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Superb December 2021 Camino

The Yukon

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Portuguese, Jacobs Weg, Camino Frances, Tui to Fatima
This isn’t a submission that was going to press. Why? I only carry an iPhone on the path. It’s such a pleasure to transmit thoughts with 8 fingers in play, but the thumbs bully their way from their usual sharing of the space bar, to taking over the whole tiny keyboard. And yes, they suck as micromanagers of this formidable task. Enough of the preamble.

Some of you encouraged me, as a current pilgrim, to share the journey. The thumbs did poorly, but given all the great support on this site, here is a synopsis of a worthwhile walk.

Good pre-trip coaching came from two sisters and brother-in-law who administered thousands of vaccination needles safely this past year, as well as their whole life, and know what it means to be safe. They accompanied me for the last two weeks of November to the stunning Azores, Portuguese islands 1/3 of the way between Portugal and Newfoundland, Canada.

Despite the uncertainty of taking 5 flights from Dawson City, Yukon, December 5 found me leaving Se Catedral in Lisbon looking for that first beckoning yellow arrow. If I had a goal, it was to enjoy the journey each day, and more importantly, walk less than 20 Km the first day.

The meteorological gods smiled the first 150 or so Km to Fatima. This December climate resembled our August climate in our subArctic town, so I was elated every morning, wearing a T-shirt by the afternoon in the high teens.

In Fatima it poured, but that’s a town with a riveting story and lots worth seeing while dodging raindrops, not to mention the Aleluja Hotel which overlooks the cathedral square for a mere 25€\night. I am not a devout peregrino; I do not walk all day in the rain. But that’s amusing too since I carry an umbrella that snaps on to my backpack for flash showers. Which suggests that I carry too much - about 12 or 13 kg (26 to 29 lbs) on my 70kg (154 lbs) frame. It’s so impressive to see how light some of you travel.

Because the heavy rain meant a day off, I discovered the Camino Nascente e Poente between Tomar and Nazare on the coast. The next 4 days were spent walking this 70+ km perk. Minimum signage, but the Camino Ninja app proved a reliable guide. The enormous Batalha Monastery is worth the 7 Km deviation from the path. A cab did pick mr up the next morning and took me back towards Moss to see another ancient castle and get me close to the path again. Should you choose this enchanting walk to the coast, consider the 5€ obscure, unmanned alberge in an old school house in Coz. Clean, great kitchen, showers, extra blankets, and you’ll have it to yourself.

In 22 days I only met 2 other pilgrims on my 3rd and 4th day, neither of them vaccinated and both lamenting the difficulty this created for them in attempting to stay in Portuguese alberges. Thankfully, double vax proof is important in this country, or an official antigen test every 48 hours, optionally a PCR every 72 hours.

Also in 22 days the sun shone warmly on 18 of them during this magical December of 2021.

The paths, the forests, the flowers , the light, the temperatures created such a magnificent milieu to walk in at this time of year. Thank god I booked that ticket so long ago and got on that plane.

The current, mostly airborne pandemic made me more cautious than usual. I booked my own room with private bath when booking into hostels, I booked hotels, not hostels or alberges, in larger centres, and I phoned ahead for alberges in smaller communities. My question was always about pilgrim numbers. They were low. A typical answer would tell me that someone from Australia had been there 4 days earlier; hence I felt safe about booking in as the lone peregrino.

The last alberge I stayed at, the Waterfalls Alberge in Pinheiro da Bemposta, with helpful owner Mikalous, was no exception and I would highly recommend this peaceful location. For someone with screaming 24/7 tinnitus, waterfalls are nirvana for they obliterate, if only ephemerally, the noise in my head.

If there’s a church I’ve always wanted to visit in Portugal, it’s in Valega, and Mikalous showed me how to reach this beautiful structure, inside and outside, via some lovely rural trails in 2 or 3 hours using the scenic maps.me app. From there a pilgrim can walk on to Ovar, on to the coast and eventually to Espinho. Given that Mikalous has the last alberge before Porto, this is a great option to avoid a couple days of the urban sprawl and traffic.

