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The big map o the Caminos de Santiago

Super Light Camino Gear

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#1
After finishing the Via de la Plata Camino route May 8th, 2016 I decided to create a web site to record my ideas about walking trips, including the use of super lightweight gear. I have walked over 6000 km in the last 5 years carrying less than 4kg. I see people on the Camino routes carrying way to much stuff and wanted to pass along my ideas and experiences to show you can be warm and comfortable with a very small amount of gear. The web site is www.roadwalking.com. I would love to get feedback from anyone who checks it out. Thanks.

lumbarPack01.jpg
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#2
I love the light weight approach, congratulations on managing on such little weight !
I notice that it relies on always staying in hotels though. Staying in albergues or even sharing a hotel room with a friend (for me) immediately changes things: I need another set of clothes, a sleeping bag, a towel.... Recently I have even reluctantly added a 'bedbug sheet'...
But I love your minimalist approach , way to go! :cool:

All this said, on my first camino my bag weighed in at 4.9 kgs on the airport scales and on a later, much longer trip, I carried 6kgs - and that included a tent and mattress. So quite pleased with myself too :D

Buen camino:)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#3
I tried it on an android smartphone. That was painful, but from what I was able to glean, your approach is really only relevant to a small range of circumstances that won't apply for most of us.

Thank you for sharing your experiences nonetheless.
 

Rajy62

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2013, Norte/primitivo 2014, vdlp (2015)
#4
Your gear suggestions are excellent. Where I may differ would be in the area of footwear and some essentials. My CPAP device weighs about 3kg, can't leave home without it. Secondly, I don't like to walk with wet feet. I am also 100 ibs heavier. Try carrying a 100 ibs pack with sneakers. So, a lightweight water resistant boot gives me great comfort/support. Others have mentioned items such as sleeping bag, towel etc for shared accommodations. Regular backpack to fit all these essentials is a must.

You are spot on with the idea of ultralight walking. All us can learn some packing discipline from your experience.
 
J

Jas Asyiken

Guest
#5
Thanks for sharing. To each his own but I am also a believer that we do not need as much as we think we do and personally, I thoroughly enjoy the experience of playing with the margins between needs and wants. Minimalist approach is very doable, it's always a question of how ready we are to embrace our potential discomforts simply because it drags us out of our normal comfort zone.

Layering is indeed a great concept. In my opinion, although I do not doubt that the Camino can and has been done with 1 set of layers (as traditionally done hundreds years ago sheltering in churches or under the sky), it would really be pushing boundaries in today's situation. In other words, can be done (of cos) but very challenging. For me, as a minimum, 2 sets of tops, bottoms, socks and inners. One mid and one outer shell. A pair of good shoes, a hat, a container for water, a stick, some contingency funds and that's about it (just like the good old days). With most things on the body, the pack is as low as it can get.

The rest are indeed safety nets and luxuries (wants and not needs) that tests our individual will for comfort and survival. Nevertheless, your approach is awe inspiring. Helped pushed my own ideals.
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#6
I love the light weight approach, congratulations on managing on such little weight !
I notice that it relies on always staying in hotels though. Staying in albergues or even sharing a hotel room with a friend (for me) immediately changes things: I need another set of clothes, a sleeping bag, a towel.... Recently I have even reluctantly added a 'bedbug sheet'...
But I love your minimalist approach , way to go! :cool:

All this said, on my first camino my bag weighed in at 4.9 kgs on the airport scales and on a later, much longer trip, I carried 6kgs - and that included a tent and mattress. So quite pleased with myself too :D

Buen camino:)
Congratulations on such a light weight considering you also carried a tent and mattress. My 3.8 kg weight also included a tent, sleeping bag and air mattress. But since I have only used the camping gear twice on my trips I won't be carrying it for future trips. This will reduce my weight to about 2.5 kg.
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#7
Your gear suggestions are excellent. Where I may differ would be in the area of footwear and some essentials. My CPAP device weighs about 3kg, can't leave home without it. Secondly, I don't like to walk with wet feet. I am also 100 ibs heavier. Try carrying a 100 ibs pack with sneakers. So, a lightweight water resistant boot gives me great comfort/support. Others have mentioned items such as sleeping bag, towel etc for shared accommodations. Regular backpack to fit all these essentials is a must.

