Part of camino norte in the middle there are some really nice scenic routes but if you want the Compostela I say Inglés.
So many routes I didn't know about haha! I will have to read up on all of them. I'm planning to go to Morocco with a friend after (to avoid the heat) so will be doing the walk mid/late September then fly out early October to Morocco.
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#37
Another Aussie here. Last year at the end of August, I also had just 6 days available. I set out from St Jean PdP, and ended up in Logroño.
This year in late March I went back, started again at Logroño and after a further 29 days of walking I made it through everything including blizzards to Santiago, Muxía and Finisterra. My goal was to complete that before turning 70, and I made it by a month.
Thanks Graeme, I think so far that's been the most appealing route for me too. As I mentioned above I might try to stretch the time so I can walk as far as Logrono if I do decide to start at SJPDP. You managed to walk to Logrono in 6 days? That's impressive! I think that would be way too much for me.. I think I would ideally have to allow 9-10 days.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#38
I'd never even heard about that route actually. Will have to look into it. But I do feel like being on a more social route this time than a super quiet one. I did a few days of Via Francigena last year and it was stunning and very quiet (some days I didn't see anyone all day), but that's why I chose it. This time I'd like to mingle with people more!
http://www.rayyrosa.com/loscaminos
Scroll down a little bit. Not all of the Caminos are there but most of them are ;)

And Sanabres is preatty social because most of the people coming from VdlP turn left on Sanabres.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (Planning)
#39
Somehow I don't like the idea of having to get to Santiago first tho if I'm going to finish there.. I know a lot of people do it.
The airport is out of the city, so it won't spoil the ending. You will not see tha cathedral if you don't want to.
Also, Santiago is the easiest airport to reach Sarria, Tui and Ferrol (three of the options you are considering) AND makes the trip back easier, as you will leave from there anyway. Saves you some travel time.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Portugues (2017)
#40
Hi all,

Long time lurker, first time poster. I'm from Australia and I'm planning to do part of the camino around September next year (would love to do the full camino one day but at the moment I can only have certain amount of time off, and I would like to combine it with a trip to Morocco).

My question is... for first time pilgrim (and novice hiker), for around 6 easy-ish walking days, which of these options would you recommend?
- Sarria to Santiago (my initial plan)
- SJPdP to Pamplona (and spend time sightseeing in Pamplona... the more I look into Pyrenees area, the more tempted I am, but also worried about the very challenging first part)
- Camino Ingles (which I can complete within my timeframe)

If you have any other suggestions as well, please let me know!

Thanks!
Hi Shierly
Hi all,

Long time lurker, first time poster. I'm from Australia and I'm planning to do part of the camino around September next year (would love to do the full camino one day but at the moment I can only have certain amount of time off, and I would like to combine it with a trip to Morocco).

My question is... for first time pilgrim (and novice hiker), for around 6 easy-ish walking days, which of these options would you recommend?
- Sarria to Santiago (my initial plan)
- SJPdP to Pamplona (and spend time sightseeing in Pamplona... the more I look into Pyrenees area, the more tempted I am, but also worried about the very challenging first part)
- Camino Ingles (which I can complete within my timeframe)

If you have any other suggestions as well, please let me know!

Thanks!
Hi Shierly,
I’m sure you’ll get many suggestions, but give the Camino Portugues a look. If you start at Tui, on the Minho River and hike north to Santiago, youcan do it in 6-7 days. Awesome countryside, fabulous food, wonderful people. I think it’s the perfect abbreviated Camino and depending on what you’re seeking in your personal Camino experience, you should find it. A wise peregrina told me whatever you thought you were looking for, you will find what you actually need. Buen Camino
 

shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#41
Hi Shierly

Hi Shierly,
I’m sure you’ll get many suggestions, but give the Camino Portugues a look. If you start at Tui, on the Minho River and hike north to Santiago, youcan do it in 6-7 days. Awesome countryside, fabulous food, wonderful people. I think it’s the perfect abbreviated Camino and depending on what you’re seeking in your personal Camino experience, you should find it. A wise peregrina told me whatever you thought you were looking for, you will find what you actually need. Buen Camino
Thanks Michael! :) I will definitely look into it. Do they have a good luggage transfer service on CP? Since I will be travelling onwards after the camino I will have more than just my backpack.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (Planning)
#43
I will definitely look into it. Do they have a good luggage transfer service on CP? Since I will be travelling onwards after the camino I will have more than just my backpack.
There is a company called TuiTrans that does lugagge and backpack transfers between Porto and Santiago. Very reliable, lots of forum members have used them. Their website is https://tuitrans.com/
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (Planning)
#46
Another useful link to look at is Gronze. The website lists all albergues and some hotels along the routes, with a description (in Spanish, but google translate solves it) of each day's walk.

The link for the Camino Portugues is https://www.gronze.com/camino-portugues (I highly recommend breaking their first day in half and stopping in Porrino).
You can choose other Caminos in the top menu.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Finished: See post signature.
Upcoming: Nothing planned
#47
Thanks Michael! :) I will definitely look into it. Do they have a good luggage transfer service on CP? Since I will be travelling onwards after the camino I will have more than just my backpack.
Or you can just send your stuff to Ivar for storage and pick it up when you arrive to SdC if you decide to walk a 100 km ending up in SdC.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I am currently walking the Camino del Norte summer 2018
#48
That sounds amazing but I think the Norte might be too challenging for a novice hiker like myself?
I don’t think so...I’m 57 and recently walked from Irún to SdC with my son...It’s not that difficult especially if you’re not on a strict schedule....you can walk as long/far as you want each day....we averaged about 22 kilometers a day...weather was great...mostly cloudy days...