Under the warm Christmas Day sunshine, I ended up leaving Espinho for Porto along 7 km of wooden sidewalks beside the Atlantic Ocean before stopping for a beer and heading inland to join the yellow arrows one more time. Crossing the bridge built by Eiffel. I knew that 21 of the finest days on a Camino had come to an end. Wisely, Portugal was going into a semi-lockdown mode early, and from now on, I would need a pharmacy’s self-Covid test every night to stay in a place of lodging.

The interior Braga route was calling, but after a couple days with a bit too much rain and a couple of nights having the places of lodging watch me do the self-test, an Old Crow Medicine Show song started ringing in my head: “Rock me mama like the wind and the rain, rock me mama like a southbound train.” The Portuguese news also suggested that by December 30 my Covid self-tests needed to be replaced by expensive officially recognized tests to enter a place of lodging or a restaurant. Suddenly the train was taking me south to the warm, sunny Algarve.

For me the Camino was never as much about reaching Point B as it was about experiencing the journey from community to community, however far that happened to be. I have to confess that I felt slightly relieved about not being able to complete the journey and mingling with other pilgrims I’d love to meet in Santiago.

For my debriefing, I have this comprehensive book about hiking trails in the Algarve. Every day the path beckons again for 10 or 20 kms as I learn which of the many future paths I might consider for taking a multi-day/week journey or Camino through another part of this inviting country. Some of jungleboy’s recent contributions have certainly peaked my new interest in walking more of this part of Portugal.

Those winter days back home (that are happening as I write this) of -40 when it’s too cold to ski or walk created the impetus for my choice during a pandemic. Thank you my friends on the Camino, not just pilgrims today, but yesterday and tomorrow,, both physically and metaphysically, for joining me on the path during this wonderful 600 km moment in time.
 
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jungleboy

Spirit of the Camino (Nick)
Time of past OR future Camino
Some in the past; more in the future!
Great write-up and I'm glad you had such a great camino (and weather in December!).

The last alberge I stayed at, the Waterfalls Alberge in Pinheiro da Bemposta, with helpful owner Mikalous, was no exception and I would highly recommend this peaceful location.

Has the albergue changed its name? It was called Albergue Moinho Garcia when I was there in Sep 2020. I also highly recommend it!
 

Trudie

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
May 2017 - Sarria
September 2018
This isn’t a submission that was going to press. Why? I only carry an iPhone on the path. It’s such a pleasure to transmit thoughts with 8 fingers in play, but the thumbs bully their way from their usual sharing of the space bar, to taking over the whole tiny keyboard. And yes, they suck as micromanagers of this formidable task. Enough of the preamble.

Some of you encouraged me, as a current pilgrim, to share the journey. The thumbs did poorly, but given all the great support on this site, here is a synopsis of a worthwhile walk.

Good pre-trip coaching came from two sisters and brother-in-law who administered thousands of vaccination needles safely this past year, as well as their whole life, and know what it means to be safe. They accompanied me for the last two weeks of November to the stunning Azores, Portuguese islands 1/3 of the way between Portugal and Newfoundland, Canada.

Despite the uncertainty of taking 5 flights from Dawson City, Yukon, December 5 found me leaving Se Catedral in Lisbon looking for that first beckoning yellow arrow. If I had a goal, it was to enjoy the journey each day, and more importantly, walk less than 20 Km the first day.

The meteorological gods smiled the first 150 or so Km to Fatima. This December climate resembled our August climate in our subArctic town, so I was elated every morning, wearing a T-shirt by the afternoon in the high teens.

In Fatima it poured, but that’s a town with a riveting story and lots worth seeing while dodging raindrops, not to mention the Aleluja Hotel which overlooks the cathedral square for a mere 25€\night. I am not a devout peregrino; I do not walk all day in the rain. But that’s amusing too since I carry an umbrella that snaps on to my backpack for flash showers. Which suggests that I carry too much - about 12 or 13 kg (26 to 29 lbs) on my 70kg (154 lbs) frame. It’s so impressive to see how light some of you travel.