You are spot on with the idea of ultralight walking. All us can learn some packing discipline from your experience.
I also hate the wet feet, or wet anything for that matter! That's why I made a set of shoe covers out of Cuben Fiber (many other waterproof materials would work as well). They are held over my Hokas with thin shock-cord that goes under the shoes. Surprisingly, this works well and the shock-cord doesn't wear out as quickly as one would think. They keep my feet quite dry in light to moderate rain if there isn't too much wind. My rain pants prevent water from getting inside and cover the back of my shoes. They don't protect against standing water, but I try to avoid puddles. I made a pair for a friend and he liked them as well.

gear-3.jpg
 

Rajy62

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2013, Norte/primitivo 2014, vdlp (2015)
#8
I also hate the wet feet, or wet anything for that matter! That's why I made a set of shoe covers out of Cuben Fiber (many other waterproof materials would work as well). They are held over my Hokas with thin shock-cord that goes under the shoes. Surprisingly, this works well and the shock-cord doesn't wear out as quickly as one would think. They keep my feet quite dry in light to moderate rain if there isn't too much wind. My rain pants prevent water from getting inside and cover the back of my shoes. They don't protect against standing water, but I try to avoid puddles. I made a pair for a friend and he liked them as well.

View attachment 26805
Have you considered monetizing those "half gaiters"...
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#9
Have you considered monetizing those "half gaiters"...
I'd say more like 1/8 gaiters! I'm not really interested in selling stuff, but I suppose an enterprising peregrino could make their own from this pattern. I made two pieces like this, folded over and taped the bottom and back sides, then joined the two halves along the top and front with 3M 1/2" transfer tape. I reinforced the bottom corners with Aquaseal, poked holes through there and threaded the shock-cord through. My second pair took less than an hour to make. I used them constantly on the Via de la Plata this year as it rained a lot . Interestingly they also keep my feet warm since they prevent evaporative cooling from the wind.

shoe cover pattern.jpg
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo
#10
Timothy not sure why, but I am unable to get further than your opening comment and photo. I'm on my Nexus5 Android so will try later on my iMac desktop......Maggie
 
#11
I tried it on an android smartphone. That was painful, but from what I was able to glean, your approach is really only relevant to a small range of circumstances that won't apply for most of us.

Thank you for sharing your experiences nonetheless.
Doug, I think you're being a little unfair

Certainly the picture is pretty ugly and I'd hate to carry everything round my waist but the idea of bringing only a minimal number of ultra-lightweight trail running gear items is one that the majority of Camino walkers should start from - yes, he stays in hotels (as I tend to) but sleeping bag liner plus towel plus flip flops is perfectly fine for albergues over say May-Sept

I have walked the Norte with a 12L pack (http://www.runandbecome.com/item/Gregory/Miwok-12L-Running-Backpack/7ZN) that has all the features of a proper pack - excluding liquid the weight is around 2.5kg - I have carried up to 4L of liquid in addition though 2.5L is a more typical maximum

I bring 1 pair of walking shorts, 2 underpants, 2 t-shirts (Merino icebreaker cool-lite), 4 pairs of barefoot socks, 1 Berghaus rain smock and a Lowe-Alpine hat that covers my neck as well plus my trusty Merrell trail glove shoes - if I walked in April or October, I would add my Berghaus hyper therm jacket and gloves and a warmer hat and maybe long trousers instead of shorts

A good description is that we're treating it as a series of summer day walks across a country that is predominantly warm but with occasional heavy rain - as opposed to an expedition to Everest - and we bring only things that protect us in the most probable circumstances rather than covering all possibilities
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#12
Doug, I think you're being a little unfair
You might be right. For a mobile user, the site design doesn't allow easy access in a readable format, which did make it difficult to evaluate. Perhaps when I get to a place where I can see it in a more conventional format, and the poor design isn't limiting the site's utility and accessability, I will have another look at it.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#13
A good description is that we're treating it as a series of summer day walks across a country that is predominantly warm but with occasional heavy rain - as opposed to an expedition to Everest - and we bring only things that protect us in the most probable circumstances rather than covering all possibilities
Seems a pretty fair summary of the OP's approach. For summer walking along the main Camino routes in Spain it sounds reasonable. The attention to detail on weight, bulk and function is valuable. However, I agree with @dougfitz that it is an approach that has serious limitations. In particular I think it would not meet the needs of those who walk in colder seasons or along routes less well provided with accommodation options. In fairness to the OP I do not think he is suggesting that it does.
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#15
Doug, I think you're being a little unfair

Certainly the picture is pretty ugly and I'd hate to carry everything round my waist but the idea of bringing only a minimal number of ultra-lightweight trail running gear items is one that the majority of Camino walkers should start from - yes, he stays in hotels (as I tend to) but sleeping bag liner plus towel plus flip flops is perfectly fine for albergues over say May-Sept

I have walked the Norte with a 12L pack (http://www.runandbecome.com/item/Gregory/Miwok-12L-Running-Backpack/7ZN) that has all the features of a proper pack - excluding liquid the weight is around 2.5kg - I have carried up to 4L of liquid in addition though 2.5L is a more typical maximum

I bring 1 pair of walking shorts, 2 underpants, 2 t-shirts (Merino icebreaker cool-lite), 4 pairs of barefoot socks, 1 Berghaus rain smock and a Lowe-Alpine hat that covers my neck as well plus my trusty Merrell trail glove shoes - if I walked in April or October, I would add my Berghaus hyper therm jacket and gloves and a warmer hat and maybe long trousers instead of shorts

