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Take a Screen Shot to Use as a Map

Terry Callery

Chi Walker
Camino(s) past & future
"Portuguese Camino - In Search of the Infinite Moment" Amazon/Kindle books authored
"Slow Camino"
I will be doing the Oviedo to Lugo section of the Primitivo leaving in just two weeks.
Alas...there is not John Brierley guide book (with his terrific maps) for this Camino route.
I am stuck with the Spanish "Editorial Buen Camino" book that also has the Norte route as well as the English Cicerone guide book "The Northern Caminos" Norte, Primitivo and Ingles.
Sadly the maps in both guidebooks are only useful for planning distance and not very useful for navigating since there is so little detail to use as reference. You simply can't "triangulate" a position (I used to going sailing here on the coast of Maine) because there are no details such as rotary's, intersections or bridges to reference.
On this Camino Forum, I came across an informative blog "The Pilgrimage Traveler" where the author Elle Bieling from Colorado has posted a google map of the Primitivo route with their GPS fixes while walking the route, superimposed so as to chart out the actual route over the map display.
My 2014 iPad would not allow me to download Elle's tracks, as the map is a 10.0 version. I will not be connected to the internet as I walk - just have the Wi-Fi at the hotels and albergues. What to do?
My computer store guy gave me the solution to storing the maps! He showed me how to take a "screenshot". I focused into each Primitivo section of Elle's Google maps until I had maybe just a third of the route, say an 8-10 kilometer section. That had tons of detail for navigation/reference points. On the iPad mini, you simply hold down the power button while at the same time clicking the main home button to take a "screen shot". Now I have 30 sceeen shot maps for the 10 days I will be on the Primitivo from Oviedo to Lugo and I do not need to be connected to the internet to use them!
By the way I really liked reading Elle's blog of her Primitivo pilgrimage. Her writing reminded me of the books I have written about my two Caminos since she is so interested in all the art, architecture, history and culture that can be part of a Camino experience if only one stops at time to take all of that in. Very informative blog.
I would be interested to know just how well the Primitivo is route marked compared to the Route Frances and the Portuguese Route both of which I did during the uncrowded winter months.
Terence Callery
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I did something similar walking through France mostly on canal towpaths and minor roads. I had a printout of schematics of the canal system and distances between locks and towns. For road walking I mostly relied on pages cut from a road atlas. For places where I thought navigation might be tricky I viewed the area in high detail on the French official mapping site Geoportail beforehand and took screenshots just in case there was no mobile signal when I needed it most. Worked very well most of the time.
 

timr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
I will be doing the Oviedo to Lugo section of the Primitivo leaving in just two weeks.
Alas...there is not John Brierley guide book (with his terrific maps) for this Camino route.
I am stuck with the Spanish "Editorial Buen Camino" book that also has the Norte route as well as the English Cicerone guide book "The Northern Caminos" Norte, Primitivo and Ingles.
Sadly the maps in both guidebooks are only useful for planning distance and not very useful for navigating since there is so little detail to use as reference. You simply can't "triangulate" a position (I used to going sailing here on the coast of Maine) because there are no details such as rotary's, intersections or bridges to reference.
On this Camino Forum, I came across an informative blog "The Pilgrimage Traveler" where the author Elle Bieling from Colorado has posted a google map of the Primitivo route with their GPS fixes while walking the route, superimposed so as to chart out the actual route over the map display.
My 2014 iPad would not allow me to download Elle's tracks, as the map is a 10.0 version. I will not be connected to the internet as I walk - just have the Wi-Fi at the hotels and albergues. What to do?
My computer store guy gave me the solution to storing the maps! He showed me how to take a "screenshot". I focused into each Primitivo section of Elle's Google maps until I had maybe just a third of the route, say an 8-10 kilometer section. That had tons of detail for navigation/reference points. On the iPad mini, you simply hold down the power button while at the same time clicking the main home button to take a "screen shot". Now I have 30 sceeen shot maps for the 10 days I will be on the Primitivo from Oviedo to Lugo and I do not need to be connected to the internet to use them!
By the way I really liked reading Elle's blog of her Primitivo pilgrimage. Her writing reminded me of the books I have written about my two Caminos since she is so interested in all the art, architecture, history and culture that can be part of a Camino experience if only one stops at time to take all of that in. Very informative blog.
I would be interested to know just how well the Primitivo is route marked compared to the Route Frances and the Portuguese Route both of which I did during the uncrowded winter months.
Terence Callery
@Terry Callery l I sometimes quote the waymarking on the Primitivo in terms of Goldilocks and the Three Bears! The Camino Frances has vastly too many waymarkings (other opinions on this are of course available). The Norte I thought had too few. And the Primitivo I thought was "just right"!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I used the Editorial Buen Camino app on the Norte last year. It worked great!
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés (2014, 2018), Finisterre (2014, 2018) Primitivo (2015), Portuguese var routes (2017, 2018)
What a clever idea, @Terry Callery. I am glad you find my maps useful. Too bad you couldn't download the tracks too. But you will be fine. The only place that you might have trouble with waymarks, is if it is foggy or bad weather on the Hospitales route. I have read that the waymarking up there was also recently improved greatly, so really, unless it is pea soup, you should be fine! I'd be interested to hear about doing this in the wintertime! You are a hardier soul than I!
 