Because the heavy rain meant a day off, I discovered the Camino Nascente e Poente between Tomar and Nazare on the coast. The next 4 days were spent walking this 70+ km perk. Minimum signage, but the Camino Ninja app proved a reliable guide. The enormous Batalha Monastery is worth the 7 Km deviation from the path. A cab did pick mr up the next morning and took me back towards Moss to see another ancient castle and get me close to the path again. Should you choose this enchanting walk to the coast, consider the 5€ obscure, unmanned alberge in an old school house in Coz. Clean, great kitchen, showers, extra blankets, and you’ll have it to yourself.

In 22 days I only met 2 other pilgrims on my 3rd and 4th day, neither of them vaccinated and both lamenting the difficulty this created for them in attempting to stay in Portuguese alberges. Thankfully, double vax proof is important in this country, or an official antigen test every 48 hours, optionally a PCR every 72 hours.

Also in 22 days the sun shone warmly on 18 of them during this magical December of 2021.

The paths, the forests, the flowers , the light, the temperatures created such a magnificent milieu to walk in at this time of year. Thank god I booked that ticket so long ago and got on that plane.

The current, mostly airborne pandemic made me more cautious than usual. I booked my own room with private bath when booking into hostels, I booked hotels, not hostels or alberges, in larger centres, and I phoned ahead for alberges in smaller communities. My question was always about pilgrim numbers. They were low. A typical answer would tell me that someone from Australia had been there 4 days earlier; hence I felt safe about booking in as the lone peregrino.

The last alberge I stayed at, the Waterfalls Alberge in Pinheiro da Bemposta, with helpful owner Mikalous, was no exception and I would highly recommend this peaceful location. For someone with screaming 24/7 tinnitus, waterfalls are nirvana for they obliterate, if only ephemerally, the noise in my head.

If there’s a church I’ve always wanted to visit in Portugal, it’s in Valega, and Mikalous showed me how to reach this beautiful structure, inside and outside, via some lovely rural trails in 2 or 3 hours using the scenic maps.me app. From there a pilgrim can walk on to Ovar, on to the coast and eventually to Espinho. Given that Mikalous has the last alberge before Porto, this is a great option to avoid a couple days of the urban sprawl and traffic.

Under the warm Christmas Day sunshine, I ended up leaving Espinho for Porto along 7 km of wooden sidewalks beside the Atlantic Ocean before stopping for a beer and heading inland to join the yellow arrows one more time. Crossing the bridge built by Eiffel. I knew that 21 of the finest days on a Camino had come to an end. Wisely, Portugal was going into a semi-lockdown mode early, and from now on, I would need a pharmacy’s self-Covid test every night to stay in a place of lodging.

The interior Braga route was calling, but after a couple days with a bit too much rain and a couple of nights having the places of lodging watch me do the self-test, an Old Crow Medicine Show song started ringing in my head: “Rock me mama like the wind and the rain, rock me mama like a southbound train.” The Portuguese news also suggested that by December 30 my Covid self-tests needed to be replaced by expensive officially recognized tests to enter a place of lodging or a restaurant. Suddenly the train was taking me south to the warm, sunny Algarve.

For me the Camino was never as much about reaching Point B as it was about experiencing the journey from community to community, however far that happened to be. I have to confess that I felt slightly relieved about not being able to complete the journey and mingling with other pilgrims I’d love to meet in Santiago.

For my debriefing, I have this comprehensive book about hiking trails in the Algarve. Every day the path beckons again for 10 or 20 kms as I learn which of the many future paths I might consider for taking a multi-day/week journey or Camino through another part of this inviting country. Some of jungleboy’s recent contributions have certainly peaked my new interest in walking more of this part of Portugal.