A good description is that we're treating it as a series of summer day walks across a country that is predominantly warm but with occasional heavy rain - as opposed to an expedition to Everest - and we bring only things that protect us in the most probable circumstances rather than covering all possibilities
A lumbar pack puts the weight on your hips, which is the best place to carry weight as it is closest to your center of gravity and takes weight off your back. I like your analysis of a walking trip as a series of day walks. Since we are sleeping indoors each night we don't need to pack like we're going on an expedition.
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#16
You might be right. For a mobile user, the site design doesn't allow easy access in a readable format, which did make it difficult to evaluate. Perhaps when I get to a place where I can see it in a more conventional format, and the poor design isn't limiting the site's utility and accessability, I will have another look at it.
Sorry, I didn't put the site together with mobile phones particularly in mind. But having said that, I just took a look at it on my Android Nexus 5 and it looks fine to me. I was able to navigate and display all the images. Are you having some specific problems you could mention?
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#17
Timothy not sure why, but I am unable to get further than your opening comment and photo. I'm on my Nexus5 Android so will try later on my iMac desktop......Maggie
Oddly, I also have a Nexus 5. I just looked at the site and it all works fine for me. If you click on the menu items running along near the top of the screen (such as "Getting Started") you should be able to see the rest of the site.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#18
Sorry, I didn't put the site together with mobile phones particularly in mind. But having said that, I just took a look at it on my Android Nexus 5 and it looks fine to me. I was able to navigate and display all the images. Are you having some specific problems you could mention?
Text is indecipherable it is so small. When enlarged it does not wrap onto the screen and needs constant scrolling across to read it. There seem to be many layouts that are not mobile friendly. It required far to much effort to find the content on a small screen.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2017 Camino Frances SJPP-Santiago
2015 St. Olav's Way Oslo-Trondheim
2017 VdlP Seville-Merida
#19
Sorry, I didn't put the site together with mobile phones particularly in mind. But having said that, I just took a look at it on my Android Nexus 5 and it looks fine to me. I was able to navigate and display all the images. Are you having some specific problems you could mention?
I could NOT see the tabs on my iPhone, just the beautiful picture and your quote. When I switched to my mini-iPad navigation was no problem.

I like your ultra weight reminders and am more than impressed with your ingenuity and creativity.
 

BrienC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés, July 2015
Via de la Plata/Camino Sanabrés, Oct/Nov 2016
#20
To each his own but I am also a believer that we do not need as much as we think we do and personally, I thoroughly enjoy the experience of playing with the margins between needs and wants. Minimalist approach is very doable, it's always a question of how ready we are to embrace our potential discomforts simply because it drags us out of our normal comfort zone.
So perfectly stated. I very much like "playing in the margins."
I opened the site on my Mac in Safari and there it too must be scrolled around side to side to see all text/tabs.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Future walks (2017)
#21
After finishing the Via de la Plata Camino route May 8th, 2016 I decided to create a web site to record my ideas about walking trips, including the use of super lightweight gear. I have walked over 6000 km in the last 5 years carrying less than 4kg. I see people on the Camino routes carrying way to much stuff and wanted to pass along my ideas and experiences to show you can be warm and comfortable with a very small amount of gear. The web site is www.roadwalking.com. I would love to get feedback from anyone who checks it out. Thanks.

View attachment 26802
Hiya Tim, thank you for sharing your experiences & for your time creating the website. .. so appreciated!
Buen Camino
Caneadea
 

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
#22
Do I understand correctly that you carry no change of clothes and sleep in your birthday suit?
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#23
Text is indecipherable it is so small. When enlarged it does not wrap onto the screen and needs constant scrolling across to read it. There seem to be many layouts that are not mobile friendly. It required far to much effort to find the content on a small screen.
Sorry you are having problems seeing the content on roadwalking.com. Try rotating your phone to landscape mode. On my phone I am able to read the text and see the photos at the same time this way, and I'm of the age where I have long since needed reading glasses. In portrait mode zoom so the text alone fills the screen and just pan over to see the photos. I'll take a look at formatting for mobile phones.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#24
I would love to get feedback from anyone who checks it out.
Since you asked for feedback, I'll give some. It's only by getting the feedback from a variety of users with different devices that you can improve your site, and you certainly do have some interesting content! So please understand that the criticism is meant to be helpful. :)

I'd agree that the page layout is not the easiest to use. Here are some examples of the problems... Even on my laptop, I had to adjust the zoom to 67% in order to see the whole screen (left to right sides). On my phone (Galaxy Note 2, with large screen) I have to do a lot of scrolling and zooming to browse through the information even in landscape mode. The text of the links across the top is quite faint. On my phone, the right-most link doesn't fit so it wraps around to the left side.