Buen Camino
 

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shierly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in September 2019
#49
I don’t think so...I’m 57 and recently walked from Irún to SdC with my son...It’s not that difficult especially if you’re not on a strict schedule....you can walk as long/far as you want each day....we averaged about 22 kilometers a day...weather was great...mostly cloudy days...

Buen Camino
Thanks! Beautiful photos!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Finisterra-Muxia 2017; SK Camino Kosiče-Levoča Oct 2017; El Norte March 2018; Ingles Nov 2018
#50
Thanks Sparrow! Yes I was thinking, on one hand it would be nice to get a compostela at the end, but on the other hand if I do want to do the entire 800km one day I can see the point of doing the first section first and coming back in the future to do the rest. I don't know if doing Sarria to Santiago first would "spoil the ending" as such if/when I do decide to do the whole CF one day?

I'm also seriously considering Camino Ingles, but it seems a lot quieter than the CF route. When I did a section of VF in Italy it was fairly quiet I only met a few other pilgrims along the way (some days I wouldn't see anyone), and while it was exactly what I was looking for at the time I think I want my next Camino to be a bit more social?
I agree with Sparrow. I’ve done 2 “full” Caminos and I think the Compostella would feel better after a longer Camino. But I’ll let you know after I do my first short one (Camino Ingles) in November.
 

grifwe

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese coastal
#52
I may as well give my opinion too ;-)
Obviously it is your Camino and you must ultimately decide, but Vigo to SDC, adding the Spiritual Variante is a stunning walk. Enough people to make it a socialable experience but you don't have the crowds. Loved adding the boat journey as part of the Camino too.
Sooo many options......Bom Camino!
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#53
Only my personal opinion.... : I really wouldn’t recommend starting with the Sarria to Santiago camino. I had done it 3 times previously (after starting in St Jean) and it wasn’t too bad. This year though, this month, it was a NIGHTMARE. So many people, such crowds! And it doesn’t mean it is more ‘social’ as there are a lot of groups who will not necessarily interract with others...
i would definitively choose a different route. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Future (October 2018)
#54
I am obsessed with folks not missing Santiago.

You can walk Sarria to Santiago this time.

When you walk full camino once you arrive in Ponferrada you can walk Invierno and have a different Santiago arrival.

Or, this time walk from Tui to Santiago.

Australia is long way to come from and not receive a Compostela.

Buen camino whatever path you take.
Thanks for this
I keep second guessing my decision to walk Sarria to Santiago. I do want my certificate as a moment to celebrate my 60th birthday
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés (2014, 2018), Finisterre (2014, 2018) Primitivo (2015), Portuguese var routes (2017, 2018)
#55
The Camino Inglés is my vote. Will give you a short, sweet sense of accomplishment! And why not end at the cathedral?? With or without the compostela! Click on the link to see how to make a perfect 6-day walk!
 
#56
I recently walked the Camino Portugese from Porto to Santiago, which was 10 walking days. I love the idea of you starting at the Valenca, Portugal/Tui Spain border. I’d spend a day exploring those 2 cities. They are fascinating. Then walk 5 days to Santiago. If you are looking for a very special hotel we loved Hotel A Torre do Xudeu which is directly on the Camino View attachment 45384
How did you get to Valença to start there or Tui?
 

Stephen F.

carpintero de Colorado
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Português 2015
Via de la Plata 2016
#58
I would highly recommend starting in Valenca or Tui (they are across the Minho river from each other). The route is really lovely, the walking pretty moderate (I was 68 when I did it). It is pretty wonderful to come into Santiago. Even a 110 k Camino (the distance from Tui) is an accomplishment and will give you a real Camino experience.

From Madrid it's a 1 hour flight to Porto. (for me, it would be anti climactic to start from Santiago). Buses leave from downtown Porto to Valenca (there are lots/day) or you could take the train. (2/day). Porto is a lovely city with wonderful friendly people.

3 years ago when I did it (in August) it was not too crowded.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk July 2017, Starting from Tui.
#60
My first time, I only had 5 days, and intended to walk from Saint Jean PdP to Pamplona - but ended up walking on to Puente la Reina, where I had one of the best evenings. It was a short bus ride back to Pamplona the next morning. Don't limit yourself more than you have to!
Otherwise you could consider walking the last part of the Portuguese from Valenca or Tui.
Last year, we just had 6 days available so we walked on the Portugese Camino from Vigo to Santiago, via the Espiritual Variante. Absolutely amazing and wonderful! This was early July but it was pretty quiet until the last day from Padron in to Santiago.
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
#61
For the novice , Pamplona to Logrono. Easy access and exit points with lots to see in both cities and relatively easy terain. A wonderful introduction with true Camino qualities
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles 2018
#62
I've been looking into Camino Ingles but from what I've gathered it's very quiet for the most part that you barely meet anyone some days?
Yes this was my experience walking it a few days ago. We saw less than 10 pilgrims on the trail although we did do it in 3 days too. We didn’t stay in albergues so we missed out on probably a more social element. That said, It was my first Camino so nothing to compare to but I really liked the diversity of the “views”. You are by the water for a bit of the first part, you see a beach town in Mino if you spend the night there, and you see old town in Betanzos, some cool statues in Bruma.
 

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