Those winter days back home (that are happening as I write this) of -40 when it’s too cold to ski or walk created the impetus for my choice during a pandemic. Thank you my friends on the Camino, not just pilgrims today, but yesterday and tomorrow,, both physically and metaphysically, for joining me on the path during this wonderful 600 km moment in time.
Enjoyed your post. Loved the Espino part of my Camino too.
 

The Yukon

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Portuguese, Jacobs Weg, Camino Frances, Tui to Fatima
Great write-up and I'm glad you had such a great camino (and weather in December!).



Has the albergue changed its name? It was called Albergue Moinho Garcia when I was there in Sep 2020. I also highly recommend it!
Thanks for asking. I saw it referred to on Google maps as Watermill Moinho Garcia.
 
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IngridF

Intrepid Peregrina
Time of past OR future Camino
2012, 2015 ,2017, 2019
This isn’t a submission that was going to press. Why? I only carry an iPhone on the path. It’s such a pleasure to transmit thoughts with 8 fingers in play, but the thumbs bully their way from their usual sharing of the space bar, to taking over the whole tiny keyboard. And yes, they suck as micromanagers of this formidable task. Enough of the preamble.

Some of you encouraged me, as a current pilgrim, to share the journey. The thumbs did poorly, but given all the great support on this site, here is a synopsis of a worthwhile walk.

Good pre-trip coaching came from two sisters and brother-in-law who administered thousands of vaccination needles safely this past year, as well as their whole life, and know what it means to be safe. They accompanied me for the last two weeks of November to the stunning Azores, Portuguese islands 1/3 of the way between Portugal and Newfoundland, Canada.

Despite the uncertainty of taking 5 flights from Dawson City, Yukon, December 5 found me leaving Se Catedral in Lisbon looking for that first beckoning yellow arrow. If I had a goal, it was to enjoy the journey each day, and more importantly, walk less than 20 Km the first day.

The meteorological gods smiled the first 150 or so Km to Fatima. This December climate resembled our August climate in our subArctic town, so I was elated every morning, wearing a T-shirt by the afternoon in the high teens.

In Fatima it poured, but that’s a town with a riveting story and lots worth seeing while dodging raindrops, not to mention the Aleluja Hotel which overlooks the cathedral square for a mere 25€\night. I am not a devout peregrino; I do not walk all day in the rain. But that’s amusing too since I carry an umbrella that snaps on to my backpack for flash showers. Which suggests that I carry too much - about 12 or 13 kg (26 to 29 lbs) on my 70kg (154 lbs) frame. It’s so impressive to see how light some of you travel.

Because the heavy rain meant a day off, I discovered the Camino Nascente e Poente between Tomar and Nazare on the coast. The next 4 days were spent walking this 70+ km perk. Minimum signage, but the Camino Ninja app proved a reliable guide. The enormous Batalha Monastery is worth the 7 Km deviation from the path. A cab did pick mr up the next morning and took me back towards Moss to see another ancient castle and get me close to the path again. Should you choose this enchanting walk to the coast, consider the 5€ obscure, unmanned alberge in an old school house in Coz. Clean, great kitchen, showers, extra blankets, and you’ll have it to yourself.

In 22 days I only met 2 other pilgrims on my 3rd and 4th day, neither of them vaccinated and both lamenting the difficulty this created for them in attempting to stay in Portuguese alberges. Thankfully, double vax proof is important in this country, or an official antigen test every 48 hours, optionally a PCR every 72 hours.

Also in 22 days the sun shone warmly on 18 of them during this magical December of 2021.

The paths, the forests, the flowers , the light, the temperatures created such a magnificent milieu to walk in at this time of year. Thank god I booked that ticket so long ago and got on that plane.

The current, mostly airborne pandemic made me more cautious than usual. I booked my own room with private bath when booking into hostels, I booked hotels, not hostels or alberges, in larger centres, and I phoned ahead for alberges in smaller communities. My question was always about pilgrim numbers. They were low. A typical answer would tell me that someone from Australia had been there 4 days earlier; hence I felt safe about booking in as the lone peregrino.