Have you considered using a Wordpress site? They have a huge variety of templates that are adapted to modern devices. Maybe you don't have as much control over the design, but at least they have the IT resources to troubleshoot a lot of potential problems so we don't have to.

Another point might be that this arrangement doesn't allow a person to follow new content and to interact with you, as a conventional blog would.

Feel free to PM me if you'd like further discussion.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#25
Sorry you are having problems seeing the content on roadwalking.com. Try rotating your phone to landscape mode. On my phone I am able to read the text and see the photos at the same time this way, and I'm of the age where I have long since needed reading glasses. In portrait mode zoom so the text alone fills the screen and just pan over to see the photos. I'll take a look at formatting for mobile phones.
Tim, thx for the suggestions. I did a couple before commenting. I'll leave you with the issues for the moment and have another look when I have access to a larger screen device. That may not be until the end of the month.
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#26
Since you asked for feedback, I'll give some. It's only by getting the feedback from a variety of users with different devices that you can improve your site, and you certainly do have some interesting content! So please understand that the criticism is meant to be helpful. :)

I'd agree that the page layout is not the easiest to use. Here are some examples of the problems... Even on my laptop, I had to adjust the zoom to 67% in order to see the whole screen (left to right sides). On my phone (Galaxy Note 2, with large screen) I have to do a lot of scrolling and zooming to browse through the information even in landscape mode. The text of the links across the top is quite faint. On my phone, the right-most link doesn't fit so it wraps around to the left side.

Have you considered using a Wordpress site? They have a huge variety of templates that are adapted to modern devices. Maybe you don't have as much control over the design, but at least they have the IT resources to troubleshoot a lot of potential problems so we don't have to.

Another point might be that this arrangement doesn't allow a person to follow new content and to interact with you, as a conventional blog would.

Feel free to PM me if you'd like further discussion.
Thanks so much for the feedback. How do you PM?
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#28
Tim, thx for the suggestions. I did a couple before commenting. I'll leave you with the issues for the moment and have another look when I have access to a larger screen device. That may not be until the end of the month.
I just made a version of the site for mobile phones. Let me know how it works for you.
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#29
Find the link (at the top center of the page on my screen) that says Private Conversations.
Thanks again for your feedback. I think I addressed the issues you brought up. I made a mobile version of the site and the PC one should display properly. Let me know if it looks ok.
 
J

Jas Asyiken

Guest
#30
Managed to see better now. Maybe it'll be nice to share a bullet point Packing List. I don't see any T. Shirts or underwear, socks, first aid, toiletries etc. Assume the total weight includes everything which is pretty impressive.

It's great to see that "walking" actually cultivates so much creativities in people. I watched a young chap's video on his PCT and AT experience and it's remarkable to see how he goes about modifying everything to trim the weight down to minimal and even invented many ultralight solutions like you are doing here. It's like an artis getting their hands on some brushes, paint and canvas.
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#32
Site looks absolutely fine to me, but then I am watching it at home on a desk top. ;)

I was wondering, since you mention 2 pairs of socks (*), do you manage to dry your socks overnight as well? And if not, how?



* "one extra pair"
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#33
From Nicholas Crane's wonderful book "Clear Waters Rising" about a LONG journey beginning in Santiago:

socks.jpg

PS: For those who are familiar with Nicholas Crane as a TV presenter the book explains why he came to carry his famous trademark umbrella so much of the time. A lot to do with starting his journey in Galicia.
 
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TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#34
Managed to see better now. Maybe it'll be nice to share a bullet point Packing List. I don't see any T. Shirts or underwear, socks, first aid, toiletries etc. Assume the total weight includes everything which is pretty impressive.

It's great to see that "walking" actually cultivates so much creativities in people. I watched a young chap's video on his PCT and AT experience and it's remarkable to see how he goes about modifying everything to trim the weight down to minimal and even invented many ultralight solutions like you are doing here. It's like an artis getting their hands on some brushes, paint and canvas.
Good idea about a written gear list. I'll be adding more detail to the site later. This was just a first stab. As to your points: no underwear or t-shirts and toiletries and first-aid are shown as two of the zip locks in the gear photo. I actually carry one more zip lock with the socks, insect head net, elastic knee support and tubular bandana. My weight on the Via de la Plata was 3.8 kg, including tent, sleeping bag and air mattress. Since I rarely use the camping stuff, I will be leaving it behind for my next trip, leaving about 2.5 kg.
 