andycohn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2012,13,15); Finisterre / Muxia (15); Portugeuse (17); Primitivo (17); Norte (18); Ingles (18)
I will be doing the Oviedo to Lugo section of the Primitivo leaving in just two weeks.
Alas...there is not John Brierley guide book (with his terrific maps) for this Camino route.
I am stuck with the Spanish "Editorial Buen Camino" book that also has the Norte route as well as the English Cicerone guide book "The Northern Caminos" Norte, Primitivo and Ingles.
Sadly the maps in both guidebooks are only useful for planning distance and not very useful for navigating since there is so little detail to use as reference. You simply can't "triangulate" a position (I used to going sailing here on the coast of Maine) because there are no details such as rotary's, intersections or bridges to reference.
On this Camino Forum, I came across an informative blog "The Pilgrimage Traveler" where the author Elle Bieling from Colorado has posted a google map of the Primitivo route with their GPS fixes while walking the route, superimposed so as to chart out the actual route over the map display.
My 2014 iPad would not allow me to download Elle's tracks, as the map is a 10.0 version. I will not be connected to the internet as I walk - just have the Wi-Fi at the hotels and albergues. What to do?
My computer store guy gave me the solution to storing the maps! He showed me how to take a "screenshot". I focused into each Primitivo section of Elle's Google maps until I had maybe just a third of the route, say an 8-10 kilometer section. That had tons of detail for navigation/reference points. On the iPad mini, you simply hold down the power button while at the same time clicking the main home button to take a "screen shot". Now I have 30 sceeen shot maps for the 10 days I will be on the Primitivo from Oviedo to Lugo and I do not need to be connected to the internet to use them!
By the way I really liked reading Elle's blog of her Primitivo pilgrimage. Her writing reminded me of the books I have written about my two Caminos since she is so interested in all the art, architecture, history and culture that can be part of a Camino experience if only one stops at time to take all of that in. Very informative blog.
I would be interested to know just how well the Primitivo is route marked compared to the Route Frances and the Portuguese Route both of which I did during the uncrowded winter months.
Terence Callery
I don’t get it. Why are you going to so much trouble when there are easier and free resources available? On this forum, Ivar has made available for free the Wisely Wise Pilgrim app, which is a downloadable GPS map of the Primitivo (as well as all the other Spanish caminos). I’ve downloaded it onto my ipad, and you don’t need data to use it. You just follow the dot when you’re walking (not that you’ll need to; the Primitivo is well-marked). It will also show you accommodations along the way, and pretty much everything else you’ll need. Here’s the link: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/new-free-camino-app-wisely-camino-forum-places.59532/#post-696597

And if you don’t like that, you’ll also find in the Resources section, “GPS Tracks of all Spanish Caminos in One File.” Once you’ve downloaded it, it will guide you along without data. Best way to use it is to have maps.me downloaded on your ipad, then download the GPS tracks (in KML format), and then you’ll have a regular mapping / guidance app (like google maps) with the Primitivo overload on it.

I’m a technological idiot, so if I can do it, anyone can.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Best way to use it is to have maps.me downloaded on your ipad, then download the GPS tracks (in KML format), and then you’ll have a regular mapping / guidance app (like google maps) with the Primitivo overload on it.
And OSMand is another mapping app using the same database as maps.me but it uses tracks in the gpx format.
 