The last alberge I stayed at, the Waterfalls Alberge in Pinheiro da Bemposta, with helpful owner Mikalous, was no exception and I would highly recommend this peaceful location. For someone with screaming 24/7 tinnitus, waterfalls are nirvana for they obliterate, if only ephemerally, the noise in my head.

If there’s a church I’ve always wanted to visit in Portugal, it’s in Valega, and Mikalous showed me how to reach this beautiful structure, inside and outside, via some lovely rural trails in 2 or 3 hours using the scenic maps.me app. From there a pilgrim can walk on to Ovar, on to the coast and eventually to Espinho. Given that Mikalous has the last alberge before Porto, this is a great option to avoid a couple days of the urban sprawl and traffic.

Under the warm Christmas Day sunshine, I ended up leaving Espinho for Porto along 7 km of wooden sidewalks beside the Atlantic Ocean before stopping for a beer and heading inland to join the yellow arrows one more time. Crossing the bridge built by Eiffel. I knew that 21 of the finest days on a Camino had come to an end. Wisely, Portugal was going into a semi-lockdown mode early, and from now on, I would need a pharmacy’s self-Covid test every night to stay in a place of lodging.

The interior Braga route was calling, but after a couple days with a bit too much rain and a couple of nights having the places of lodging watch me do the self-test, an Old Crow Medicine Show song started ringing in my head: “Rock me mama like the wind and the rain, rock me mama like a southbound train.” The Portuguese news also suggested that by December 30 my Covid self-tests needed to be replaced by expensive officially recognized tests to enter a place of lodging or a restaurant. Suddenly the train was taking me south to the warm, sunny Algarve.

For me the Camino was never as much about reaching Point B as it was about experiencing the journey from community to community, however far that happened to be. I have to confess that I felt slightly relieved about not being able to complete the journey and mingling with other pilgrims I’d love to meet in Santiago.

For my debriefing, I have this comprehensive book about hiking trails in the Algarve. Every day the path beckons again for 10 or 20 kms as I learn which of the many future paths I might consider for taking a multi-day/week journey or Camino through another part of this inviting country. Some of jungleboy’s recent contributions have certainly peaked my new interest in walking more of this part of Portugal.

Those winter days back home (that are happening as I write this) of -40 when it’s too cold to ski or walk created the impetus for my choice during a pandemic. Thank you my friends on the Camino, not just pilgrims today, but yesterday and tomorrow,, both physically and metaphysically, for joining me on the path during this wonderful 600 km moment in time.
So enjoyed your story. Keep well.
 

lindam

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
I enjoyed reading about your travels and adventures on the Camino. Hope you enjoyed your time in the Azores as well. I have recently moved to one of these tiny islands and love the peacefulness and natural beauty it offers.
 

sharonmonty

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Portuguese 2022
This isn’t a submission that was going to press. Why? I only carry an iPhone on the path. It’s such a pleasure to transmit thoughts with 8 fingers in play, but the thumbs bully their way from their usual sharing of the space bar, to taking over the whole tiny keyboard. And yes, they suck as micromanagers of this formidable task. Enough of the preamble.

Some of you encouraged me, as a current pilgrim, to share the journey. The thumbs did poorly, but given all the great support on this site, here is a synopsis of a worthwhile walk.

Good pre-trip coaching came from two sisters and brother-in-law who administered thousands of vaccination needles safely this past year, as well as their whole life, and know what it means to be safe. They accompanied me for the last two weeks of November to the stunning Azores, Portuguese islands 1/3 of the way between Portugal and Newfoundland, Canada.

Despite the uncertainty of taking 5 flights from Dawson City, Yukon, December 5 found me leaving Se Catedral in Lisbon looking for that first beckoning yellow arrow. If I had a goal, it was to enjoy the journey each day, and more importantly, walk less than 20 Km the first day.

The meteorological gods smiled the first 150 or so Km to Fatima. This December climate resembled our August climate in our subArctic town, so I was elated every morning, wearing a T-shirt by the afternoon in the high teens.