#35
From Nicholas Crane's wonderful book "Clear Waters Rising" about a LONG journey beginning in Santiago:

PS: For those who are familiar with Nicholas Crane as a TV presenter the book explains why he came to carry his famous trademark umbrella so much of the time. A lot to do with starting his journey in Galicia.
I can remember reading Nick's book - wonderful - in Winter, climbing along the whole of the Alps all the way to the middle of Europe with not much more than the clothes he was walking in, the trusty umbrella and modest quantities of bread and cheese - he lives close to me and I sometimes see him jogging around
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#36
Thanks again for your feedback. I think I addressed the issues you brought up. I made a mobile version of the site and the PC one should display properly. Let me know if it looks ok.
Yes, that is a great improvement on the page display for both computer and phone. Have you given any thought to the question of engaging readers - once I've looked at it, why would I go back? If you provide wonderful new material deep in the site, how would I know?

I was interested to look at your gear and see how the quality outerwear dominates (as it should). However, I do like to have indoor night wear as well!
 

psychoticparrot

psychoticparrot
Camino(s) past & future
April, May (2017)
#37
Your road-walking site and extreme light-weight packing system are both interesting and informative. One question -- How available are private accommodations on the Camino Frances? Like you, the communal albergues/hostels do not appeal to me. I plan on staying in hotels as often as possible. A mint on the pillow would not be unwelcome either. ;)

My packing list is longer than yours, partly because of my age (mid-60s -- must carry medicine, hiking sticks, and a few other age-related necessities). I plan to walk in April/May of 2017, so I must also include protection against the cold. But if I can feel sure of finding small hotels or their equivalent every night, I'll be able to whittle down a lot of other items on my list.

Your suggestions would be most welcome.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#38
How available are private accommodations on the Camino Frances?
There are thousands of private places to stay. Literally! Look up the towns on booking.com, hotels.com, tripadvisor, etc. Or try one of the camino apps for smart phones, that show accommodations along the route.
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#39
Your road-walking site and extreme light-weight packing system are both interesting and informative. One question -- How available are private accommodations on the Camino Frances? Like you, the communal albergues/hostels do not appeal to me. I plan on staying in hotels as often as possible. A mint on the pillow would not be unwelcome either. ;)

My packing list is longer than yours, partly because of my age (mid-60s -- must carry medicine, hiking sticks, and a few other age-related necessities). I plan to walk in April/May of 2017, so I must also include protection against the cold. But if I can feel sure of finding small hotels or their equivalent every night, I'll be able to whittle down a lot of other items on my list.

Your suggestions would be most welcome.
I'm also in my sixties, but have no medical problems requiring extra gear, except for reading glasses. I started my Via de la Plata walk in late March and my down jacket keeps me warm in all conditions down to around 7 or 8C. With Google maps search and hotels.com you can find lots of places to stay along any of the camino routes. I have updated www.roadwalking.com with more content if you want to check it out.
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#40
Yes, that is a great improvement on the page display for both computer and phone. Have you given any thought to the question of engaging readers - once I've looked at it, why would I go back? If you provide wonderful new material deep in the site, how would I know?

I was interested to look at your gear and see how the quality outerwear dominates (as it should). However, I do like to have indoor night wear as well!
I just added a lot more content to www.roadwalking.com. including complete trip itineraries and a more complete gear list with photos of every item. Good point about why someone would revisit the site in case I add more content. At this point there isn't much more I would add, except more trip stuff. But the gist is all there, with a few minor tweaks maybe now and then. In my case, if I find a web site interesting I save a link, and if there was a lot of content I might go back to take another look from time to time.

Even adding an extra pound or so to my list for evening clothes would still leave only around 6 pounds total, which would give you the second lightest load on the Camino (after me!)
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#41
I added more content to www.roadwalking.com including a more detailed gear list with photos of each item, as well as complete itineraries for each of my trips.
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (15 April 2013)
Camino Portuguese (1 May 2014)
Camino Mozárabe from Málaga (8 April 2015)
Camino del Norte & Camino Ingles (April 2016)
#43
...I started my Via de la Plata walk in late March and my down jacket keeps me warm in all conditions down to around 7 or 8C...
I am interested about your use of down jacket. On my first Camino I used a down vest which was great for keeping warm in the the evening, but when worn for extra warmth under my well vented raincoat it soon became very damp with perspiration. With a bit of experience I now have different methods to keep warm. This year I did take an ultra light down jacket for use in the evening and it was worn every evening, but never during the day. Is your jacket efficient at wicking moisture?
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#44
I am interested about your use of down jacket. On my first Camino I used a down vest which was great for keeping warm in the the evening, but when worn for extra warmth under my well vented raincoat it soon became very damp with perspiration. With a bit of experience I now have different methods to keep warm. This year I did take an ultra light down jacket for use in the evening and it was worn every evening, but never during the day. Is your jacket efficient at wicking moisture?
I guess if I was so hot I was sweating in my down jacket I'd take it off!
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#45
@psychoticparrot http://www.gronze.com/ lists nearly ALL available accommodation along the Frances. Frequently with links. Booking.com will cheerfully offer places a days hike off-route.
I've done the Camino Frances, Caminho Portuguese and the Via de la Plata all in hotels, pensions, or hostals (small hotels). I've never stayed in an alberque. All my accommodations were right on or easy walking distance from whatever camino route I was on. I've never taken transportation to my accommodation.
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#46
I added more content to www.roadwalking.com including a more detailed gear list with photos of each item, as well as complete itineraries for each of my trips.
Thanks for the links, what a nice surprise. I worked for Dyneema when it was still a nervous start up moving from the lab into a real chemical plant. Stories of how researchers had to hide in the cupboards after hours (when security came around) to do their illegal work on this silly idea were still abundant. And look who's walking now....
 
