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Take it easy

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#1
We often hear pilgrims say "the journey is the destination" but then they rush through the journey, walking extra long distances, often injuring themselves along the way.
Take it easy! I have heard of 7 pilgrims so far who have had to give up walking due to injury.
Like this poor fellow who had to stop with only 100kms left to go.

http://ontheroadtosantiago.blogspot.com ... o-end.html
 

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evanlow

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances-06,Primitivo-07,Plata-08,Norte-12,Levante-(14-15),Vasco-16,Mozarabe-(16-17),Madrid-17
#2
100 km! Ouch! As a pilgrim that must be very painful (mentally) to give up.

In my first Camino, I got tendonlities around Melide. That's 50+ km or 2 day's walk. What did I do? Something foolish. I pushed on.

The last 2 days before Santiago I will never forget ever in my life. The pain and eurphoria was so great when I arrived at Santiago that I broke down emotionally and didn't move in front of the cathedral for more than 1/2 hour.

I was lucky I did not suffer any long term effect from this. This year my camino ended without a hitch. I don't think I will ever do something like that foolish in any of my future camino. It's probably because that it's my first camino that I got that foolish drive to complete the journey despite the pain.

In the camino our minds are open to all things spiritual, mental, emotional and physical. Reflecting back, I think it's takes a while (maybe a couple of caminos) to get them to work together properly.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#3
sillydoll said:
We often hear pilgrims say "the journey is the destination" but then they rush through the journey, walking extra long distances, often injuring themselves along the way.
Take it easy! I have heard of 7 pilgrims so far who have had to give up walking due to injury.
Like this poor fellow who had to stop with only 100kms left to go.

http://ontheroadtosantiago.blogspot.com ... o-end.html
I wonder if that has to do with trying to do the Camino under a time crunch? I walked it during July-August of 2007, and I'm glad I had two months to do it in. As it was, I took 40 days to get from St. Jean to Santiago. I made the mistake of starting with too much weight and the wrong kind of boots. After the first two days, I had to slow down to 10 - 12K a day due to pain and blisters, get lighter boots, and dispose of a bunch of unnecessary gear. It took me quite a while before I could actually finish one of the "stages" listed in my guidebook.

If I would've only had, say, 30 days or less to do the trek, then I might've had to give up as well, or at least take a bus/train for some of the way. And in the end, I still didn't get off scott free - even now I have some residual pain and stiffness from putting my body thru so much. Doing the Camino was worth it, but knowing what I know now, I would've approached the Way with more respect/humility and better preparation.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#4
I have just walked from Roncesvalles to Santiago in 37 days and found it a wonderful experience. (I walked it in 27 days in 2002 and although I was 5 years younger then, it was a bit rushed.)
Just one bit of warning, we found a couple of albergues who will not accept pilgrims who have walked short distances. The CSJ Guide does mention a couple who require that pilgrims have walked at least 20kms and the albergue in Ferreiros in Galicia even has a sign on the door telling pilgrims who have only walked from Sarria to move on to Portomarin as they will only accept pilgrims who have walked at least from Triacastella. It is 14.5km from Sarria to Ferreiros and almost 23kms from Sarria to Portomarin.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#5
sillydoll said:
Just one bit of warning, we found a couple of albergues who will not accept pilgrims who have walked short distances.
I saw that a couple of times as well - once in Najera, and then later on (perhaps in Sarria). I think it may depend on the albergues, though. Not sure I like that kind of policy, but what can you do? I would hope that they'd make an exception for a hurting peregrino...
 

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notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
#6
I totally agree with your sentiments. I saw some people suffering a lot of pain and blisters from walking with someone who was too fast for them. What happens is that the slower person ends up getting no rest stops, becuase they feel bad for keeping the faster one waiting. If your companion is faster than you, agree to meet later at the refugio and walk separately, taking your own time.
 


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