In Fatima it poured, but that’s a town with a riveting story and lots worth seeing while dodging raindrops, not to mention the Aleluja Hotel which overlooks the cathedral square for a mere 25€\night. I am not a devout peregrino; I do not walk all day in the rain. But that’s amusing too since I carry an umbrella that snaps on to my backpack for flash showers. Which suggests that I carry too much - about 12 or 13 kg (26 to 29 lbs) on my 70kg (154 lbs) frame. It’s so impressive to see how light some of you travel.

Because the heavy rain meant a day off, I discovered the Camino Nascente e Poente between Tomar and Nazare on the coast. The next 4 days were spent walking this 70+ km perk. Minimum signage, but the Camino Ninja app proved a reliable guide. The enormous Batalha Monastery is worth the 7 Km deviation from the path. A cab did pick mr up the next morning and took me back towards Moss to see another ancient castle and get me close to the path again. Should you choose this enchanting walk to the coast, consider the 5€ obscure, unmanned alberge in an old school house in Coz. Clean, great kitchen, showers, extra blankets, and you’ll have it to yourself.

In 22 days I only met 2 other pilgrims on my 3rd and 4th day, neither of them vaccinated and both lamenting the difficulty this created for them in attempting to stay in Portuguese alberges. Thankfully, double vax proof is important in this country, or an official antigen test every 48 hours, optionally a PCR every 72 hours.

Also in 22 days the sun shone warmly on 18 of them during this magical December of 2021.

The paths, the forests, the flowers , the light, the temperatures created such a magnificent milieu to walk in at this time of year. Thank god I booked that ticket so long ago and got on that plane.

The current, mostly airborne pandemic made me more cautious than usual. I booked my own room with private bath when booking into hostels, I booked hotels, not hostels or alberges, in larger centres, and I phoned ahead for alberges in smaller communities. My question was always about pilgrim numbers. They were low. A typical answer would tell me that someone from Australia had been there 4 days earlier; hence I felt safe about booking in as the lone peregrino.

The last alberge I stayed at, the Waterfalls Alberge in Pinheiro da Bemposta, with helpful owner Mikalous, was no exception and I would highly recommend this peaceful location. For someone with screaming 24/7 tinnitus, waterfalls are nirvana for they obliterate, if only ephemerally, the noise in my head.

If there’s a church I’ve always wanted to visit in Portugal, it’s in Valega, and Mikalous showed me how to reach this beautiful structure, inside and outside, via some lovely rural trails in 2 or 3 hours using the scenic maps.me app. From there a pilgrim can walk on to Ovar, on to the coast and eventually to Espinho. Given that Mikalous has the last alberge before Porto, this is a great option to avoid a couple days of the urban sprawl and traffic.

Under the warm Christmas Day sunshine, I ended up leaving Espinho for Porto along 7 km of wooden sidewalks beside the Atlantic Ocean before stopping for a beer and heading inland to join the yellow arrows one more time. Crossing the bridge built by Eiffel. I knew that 21 of the finest days on a Camino had come to an end. Wisely, Portugal was going into a semi-lockdown mode early, and from now on, I would need a pharmacy’s self-Covid test every night to stay in a place of lodging.

The interior Braga route was calling, but after a couple days with a bit too much rain and a couple of nights having the places of lodging watch me do the self-test, an Old Crow Medicine Show song started ringing in my head: “Rock me mama like the wind and the rain, rock me mama like a southbound train.” The Portuguese news also suggested that by December 30 my Covid self-tests needed to be replaced by expensive officially recognized tests to enter a place of lodging or a restaurant. Suddenly the train was taking me south to the warm, sunny Algarve.

For me the Camino was never as much about reaching Point B as it was about experiencing the journey from community to community, however far that happened to be. I have to confess that I felt slightly relieved about not being able to complete the journey and mingling with other pilgrims I’d love to meet in Santiago.

For my debriefing, I have this comprehensive book about hiking trails in the Algarve. Every day the path beckons again for 10 or 20 kms as I learn which of the many future paths I might consider for taking a multi-day/week journey or Camino through another part of this inviting country. Some of jungleboy’s recent contributions have certainly peaked my new interest in walking more of this part of Portugal.