J

Jas Asyiken

Guest
#47
I added more content to www.roadwalking.com including a more detailed gear list with photos of each item, as well as complete itineraries for each of my trips.
The improvements are great and provided much more details.

You also mentioned walking late March with those gear. What would you do differently if it was the Summer, i.e. June, July, August?

Also you mentioned that 1 convertible pants being enough. Does that mean if you arrive at around midday, after checking in and cleaning up, you would still put on the same pants for walkabouts and meals and only get to washing them when back in room to retire (if washing is needed otherwise you would just air them overnight?). The challenge will be if one is rained out and the pants would be damp. Wearing back a damp pair of pants after shower just sounds very uncomfortable. Unless it's room confinement after walk (if and when pants got wet).

I like the 1 pants concept. Just trying to convince myself that it's enough as I do hope to get outside in the late afternoons and evenings.
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#48
The improvements are great and provided much more details.

You also mentioned walking late March with those gear. What would you do differently if it was the Summer, i.e. June, July, August?

Also you mentioned that 1 convertible pants being enough. Does that mean if you arrive at around midday, after checking in and cleaning up, you would still put on the same pants for walkabouts and meals and only get to washing them when back in room to retire (if washing is needed otherwise you would just air them overnight?). The challenge will be if one is rained out and the pants would be damp. Wearing back a damp pair of pants after shower just sounds very uncomfortable. Unless it's room confinement after walk (if and when pants got wet).

I like the 1 pants concept. Just trying to convince myself that it's enough as I do hope to get outside in the late afternoons and evenings.
Great questions! I don't sweat much or smell bad after walking so I rarely wash my shirt or pants. Maybe once every 10 days or so. Socks every two or three days. My rain jacket and pants keep my shirt and pants mostly dry. I have only arrived at a hotel with very damp clothes once or twice so I wouldn't take extra clothes for those rare occasions. Synthetics dry so quickly, I have hang up my damp shirt and pants and by the time I have a long bath they're dry enough. One could also roll them tightly in a bath towel or even use the hotel hair dryer if need be. A friend of mine using the same gear as me on the Camino Frances said he has washed his shirt after arriving, done the towel roll and a bit of hair dryer and worn the shirt to dinner. It would still be slightly damp but after a matter of a few minutes it's dry enough so you don't notice.
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#49
Thanks for the links, what a nice surprise. I worked for Dyneema when it was still a nervous start up moving from the lab into a real chemical plant. Stories of how researchers had to hide in the cupboards after hours (when security came around) to do their illegal work on this silly idea were still abundant. And look who's walking now....
Fascinating! I would go so far as to say Cuben Fiber has changed my life. It sparked an interest in making stuff, like tents and kayaks and opened up possibilities I had never imagined. I assume you saw my DSM interview regarding the kayak projects. I'm working on a new one at the moment that might crack 8 pounds. It keeps me out of trouble until my next walking trip!
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#50
Great questions! I don't sweat much or smell bad after walking so I rarely wash my shirt or pants. Maybe once every 10 days or so. Socks every two or three days. My rain jacket and pants keep my shirt and pants mostly dry. I have only arrived at a hotel with very damp clothes once or twice so I wouldn't take extra clothes for those rare occasions. Synthetics dry so quickly, I have hang up my damp shirt and pants and by the time I have a long bath they're dry enough. One could also roll them tightly in a bath towel or even use the hotel hair dryer if need be. A friend of mine using the same gear as me on the Camino Frances said he has washed his shirt after arriving, done the towel roll and a bit of hair dryer and worn the shirt to dinner. It would still be slightly damp but after a matter of a few minutes it's dry enough so you don't notice.
I should add that my gear does include extra pants. If my pants were soaking wet on arrival at my hotel, I could wear my rain pants, assuming they were dry on the inside. They are simple black pants that would look fine. And if my shirt was soaking wet I could wear my wind shell as a shirt, again assuming it was dry. If everything was wet because I fell in a stream, chances are any extra clothes I brought would also be wet. But honestly, being wet on arrival has not been much of an issue for me and I've done a lot of walking in the rain.
 