I too am somewhat mystified at your seeming re-invention of the wheel: it's not an orienteering contest but a quiet road / trail based walk through nothern Spain

Of the books, the best maps are in the Wise Pilgrim editions - there is one for the Primitivo with 80 hand-sized pages that weighs only 120g - the whole route is described in 11 pages of regular maps with a wonderful elevation change / distance along the bottom of the page; the remaining 56 pages of maps contain anotated street plans with full details of accomodation options and shops - it is also available as an app
 

apoivre

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Mozárabe de Almería in March 2019
Most trekking apps have web-based versions as well. So you could always plot your route before you leave home on your desktop computer and then use the app on your iPad or smartphone to follow it. If you have time, give several apps a try to see which suits you better. Of the apps I tested ViewRanger was the winner, with Openrunner coming in a close second. Openrunner will also give you free access to topographical maps of Spain (in their web-based version). Most North Americans seem to prefer Gaia but I have no experience with it.

So just plot a route you like at home, using tracks you downloaded from elsewhere or just draw one from scratch, then synch the app on your iPad or smartphone once and you're good to go. You don't need internet access to use these apps on the road.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
There is a good free guide on this forum for the Primitivo. Having done it, I can assure you that you don’t need a map. Very well marked route. Eroski.com is also a great source for up to date accommodation listings.
 

Terry Callery

Chi Walker
Camino(s) past & future
"Portuguese Camino - In Search of the Infinite Moment" Amazon/Kindle books authored
"Slow Camino"
I am a technology Luddite - I do not own a smart phone and I check my email on my iPad just once a day. I like paper.
Previously I used Brierely's maps torn out of the book and placed in a Ziplock in my pocket for easy access. It simply would not occur to me to use an app. and a device to view it on. The sceeen-shots on my iPad are really just a backup in case I feel like I have gone off route which has happened to me on rare occasions on my last Camino on the Portuguese route.
That being said I am glad to learn that the markings are "just right" on the Primitivo route.
Thanks to all for your valuable suggestions.
Buen Camino
Terence Callery
 

TDS

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
I will be doing the Oviedo to Lugo section of the Primitivo leaving in just two weeks.
Alas...there is not John Brierley guide book (with his terrific maps) for this Camino route.
I am stuck with the Spanish "Editorial Buen Camino" book that also has the Norte route as well as the English Cicerone guide book "The Northern Caminos" Norte, Primitivo and Ingles.
Sadly the maps in both guidebooks are only useful for planning distance and not very useful for navigating since there is so little detail to use as reference. You simply can't "triangulate" a position (I used to going sailing here on the coast of Maine) because there are no details such as rotary's, intersections or bridges to reference.
On this Camino Forum, I came across an informative blog "The Pilgrimage Traveler" where the author Elle Bieling from Colorado has posted a google map of the Primitivo route with their GPS fixes while walking the route, superimposed so as to chart out the actual route over the map display.
My 2014 iPad would not allow me to download Elle's tracks, as the map is a 10.0 version. I will not be connected to the internet as I walk - just have the Wi-Fi at the hotels and albergues. What to do?
My computer store guy gave me the solution to storing the maps! He showed me how to take a "screenshot". I focused into each Primitivo section of Elle's Google maps until I had maybe just a third of the route, say an 8-10 kilometer section. That had tons of detail for navigation/reference points. On the iPad mini, you simply hold down the power button while at the same time clicking the main home button to take a "screen shot". Now I have 30 sceeen shot maps for the 10 days I will be on the Primitivo from Oviedo to Lugo and I do not need to be connected to the internet to use them!
By the way I really liked reading Elle's blog of her Primitivo pilgrimage. Her writing reminded me of the books I have written about my two Caminos since she is so interested in all the art, architecture, history and culture that can be part of a Camino experience if only one stops at time to take all of that in. Very informative blog.
I would be interested to know just how well the Primitivo is route marked compared to the Route Frances and the Portuguese Route both of which I did during the uncrowded winter months.
Terence Callery
I am a technology Luddite - I do not own a smart phone and I check my email on my iPad just once a day. I like paper.
Previously I used Brierely's maps torn out of the book and placed in a Ziplock in my pocket for easy access. It simply would not occur to me to use an app. and a device to view it on. The sceeen-shots on my iPad are really just a backup in case I feel like I have gone off route which has happened to me on rare occasions on my last Camino on the Portuguese route.
That being said I am glad to learn that the markings are "just right" on the Primitivo route.
Thanks to all for your valuable suggestions.
Buen Camino
Terence Callery
I will be doing the Oviedo to Lugo section of the Primitivo leaving in just two weeks.
Alas...there is not John Brierley guide book (with his terrific maps) for this Camino route.
I am stuck with the Spanish "Editorial Buen Camino" book that also has the Norte route as well as the English Cicerone guide book "The Northern Caminos" Norte, Primitivo and Ingles.
Sadly the maps in both guidebooks are only useful for planning distance and not very useful for navigating since there is so little detail to use as reference. You simply can't "triangulate" a position (I used to going sailing here on the coast of Maine) because there are no details such as rotary's, intersections or bridges to reference.
On this Camino Forum, I came across an informative blog "The Pilgrimage Traveler" where the author Elle Bieling from Colorado has posted a google map of the Primitivo route with their GPS fixes while walking the route, superimposed so as to chart out the actual route over the map display.
My 2014 iPad would not allow me to download Elle's tracks, as the map is a 10.0 version. I will not be connected to the internet as I walk - just have the Wi-Fi at the hotels and albergues. What to do?
My computer store guy gave me the solution to storing the maps! He showed me how to take a "screenshot". I focused into each Primitivo section of Elle's Google maps until I had maybe just a third of the route, say an 8-10 kilometer section. That had tons of detail for navigation/reference points. On the iPad mini, you simply hold down the power button while at the same time clicking the main home button to take a "screen shot". Now I have 30 sceeen shot maps for the 10 days I will be on the Primitivo from Oviedo to Lugo and I do not need to be connected to the internet to use them!
By the way I really liked reading Elle's blog of her Primitivo pilgrimage. Her writing reminded me of the books I have written about my two Caminos since she is so interested in all the art, architecture, history and culture that can be part of a Camino experience if only one stops at time to take all of that in. Very informative blog.
I would be interested to know just how well the Primitivo is route marked compared to the Route Frances and the Portuguese Route both of which I did during the uncrowded winter months.
Terence Callery
TrailSmart App has the GPS track.
 