Those winter days back home (that are happening as I write this) of -40 when it’s too cold to ski or walk created the impetus for my choice during a pandemic. Thank you my friends on the Camino, not just pilgrims today, but yesterday and tomorrow,, both physically and metaphysically, for joining me on the path during this wonderful 600 km moment in time.
I really enjoyed reading this. Your thumbs worked fine!
 
John Brierley 2023 Camino Guide
Get your today and start planning.
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jenwearing

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (SJPP) 2018, Portuguese (Lisbon) Dec 2022
Great post. I'm doing the Portuguese route from Lisbon starting Dec 15 this year (literally the only time I can get enough vacation from work) and your post gives me better insight into what to expect. Of course, no two years are the same but it reminds me to prepare for anything.
 

The Yukon

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Portuguese, Jacobs Weg, Camino Frances, Tui to Fatima
Great post. I'm doing the Portuguese route from Lisbon starting Dec 15 this year (literally the only time I can get enough vacation from work) and your post gives me better insight into what to expect. Of course, no two years are the same but it reminds me to prepare for anything.
Obrigado! Good on you for embracing a winter window. Last year I started in early December in Lisbon and will do so again this year, but not sure from where yet: Lisbon, Faro, Nazare, Coimbra, Viseu - so many beckoning paths that end up in SdC. How's your time line? Do you have the 30 days or so you might need?

I didn't make it all the way to SdC last year due to a sudden lock down at Xmas, but might not have made it anyways, after learning about and walking another little known camino, the Nascente e Poente - winding from Tomar to the longest surfing waves in the world on the west coast. The journey itself tends to interest me more than timelines and destinations.

Just wanted to welcome you to a beautiful winter walk and wish you Bom Caminha!
 

jenwearing

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (SJPP) 2018, Portuguese (Lisbon) Dec 2022
Obrigado! Good on you for embracing a winter window. Last year I started in early December in Lisbon and will do so again this year, but not sure from where yet: Lisbon, Faro, Nazare, Coimbra, Viseu - so many beckoning paths that end up in SdC. How's your time line? Do you have the 30 days or so you might need?

I didn't make it all the way to SdC last year due to a sudden lock down at Xmas, but might not have made it anyways, after learning about and walking another little known camino, the Nascente e Poente - winding from Tomar to the longest surfing waves in the world on the west coast. The journey itself tends to interest me more than timelines and destinations.

Just wanted to welcome you to a beautiful winter walk and wish you Bom Caminha!
Bom Caminha!
I don't have enough time at all, only 20 days to walk. It was the most time I could get. I think we will maybe skip a handful of stages or portions of between Coimbra and porto and maybe the first stage after porto. Ideally I'd walk every step but realistically we will probably have to cut about 100km out of it. I've been reading up on where the highway slogs are. LOL. Also planning on booking ahead in hostels and pensions as I believe a lot of the alburges will be closed for Christmas
It sounds like you had a great time last year and I can only imagine those waves in real life. I hope to do one day on the coast if weather permits.
I Hope you have a good trip this year too, glad you have the opportunity to go back!
 
Last edited:

mspath

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Great post. I'm doing the Portuguese route from Lisbon starting Dec 15 this year (literally the only time I can get enough vacation from work) and your post gives me better insight into what to expect. Of course, no two years are the same but it reminds me to prepare for anything.
jenwearing,
As you plan to start your winter camino from Lisbon here is an earlier but still relevant thread re Great Reasons to Start in Lisbon.

Christmas and New Years are very special times in Portugal with beautiful traditions of nativity scenes and delicious food. During past years when my husband and I traveled in Portugal at Christmas the assortment of desserts was splendid. I especially enjoyed the Bolo Rei /King's cake made with sweet dough, lemon zest, crystallized fruit and a bit of Port wine.

Enjoy your planning and Bom caminho!
 
Last edited:

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