J

Jas Asyiken

Guest
#51
Great questions! I don't sweat much or smell bad after walking so I rarely wash my shirt or pants. Maybe once every 10 days or so. Socks every two or three days. My rain jacket and pants keep my shirt and pants mostly dry. I have only arrived at a hotel with very damp clothes once or twice so I wouldn't take extra clothes for those rare occasions. Synthetics dry so quickly, I have hang up my damp shirt and pants and by the time I have a long bath they're dry enough. One could also roll them tightly in a bath towel or even use the hotel hair dryer if need be. A friend of mine using the same gear as me on the Camino Frances said he has washed his shirt after arriving, done the towel roll and a bit of hair dryer and worn the shirt to dinner. It would still be slightly damp but after a matter of a few minutes it's dry enough so you don't notice.
Thanks Tim, for the prompt reply. Much appreciated. Now it gives a better pic. I don't smell although I do sweat (expecting more in summer heat too). But I reckon it won't be enough to damp my pants which is synthetic and highly breathable too. So that is certainly a great solution to 1 pants concept. (Thumbs up!)

You missed my earlier question which was about Spring and Summer. Well, more specifically...would you drop the down top for summer? Cheers!
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#52
Thanks Tim, for the prompt reply. Much appreciated. Now it gives a better pic. I don't smell although I do sweat (expecting more in summer heat too). But I reckon it won't be enough to damp my pants which is synthetic and highly breathable too. So that is certainly a great solution to 1 pants concept. (Thumbs up!)

You missed my earlier question which was about Spring and Summer. Well, more specifically...would you drop the down top for summer? Cheers!
Sorry about that. I take the down jacket on all my trips. I don't walk in July or August anyway as I don't like extreme heat and I love being home in Vancouver in the summer. But I even take it on summer overnight camping as it can get cool in the evening sitting around a camp site. It's about the lightest amount of insulation you can get and is really more a down sweater than a jacket you would wear in freezing temperatures. It only weighs 136 grams and packs about the size of two fists. I took a Montbell down vest on the Frances but a few times in the morning my arms were cold. I love my Plasma jacket and it's my favorite piece of gear.
 
#53
I should add that my gear does include extra pants. If my pants were soaking wet on arrival at my hotel, I could wear my rain pants, assuming they were dry on the inside. They are simple black pants that would look fine. And if my shirt was soaking wet I could wear my wind shell as a shirt, again assuming it was dry. If everything was wet because I fell in a stream, chances are any extra clothes I brought would also be wet. But honestly, being wet on arrival has not been much of an issue for me and I've done a lot of walking in the rain.
As you say drying walking clothes is less of a problem due to synthetic materials and/or sunshine and/or wind. Normally a change of socks and the relative warmth of my feet is all that I need for my trail shoes to dry quickly. If you keep your extra clothes in a dry bag (I use Exped) then they'll stay dry whatever!
 

pvh

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015 hopefully
#54
On the subject of ultra light gear, I am starting in Saint Jean on August 2nd this year and was wondering what anyone's thoughts were on my plan to take my windproof running jacket instead of a waterproof or smock. The windproof is extremely lightweight, shower proof and very breathable. I find all waterproof jackets I try leave me as wet with condensation as if not wearing them, especially when exercising. I am aware of the potential for hypothermia but I'll also have a synthetic t shirt and micro fleece, which I imagine will keep me warm if necessary and hopefully move the sweat out faster than the rain can come in, much like the "buffalo" shirts that used to be very popular with UK climbers (they are a combination of pertex outer with pile fibre lining, designed to work a bit like an animal's skin, with the capillary action etc).
I need to stop before Galicia, owing to time, and as it's August, does anyone think that this is a good idea?
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#55
On the subject of ultra light gear, I am starting in Saint Jean on August 2nd this year and was wondering what anyone's thoughts were on my plan to take my windproof running jacket instead of a waterproof or smock. The windproof is extremely lightweight, shower proof and very breathable. I find all waterproof jackets I try leave me as wet with condensation as if not wearing them, especially when exercising. I am aware of the potential for hypothermia but I'll also have a synthetic t shirt and micro fleece, which I imagine will keep me warm if necessary and hopefully move the sweat out faster than the rain can come in, much like the "buffalo" shirts that used to be very popular with UK climbers (they are a combination of pertex outer with pile fibre lining, designed to work a bit like an animal's skin, with the capillary action etc).
I need to stop before Galicia, owing to time, and as it's August, does anyone think that this is a good idea?
I take both a rain jacket and a wind shell. A wind shell will leak very quickly and in heavy or sustained rain you'll get wet. I walked with someone in Portugal who only had a wind shell and in heavy rain we had to stop in a town so he could buy a waterproof jacket as he was freezing. I personally don't sweat much in rain jackets except in hot weather, but I know other people do. A poncho is a better option in warmer weather as it is looser, and if it's open and tied at the sides (as mine is) more air gets in so you shouldn't sweat as much.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#57