cbacino

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Francigena, 2017
Camino del Norte (2018?)
I will be doing the Oviedo to Lugo section of the Primitivo leaving in just two weeks.
Alas...there is not John Brierley guide book (with his terrific maps) for this Camino route.
I am stuck with the Spanish "Editorial Buen Camino" book that also has the Norte route as well as the English Cicerone guide book "The Northern Caminos" Norte, Primitivo and Ingles.
Sadly the maps in both guidebooks are only useful for planning distance and not very useful for navigating since there is so little detail to use as reference. You simply can't "triangulate" a position (I used to going sailing here on the coast of Maine) because there are no details such as rotary's, intersections or bridges to reference.
On this Camino Forum, I came across an informative blog "The Pilgrimage Traveler" where the author Elle Bieling from Colorado has posted a google map of the Primitivo route with their GPS fixes while walking the route, superimposed so as to chart out the actual route over the map display.
My 2014 iPad would not allow me to download Elle's tracks, as the map is a 10.0 version. I will not be connected to the internet as I walk - just have the Wi-Fi at the hotels and albergues. What to do?
My computer store guy gave me the solution to storing the maps! He showed me how to take a "screenshot". I focused into each Primitivo section of Elle's Google maps until I had maybe just a third of the route, say an 8-10 kilometer section. That had tons of detail for navigation/reference points. On the iPad mini, you simply hold down the power button while at the same time clicking the main home button to take a "screen shot". Now I have 30 sceeen shot maps for the 10 days I will be on the Primitivo from Oviedo to Lugo and I do not need to be connected to the internet to use them!
By the way I really liked reading Elle's blog of her Primitivo pilgrimage. Her writing reminded me of the books I have written about my two Caminos since she is so interested in all the art, architecture, history and culture that can be part of a Camino experience if only one stops at time to take all of that in. Very informative blog.
I would be interested to know just how well the Primitivo is route marked compared to the Route Frances and the Portuguese Route both of which I did during the uncrowded winter months.
Terence Callery
Just get a mapping app for your phone or pad. Download the KML for the Primitivo from the web. You don’t need WiFi or cell to use the GPS in your phone. Forget about screen shots and paper maps; a waste of time.
 

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