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suggestions for Figeac to Paris?


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Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
#3
If your schedule doesn't allow for the 6-8 hour train, you might want to consider flying from Rodez to Paris, flying time being around 1:20. (Personally, long train rides at the end of pilgrim walks are great for decompression, but not everyone may agree with me.)
 
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017
#4
I took the night train from Figeac to Paris. -- I had 12 days from Le Puy to Figeac too. But it was slower going for me than I had planned. The hills slowed me down (there was one difficult switchback that was covered in wet chestnuts on slippery rocks that took me forever!) It was also difficult for me to push and extra 5 or 10km (as I did on the Frances) as the gîtes were not as numerous and not was well spaced. Even if I pushed myself for a few days, i would run into a day where I could either walk 13km or 35. :( -- I wish that I had brought my tent for a bit more flexibility. Speaking of which... there is a great camp ground in Sauges with hot showers and washing machine and lines. They have a few little caravan rentals if you don't have a tent. Its on the far edge of town...--- But back to walking. I made it to Conques, but then took a bus from there to Figeac.
Bon Chemin!
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Burgos, Camino Frances (2012 - 2018)
#5
The overnight direct train from Rodez to Paris via Figeac no longer seems to run, but there are 10+ trains per day with 1 or 2 changes to Paris. Spend a day in Figeac - it's one of my favourite towns in France and repays a wander round.
 

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#6
Thanks - most helpful. We are now considering that if we arrive on the 17th in Figeac, we could hop on the train on the 18th and spend that day/night in Cahors, then back to Paris on the 19th from Cahors. Otherwise if we arrive later in Figeac, we might head to Paris directly from there. Given the uncertainties of arrival date depending on possible slowing or speeding factors, as sagely mentioned by Kelleymac, is it to be expected that we can buy train tickets upon arrival at the station? This happens to be weekend travel.
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Burgos, Camino Frances (2012 - 2018)
#7
Yes, you can buy tickets at the (well-staffed) stations. All have machines which take credit cards and have a choice of languages, incuding English. If you're over 60, you get an automatic discount.

Note that there is no longer a direct train connection between Figeac & Cahors (despite what IGN maps show, the line closed 20+ years ago) and has been replaced by a bus service, (5 times a day) which takes 1 h 40 m. The only train connection is via Toulouse, which takes 3 h 40 m. http://www.sncf.com/
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Burgos, Camino Frances (2012 - 2018)
#9
Buses leave from the railway station - Place de la Gare, at the end of Avenue des Poilus. (I always think of them as I walk down it - for many, it was their last sight of home.)
 
#10
Thank you for that helpful if sad information. WW2 past remains so present in France. I appreciate the large number of memorials that have been placed in the last 10 years.
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Burgos, Camino Frances (2012 - 2018)
#11
At the risk of derailing this thread, poilu usually refers to WW1, when some towns and villages in France lost up to 50% of their young men, a fact often overlooked when criticising their surrender in 1940. Every hamlet in France has a memorial, most erected in the 1920s, and the sheer number of names on each (e.g. Saugues) is heartbreaking.
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Burgos, Camino Frances (2012 - 2018)
#13
From memory, the first war memorial after Le Puy is at St Christophe. Thereafter, they are ubiquitous. Spend a few moments in reflection at the occasional one and you will realise that, in some villages, 20-50% of the young women had no hope of marriage or children, as the young men had been killed in the "mincing machine" of Verdun. It is impossible to understand contemporary France without some knowledge of the first World War. Like the Civil War in Spain, it casts a long shadow.
 

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