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#59
I've been wondering how durable those super lightweight rain jackets are, especially when worn under backpack. Any comments?
I also wear the Berghaus Vapourlight. Amazing jacket and the lightest available to my knowledge. I've used mine for a few years and it's going strong and is fully waterproof. Good point about the durability of a light jacket like this with the wear from backpack straps. I met a couple on the Via de la Plata who had leaks in their rain jackets where there backpack straps pressed against their jackets. They had to buy cheap ponchos along the way to stay dry. With the Vapourlight this could be a problem as it is designed to be the lightest possible jacket for long distance running, not for carrying a backpack. This is not a problem for me since I carry a lumbar pack, which had no shoulder straps to wear against the jacket. Yet another advantage of a lumbar pack.
 

hampshire!tim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Ingles (2014), Finisterre (2015)
#62
Very interesting discussion and comments.

All my stuff is lightweight but my Rab down jacket is quite bulky. Maybe I should fold it smaller, but for some reason don't like disrespecting it like this. So I am not sure I can squeeze it all in a lumbar pack - even though the idea is great.

Any recommendations where to get cuben fibre in UK ? Haven't searched recently, but last time I did, it all seemed to be US suppliers
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016 (without Meseta)
#63
On the subject of ultra light gear, I am starting in Saint Jean on August 2nd this year and was wondering what anyone's thoughts were on my plan to take my windproof running jacket instead of a waterproof or smock. The windproof is extremely lightweight, shower proof and very breathable. I find all waterproof jackets I try leave me as wet with condensation as if not wearing them, especially when exercising. I am aware of the potential for hypothermia but I'll also have a synthetic t shirt and micro fleece, which I imagine will keep me warm if necessary and hopefully move the sweat out faster than the rain can come in, much like the "buffalo" shirts that used to be very popular with UK climbers (they are a combination of pertex outer with pile fibre lining, designed to work a bit like an animal's skin, with the capillary action etc).
I need to stop before Galicia, owing to time, and as it's August, does anyone think that this is a good idea?
I walked between mid May and early June- I took a lightweight wind jacket that I sometimes use cycling - started most days in that. I wore some lightweight McKinley short sleeve shirts (2 of - different colours). I took merino arm warmers that I use when cycling - I had those on for a lot of mornings. I had a poncho for rain. I had a lightweight polartec hoody for 'evening wear' and as an option if it was cold in the day - I was never that cold, even though I would say that I do feel the cold. I took lycra arm covers (also cycling) for sun protection - once the wind jacket was off and it was too warm for the merino covers. I also had a merino t-shirt that I wore in the evenings but could have used under my shirt during the day. Oh and a buff that I wore around my neck.
Sounds like a bit of kit but it was all lightweight and didn't take a lot of space. I was worried about being cold but wanted a number of layers. Tim's approach is definitely the most minimal and something that I'll aspire to. The merino t-shirt was a nice to have and gave me some colour variety but I could have got by without it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in 2015.
#64
Your website wouldn't work on my iPad. But it looks interesting. I love readings bout different peoples packing philosophies. I'm all for eliminating the unnecessary and lightning ones load. Ultimately tho, everyone is unique in their needs, wants and abilities. As a travel photog, I've totally embraced the iphone as a camera, and it has freed up A LOT of space in my bag. I've gone from a 50L to a 44L to now using a Stratos 34 or Exos 38 for most of my international travels. And I'm totally comfortable with that. They are practically daypacks. I'd love to just walk on a plane with just a fanny pack, and the clothes on my back and travel internationally...but that's not practical really. I think it gets to the point where this traveling light thing gets to be a weird kind of competition, and crosses into being as much of an inconveinence as carrying too much! I'm all for less is more...but sometimes less is not enough. So while I applaud the ultra light philosophy, and am always looking for ways to lighten my load...there is a limit depending on the person, and kind of trip one is taking.
 
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
#65
My approach is, all other things being equal, choose the lightweight option. But often "all things" are not equal, in which case I choose comfort. For example I have an old-fashioned Altus, which is very long and quite heavy. But so far it has worked better than any other wet weather gear. And recently I added a silk fitted single sheet to my "essentials" packing list - it is quite thick but wonderful to sleep on.

Still hoping and looking for improvements!
 

TimothyE

Road Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camihno Portuguese, Via de la Plata
#67
@TimothyE , what brand heel pads have you been using for shock absorption? Any suggestions?
Actually, my Hoka shoes provide all the shock absorption I need. I carry Dr. Scholl's heel gels only to raise my heel when I occasionally have a sore Achilles tendon, as this seems to relieve it.
 

Rajy62

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2013, Norte/primitivo 2014, vdlp (2015)
#68
Actually, my Hoka shoes provide all the shock absorption I need. I carry Dr. Scholl's heel gels only to raise my heel when I occasionally have a sore Achilles tendon, as this seems to relieve it.
Thank you.
 

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